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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00518
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 06-09-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00518


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NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


BI mAIi lI
I AUMriiBJi


Key Royale Bridge repairs accelerated


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Superintendent of Public Works John
Fernandez gave engineers.the verbal OK last week to
begin the design on repairs to the Key Royale Bridge.
The OK came after a meeting with engineers from
Parsons Brinkerhoff of Tampa revealed new findings
about the bridge's original construction.
"They were basing some of their assumptions on the
original drawings of the bridge," explained Fernandez.
"They found that the approach slab bulkhead was not

Anna Maria Island

Bridge dispute

continues
Environmental regulators continue to poke holes in
arguments made by the Florida Department of Transpor-
tation regarding placement of a new, high bridge to replace
the Anna Maria Island Bridge at Manatee Avenue.
Bob Stettler, Florida Department of Environmen-
tal Protection, said in a letter to DOT officials Friday
navigation, environmental and manatee concerns by
the transportation department are not sufficient to sway
the DEP toward permitting the bridge.
The argument between the two agencies centers on
alignment of the proposed replacement bridge. DOT of-
ficials want to build a 65-foot, fixed-span bridge to the
south of the existing structure. DEP officials have stead-
fastly refused to issue permits for the southern alignment,
citing seagrass bed and mangrove damage, and instead
suggest the replacement bridge be built to the north.
Stettler refuted DOT arguments regarding con-
struction techniques, width of a navigation channel
leading to the Perico Harbor Marina, and manatee us-
age of the area. Specifically:
DOT officials had said they need a 100-foot-wide
platform upon which to work to build the replacement
bridge to the north, a platform they said would virtu-
ally eliminate access to the marina during construction.
DEP officials said the platform width was only 40
feet for the southern alignment. Why would you need
a platform so wide to the north? DEP officials asked.
DOT officials had said the 150-foot-wide channel
to the north would be adversely impacted by a new bridge
there, impacting boaters trying to reach the marina.
DEP officials said the channel, after the new bridge
was constructed, would be 90 feet wide, much wider than
many channels leading to marinas in the area. Why does
the channel need to be so wide? DEP officials asked.
DOT officials said manatee usage in the area
would be impacted by a bridge to the north.
Biologists have found manatees frequent the area to
both sides of the bridge. DEP officials said there is a deep
hole frequented by.manatees 450 feet to the north of the
bridge, but the distance is far enough away to not ad-
versely impact manatees. And if manatees are in the area
on both sides of the bridge, wouldn't a southern alignment
impact them, too? DEP officials asked.
"The northern alignment on the bridge is feasible
and practical and would very significantly reduce any
permanent impacts on manatees and seagrasses,"
Stettler wrote in his letter.

Kids wanted: Free
Islander classified
Do you have a summer job suitable for a stu-
dent? Are you a student looking for some extra
money this summer? The IslanderBystanderis of-
fering free classified advertising to those who would
like to help kids looking for summer work or for
kids who have job skills to offer.
Please bring your ad in person to The Islander
Bystander office at 5408 Marina Dr., Island Shop-
ping Center, Holmes Beach. The deadline is noon
Monday. For information call 778-7978.


constructed according to the drawings. They went out into
the field and found that small rebar had been used. This
changed some of their calculations."
Due to this discovery, said Fernandez, engineers
recommended the $160,000 option for repairs. This
option calls for installing new bulkheads in front of the
existing bulkheads, establishing a stable fill situation
between the two and stabilizing the approach.
During last year's budget process, council had
hoped that the $110,000 option to install a collar sys-
tem would be sufficient but had budgeted the $160,000


just in case it would not
"I gave them the verbal go ahead to design the
$160,000 option," said Fernandez, after consulting
with Mayor Rich Bohnenberger. "I felt we needed to
make a decision. I told them we're ready to move on
it as fast as they can. I'm not sure if it has to go back
to council for a formal vote."
Fernandez is also contemplating reducing the speed
limit on the bridge to 15 mph as a conservation measure.
This would create less stress on the approach slabs and
keep the deterioration from accelerating, he said.


Islander Photo: Paul Roat
Despite protesters and threats of violence, the Sarasota Sailing Squadron's Sarasota-to-Havana regatta is
on. Cuban-Americans protesting the race took to the water last Saturday to protest the race, which they
claim will benefit the Castro government in Cuba. One protestor, complete with Fidel Castro mask,
shouted at the sailors while on a floating coffin. About 100 boats are planned to depart from the starting
line off Lido Beach Friday. For more on the race, see page 4.


Secretary of State, gubernatorial

candidate Jim Smith visits Anna Maria


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
More than 100 supporters turned out for a reception
held for Florida Secretary of State Jim Smith at the An-
chorage Restaurant Thursday evening. Smith was in town
campaigning to become the state's next governor.
The 53-year-old Republican was joined by his
wife, Carole, as he shook hands and talked politics with
well-wishers who attended the party sponsored by
Anna Maria plumbing contractor Dennis Christie. Be-
fore the reception, Smith arrived at Christie's house
accompanied by Bradenton Mayor Bill Evers, and it
was there The Islander Bystander asked Smith a couple
of questions of importance to Islanders.
Topping the list was the perennial subject the
proposed 65-foot, fixed span bridge at Manatee Av-
enue. Smith said he was not familiar with the proposed
project. When told $14 million has already been ear-
marked for the bridge, but there has been loud opposi-
tion to its construction by many Islanders, Smith said
the wishes of local residents should be honored.
"I think if people at the local level are concerned
about it, DOT (the state Department of Transportation)
should pay attention to that," Smith said. "But I'm sure
it must be part of some transportation plan DOT feels
is important."
Smith says if Islanders are successful in defeating
the proposed bridge, they'd better be sure what they're
doing, because they'll have to live with their decisions
for a long time.


"My approach would be (to reject the project) as
long as you folks understand you can't come back five
or 10 years from now (complaining about traffic con-
gestion)," Smith said. "If you want to leave things the
way they are, live with the way they are. This is your
shot if you don't take it, it could be lost forever."
Smith then said something that could cause cheers
to rise from staunch anti-bridge supporters.
"My opinion is let's spend 14 million bucks some-
where else," Smith said.


AND THE RACE TO CUBA IS ON!


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Sandbar Restaurant dispute ........................... 2
M eetings........................................ ............. 3
Opinions .................... .................. ...... 6
ThoseWere the Days ............... ........ 7
Scams ......................... ........................ 8
Announcements ........................................... 10
Sarasota Bay restoration .......................... 14
Streetlife ................................... 17
Outdoors .............. ........................................ 20
Anna Maria tides ...................................... 21
Real estate ................................... ......... 23


JUNE 9, 1994


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND






I[] PAGE 2 M JUNE 9, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Lawyer: point, counterpoint on Sandbar issue


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
It appears the issue involving alleys and vacating
alleys at the Sandbar Restaurant will not die with a vote
on the matter by the Anna Maria City Commission.
Lawyers representing those for and against the
vacation indicate their clients may be willing to go to
court if things don't turn out as they want.
Bill Merrill, the attorney representing some 20
property owners near the Sandbar Restaurant, the Pine
Avenue Group, is more adamant about the possibility
of litigation than his opponent, but William Strode, the
lawyer representing Sandbar owner Ed Chiles, cer-
tainly is not ruling out a court battle.
"There is much more of a threat (of a lawsuit) from
my clients than there is from (the Sandbar)," Merrill
referred to remarks made by Sandbar opponent Fred
Edmister, asserting Ed Chiles would be reluctant to sue
the city in an election year since his father, Florida
Governor Lawton Chiles, owns 25 percent of the res-
taurant. "As my client said, what's the likelihood of the
Sandbar suing the city with the people who are in-
volved in that?"
Merrill claims the chances of his clients suing the
city are "much greater because of all of the impropri-
eties in the procedural steps that have been taken, Plus,


and I think most importantly,
this is not consistent with the
comprehensive plan. We have
a built-in legal procedure we
can follow in the event this al-
ley is vacated and it is inconsis-
tent with the comprehensive
plan."


Also, the traffic circulation element requires that
the city preserve and protect existing rights-of-way,
and this is an existing right-of-way.
Sandbar: William Strode Not only is it con-
sistent, but a denial of the petition would be inconsis-
tent, because they are turning down a us-
able link in the traffic circulation system Bill Merrill
to keep an unusable, unused alleyway. It some 20prn
was listed as abandoned when Ed Chiles Sandbar Re
bought the property, he relied on that and Group, is m
was given permits to build encroach- possibility o
ments into that "paper" alleyway. The nent, but W
city's really on very shaky legal grounds representing
- if he (Chiles) wanted to be mean-spir- e
ited about it he could just go to court, Chiles cert
challenge it and not give them another court battle
alley. the attorney
There have been encroachments Islander By
there for 60 or 70 years as long as that address the
restaurant's been there. The prior owners land develop
said there have been some kind of en-
croachments there for many years, and the public
records show (the alley) is vacated.

* Item: the right-of-way does not provide the sole
access to any property.


The alley vacation would create
a large block ofprime water-
front land that would be ideal
for a major commercial expan-
sion or a large residential devel-
opment which isn't in keeping


Of the possibility of Chiles with the village atm,
suing the city, Strode said Anna Maria. I thin
"That would be my client's important thatpast
decision. I don't want to get signers wisely real
put in that posture. I think the
petitions very meritorious and restrictions were ne
it shows good will and a non-
adversarial approach to the thing by Ed Chiles."
To get some sense of how the attorneys view the
matter, The Islander Bystander asked them to address
the four elements of the city's land development regu-
lations which govern the vacation of alleys. This is the
criteria by which the commission must judge the mer-
its of the proposal.
These elements have been referred to at two meet-
ings as the cause for stiffling opponents' objections to
the alley vacation.
At both the May 18 planning commission meeting
and the May 24 city commission meeting, detractors of
the alley vacation were told the only testimony that
would be heard would be that which specifically relates
to the criteria set forth in the city codes. Additionally,
City Attorney Jim Dye cautioned city officials they
should consider only the city code in their deliberation.
Although the section of municipal law dealing with
alley vacations is lengthy and involved, 51 words have
become the focus of the controversy. Those words
comprise the four elements of the land codes that are
so strongly debated.
According to city land codes, "Applications to vacate
aright-of-way shall be recommended for approval by the
planning commission based upon a finding that all of the
following requirements are met: (a) The requested vaca-
tion is consistent with the traffic circulation element of the
city's comprehensive plan; (b) The right-of-way does not
provide the sole access to any property; (c) The vacation
would not jeopardize the current or future location of any
utility, (d) The proposed vacation is not detrimental to the
public interest"
Attorneys for both sides provided their arguments
concerning these points.

SItem: the requested vacation is consistent with the
traffic circulation element of the city's comprehensive
plan.
Pine Avenue Group: Bill Merrill We feel it is
not consistent. There are a number of goals, policies
and objectives that indicate it does not meet the traffic
circulation element, nor does it meet the city's compre-
hensive plan.
They said this will improve traffic flow, but their
reason is just ridiculous. They're saying, "It will im-
prove traffic flow because we built on top of the old
alley so you cant use it, so anything is going to improve
traffic flow."


sphere of
k it's most
city commis-
ed-these
cessary.


Merrill I don't think we raised that
issue as one of our objections this time
around. The way they've reconfigured it
I think they've avoided that, because it's
all between (the Sandbar) property. But
previously, when they extended it beyond
that area, it did create problems.
(Although) it's not the sole access, it
does limit some access to the properties
over to the north, I believe, to the county
lot. There are rocks, revetments and a
fence that block access from the other side
of that right-of-way.
Strode It currently doesn't provide
access to anything. I guess theoretically a


pedestrian could walk along the edge of the restaurant,
but the new one will provide much better access be-
tween the two streets.

* Item: the vacation would not jeopardize the current
or future location of any utility.
Merrill I really can't speak to
that. That's something they would have The real agent
to prove, and they didn't prove that in neighbors are.
this most recent hearing. They didn't and they're op
even raise that issue. In fact, (the Sand- that Mr. Chiles
bar) did not even address the criteria r ally got t
listed in this section in any way what- o
soever. They just basically said, stirred up was a
"We're here, we want it, give it to us." other alleys am
(The Sandbar) has to prove each north to inc
one of these, and they haven't done everything. Tht
that. They didn't address any one of want to see thai
these four points. They didn't even probably hada
submit any letters of utilities with re- that potentially
gards to this petition. other alleys mii
It was the job of the planning com- usefulpurpose.
mission to have denied it (the requested t'
alley vacation) if it wasn't presented. doned-thats
Strode As a practical matter, I
don't think a utility would try to put anything there,
because they'd have to tear out grease traps. Even if
there were a legal alleyway there, there would be a
conflict between the existing uses of the restaurant and
any utilities.
The old one effectively has no use for utilities
where the new one would have a utility capacity.

* Item: the proposed vacation is not detrimental to
the public interest.
Merrill Again, the burden of proof is on the
applicant to demonstrate there is no detriment to the
public interest The burden of proof is not on the pub-
lic. In other words, the public does not have to demon-
strate there is a detriment.
The burden of proof on all these is very, very im-
portant, and I think, at least at the planning commission
level, it hasn't been handled that way. It's been the
public having to prove up their case rather than the
petitioner having to prove his case.
The first threshold question as to this criteria is
what is public interest? Here it's pretty clear, and I
think the planning commission was unnecessarily and


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unduly, and perhaps illegally, limiting what public in-
terest is.
The alley vacation would create a large block of
prime waterfront land that would be ideal for a major
commercial expansion or a large residential develop-
ment which isn't in
the attorney representing keeping with the village
7erty owners near the atmosphere of Anna
taurant the Pine Avenue Maria.
re adamant about the I think it's most im-
litigation than his oppo- portant that past city
liam Strode, ihe lawyer commissioners wisely
Sandbar owner Ed realized these restric-
tions were necessary to
ly is not ruling outa preserve the small
To get some sense of how homes, the sidewalks,
view the matter, The the quiet streets and the
'ander asked them to village atmosphere that
our elements of the city's makes Anna Maria very
nent regulations. unique among the beach
communities.
Now, if you have the zoning and the comprehen-
sive plan designation already which they do, they
have all that what's left to control growth? The only
thing that's left to control growth is the maintenance of
the right-of-way system, those alleys that bisect the city
into smaller blocks. That's critical to upholding the
current zoning laws.
Also, by doing this alley vacation, it does grant a
special privilege and benefit to the applicant They cre-
ated the encroachments on the alley, now they want to
benefit by their own illegal use. That is not something
the American justice. system usually fakes kindly to.
Strode -If somebody said, "My interest is to ag-
gravate Ed Chiles," that's not a legitimate interest. The
public interest in an alleyway is to have vehicular, pe-
destrian and utility access. It's much more in the pub-
lic interest to have a usable alley than an unusable one.
It's definitely a win-win situation (for Chiles) it
would clear up a fuzzy, ambiguous "paper" alley, and
the public would get a usable link in the traffic circu-
lation system.
We've presented testimony. In most vacation pro-
ceedings, special exceptions and various other land use
decisions, the only written material is the petition itself.
The petitioner, the supporters and the opponents give
verbal testimony. That's the general way the burden of
proof is met there's no par-
a here is that the ticular magic documentation
ust all up in arms required as long as the request
losing anything is consistent with the local
wants to do. What government's comprehensive
Sleigh d al plan and the code of ordinances.
e neighborhood all As far as the merits are con-
plan to vacate two cerned, most street or alley va-
to expand to the cation (petitioners) just say,
ease the deck and "There's an alley here that's not
neighbors did not serving any useful function, so
expansion, and they please vacate it." In this case
egidmate argument we're saying we'll trade you a
n the future, those new one for an old one.
ht have served some That alley doesn't really serve
But that is aban, anything it's obstructed at
both ends, and there are serious
history. legal questions whether the city
could even enforce it if there
were a legal challenge. Not that we're trying to be
adversarial. We're trying to approach it in a coopera-
tive, responsible manner and offer a usable easement
that has every attribute of any other alley. It's the same
width and length, and actually goes somewhere -
between Spring Avenue and the other alley to the north.
People could use it. It would serve vehicular and
pedestrian traffic and utilities that's all any alley
does. And it couldn't be moved without the city's ap-
proval.
There's been some talk of growth control, but an
alley is not a growth control device.
The real agenda here is that the neighbors are just
all up in arms and they're opposing anything that Mr.
Chiles wants to do.
What originally got the neighborhood all stirred up
was a plan to vacate two other alleys and to expand to the
north-- to increase the deck and everything. There were
some legitimate concerns. The neighbors did not want to
see that expansion, and they probably had a legitimate
argument that potentially in the future, those other alleys
might have served some useful purpose. But that is aban-
doned that's history. It's a dead issue.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 9, 1994 A PAGE 3 Im

Rum punch packs Stately wallop at Ato's


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Seemingly unable to please officials of the City of
Anna Maria, Ato's Restaurant may now be in trouble with
state authorities as well. An officer with the Florida De-
partment of Business regulation, Division of Alcoholic
Beverages and Tobacco, says the restaurant may have
recently violated state law concerning
the sale of alcohol.
The problem stems from a rum
punch guests have been enjoying at
Ato's monthly luaus. Since the restau- .
rant does not have a liquor license, it
can'tlegally sell the tropical concoction,
but it ispermitted to give it away. As far
as the state is concerned, as long as the
punch is served on a "complimentary"
basis meaning there is no monetary
consideration involved in a customer
obtaining the drink Ato's can serve
all it wants.
A simple test the state uses to de-
termine whether alcoholic beverages
are being sold or given away is to es- Festivities atAto'.
tablish whether a person can walk in
and get a drink without having to pay
for anything on the menu. If a purchase is required to
get the "free" drink, the state calls it selling.
Edgar Kelly, owner of Ato's, told The Islander
Bystander that although he didn't charge for the rum
punch, only those persons who bought a ticket to attend
the luau could partake of it. It is this policy which has
piqued the interest of state alcohol authorities.
"It could be a violation of the law," says Brad Nelson,
a lieutenant with the Division of Alcohol and Tobacco.
But apparently, Ato's has little to worry about if at
future luaus it either stops dispensing the punch or
makes it available to anyone of legal drinking age who
asks for a cup. For the most part, any violation which
may have already occurred won't amount to much be-
cause no official from the state witnessed it.
"We would have to (see it)," Nelson says. "A mis-
demeanor actually has to occur in the presence of an
investigator."


Although information on previous alleged viola-
tions could be used to direct an investigation, it is un-
likely Ato's would be prosecuted solely on that basis,
Nelson says.
"In order for us to do anything withit at this point,
we would have to go back and investigate it past tense,"
Nelson explained. "Then we would have to turn our
findings over to the State Attorney's
S.. Office, and they would have to make a
Ruling on whether they want to charge
somebody."
Nelson says generally his department
is more comfortable in citing violators
when the offense has been directly wit-
nessed by a state investigator.
Kelly admits his knowledge of the law
is not as good as it could be, but he says
this this is the first time he has run a
restaurant.
"The laws are so vague to me I'm
a rookie at the game," Kelly says, ac-
knowledging he never consulted with
the state concerning the giving away of
"complimentary" rum punch.
Kelly says there may be some good
news for Ato's in regard to the
restaurant's ongoing battle with city officials. The city
says Ato's has been operating without an occupational
license, and has turned the matter over to the code en-
forcement board, but Kelly says he is very close to
being in compliance now.
"Today we are submitting a parking plan which
sets up the occupancy of the place," Kelly said Friday.
"It equates to over 40 (persons who can be served)."
According to Building Official Don Tarantola, the
city will issue Ato's a license as soon as Kelly can dem-
onstrate he can provide adequate parking, and can show
proof he holds a current license to operate a restaurant
issued by the state's Division of Hotels and Restau-
rants. Kelly says this last requirement is also in the bag.
"I have a license from Hotels and Restaurants
which authorizes (serving) 40," Kelly says.
Over the past few weeks, the city has claimed
Ato's only has state authorization to serve breakfast,


but has unlawfully been serving other meals as well.
Additionally, it has been the position of the city that
Ato's could only seat 25 patrons. Kelly says he is con-
fident everything is now in order and relations with the
town government will smooth out.
"We've had a misunderstanding (with the city),"
Kelly says. "A lot of it is my fault, and I have to apolo-
gize for that. I've just never been in the business before,
so I didn't understand some things. I haven't done
things right, because there were certain codes that I
should have known about, but again, I've only been in
the restaurant business for four months. We want to
follow the rules and regulations we love it here."



Anna Maria City
6/14,7:30 p.m., Commission work session
6/15, 10 a.m., Planning Commission
sub-committee
6/15, 7:30 p.m., Planning Commission
Bradenton Beach
6/9,7 p.m., Council meeting
6/13,7 p.m., Code Enforcement Board
6/14, 7 p.m.,Work session with council,
department heads and CRA
6/15 10 a.m.,Budget work session with council
and department heads
Holmes Beach
6/9, 7:30 p.m., Council work session
Of Interest
6/13, 7 p.m., Anna Maria Fire Commission,
Station 1, Holmes Beach
6/14, 10 am., Meeting of Swiftmud and Island
public works officials concerning technical
aspects of Island drainage study,
Anna Maria City Hall
6/15, 10 am., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Anna Maria City Hall
6/15,4 p.m., meeting of local legislative
delegation and Island elected officials,
Bradenton Beach City hall


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lD PAGE 4 A JUNE 9, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Next stop,


Cuba!

By Bob Ardren
The next stop will be Cuba for about 100 boats and
more than 400 sailors as they sweep across the Sarasota
Sailing Squadron's starting line off Lido Beach Friday
enroute to the "Queen of the Caribbean."
The Sarasota-Havana yacht race was conceived as
both a sailboat regatta and a mission of mercy to the
Cuban people. The event has become the focus of in-
ternational political debate between anti-Castro Cuban-
Americans and aid-offering sailors.
Cuban-Americans appear to oppose the race due to a
belief supplies carried on the boats will aid the Castro
government The sailors appear to be looking to again
enjoy the historic destination of Havana as a sailing
Mecca, as well as offer humanitarian aid to Cuban people
suffering from a life-threatening economic depression.
No ordinary yachting race, these boats will be car-
rying tons of clothing, medical and even school sup-
plies as aid for the embargoed nation. What began as
a simple idea by Bob Winters of Bradenton at a Squad-
ron meeting last March has mushroomed into a flotilla
which has drawn the attention of national media such
as Pacifica Radio and ABC News.
Saturday's demonstration was purely political.
"Yankee stay home," were the cries heard at the
Squadron that morning. Hundreds of Cuban-Ameri-
cans from both Tampa and Miami came to Sarasota to
protest the race to their homeland, with about 75 men
and women taking to powerboats and even a float-
ing coffin to make a waterborne protest in front of
the Squadron.
One demonstrator, retired U.S. Army Special
Forces Col. Orlando Rodriguez of Tampa, wore a Fidel
Castro mask as he rode in the coffin/boat powered by
a small sail and an electric motor. He later told report-
ers his themes of sails, saltwater and death were seri-
ous, then joined his associates in claiming that any aid
taken to Cuba "will be sold by the [Castro] government
in hard currency stores."
Watching the protest from a Squadron dock, event
organizer Winters said the event "has nothing to do with
Castro, but a lot to do with hungry children. Isn't it ironic
how well fed all those demonstrators appear to be?"
In preparation for the race, the Later Rain Minis-


i no rinmpa.


About 75 Cuban-Americans protested the Sarasota-to-Havana sailboat race Saturday at City Island near the
Sarasota Sailing Squadron in Sarasota.


tries of Litchfield, Ill., was delivering 400 pairs of new
shoes and gallon jugs of shampoo to the Squadron for
delivery to church leaders in Cuba. The non-denomi-
national group specializes in work throughout Latin
America.
Later on Saturday, 200 protesters showed up at
Gillespie Park near downtown Sarasota to protest the
race. This group included two busloads of Cuban-
Americans from Miami, who heard speeches in both
Spanish and English. Both the American and the Cu-
ban national anthems were played.
Ralph Fernandez of Tampa, an attorney for the
World Federation of Cuban Former Political Prisoners,
told demonstrators at Gillespie Park the upcoming re-
gatta "will be a failure because we have identified it for
what it is. It will be a failure because it was identified."
Fernandez has been trying for months to stop the
race, an action he successfully accomplished last year
in a proposed St. Petersburg-Havana yacht race. In
addition to attempting to have the Sarasota City Com-
mission pressure the Squadron a tenant on city-
owned land to abandon the race, Fernandez also
called for an investigation by the U.S. Treasury Depart-


ment. But his efforts failed to halt the regatta this year.
Federal authorities have said the race, as planned,
violates no laws. The Cuban government has arranged
for racers to receive free visas, free moorings at the
marina and free ground transportation. The U.S. em-
bargo against Cuba forbids American citizens to spend
any money there. Humanitarian aid is not forbidden,
however, nor is simply traveling there.
The most common refrain Saturday from protesters
to Winters was "How much is Castro paying you for this?"
Winters has repeatedly assured all, including U.S.
Customs agents, that the race is solely humanitarian
without political ramifications.
Customs officials, manning the "Blue Lightning
Strike Force," were scheduled to appear at the Squadron
Thursday with at least two 40-foot speedboats and a he-
licopter to accompany the sailors enroute to Marina
Hemingway, destination of the race. The action was pre-
cipitated by threats of violence against race participants.
Blue Lightning normally used for large drug
interdictions also plans to guard and check boats at
their Sarasota moorings after threats of sabotage were
received last week.


Island Centennial profitable for all sponsors


.. . Islander Photo: Pat Copeland
Paint.sale to benefit centennial Ph: Pa Copend
Luke Courtney shows some of 265 gallons ofpaint and stain donated to the Island
Centennial celebration by Home Depot. The retail value of the paint is estimated
at $3,000 and will be sold for $2 a gallon. Buyers are asked to stop by Courtney's
business, Haley's Motel in Holmes Beach, to select what they want.


The money figures are in and the
report is good on all accounts.
The three-day Centennial event will
net $10,000 after final pledges and do-
nations are deposited, remaining souve-
nirs and paint are sold and the bills are
paid according.to Luke Courtney, Cen-
tennial executive committee chairman.
The money is earmarked for infor-
mational signs at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center and the Anna Maria
Elementary School, as well as donations
to the Anna Maria Island Historical So-
ciety and the Anna Maria Island Cham-
ber of Commerce.
Only a few souvenirs were left after
the festivities, said Courtney. These in-
clude 38 of 540 T-shirts, 12 of 144 cof-
fee mugs and 228 of 1,000 buttons. Re-
maining souvenirs are available at the
Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine
Avenue, Anna Maria.


The celebration was funded with
$500 donations from each of the three
Island cities, the county's Tourist Devel-
opment Council for publicity, and from
the First National Bank of Manatee for
Flavors of the Island. $250 donations
from Gus Wacker, owner of the Rod and
Reel Pier, covered costs for trolley rides
as well as the historical society.
Funds raised at the weekend's events
included: auction and raffles, $661; street
dance; $1,477 for beer sold and $356 in
entry donations; family picnic, $632 for
food, with all profits donated by the Island
Rotary Club; Flavors of the Island, $747
for beer and wine sold, $750 in vendor's
fees and $50 donations from the Gulf
Drive Cafe, Joe's Eats and Sweets and
Rita's Specialties; arts and crafts show,
$924 in vendor's fees; Home Depot paint
donation, $130 sold with 190 gallons re-
maining for sale at Haley's Motel.


SAM to meet at library
Saturday, 1 p.m.
Save Anna Maria (SAM) will meet at the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, on
Saturday, June 11, at 1 p.m.
Topics to be discussed include joining the "Bo
Bridge opponents" of Santa Rosa County to Florida
Department of Transportation's bridge policies to bar-
rier islands, coordinating with state-wide bridge oppo-
nents in a march to Tallahassee, a Department of En-
vironmental Protection update and the Holmes Beach
density ordinance.
The meeting is open to the public.


City offers informational brochures


The City of Holmes Beach is offering two in-
formational brochures to its residents. One is a new-
comers' guide and the other is a guide to the city's
code enforcement procedures.
The newcomers' guide gives facts about the city
and its departments with phone numbers and hours,
names of elected officials, names and phone numbers
of local utilities providers, driver's license information
and garbage and recycling facts. Phone numbers of the
Island's library, chamber of commerce, fire depart-


ment and newspapers are also included.
The Guide to Holmes Beach Code Enforce-
ment details the purpose of code enforcement, how
to make a complaint and the purposes of the city's
environmental codes. It also gives information on
occupational licenses, signs, parking or storage of
commercial or recreational vehicles and boats and
trailers, care of premises, garbage disposal, and
building permits.
Both brochures are available at city hall.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 9, 1994 U PAGE 5 lI


Anna Maria officials looking

at new commercial zoning

classification


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
A subcommittee of the Anna Maria
Planning Commission is expected to
recommend the city adopt a new zoning
classification which would allow resi-
dences within the municipality's current
commercial district.
Jimmy Nichols, a member of the
planning commission as well as its sub-
committee, says the new zoning classi-
fication is being considered as a possible
solution to problems the city has faced
with people who want to build homes on
commercially-zoned lots. Nichols says
the state's Department of Community
Affairs recommended the change.
"The state talked to the mayor and
made these recommendations, so now
we're trying to revise (the city's zoning
regulations)," Nichols said. "But there
are very few properties that will be af-
fected by it."
Nichols says the new classification
essentially combines commercial zoning
with the residential-office-retail (ROR)
zoning, making it possible for homes to be
constructed in the present commercial ar-
eas. Currently, that is not allowed, al-
though homes which were in existence
prior to the city adopting new zoning sev-
eral years ago are "grandfathered."
"The undeveloped properties is
what this is going to apply to, and to
those recent places that have gone in as
commercial if they want to change


them to residential, they can't (cur-
rently) do that," Nichols says. "It pro-
vides flexibility. It's all for the better-
ment of the city to do it this way."
Nichols says under the proposed
new zoning which is known as MUG,
for mixed use general, owners of com-
mercial property will find they can do
more with their land than present city
laws allow.
"You can do the same things you
do with commercial, and you can do
the same things you do with ROR,"
Nichols said of MUG. "It is a new cat-
egory of land use that has been ap-
proved by the state."
In addition to combining the ROR
and commercial districts, Nichols says
the MUG zoning -will have a few other
changes. These include eliminating a
city requirement that commercial es-
tablishments must have a sidewalk on
the sides of buildings. Nichols says
there will be no changes in allowable
building heights, square footage or
maximum impervious surface areas.
Nichols says he does not expect the
proposed changes to the city's zoning
regulations will be ready for review by
the city commission in time for its next
meeting, June 14. Nichols says the
planning subcommittee has "just tack-
led the surface" in its consideration of
how the new zoning law should read.
The subcommittee meets at City
Hall every Wednesday at 9 a.m.


National Safe Boating Week begins June 5
In order to commemorate National Safe Boating week, June 5 to 11, members of
the Anna Maria Island Power Squadron were invited by the mayors of the three
Island cities to accept Safe Boating Proclamations. Mayor Katie Pierola (right)
declared June 5 to 11 as Safe Boating Week for the city of Bradenton Beach at
the May 19 City Council meeting. She also extended appreciation to Anna Maria
Island Power Squadron and the U.S. Coast Auxiliary members present for
promoting safe boating including public boating classes.

Safe boating course offered


A course in boating safety will be-
gin Tuesday, June 7, 7:30 p.m., at the
Flotilla #81 Training Center, 4208 129th
St. W., Cortez.
The three-week course is conducted
by certified Coast Guard Auxiliary in-
structors and includes boat handling,


Holmes Beach skunks
Once again, Holmes Beach has
proved itself as a force in horseshoes,
with all of the winners from the June 4
games being residents of that city.
Overall winners were Ruth and
Rich Foehrkolb, both of Holmes Beach.
Runners up were a pair of pitchers
from Holmes Beach, who have a reluc-
tance for fame (they don't provide names.)


navigation, legal requirements, weather
and radio. The class is twice a week on
Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Ex-
cept for a nominal fee for materials, the
class is free.
For more information call Flotilla
Officer Shirley Northrop at 722-6971.


all in horseshoe action
The horseshoe matches are held
every Saturday at Anna Maria City
Hall, but beginning with the June 11
games, the starting time will be 9 am.
The one-hour-earlier time is due to the
approach of summer, so pitchers want
to get going before the horseshoes be-
gin to feel like they've just come off
the smithie's anvil.






RG PAGE 6 K JUNE 9, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


F


'Lawton's


Bridge'


campaign

issue?
Opponents of the proposed 65-foot, fixed-span
bridge to replace the bascule bridge on Manatee
Avenue take heart.
There's another straw to grasp. What with this
being an election year, and the flurry of candidates
to oppose Governor Lawton Chiles, there may be
hope.
The recent visit from Secretary of State and gu-
bernatorial candidate Jim Smith could serve as a
testing ground for our issue with the Florida De-
partment of Transportation.
As reported in this issue on page 1, Smith told
us he could find a lot of uses for $14 million as
long as Islanders are willing to live with the bridge
they have now for another 10 years at least.
Hurrah! Our unofficial poll in The Islander By-
stander last year, and the straw poll conducted by
SAM, indicate overwhelmingly that Islanders do
not want a 65-foot bridge.
We object on grounds of potential harm to the
environment, safety during high winds and the pos-
sibility of early closure during evacuation. We
object to the aesthetics of a 65-foot bridge over-
shadowing the quaint atmosphere of our bit of
paradise, where buildings higher than two stories
were outlawed in the 1970s.
As the campaigns continue and the politicians
come to the area, keep in mind what we wish for
and what we want in bridges.
And there's plenty more to wish fQr;when you
have $14 million to spend. Add that figure to the
$84 million panhandle boondoggle once called
"Bo's Bridge" because of strong support from
bridge sponsor and Florida House Speaker Bo
Johnson but now referred to as "Lawton's Bridge"
in the St. Petersburg Times. Sorry, Times, but we
have "Lawton's Bridge" proposed for Anna Maria.


ISLANDER


'iii h1UM N


JUNE 9, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 29
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Jeannie Friedman
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Kathariie Wight
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V ClassifiedServices
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


By Egan

By Egan


SLICK


I^e YOURe-PINION


Ato's owner wants retraction
Your April 28 article was not correct and we think
you should of had the courtesy of talking to Ato and I
before printing such .
The fact that you have access to our private letters
to the city I do not understand, but if you are to quote
such why don't you include the whole letter.
We have had a meeting with the mayor and it looks
like we have resolved any misunderstandings..
I now request a retraction and apology from your
office.
Edgar G. Kelly, Anna Maria
* Editor note: All written communication to city hall
is public record. The issue of Ato's license to operate
a business in the city of Anna Maria is currently in the
hands of code enforcement as reported.

Too many 'don't s' in
Bradenton Beach
The mind-boggling litany of don'tt" currently
being considered by the Bradenton Beach City Coun-
cil poses an interesting question. Do the city elders
perhaps plan to post this endless saga at all beach ac-
cesses and public parking lots?
If so, a horrible picture emerges one of huge
billboards (they'd have to be in order to accommodate
all the rules).
The very act of reading and digesting these rules will
take a healthy chunk of time from those wishing to enjoy
a carefree day at the beach. And how are the limited po-
lice resources expected to cope with enforcing all these
rules? Or is the Island intending to qualify for some of the
100,000 additional police officers that the Clinton admin-
istration has promised to put on the streets of America in
order to catch the odd frisbee thrower?
In the spirit of maintaining the beauty of the Island
and reducing the already excessive array of "don't"
signs, how about small, tastefully engraved plaques
that simply state the few remaining activities that ARE
permitted at the beach?
As a passionate beach walker, I would hope that
fellow early-risers will voice their dismay at the pro-
posed restrictions for beach access.
Elfi Starrett, Bradenton


Too much lighting
on Cortez Road
I fully understand that progress and safety issues
dictate improvements to Cortez Road, such as the wid-
ening to four lanes. But the street lights are definitely
overkill. The size and number of lights that have al-
ready been installed from the intersection at Cortez and
75th Street heading west are similar to those seen on
major highways in a major metropolis Houston and
Los Angeles come to mind not Manatee County.
Do we need such a highway, lit to such an ex-
treme? Every third light would be efficient. Why waste
taxpayer money?
It took me eight phone calls to finally ascertain that
those lights will be installed all the way to Cortez Vil-
lage at 119th Street where the four-laning will end.
Why the need to light up the mangroves and dis-
turb the little bit of natural habitat left for our vanish-
ing wildlife?
The last man I spoke with at the MPO laughed at
me when I said I'd miss seeing the stars. I didn't find
it funny at all.
Margaret Dickson, Cortez

Honesty? Fairness? Integrity?
Whatever happened to honesty, fairness and integ-
rity?
I've been keeping up with the Jet-ski rental busi-
ness in the paper about who and where these businesses
can be conducted.
I can't believe Mayor Katie Pierola would allow a Jet-
ski business behind her motel without being able to pro-
duce proper licenses and permits. It's beyond me how she
can allow this concession to operate to this day.
If this were anyone else, believe me, they would
have been asked to vacate immediately as others al-
ready have.
Mayor Pierola claims she accepts no money for
this rental business.
That is not the issue!
What's good for one business to operate should be
good for another.
But then, we can not all be mayors or public figures.
Janet Strauser, Bradenton


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TOfl E WERE THE AYS
___ Part 11, Anna Maria Island and the Seminole War, 1835-1842
by June Alder


A typical Florida fishing rancho like the one on Anna Maria Island where an
American atrocity took place 156 years.

JESUP'S CRUELTY


William Bunce usually had a glori-
ous view of sunrise over Tampa Bay
from the wide veranda of his house in
his new fishing rancho on Palm Island
(as Anna Maria Island was called in
1838). But not today, a humid morning
in April. A thick haze hid the sun and
stung his eyes.
Bunce's fishermen had already
pushed off in their fishing smacks. They
needed to make the most of the remain-


ing time before the
rancho would close
down until August.
It had been a
good season, Bunce
thought, considering
the tribulations of
two years of war
with the Seminoles.
Three times he had
been compelled to
move his camp.
Twice because of


All rancho inhabit
Indian blood were
to Fort Brooke tha
course they would
New Orleans and ti
Arkansas Territory
before he finished
started to moan, an
soldiers drew their
keening crescendo
wail of pain.


threats of Indian attacks and then 10
months ago when his Manatee River
rancho had been burned to the ground
- not by Seminoles but by order of
Bunce's nemesis, Gen. Thomas Jesup.
Incredibly, Jesup had accused
Bunce's Indian workers of aiding Chief
Osceola in liberating 700 Seminoles
from a detention camp at Fort Brooke.
It was nonsense, of course. Bunce's
people were deathly afraid of the Semi-
noles. Nevertheless, Jesup had threatened
to send them away to the West, too. But
Bunce found it hard to believe he would
do such a thing. They were too valuable to
the military as pilots and guides.
Pulling his bandana up closer
around his face, Bunce started off on his
usual morning stroll around the rancho.
The shadowy figures of the Indian
squaws flitted to and fro in the grayness.
With their men away, they had many
chores to do smoking mullet and
mackerel, mending nets, hoeing in their
garden patches.-
Bunce marveled at how stoically the
women had endured the turbulence in
their lives the war had caused.
Bunce paused at the warehouse to
speak with his foreman, Pedro. As he
took off his hat to mop his brow he
caught the flicker of a lantern in the
murk. Straining his eyes, he discerned
the outline of a large ship anchored


nearby. Nothing unusual about that.
There were always vessels coming and
going around Egmont Key, the staging
area for the ships carrying the Semi-
noles into exile.
But this was a steamer for trans-
porting troops. Bunce heard the rattle
of chains as several boats were low-
ered. They headed ashore, some filled
with soldiers, some ominously empty.
The bows of the craft scraped on
the beach and a fully
ants of armed detachment of
to be taken soldiers marched two-
t day. In due by-two up the shore-
be sent off to line, led by a stern-
hence to faced officer in blue.
. Even Bunce advanced to
the women meet him, holding out
?d when the his hand. But the of-
guns, their ficer ignored it and
ed to a high pulled out a paper from
his tunic.
The women of the
camp, with frightened youngsters
clinging to their skirts, gathered behind
Bunce. They remembered the last time
soldiers had come. Everyone had been
taken away for questioning.
The orders were read out in clipped
tones. All rancho inhabitants of Indian
blood were to be taken to Fort Brooke
that day. In due course they would be
sent off to New Orleans and thence to
Arkansas Territory with other emigrat-
ing Seminoles.
Even before he finished the women
started to moan, and when the soldiers
drew their guns, their keening
crescendoed to a high wail of pain.
Screaming youngsters tried to run
off into the woods. They were pursued
and caught. Older lads who struck out
at the soldiers were pinioned with their
hands behind their backs. Many of the
women also struggled and spat in the
soldiers' faces. Others sank to the
ground with their babies clutched to
their breasts.
In the end they were all seized and
dragged away some 100 women and
children, most of whom would never
see their husbands and fathers again.
Bunce's protests were in vain. Too
late he realized he had underestimated
the depths of Jesup's cruelty. In help-
less despair he watched the boats disap-
pear into the mist.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 9, 1994 N PAGE 7 lIM


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By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
At a recent "Scam Prevention" seminar spon-
sored by the Manatee County Chamber of Commerce,
the repeated message was loud and clear. The speak-
ers, all experts in different areas of crime and preven-
tion, advised: Whatever you do -- pay attention to
details, take precautions and protect yourself.
The seminar, aimed at businesses, covered topics
such as learning to avoid losses due to scam artists,
fraud, liabilities, bad checks and credit cards, shoplift-
ing and counterfeit currency.
But the keynote talk, "Contractor Agreements
Beware," was a practical guide for any consumer, not
just the small business person.
"It is always dangerous to pay for services in ad-
vance," warned key note speaker Steve Overton, re-
porter for TV's Channel 8 "Eight on Your Side."
Overton, who has been the consumer services divi-
sion reporter since 1979, said the complaints which
come to him all have one thing in common: they are
people complaining about products and services al-
ready paid for.
"Complaints are that 'I've paid, I'm not happy
and they won't come back (to fix the problem),' "
Overton explains.
Overton says his show gets an overwhelming
amount of complaints by phone and mail every
day, far more than the state department of consumer
protection. They receive nearly 250 letters every
week. They are so busy, he says, they are adding an-
other reporter to "Eight on Your Side."
The main problem, says Overton, is contractors
who ask for money up front.
"When you buy a house or a car," Overton says,
"it's a solid purchase. You are dealing with licensed
certified professionals. It's not risky.
"When you buy groceries, you often buy brands
you are familiar with at a store that has been around
for a while and you know will be there the next time
you go to shop.
"Even with fast food," he explains, "you ex-
change food for cash at the same time. "And for
telephone and power, we pay the fair and courteous
old-fashioned way we use the services, then we
pay for them ."
Then why, Overton asks, do we hire a contractor
who wants you to sign a "Draw Schedule" a stan-
dard contract which usually requires you to pay 10
percent, then 30 percent, then the final payment be-
fore services have been completed? This immediately
puts the consumer at a disadvantage.
"Who should show good faith you or the
builder?" asks Overton. Overton says he has dealt
with this situation over and over again. Contractors,


Steve Overton, "Eight onYour Side" TV reporter,
was the key note speaker at a recent Manatee
Chamber of Commerce seminar on scam prevention.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka

who many times have bought into or are working un-
der a good-name franchise, go out of business or sim-
ply disappear after consumers have paid out their hard-
earned money.
"I have seen too many people who are left with a
big hole in their wall," says Overton. "Who should be
expected to show good faith here?"
Overton says checking local sources and references
for contractors is a good beginning. Buthe stresses that
when you sit down with a contractor, you should work
with that builder or service provider about financial
arrangements. A good contractor who wants your busi-
ness can show his good faith by compromising on a
payment schedule.
"Ask the contractor," Overton suggests, "when he
buys the materials to deliver them to your house. Then
you will pay the first draw for the cost of the materi-
als. Then if he goes out of business, you at least have
the materials you've paid for."
And whatever you do, warns Overton, don't make
the final payment until the job is complete and you are
satisfied with the work.


Be wary of

home improvement solicitors


The Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services advises consumers to make sure to
deal only with reputable building contractors. Con-
sumers can avoid being ripped-off by following these
guidelines:
Do not pay for any portion of home improve-
ments until the job has been started and be cautious
of contractors who demand large up-front deposits or
payments in full.
Use well-established contractors. Ask for and
verify local references. Check with your Better Busi-
ness Council.
Obtain more than one written estimate, espe-


cially on large jobs. Make sure the estimate contains a
complete description of all work to be done, costs and
completion dates, and specifies the builder's responsi-
bilities to secure all appropriate building permits and
to adhere to all building codes and ordinances.
Don't automatically select the lowest bid, espe-
cially if it's considerably lower than all the others.
Some contractors intend to seek more money after the
job is underway. Such contractors may not be able to
meet contractual obligations and the homeowner could
be left with incomplete or substandard work.
Make sure the contractor has insurance for liabil-
ity and workers compensation.


Teen input needed to create

summer programs


Island adolescents and teens, ages 11 to 17,
are invited to the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, on
Thursday, June 9, from 4 to 5:50 p.m. Pizza will
be provided.
Community Center staff would like to know


what activities students would like to take part in
during the summer. Field trips will be scheduled for
Monday, from noon to 5 p.m. Friday from 6 to 9
p.m. will be an open center teen night which includes
sports, games, movies, art projects and social activi-
ties. For more information call 778-1908.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 9, 1994 A PAGE 9 IIu


Fundraising letter causes

Island concern


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
When a Bradenton Beach resident recently re-
ceived a questionable letter concerning a fund drive for
Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS), she turned to
Police Chief Jack Maloney for guidance.
At the top of the letter is the heading "1994
Bradenton Beach Area Concerns of Police Survivors
Annual Fund Drive.'The city is mentioned three times
in the body of the letter which begins like this:
"COPS is now conducting its 1994 Bradenton
Beach Area Annual Fund Drive. And during this time
of year, many friends of COPS and neighbors in the
Bradenton Beach area make their annual contribution
to our organization.
"When you send your 1994 contribution to COPS,
we can provide immediate support and counseling to
the families of police officers who have been killed in
the line of duty across the country. COPS is very often
the grieving family's only means of comfort and assis-
tance from others who truly understand the pain of their
loss."
In addition, a slip is enclosed for the contributor to
return which lists a suggested contribution of $5 and
displays the designation "1994 Bradenton Beach Area
Annual Fund Drive."


Maloney immediately called the National Police
Chiefs Association to determine the legitimacy of
the fund-raising group based in Camdenton, MO.
"The group is legitimate," said Maloney after the
call, "but none of the money is used locally. The
funds are to go to the police memorial in Washing-
ton, D.C."
He also had some advice for those who receive
pleas from organizations they are unsure about
"There are so many of these organizations," he
noted. "Residents should check with the Better Busi-
ness Bureau in the organization's home state to see
if any complaints have been registered. They should
also realize that in many of these organizations, about
80 percent of the funds are used for administrative
costs."
Maloney stressed that his department does not do
any fund-raising. The department is funded in the
city's budget. The department's auxiliary officers
volunteer their time but receive a uniform allowance
in the city's budget
"If residents want to make a donation, they
should make it to the local Fraternal Order of the
Police or the Police Benevolent Association," said
Maloney. "These are organizations that focus on lo-
cal problems and issues."


County permits AMFD

training facility


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
With county permits in hand, the Anna Maria Fire
Department is ready to move ahead on its training facil-
ity to be constructed behind Station 2 on Cortez Road.
"This has been our dream for five or six years,"
4 said Fire Inspector Tony Bailey. "We took it upon our-
selves to do this for our people. The money will stay
in the district to train the people who will come to your
house and render care to you. Residents want the secu-
rity of knowing our fire fighters are knowledgeable,
well trained professionals."
Work on the facility began a year-and-a-half ago,
said Bailey but hit a snag in the county's permitting
department last year. The problem was two-fold the
uniqueness of the project and the fact that the county
was revising its permitting procedures.
To date, the land has been acquired and cleared, fill
has been added and volunteers have lined up to help.
"It has been overwhelming how willing people
have been to help us," said Bailey. 'Once people found
out what we were doing, they came through with do-
nations of money, manpower, materials and equip-
ment.. We're all working together on it."
Volunteers include Anna Maria architect Gene
Aubry, who donated his time and talent to draw plans
for the facility; Carmine Galati, who donated a steel
hulled boat for boat fire training and material for a
dock; Vision Gas, which is donating all materials for
the LP training; Price Towing (no relation to Fire Chief
Andy Price), which will donate up to five cars a month
for Jaws of Life training; Franklin Mobile Homes,
which will donate mobile homes; and Butch Van
Ostenbridge who is shooting elevations for the con-
struction of cement pads.
The boat will be anchored in the site's drainage
retention pond and the dock will extend along one side.
In front of the pond will be a car and LP gas tanks on
a cement pads. Gas from the tanks will be piped into


the boat and car. Tanks will also be used to simulate
leaking tanks.
Around the perimeter of the site will be cement
pads to hold the mobile home, the Jaws of Life train-
ing car and a three-story training tower. The tower
will be used to train for search and rescue, roof and
window rescue, smoke and extraction. The open area
in the center will be used for hose training.
"We hope to have everything in place by the end
of the year except the training tower, which will be
the most expensive part," said Bailey. "The entire
project will cost about $60,000. We have raised
$6,000 in cash and have received another $15,000 to
$20,000 in donations of materials and equipment."
Bailey is preparing a letter to be sent to all busi-
nesses in the fire district seeking sponsorship of a
yard or more of concrete for the pads. Each yard is
$43.50. Cash donations are also being accepted from
businesses and individuals.
Fire Chief Andy Price noted, "The facility will
benefit every person in the district. Years ago, our
volunteers were local individuals and business own-
ers, but now many of them don't have the time to give
to the increased demands of training. Our volunteers
are younger people looking for a career and it's hard
to maintain good volunteers without providing the
proper education and training.
"Fire fighting is very different today. In the past,
training was very minimal. Today, we have to train
for things like toxic gases and blood borne pathogens.
We have to be concerned about lawsuits, look at it
from a business standpoint and be very aware that
better training will reduce risks to the firefighter, the
district and the home and business owner."
Bailey added, "Fire fighting takes more mind than
-muscle today. In many cases, its not knowing what to
do, it's knowing what you can't do. The first few fire
fighters on scene at any given call will make or break it
and this is why good training is so important."


Help a kid go to camp this summer
Nicole Quigley is willing to pick up trash an lots one reason: Not only are they helping out the envi-
of it in order to go to summer camp. Quigley, along ronment but they are looking for sponsors to help
with other kids from the Palma Sola Presbyterian raise funds for a week at summer camp. There is a 10-
Church, will be collecting Palma Sola Causeway trash bag limit which means if you pledge $1 a bag, if
on Saturday as part of a Trashathon, sponsored by Quigley packs 10 bags of trash you pay $10.
neighbors and friends at a per-bag rate. If you would like to help Nicole Quigley go to
The kids will pick up and bag trash for more than summer camp call 778-5537.


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Holmes Beach


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R[ PAGE 10 0 JUNE 9, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYST


ANDER

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Voters can register
at library
The Manatee County Supervisor of Elections will
conduct voter registration at the Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, on Saturday, June 18
from 10 am. to 2 p.m.
For more information call 778-6341.

Concerned Island
Parents to meet Sunday
Concerned Island Parents will hold a general meet-
ing on Sunday June 12, at noon, in the Roser Memo-
rial Community Church, 512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.
All residents are invited to attend and share concerns
about Island youth and teens. The meeting will cover
working with the Anna Maria Island Community Center's
efforts, to provide additional activities and to help provide
a safe and healthy environment for Island kids.

Art League offers
classes for kids
The Anna Maria Island Art League offers summer art
classes for children on Tuesday and Wednesday after-
noons, attheLeague, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach.
A Drawing and Crafts class taught by Laura Beard
will be held on Tuesdays, 12:30 to 2 p.m. The class
includes fun projects using found objects. Projects in-
clude paper mache, paper making and printing tech-
niques. Most projects will be finished the same day and
supplies are provided.
Three Prisma-Color Drawing classes will be taught
by Julie Stewart on Tuesdays, from 4:45 to 6:15 p.m.,
and Wednesdays, from 3:35 to 5 p.m. and from 5 to
6:30 p.m. Students in the class will work on longer
range drawing projects.
The classes are $6 per class, pay ahead or as you go.
For more information call 778-2099.

Chamber board to meet
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will hold a meeting for its board of directors and offic-
ers on Wednesday, June 22, at 5:30 p.m., 501 Manatee
Ave. W., Holmes Beach.
The meeting is open to members and the public.


Vacation Bible schools,
church youth groups
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, 4408
Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach: Vacation Bible School, June
13-17, from.9 a.m. to noon. Activities include Bible
lessons, crafts and music. For all Island children who
attended kindergarten through the 5th grade during the
1993-94 school year. Information: 778-1638.
Island Baptist Church, 8605 Gulf Dr., Anna
Maria: Vacation Bible School, July 25-29. Information:
778-0719.
Roser Memorial Community Church, 512 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria: Vacation Bible School, Aug. 1-5, 9
a.m. to noon. Ages 4 through 6th grade. A picnic will
follow the last session. No registration fee, but please
register in advance. Information: 778-0414.
All Island Youth, a cooperative program spon-
sored by All Island Denominations for youths 7th
through 12th grades, meets weekly on Wednesdays,
from 6 to 8 p.m. In June, meetings are at Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church. In July, the group will meet at Roser
Memorial Community Church. In August, meetings
will be held at St Bernard Catholic Church. Informa-
tion: 778-0414.


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Art for Peace
Entries in the "Art for
Peace" contestfor
Manatee County stu-
e dents were judged
recently by Anna Maria
artists (left to right)
Doug Wolfe, wood
carver; Gloria Hall,
tapestry weaver and
basket maker; Mary
SWorobec, clay sculptor;
and Riley Conarroe,
70 painter and wood
carver. Art for Peace, a
program encouraging
children to produce
artwork with a peace
motif is the 12-year
enterprise of Riley
Conarroe, Holmes
Beach.
Library offers colorful
summer reading
C.O.L.O.R. Celebrate Our Love of Reading -
is the "reading adventure" offered at Manatee County
Public Libraries this summer. Reading clubs, story pro-
grams and activities for school-aged young people will
be available.
Programs begin June 13 and continue through July.
For more information call the Children's Depart-
ment of the Central Library at 748-5555.
College funding meeting
A workshop, "College Education: How Will You
Fund Your Child's Education," will be held Saturday,
June 11, 10:15 am., at the Island Branch Library. The
free seminar will be presented by Cynthia A. Olcott and
John T. Sharp.
For more information call 755-7000.
ALS presents 'Glades
The American Littoral Society is presenting a free
program on the Everglades on Wednesday, June 15, 7
p.m., in Gulf Gate Library, Curtiss Avenue, Sarasota.
For more information call 951-0884.



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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 9, 1994 A PAGE 11 i


ANimMUNCEM


Children's summer
program to be held at
Island Branch Library
Children may now register for the Island Branch
Library summer program. The program includes activi-
ties for preschoolers and 1st graders in one group, and
2nd graders and older in another group.
On Wednesday, June 22 and 29, July 13 and 20,
from 7 to 7:30 p.m., preschoolers and 1st graders can
wear their pajamas and bring their stuffed animals to
evening story time.
For 2nd grade and older, the library will have pro-
grams on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, through July 26.
Jim Moone, scuba diver, will uncover "Creatures
under the Sea," on Wednesday, June 15, from 7 to 8 p.m.
Rosie Tyrrell, dried flower arranger, will talk about
"Green Things that Grow," for 3rd graders and older,
Tuesday, June 21, from 2 to 3 p.m.
Julia Garland, art teacher, will speak on "Violet and
Wild Crafts," on Tuesday, June 28, from 2 to 3 p.m.
John Waltz will present "Magic in Technicolor,"
on Wednesday, July 6, from 7 to 8 p.m.
Irene Murphy, bead artist, will demonstrate "Bead-
ing into Color Crafts," for 3rd graders and older, on
Tuesday, July 12, from 2 to 3 p.m. Limit of 10 children.
A puppet show, "Wiley and the Hairy Man," will
be presented onTuesday, July 19, from 2 to 3 p.m.
Marian Czyspak, Island Branch staff member, will
demonstrate 'Weaving a Rainbow," for 3rd graders and
older, on July 26, from 2 to 3 p.m. Limit of 10 children.
Participants may register for limited attendance pro-
grams at the Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach. For more information call 778-6341.

Nutrition class offered
"Healthy Eating: Fact or Fallacy," is a free class to
be held on Saturday, June 18, 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the
Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria. Jennifer Kring, a registered dietitian
with St. Luke's Hospital/Mayo Clinic Jacksonville,
will talk on basic nutrition, weight loss, facts on cho-
lesterol, butter vs. margarine and beta-carotene.
No registration is required. For more information
call 778-1908.


Business "briefs" and social
"notes" are always welcome at
The Islander Bystander... call us
at 778-7978 to find out how you
can be included.


Interns wanted for
Florida House of
Representatives
Applications are available for the 1995-96 Florida
House of Representatives Legislative Intern program.
Interns would serve in Tallahassee from June 1995 to
May 1996.
The program is available for students who have
received undergraduate degrees and are continuing
graduate studies. Interns must be enrolled in at least six
hours of classes during the program year.
Interns will work for the Florida House of Repre-
sentatives in Tallahassee a minimum of 20 hours per
week. They will receive a monthly stipend of $1,000.
In addition, the Florida House of Representatives will
pay for 36 hours of tuition during a two-year period.
Deadline for submitting applications is Nov. 1,
1994.
Applications are available through the office of
Rep. Julie McClure, 1101 6th Ave. W., Ste. 120,
Bradenton, FL 34205.
Information, call 748-7756.


Children's group therapy
scheduled at island
Community Center
Group therapy services will be offered to children
this summer by the Anna maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Topics that may be available, depending on com-
munity needs, are Children of Divorce, Anger Manage-
ment Skills, Social Skills I (Dealing with Feelings),
Social Skills II (Making Good Choices, Substance
Abuse Prevention, Self-Esteem and Grief and Loss.
Groups of five or six children will meet for 30 to 45
minutes once a week.
Methods such as role play, art therapy and play
therapy techniques which teach children new skills,
encourage self-esteem and self-understanding will
be employed.
For more information call Susan.at 778-1908.

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AIDS support groups
offered Fridays
Ongoing support groups for individuals who have
AIDS, their caretakers and families are held weekly.
The free groups are sponsored by Stratogen Health of
West Florida, 3701 Cortez Rd., Bradenton, and facili-
tated by experienced counselors.
The men with AIDS group meets every Friday,
from 7 to 9 p.m. The women's group meets bimonthly
on Wednesday, June 15 and 29, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
The group for families and caregivers meets every
Tuesday, from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
For more information call 753-2949.


Swanberg to give art
demonstration
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will
present a program on Monday, June 6, at the Guild
Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. Dorothy
Swanberg will give an introduction to Rosemalling, the
Norwegian folk art of painting or carving floral designs
on furniture or woodwork.
Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. The pro-
gram will begin at 7 p.m. and a general meeting will
follow.
The public is invited to the free program. For more
information call 778-6694.


Historical museum
changes hours
The Anna Maria Island Historical Museum an-
nounces its new summer hours through September. The
museum is open from 10 am. to 1 p.m. on Tuesdays,
Wednesday, Thursdays and Saturdays.
Admission is free and donations are accepted.
Centennial souvenirs are still available at the mu-
seum as well as gift items such as books, T-shirts, hats,
visors, mugs, stationery, matted and framed watercolor
prints and calendars.
The museum is located at 402 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria. For more information call 778-0492.

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Friends and relatives up north? You can send them Island greetings and news every week,
all year long with a subscription to The Islander Bystander. See page 7 for details.


I


:EH5 BYSEBa


IISLANDER







Ei PAGE 12 m JUNE 9, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


How I spent my European vacation


By Katharine Wight
Islander School Correspondent
I lean my head against the airplane cushion and
close my eyes. "We should be landing in Gatwick air-
port in oh, say, 20 minutes," the captain's voice booms
through the plane.
I smile, not fully believing that soon I'll be in Lon-
don.
Forty-two people, kids and adults, are traveling in
an EF tour group arranged chiefly by Diana Hall and
King Middle School's Advanced Academics Depart-
ment
During the past two days I've had a semi-hysteri-
cal fit, packed my suitcase, had another semi-hysteri-
cal fit, and re-packed my suitcase. I felt that it would
be good to get the "homesickness thing" over with.
I said goodbye to my family this morning. Yester-
day morning?. What time is it anyway? 6 a.m. So, it's
actually one o'clock in the morning to us.
I look around at my fellow Island travelers. Katie
and Ann Jenkins, Julie St. Germaine Critelli, Paul
Esformes, Derek and Joan Pettigrew, Dixie Ferguson,
Toby Baugher, Marisa and Madeline Bergquist, and
Jake Spooner. They're all bursting with excitement. I
can tell by the way they're sleeping.
"Please return your seats and tray tables to upright
positions. We are preparing for landing." 3 2 1
TOUCHDOWN!
The scenery here is awesome. We're in a bus, half-
way to the Osterly, our London hotel. We've been
passing endless fields of cows and sheep, with beauti-
ful hills, trees, and flowers dotting the backdrop. It's
just like the U.S., but it's different.
It's England.

We have arrived at the Osterly Hotel. It's very nice,
which surprised me, considering all the horror stories
I've heard about European hotels. The rooms are spa-
cious, and the bathrooms have towels, washcloths and
little Osterly soaps.
After dropping off our luggage and having a "nice
cuppa tea" in the lobby, we started off on a walking
tour. It was a mile walk to the tube station (subway),
and after 15 minutes of utter chaos and confusion, we
managed to board the tube. We emerged 20 minutes
later and breathed in the somewhat fresher air.
Our tour guide, Carrie Harvey, walked backwards,
shouting out the sights as we passed them. After a bit
we ended up at a truly awesome place; Trafalgar
Square. Beautiful fountains and four impressive lion
statues make a great photo op, and thousands of pi-
geons mill underfoot. We fed the pigeons, sat on the
stone walls, and walked around, just enjoying the
sights, until it was time for lunch.
We split into three differentrestaurant groups: one
went to Pizza Hut, another to a small cafe, and the third
to a place called The American Burger. I braved the
cafe, which turned out to be quite good. I was surprised,
though, when I recieved my chocolate shake. In Lon-
don, it seems, shakes are just warm, bubbly, flavored
milk. However, it was good, and I was just beginning
to relax when we started off on the rest of our walking
tour.
We saw numerous statues, wandered along through
parks, and nearly got flattened by double-decker buses.
It was cool.
Finally, we ended up at a different hotel, one where
we would eat dinner for the rest of our London tour.
The bright sun was going down as we ate fish and
eggrolls.
At 10 p.m. we dragged our weary bodies to the
Osterly. We faced the tube ride and the mile walk, com-
plaining all the way, and then played charades until
midnight. (Seventh graders are very resilient.) We
unpacked and went to bed for the first time in over 40
hours.
Tomorrow we get to go check some major shop-
ping spots, see the changing of the guard, and take in
the musical, CATS.

I'm on the plane from Newark to the Tampa air-
port. So much has happened in the past couple of days
I haven't found time to write. I hope I remember every-
thing right.
We took a ferry across the English channel to
Calais. The moment we stepped off I thought "We're
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


London Trafalgar Square
was a perfect opportunity
to pose. Front standing,
Derek Pettigrew, left to
right, Katie Jenkins,
Dixie Ferguson, Paul
Esformes, Marisa
Berquist Katherine
Wight, Julie St. Germaine
Critelli, Toby Baugher
and Jake Spooner


Dixie Ferguson, left, Julie St. Germaine Critelli and
Katie Jenkins kept themselves entertained on the
plane.


Derek Pettigrew, left, and Paul Esformes warned the
countrymen, "London, here we come!"


Marisa Berquist gives Londoners some serious Katharine displays her favorite newspaper at
thought. Gatwick Airport, London.


Escort Jean Pettigrew sipped her first cup of British
tea.


Katharine and Julia Ruzich posed before dodging
double decker buses in London.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 9, 1994 A PAGE 13 BiG


European vacation,

with an Island

twist and flair
not in London anymore!" For one thing, I couldn't
understand a word of any conversation around me.
Plus, I don't know, the air seemed different. More for-
eign, I guess.
After a very bumpy bus ride we ended up shopping
in Paris. Two hours later, loaded down with souvenirs,
we collapsed at a sidewalk cafe and consumed mass
quantities. Pastry heaven!
But our journeys just weren't enough to end the
day. We got back on the bus and were off to beautiful
Versailles. The ceilings were intricately painted in rich
colors and detailed scenes a Greek or Roman god or
goddess the center of each room. After touring Marie
Antoinette's bedroom we ran amok through the court-
yard, taking pictures of the beautiful gardens.
Had enough yet?
We finally took a break to eat, and then we went
back to the hotel to get settled in.
The next day we got up early to go see the Louvre.
But first a brief photo op in front of the Eiffel Tower! That
structure is so huge, you just feel insignificant beside it.
After 15 minutes we reluctantly piled back onto the bus
and steadied ourselves for a boring day of museums.
The Louvre was a zoo! We split into groups so we
could see what we wanted, and everyone headed off to
the Mona Lisa. When we had almost reached the top of
the stairs, just a few feet away from the famous paint-
ing, I got crashed into and I slid back down the
marble staircase.
Understandably, my group decided to chill in the
snack bar for a while after that. We finally got up and
pushed through the crowds to find a very small paint-
ing. It was very old, but in good condition.
I can see the allure of the picture. In fact right now
I'm wrestling with the question that has plagued man-
kind for centuries what is she smiling about?
I lean back against the airplane seat and close my
eyes. I only have one thing to say about my trip: Je etre
le dos!





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Film protects windows
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
After reading last week's story on hurricane pre-
paredness in The Islander Bystander, many people in-
quired about a film, which was mentioned in the story,
that is applied to windows to protect them from break-
age in a hurricane.
Tony Davis of Glass Protection Services in Largo,
Fl., explained, "This product was patented in 1968 to
contain bomb blasts from car bombings in northern
Ireland. It was used only by the British Home Office
and the U.S. State Department to put on windows in
embassies and state department facilities to keep em-
ployees safe from flying glass."
Homeowners in Miami began applying the film to
their windows in 1989 as protection against break-ins,
said Davis. When Hurricane Andrew roared through
south Florida in 1991, homeowners discovered the
film's value in protecting windows against hurricane
force winds.
"After that, the testimonials came rolling in," said
Davis. "The product has been around for 15 years, but
there was no market for it here. We weren't afraid of
terrorism and crime hadn't escalated to where it is now.
But now this is the most economically viable solution
to violent storm damage.
"It will handle 150 mph winds with no debris," he
said. "But when you're talking about 150 mph winds,
they are gusting up to 175 mph. The product makes
your glass at least 40 times stronger than it currently is,
regardless of how thick it is."
Davis said the film was recently tested by the
Tampa Bomb Squad and it held up under the stress of
one pound of plastic explosive (used by terrorists in
bombs and by armed forces in land mines.)
The film is applied to the inside of windows and is
available clear or tinted. In addition to adding strength,
the clear film blocks out 99 percent of the ultraviolet
rays, said Davis. The tinted film blocks out 63 percent
of the heat, 50 percent of the glare and 99 percent of the
ultraviolet rays coming into a home.


IISLANDERUMIEVOCK,
Better than a
"hallmark" greeting!
Send The Islander
Bystander to your
distant friends and
relatives..
It's just like getting a
letter from home! See
the form on page 7
to subscribe.


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Mrs. Russell's Class
Barren Andricks
Jasmine Atwood
Carla Bensinger
Richard Buckelew
Carly Castoro
Elizabeth Caudill
Amanda Cicero
Eric Clark
Lisa Comkowycz
Rebecca Epright
Evan Golden
Dennis Granstad
Charles Kyle
Scott MacGregor
Nerissa McClung
Seth Mitchell
Melissa Mixon
Katie Ot
Beatrice Pohl-Wilmott
Joshua Shimadle
Krista Skee
Kimberly Sultenfuss


from hurricane damage
Test data is available to the consumer, he said, and
the company offers free estimates. Cost comparisons of
the film with other methods of window protection, such
as plywood and shutters, are listed in the 1994 Mana-
tee County Hurricane Guide, which is available at city
halls and the fire station. The film comes with a 10-year
warranty on labor and materials and it takes about a day
to install the film on windows in an average house.
The company has installed the product on windows
in the Pinellas County Sheriffs Department, the mas-
ter fire station for the City of St. Petersburg and is in
the process of completing work on the Special Opera-
tions Command Center at McDill Air Force Base, in
addition to homes and businesses throughout the area.
Davis may be contacted at (813) 541-7779.


Hurricane

preparedness

discussed at

seminar
A one-day seminar, "Hurricane Preparedness,
Breaking the Cycle of Damage: From Response to
Recovery," will be held Wednesday, June 29, 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m., at the University of South Florida, Sudakoff
Center, Sarasota.
Disaster preparedness, emergency management,
county management and community affairs experts
will speak on how to prepare for and survive a hurri-
cane. The program is sponsored by Manatee Commu-
nity College Open Campus, Florida Planning and Zon-
ing Association, Gulfcoast Chapter American Planning
Association, Suncoast Southwest Regional Planning
Council and the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Coun-
cil.
The fee is $35 in advance, $40 at the door and in-
cludes lunch. For more information call 755-1511, ext.
4203.


Erin Vanleeuwen
Natalie Vanwormer
Travis Wicklund
Kiernan Wilkins

Mrs. Ellis's Class
Jeffrey Ambut
Michael Armstrong
Taylor Bernard
Logan Bowes
Samantha Eaton
Candice Echols
Jamie Edwards
Alicia Fisiorek
Michelle Gonzales
David Headrick
Lisa Jenkins
Michael Knott
Mark Lackey
Kelsey Lashway
Christopher Martin
Jennifer McDonald
Jon-Robert McLaughlin


---

LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc.


Brittni Murphy
Rhomas Reiner
Kaelan Richards
Bryan roberts
Nicholas Rossi
Shawn Snyder
Crystal Stephens
Suzanne Wight
Jamie Williams

Ms. Small's Class
Adina Bridges
Lucina Courtney
Melanie Doster
Justin Dries
Jesse Ferguson
William Floto
Jessica Foraker
Janae Haupt
Jonathan Kent
Marc Manali
Jeremy Purvis
Joseph Sankey


ISLANDER

It 111


LAPENSEE PLUMBING AND

THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

CONGRATULATE THE

ANNA MARIA ELEMENTARY

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1994







Em PAGE 14 a JUNE 9, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Sarasota Bay: Paradise Reclaimed


A community strategy for restoration


Editors note: Since 1989, Sarasota Bay has been the
site of the most intensive study of any body of water in
Florida. The Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program
is now in the process of consolidating the information
learned into a manner that citizens in Manatee and
Sarasota Counties can use to improve the Bay. The
recommendations presented below are an outline for
restoring Sarasota Bay.

During the past 50 years, human activities have
caused a slow but steady decline in the general health
of Sarasota Bay.
The people of Manatee and Sarasota counties are
now realizing the extent of damage that began with
massive dredge-and-fill projects in the 1950s, and con-
tinued with the community's rapid growth and associ-
ated pollution.
Only recently has the community noticed improve-
ments in the bay, largely resulting from concerted gov-
ernment action to improve water quality through bet-
ter wastewater treatment. Still, past destruction of
seagrasses and mangroves, and continuing pollution
from wastewater and stormwater, present a major chal-
lenge for the stewards of Sarasota Bay.
This challenge can be met through the concerted
effort of the community. In this spirit, the Sarasota Bay
Program recommends specific actions to restore and
protect Sarasota Bay.
In 1993, the Sarasota Bay Program completed the
most comprehensive analysis of any estuary in Florida,
documenting problems related to pollution by wastewa-
ter and stormwater, loss of wetlands and seagrasses, and
recreational use of the bay. Results of these investigations
by top estuarine scientists were presented in the Frame-
work for Action report and are summarized below.

Declines in water, sediment
quality
In general, water quality in northern and central
portions of Sarasota Bay is improving. Similar im-
provements have not been detected in the lower bay.
Sediment quality is degraded in tributaries baywide,
but the main bay is relatively free of contaminants.
A principle pollutant affecting bay water quality is
nitrogen. An over-abundance of nitrogen harms the bay
by increasing algal growth which reduces light penetra-
tion to submerged grasses and, through biological and
chemical processes, depletes oxygen from the water.
Nitrogen loadings to Sarasota Bay have tripled since
pre-development times. Without remedial action, nitro-
gen loadings are projected to increase another 8 percent
during the next 20 years, and 16 percent when the area
is fully developed according to existing plans. How-
ever, by implementing the restoration strategy for
Sarasota Bay, nitrogen loadings at build-out can actu-
ally be lower than today.
Human-induced sources of nitrogen are wastewa-
ter (including small and large wastewater treatment
plants); ground water (from septic systems and small
treatment plants); and stormwater (including fertilizers
from lawn care and agriculture). Nitrogen also is
loaded to the bay through uncontaminated groundwa-
ter (baseflow) and by rainfall. Nitrogen concentrations
in rainfall may be associated with so-called "acid rain"
effects induced by auto and other emissions. (Measur-
ing rates of atmospheric deposition of nitrogen in the
bay is a research priority recommended by the Sarasota
Bay Program.)
The major source of nitrogen loading varies among
the regions in the bay's watershed. Baywide,
stormwater contributes nearly half the bay's nitrogen
loads. But in the Sarasota County portion of the water-
shed, wastewater is a regionally significant source of
nitrogen. Wastewater from septic systems and small
treatment plants in Sarasota County contribute up to 32
percent of nitrogen loadings in Whitaker Bayou; 32
percent in Phillippi Creek and 24 percent in Roberts
Bay. High levels of treatment are possible for wastewa-
ter, which means that a major source of pollution in the
lower bay can be effectively eliminated through avail-
able technology. Sarasota County is planning to cen-
tralize sewer systems over the next few years, and op-
portunities exist to speed up the process through coop-
eration between the county and the City of Sarasota,


- --

Tampa
Bay ,rra


Beach


Beach


Gulf
of
Mexico


w Top 25%

j Top 50%


SBottom 50%


B Bottom 25%


Lido


Siesta Key \ I







CaseyKey

Casey Key


Water clarity in Sarasota Bay


which now has a highly efficient wastewater treatment
plant. Solving wastewater treatment problems also will
help the community address water supply problems as
the treated wastewater is reclaimed for irrigation or
other uses.
Unfortunately, nitrogen loadings from stormwater
runoff are not as readily addressed by technology.
Baywide, stormwater contributes 47 percent of nitro-
gen loads, and the largest single source is residential
land uses our yards and neighborhoods.
Conventional treatment technologies, such as de-
tention ponds, are only partially effective at removing
nitrogen from stormwater. Therefore, pollution preven-
tion will be the key to reducing stormwater's contribu-
tion of nitrogen to the bay. An excellent place to begin
is in our yards, where each of us has control over the
solutions.
Information on bay-friendly landscape design and
maintenance is available through the Florida Yards &
Neighborhoods Program of the Cooperative Extension
Service. The program provides information and on-site
advice from knowledgeable volunteers who help prop-
erty owners plan changes in plant selection and/or
maintenance practices. Information also is provided on


shoreline management, mangrove conservation, and
earth-shaping to reduce runoff. The potential for this
program to reduce nitrogen loads is still being assessed,
but research in the Chesapeake Bay area suggests that
nitrogen loads could be significantly reduced by land-
scaping with low-maintenance trees, shrubs and
groundcovers.
In addition to nitrogen, stormwater is the major
contributor of sediment and toxic substances, such as
heavy metals and pesticides, which are carried by par-
ticles of sediment to the bay. These contaminants can
be deadly to marine life or may interfere with reproduc-
tion or larval development in fish and shellfish. Heavy
metals include elements like lead, cadmium, copper
and zinc. Lead and cadmium come from vehicle emis-
sions and deterioration of brakes and tires. These met-
als collect on pavement and, when it rains, run into
Sarasota Bay through the tributaries. Copper, which is
often found near marinas, is thought to be associated
with antifouling bottom paints used on boats. Copper-
containing herbicides may be another source. Zinc is
mainly contributed by rainfall to the open bay; the
source of atmospheric zinc is undetermined.
While few toxic substances were found in the main


r""^
TO
ro *
U3i
co
n,.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 9, 1994 U PAGE 15 I


bay, heavy metals were found in elevated levels in sev-
eral creeks and bayous flowing into Sarasota Bay.
Concentrations of heavy metals in some sediments
were found to be at levels of ecological risk, but not
human health risk. Pesticides were also found in trace
amounts in sediments in some low-salinity areas. The
combined effects of toxic substances found in Sarasota
Bay are a source of additional ecological concern. In
addition, the concentration of toxic substances in vital,
low salinity environments is of concern because fish
and shellfish require these habitats during sensitive,
juvenile stages.
Improving stormwater treatment through structural
means such as detention ponds can reduce such con-
taminants by up to 93 percent. Priority areas to receive
stormwater treatment to reduce pollution by contami-
nants include: Cedar Hammock and Bowlees Creeks in
Manatee County; Whitaker Bayou, Hudson Bayou and
Phillippi Creek in Sarasota County. Stormwater Envi-
ronmental Utilities established in both counties will
take the lead on providing structural treatment in these
tributary watersheds. By paying stormwater fees, resi-
dents in both counties will not only help reduce flood-
ing in neighborhoods, but will also help protect the bay
from sediments and contaminants.

Loss of fresh and saltwater
wetlands
Healthy wetlands, including both freshwater and
intertidal habitats, are important to the vitality of
Sarasota Bay because they provide food and shelter for
bay life. They also filter pollutants and help regulate
the flow of fresh water into the bay. Intertidal habitats
salt marshes and mangroves also help protect
shorelines from erosion. Since 1950, the area of inter-
tidal wetlands in the bay watershed has declined 39
percent.
Since 1975, freshwater wetlands (as a whole) have
declined 16 percent, and non-forested freshwater wet-
lands have declined 35 percent. Remaining wetlands
are fragmented and smaller and may no longer provide
the same level of function.
Because of the importance of wetlands both
freshwater and saltwater-- to the bay's condition, the
restoration strategy for Sarasota Bay seeks to restore 18
acres of intertidal wetlands and 11 acres of freshwater
wetlands annually. A comprehensive protection, acqui-
sition, restoration and public education initiative will
be facilitated by a wetlands coordinator at the local
level. The coordinator will have no regulatory author-
ity, but will instead facilitate activities aimed at restor-
ing and creating wetlands throughout the watershed.

Declines in fisheries and other
living resources
The health of Sarasota Bay's fishery is dependent
upon the quality of bay waters, wetlands and seagrasses.
As with water quality and wetlands, seagrass acreage has
generally declined in the bay, and nitrogen pollution is
damaging the habitat value of many remaining seagrass
meadows. Seagrasses have declined approximately 30
percent baywide, except in localized areas where water
quality has improved in recent years. Significant shifts of
seagrass species (from Thalassia to Halodule and Ruppia)
in Little Sarasota Bay indicate declining water quality in
that area of the bay. Thalassia (turtle grass) generally re-
quires better water quality than Halodule (shoal grass) or
Ruppia (widgeon grass). Seagrass recovery in Sarasota
Bay is directly linked with restoring water quality, particu-
larly by reducing nitrogen loadings to the bay.
In addition, extensive acreage of the bay bottom
(15 percent, or 4,800 acres) was altered to create
homesites and boat channels during the 1950s and
1960s. Many of the disturbed areas are now "sinks" for
fine-grain sediment and pollutants. This is especially
relevant in areas dredged for fill material and boating
channels. Many of these sinks also are anoxic (no oxy-
gen) and can no longer support diverse aquatic life
found elsewhere in the bay. Some of these areas could
potentially be restored using appropriate technology.
In addition to altering bay bottom habitats, dredge-
and-fill activities dramatically altered bay circulation,
the movement and mixing of water. Changes in circu-
lation can modify habitats by changing factors that in-
fluence sunlight penetration or the movement of nutri-
ents transported by water. The Sarasota Bay Program's
computer model of bay circulation indicated two par-
ticular areas where circulation has been reduced: Palma
Sola Bay in the north and Little Sarasota Bay in the
south. The reconstruction of the Palma Sola Causeway
will allow circulation to be improved in that area. The


Sarasota Bay Program has not yet reached consensus
on issues in Little Sarasota Bay, where the closure of
Midnight Pass reduced circulation.
Since most of the natural factors affecting fish
populations water quality, seagrasses, intertidal
wetlands and low- salinity areas have been degraded
over time, declines in bay fisheries come as no surprise.
The limited data available suggest that Sarasota Bay's
fish populations have been relatively stable since 1978.
However, compared to 1950, seatrout landings are
down 50 percent, and there are seven times more rec-
reational anglers using the bay. Comparative historical
data are not available, but other interesting facts about
Sarasota Bay fisheries were documented by the
Sarasota Bay Program in creating a baseline for future
comparison. For example, the average angler now re-
quires 3-4 hours to catch a "keeper" fish in Sarasota
Bay. Desirable species, such as spotted seatrout, require
an average of 12 hours of effort.
Improving water quality and habitats is expected to
result in greater numbers and diversity of fish in the
bay. Testing additional management measures, such as
limiting use in a conservation area or developing spe-
cial size and catch limits for the local area, may prove
beneficial for the future of the bay's fisheries. Small,
seawall reefs for canal communities can mimic natural,
shoreline habitat for juvenile fish.

Increased recreational use
Increased recreational use of Sarasota Bay has re-
sulted in conflicts between user groups (anglers vs.
skiers; boaters vs. swimmers) in certain geographic
areas. Locations of concern are the Intracoastal Water-
way (ICW) around Phillippi Creek, Palma Sola Cause-
way, Venice Inlet, Big Pass, Longboat Pass and the
ICW entrance to Big Sarasota Bay just south of Sister
Keys. Management and enhancement of recreational
uses in the bay do not receive the same emphasis as
similar uses on the Gulf beaches. Management plans
targeted to areas of recreational conflict, if developed
in cooperation with government agencies and bay us-
ers, would enhance the recreational experience pro-
vided by Sarasota Bay. This in turn would promote
stewardship of the bay, contribute even more to the
local economy, and protect bay resources.
In addition, informing residents and visitors of the
bay's recreational attractions would enhance public
concern for bay resources. A "Heritage Trail," devel-
oped with technical assistance from with the National
Park Service would promote the cultural, historical,
educational, recreational and environmental opportuni-
ties that surround the bay.

Paradise Reclaimed
The combination of excessive pollutant loads, loss
of fishery habitats and increased demand for bay re-
sources has caused a decline in the overall health of
Sarasota Bay. Yet because many of the bay's problems
are caused by people, the solutions are within the
community's grasp. The restoration strategy for
Sarasota Bay is based on practical, achievable actions
that have been tested locally or under similar conditions
in other locations.
During the technical investigation conducted by the
Sarasota Bay Program from 1989-1993, action was
taken to restore saltwater wetlands around the bay to
provide habitat for juvenile fish. By early 1994, ap-
proximately 75 acres of this vital, intertidal habitat had
been restored, with additional projects awaiting fund-
ing. The Program also began testing the practicality of
using artificial reefs along seawalls to replace habitat
lost during dredge-and-fill activities. Preliminary re-
search shows each reef provides habitat for hundreds of
juvenile fish, while bare seawall control sites have al-
most no resident fish populations.
Other action-oriented projects investigated practical
options for stormwater treatment in urban settings. For
instance, in the Clower Creek basin near Sarasota Square
Mall, Sarasota County's Stormwater Environmental Util-
ity and the Sarasota Bay Program examined and imple-
mented cost-effective strategies for improving stormwater
treatment in an urban setting. Thisproject is used as a
model for pursuing stormwater improvements in other
drainage basins. Additional early action focused on trans-
planting techniques for seagrasses, reducing propeller
scarring of seagrasses, and re-establishing a breeding
colony of scallops in the bay.
Meanwhile, concerted action on wastewater treat-
ment by local governments led to noticeable improve-
ments in the bay. In 1990, both the City of Sarasota and
Manatee County significantly improved wastewater


treatment operations, resulting in a 43- percent reduc-
tion in nitrogen loads to the central bay and a 25-per-
cent reduction in baywide nitrogen loads. These actions
improved water quality in the northern and central parts
of the bay and increased seagrass coverage by 125
acres in the central bay.
After evaluating these actions and through inten-
sive collaboration with the public and government
agencies, the Sarasota Bay Program's advisory com-
mittees developed a slate of options for improving the
bay. Major actions in the plan, in no particular order of
priority, include:
Improving treatment and reclamation of waste-
water to reduce bay pollution and enhance water
supplies. Treatment priorities are located in Sarasota
County. Reclamation opportunities are baywide.
Implementing the strategy would reduce nitrogen loads
to the bay by 16 percent. The most significant water
quality improvements would be expected in the central
bay, Roberts Bay and upper Little Sarasota Bay.
Preventing and treating stormwater pollution to
improve water quality and reduce contaminants in
the bay. Opportunities are baywide, with emphasis on
Manatee County to develop a fee structure to pay for
stormwater treatment systems. Implementing the strat-
egy would reduce nitrogen loads by 7 percent, and
would reduce lead loadings (as a surrogate for other
heavy metals) by almost 28 percent.
Restoring, enhancing and protecting freshwater
and saltwater wetlands to provide habitat, to repair
freshwater flows in streams and to filter pollutants.
Opportunities are baywide. Implementing the strategy
would restore an annual average of 18 acres of saltwa-
ter wetlands and 11 acres of freshwater wetlands.
Restoring and protecting fishery habitats, par-
ticularly for juvenile fish. Opportunities are baywide.
Implementing the strategy would significantly increase
potential fishery productivity.
Improving recreational opportunities in the bay
while protecting natural resources. Opportunities are
baywide. Implementing the strategy would improve
recreational enjoyment of the bay and reduce recre-
ational use impacts on natural resources.
Emphasizing restoration, not solely protection,
in community decisions that affect the bay. Integrat-
ing the bay restoration strategy in community decisions
will be more cost-effective than a piecemeal approach.
The restoration plan for Sarasota Bay recognizes
the reality of economic and political conditions. Fortu-
nately for Sarasota Bay, many of the actions that will
help restore the bay also meet other community priori-
ties. For example, improving wastewater treatment and
reclaiming treated wastewater in northern Sarasota
County will provide an alternative water source for a
community in dire need of additional water supplies.
Where development occurs, clustering will increase
open space and reduce stormwater run-off to protect
the bay. Cluster development also creates a more sus-
tainable community by reducing costs of infrastructure,
enhancing wildlife corridors and encouraging closer
knit neighborhoods.
Implementing the Sarasota Bay restoration plan
will require a long-term commitment by.the commu-
nity. Many actions can be implemented within the first
five years, but others require long- term investments of
money and effort by the community. Even an action as
apparently simple as adopting a local ordinance can
require up to two years to provide sufficient public re-
view.
The process of restoration will require patience.
Other restoration projects in the United States, such as
the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay programs, re-
quired up to 15 years for major improvements to be
apparent in those water bodies.
While a forum of participating government agen-
cies will remain in place to guide implementation of the
plan, sustaining effort and commitment during this
lengthy term will largely fall to the advocacy of con-
cerned citizens. They must remain constant, despite
political change and the potential for public apathy, in
providing constructive input and leadership to pursue
actions outlined in the plan.
Citizens who will take part in this campaign for the
bay's recovery and enhancement are a diverse group.
Members of conservation organizations and civic
groups, representatives of business, industry and com-
merce, educators, anglers, boaters, homeowners and
bird-watchers all have a stake in the bay and can find
a role within the restoration strategy.
Ultimately, the restoration strategy for Sarasota
Bay is only as effective as the community's will to
implement it.






PAGE 16 0 JUNE 9, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
There seems to be lots going on or not going on
-in Bradenton Beach this week. Clem Dryden of Key
West Willy's tells me they're having some problems
getting the new lights to turn on at the roundabout.
They wanna show off that beautiful new Reclinata tree
(cluster palm) in the middle but when they turn on the
light switch nothing happens. Sure hope they don't
have to dig it up to solve the problem.
Meanwhile, Connie and Dave have been drawing
huge crowds at Key West Willy's for two weekends
and they'll be there for one more weekend. As far as
kitchen specials, Dryden says he's serving lots of
Maine lobster and combinations.
Don't forget about the benefit for Tommy Tanner
on Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. outside the Drift-In on
Bridge Street. A $5 ticket includes barbecue chicken
cooked by Mickey Banyas and Kenny Price, mullet
smoked by the Anna Maria Island Privateers, salads
and accompanying fare. The fun includes a cash bar
and live entertainment. Proceeds go toward medical
expenses for Tanner, a long-time resident, former em-
ployee of Bradenton Beach and a Privateer.
Kathy Eubanks of the Bridge Tender Inn tells me
that there are delays on the opening of their new addition.
They hope to open the doors bythe end of the new week.
But Eubanks is excited about a new prospect ex-
pansion. The concession at the Bradenton Beach City
Pier is up for bid and current operator Mickie Mimms
is not renewing her option. Eubanks says they'll know
by ThurSday if they get the bid and if so, they take over
on June 15.




Griff& Catering ChargrildlBurgers and Morl
- QIBREKFAST PECIIIL -
2 EC6S + 2 BiOe ^m
+ 2 Pm fm ,
S+ Gufrr o HMv """
S MON-SAT 8AM-11AM Expires 6/15/94
III IIEII II II I III IIIEIi
7834 Cortez Road West 778-8147

COUPON
EXPIRES w fl I
6/16/94E pLB 'S
Ii 10519 Cortez Road I
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon- 8 PM
* .I
LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET I
/ SECOND I
$.99/ BUFFET $2.99

DINNER PIZZA BUFFET
I $A O/ SECOND .99
F" 9 / BUFFET .
I mmmmmm COUPON mm m mI


Join the

Lunch Bunch

At the Sandarr.;


~" 4 '
A. ^.. I


y res a breezes while dining on
finest of food under the shade of ourfefive
umbrellas. It's the most beautiful time of year
to get together with friends
and family at the Island's ADf
traditional favorite restaurant: -T AR
the Sandbar. Join the lunch '_I_
bunch! (We serve dinner, too.
Entertainment nightly.)
400 Spring Avenue Anna Maria, Florida U 778-0444


The Beach Bistro in Holmes Beach is offering
lighter portions and a lighter fare for summer. And,
having dinner for two? If you're a bonafide Islander
you'll enjoy a bottle of Dunnewood wine, a
chardonnay, merlot or sauvignon blanc on the house.
Yes, free wine for Islanders.
The Toler Brothers & Friends will be at the Anchor
Inn on Friday and Saturday night Dan Toler, aka "Dan-
gerous Dan" for his incredible guitar licks along with
brother Frankie on drums, will be joined by MarkPettey
on keyboard and trumpet, Gregg Voorhees on bass, and
blues vocalist Gwen Fogt of China Moon to produce what
promises to be a hot mix of Southern rock.
At Turtles on Thursday the Alternative band
Knucklehead is playing, and on Friday and Saturday
nights you can catch the Hammerheads.
Ralph of Rotten Ralph's in Anna Maria and the
Hunt Club on Longboat Key says the British-style fish
and chips all-you-can-eat special is on again at both
restaurants Monday through Thursday.
Big Mama and Eddie are entertaining at the Hunt
Club this week for four nights Friday through Mon-
day. Their usual slot is Sunday and Monday.
Ralph also told me that he and his wife Doreen had
a great time at Ato's luau last month. He says he wishes
them well and hopes Edgar and Ato Kelly get through
the bureaucratic difficulties they are encountering.
Ralph mused at the similarities to the Pete Cain/Candy
Cain problems in the past It must be tough going in the
shadows of what was once Fast Eddies.
The Plaza's Executive Chef Kim Strazis-Grant
was interviewed in last month's West Coast Woman.
Strazis-Grant, a graduate of Sarasota High School, has
returned to the area as a culinary success. She was fea-
tured in Florida Trend as the youngest executive chef
(she was 25 at the time) male or female in the
country and she won a coveted Golden Spoon award
from the magazine three years consecutively. The Plaza
on Longboat Key, owned by Marina Jack's Lee



FINE MEXICAN CUISINE
q C Direct From Mexico City
LO 9 Real Taquitos Enchiladas
Fajitas Chimichangas Burritos
STamalas Tortas and More...
3 Always Fresh & Soft Tortillas
Deck Overlooking Bayou
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY 11-9
387-0161 CLOSED SUNDAYS
: ,


Daily Specials:
MON: Goulash, Salad, Roll ....................... $5.25
TUES: Meat Loaf, M. Potato, Gravy, Veg. .....$5.25
WED: Hot Turkey Sandwich, Mashed Potato,
Gravy, Vegetable ............................... $4.95
THUR: Prime Rib, Potato, Veg., Salad, Roll .... $6.95
FRI: Seafood Specials, Potato, Cole Slaw.. $5.75
PLUS many other specials for Breakfast & Lunch.
Our regular menu: Cheese Blintzes, Homemade
V Soup, Pies, and Biscuits.

SIsland Inn

Restaurant
,OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-5031
1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach


ROD4VWEL

"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
Open Daily *
8 am. to Closing
Same Menu and
Prices as Below
Air-Conditioning *"
Restaurant Seating
Full Breakfast *
Lunch & Dinner -
Draft Beer Wine
Car Parking
ALSO
50 Guarded Bike Holders!
Please come by bike *


The Toler Brothers & Friends will play at the An- ,
chor Inn, Friday and Saturday night from 10p.m. to
2 a.m. Both Dan Toler, left and his brother Frankie
perform with the Gregg Allman Band and have
written and performed with Dickey Betts' band Great
Southern.
Sullivan, recently reopened to rave reviews.
Zoomerz has been sold, but I've been told that the
new owners want it quiet for now. We'll be hearing
more about it in the month ahead. The new owner is a
part-time Islander with what sources say is a very suc-
cessful and elegant restaurant in Connecticut. They
report that plans are in the making for an elegant din-
ing upstairs and downstairs and the deck will be casual.
Talk about turning a restaurant upside down sounds
like some major remodeling.
Neal Finnelli, publisher of Taste, The Dining
Guide has premiered a new edition of his tabloid in the
Naples area. Reports are that it is being received well
and getting a great response for advertisers. Finnelli
says they could use another community newspaper like
The Islander Bystander in that area. Are you wannabe
publishers listening?



oe's Eats & Sweet

The Best Homemade-Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays
219 GulfDrive South, Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge


Over-stuffed sandwiches, cold cuts by the
pound, clam bar and fresh salads to order.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 9, 1994 A PAGE 17 EI


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 29, alcohol citation, Pine Avenue beach.
May 30, burglary, 700 block of North Shore
Drive. A person unknown attempted to enter the resi-
dence.
May 31, lost property, 700 block of Jacaranda.
Three Coke clocks were lost or stolen while the com-
plainant was moving.
May 31, larceny to an automobile, 600 block of
North Shore. A person unknown pried open the driver's
side door and removed a CD player.
Bradenton Beach
May 25, burglary to an occupied dwelling, pos-
session of a controlled substance, 100 block of First
Street North. The victim reported he heard the subject
outside yelling and told him to keep quiet. The victim
said the subject then tried to punch him and he told the
subject to leave the property and went back into his
apartment. The subject entered the victim's apartment,
grabbed him by the throat, then left the apartment.
The officer located the subject a block away, took
him to the victim's apartment for identification and
placed him in custody. The officer also found a Valium
on the subject. The subject said the drug belonged to his
mother and he did not have a prescription for it.
May 26, attempted grand theft, 2100 block of
Gulf Drive. The complainant reported that a person
unknown attempted to remove two Jet-skis from a
trailer in the driveway.
May 27, theft, 101 Bridge Street, Vienna Castle.
A witness observed a white male and female leave the
premises with two beer steins and asked the owner if
he sold them to the subjects. The owner said he did not
and he and the witness went to find the subjects. They
located the subjects at the Circle K at 100 Gulf Dr.
buying snacks. The owner confronted the subjects and
asked for the steins while the witness contacted the
police. The subjects denied that the steins were in their
Circle K bag and walked away.
The owner continued to follow the subjects to
Oma's Pizza and observed the male subject remove
some snacks from the Circle K bag and place the bag
on the ground behind a fence. The subjects then entered
the restaurant and the owner located the two steins in
the bag. A police officer arrived, interviewed the sub-
jects and released them.
May 27, warrant, 1300 block of Gulf Drive.
May 27, information/assault, 100 block of Gulf


Drive North. Two complainants reported that a white
male was beating on a white female and pulled her into
a vehicle. The complainants attempted to intervene and
the male subject reached into the vehicle and said he
had a gun and would "blow their heads off." The ve-
hicle traveled north on SR 789 and was not found.
May 29, DWLS, 1400 block of Gulf Drive.
May 30, attempted stolen vehicle, 2502 Gulf Dr.
N., Villa del Sol. A person unknown removed the lock
on the driver's side door but was unable to gain entry.
May 30, attempted stolen vehicle, 2502 Gulf Dr.
N., Villa del Sol. A person unknown removed the lock
on the driver's side door and shattered the steering
column.
May 30, suspicious fire, Cortez Beach.
May 31, grand theft auto, DWLS, resisting arrest
without violence, DUI, fleeing to elude, open container
citation, Gulf Drive at 2600 block. The officer on pa-
trol observed a stolen vehicle south bound on Gulf
Drive and followed in pursuit. The driver, Brent Allen
Smith, 23, of Bradenton, did not stop, accelerated to a
speed of 55 mph in a 35 mph zone, turned east on
Cortez Road and accelerated again, according to the
report.
Smith passed another vehicle in a no-passing zone
on the bridge and continued east at speeds of 55 to 85
mph. Smith lost control of the vehicle at 102nd Street
West and went of the road causing damage to the right
front of the car and popping both right tires off their
rims. Smith and his passenger hit the windshield,
breaking it.
S Smith recovered control of the vehicle and contin-
ued east on Cortez Road at 20 to 25 mph, driving on the
rims. He turned into a motel parking lot in the 8600
block of Cortez Road North. As the parking lot was a
dead end, the vehicle hit a tree and fence. The officer
blocked Smith's exit from the vehicle, and Smith
crawled over the passenger and out the window. He
was placed in custody.
The report noted that Smith was uncooperative,
refused to give all but basic information, refused to take
performance tests and passed out in the back of the
patrol vehicle. A license check revealed that Smith's
license was suspended. At the jail, a nurse used an
ammonia packet to wake Smith, who then became vio-
lent and had to be restrained.
May 31, theft, 2201 Gulf Drive North, Sunset
Beach Motel. A person unknown removed a phone and
made numerous calls.
Holmes Beach
May 27, assist Bradenton Police Department,


6500 block of Gulf Drive. The officer stopped a vehicle
to check the temporary license plate and a check of the
occupants showed that one was a missing juvenile. The
juvenile was released to his mother.
May 27, found property, Marina Drive and 77th
Street. A wallet was found and the owner contacted.
May 27, service, 5600 block of Guava. The of-
ficer assisted with a vehicle lockout.
27, suspicious, Marina Drive and 66th Street The
complainant reported a vehicle with obscenities writ-
ten across the back windshield. The owner said she
would have her son remove the writing.
May 27,500 block of 56th Street. The complain-
ant reported that she hired a subject to do yard work
and paid him $600 in advance. The subject left and did
not return. The complainant also told the officer she
had a recent operation and does not remember things
very well. The officer asked her if he could contact the
Manatee County Council on Aging to assist her and she
agreed.
May 28, loitering and prowling, exposure of
sexual organs, 4307 Gulf Drive, Cayman Cay. The
officer observed the nude subject behind the condo-
minium complex. The subject attempted to flee when
he saw the patrol vehicle but was apprehended and
placed in custody.
May 28, service, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee County
Public Beach. The officer assisted in a vehicle lockout
May 29, petty larceny, 5700 block of Marina
Drive. A person unknown entered the trunk of a vehicle
and removed a purse containing $40 in cash, a driver's
license, identification cards and a checkbook.
May 29, DWLS, 3900 block of East Bay Drive.
May 29, vandalism, 600 block of Key Royale
Drive. A mail box post was broken. A rear view mir-
ror and empty beer bottles were found on the ground.
May 29, service, 700 block of Manatee Avenue.
The complaint reported that a small animal was stuck
in her bathroom wall. The officer could find no open-
ing and called Manatee County Animal Control to re-
spond.
May 29, suspicious, 100 block of 39th Street on
the beach. The lifeguard reported that three juveniles
were throwing objects at sea gulls with a slingshot.
They were gone upon the officer's arrival.
May 29, animal, 400 block of 74th Street. A dog
was found and the veterinarian's office was alerted.
May 29, disturbance, 28th Street on the beach.
The subject and companions were reportedly "moon-
CONTINUEDON NEXT PAGE


Just visiting? Don't forget to sign up for your subscription to The Islander
Bystander before you leave! We're in the Island Shopping Center,
right next to Chez Andre and D.Coy Ducks.


Joflm us for our IVEW V IGCTLY
GOURMET$95 $995
DINNER BUFFET 11 $9
4 pm til' Close FRI-SUN MON-THURS
Gourmet Dinner Buffet Indudes Oysters-on-the-Half-Shell, Oysters Rockefeller, Cams Casino, Zuppa DI Clams,
Huge Anchorage Anti Pasta, Peel-N-Eat Shrimp, Carved Top Round of Beef, Veal Marsala, Veal Sldllano, Roast
Pork, Calamarl, Lobster Fra Diablo, Eggplant Rollltnl, Chicken Marsala, Grouper, Salmon, Lobster Cakes, Pasta.
Fruit and much more ... Desserts tool (Menu Varies Nightly)


SUNDAY BRUNCH Th)
Buffet 10 am-2 pm
Over 30 Breakfast and
.Dinner Items Including:
Eggs Benedict, Waffles.
Baked Egg Dishes RESTAURA]
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$10 Mmosas, Bloody Marys.
St Screwdrivers. Seabreezes
with Sunday Brunch
Happy Hour & Live Entertainment In Our Lounge
FRI & SAT: "Splash"
WED & SUN: Brian Beebe
MON & THURS: Sons of the Beach
101 S. BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA 778-9611 *.. Oyster Bar on Anna Maria


ISLAND)

SEilFOOD)

SP'ECIAI TIES

Fresh Live Maine Lobster & Local Fish Daily

Stop In to See Us for the Freshest Fish Available
Special Prices on Whole Fish
Also Available Smoked Fish on Saturdays go.i


New Summer Hours Tues.-Sat. 10-6
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
S *d- lon our casual outside patio."
P.S. We have the very best sunsets.


Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting)
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulfbegins!


r 778-0475


--






liE PAGE 18 0 JUNE 9, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

I-


CONTINUED FROM PROCEEDING PAGE
ing" people on the beach, were intoxicated and playing
loud music. The officer asked them to leave the area.
May 29, petty larceny of a bicycle, 4000 Gulf Dr.,
Manatee County Public Beach.
May 29, DWLS, 3000 block of Gulf Drive.
May 30, warrant, 3600 block of East Bay Drive.
May 30, burglary, 100 block of 49th street. The
victim reported that a person unknown entered her
house during the three-day weekend and appeared to
have lived there for a few days. Beer cans, whiskey
bottles, paper cups and full ashtrays were found
throughout the house. The beds had been slept in and
there were wet towels in the bathroom.
May 30, DAV, Manatee bridge. The officer re-
sponded to a disabled vehicle on the bridge, got the ve-
hicle started and drove it to the other side of the bridge.
May 30, drunk, 2700 block of Gulf Drive on the
beach. The complainant reported a drunk woman on
the beach. The officer spoke to the woman and noted
that she did not appear to be very intoxicated and spoke
clearly. She agreed to leave the beach.
May 30, DUI, 700 block of Manatee Avenue. The
officer observed Ronald Kaufman, 48, of Bradenton,
driving carelessly on three tires with one flat tire, cross
the center line, drive off the right side of the road and
tailgate another vehicle. He was placed in custody.
May 30, disturbance, 400 block of 63rd Street.
The complainant reported two white juvenile males
fighting in the front yard. They fled in a red pickup
truck.
June 1, petty larceny, 6700 Gulf Drive, Gulf
Place. A person unknown removed two lawn chairs
valued at $75.
June 2, animal, 5800 block of Gulf Drive. A dog
was found by the officer and taken to the Island Ani-
mal Clinic where the owner claimed it.
June 2, 3610 East Bay Dr., storage units. The
complaint found a couch and clothing in a storage unit.
The officer also found shoes, food and cigarette butts
and noted that it appeared that someone had been stay-
ing in the unit. The manager locked the unit.







u"1 1. 1 ..




"The best hamburgers anoa
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." fRisa
Puffg, Pat Geyer, Owner.
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


d..--

Tennis Anyone? Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka
Tennis practice will be offeredfor children and youth who have little or no experience with the game on
Tuesday, beginning June 14, from 10 to 11 a.m., at the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Bring a racket
if you have one. Pictured are Hayzen Dunsworth, 6, who hits the tennis ball back to instructor Roy McChesney
(wearing the turtle hat on his head). McChesney is lookingfor adult or older teens to volunteer to teach the
kids how to hit the ball. And they could use some extra rackets, too. If you would like to help call the Commu-
nity Center at 778-1908


ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
----------T-------------
EVERY MONDAY JAM NIGHT 9PM-1AM
(ALL MUSICIANS WELCOME)
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION EVERY TUESDAY
DISCOUNT DRINKS 10PM-1AM
EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT LADIES NIGHT
FEATURING T.C. & THE ALLSTARS"* 10 PM-2AM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
JUNE 10 & 11 10PM- 2AM
THE TOLER BROS. & SPECIALS GUESTS
INCLUDING: GWEN of CHINA MOON,
MARK PEITY & MORE!
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085

If You've Tried The

QCaM4i .. Q On Sunday:..


TYIER'S .
FYL IR S7Old Fashioned
I and
Waffle Cones
Made on
S._ Location.
f This Area's Only Full
Service Ice Cream Shoppe
Ice Cream Pies & Cakes Soft Serve
Le u ~1I Colombo Yogurt Diabetic
Surfing World Village
11904 Cortez Road W. DaIly Noon to 10 p.m. 794-5333


3B t ?HAPPYHOUR
S--l- ( Mon-Fri 4-7 PM II

795-8083
SUNDAY:
HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY
WITH NASCAR RACES
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION PLUS DART NIGHT
Soft Tip Blind Draw Cricket 7:30 PM Double Pot

KARAOKE
Thursday Nights* 8 to Midnight

GENERATIONS
Fri & Sat.* June 10 & 11 9 pm- 1 am

The Best Burgers and
The Best Phillie Cheese Steaks
in Manatee County
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


I Please Call For Preferred Seating I
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39
.383-2.391






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 9, 1994 I PAGE 19 IM
--


School Daze ... School's out


for the summer


Commendable job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending May 27. First
row, left to right, are Shaunna Rogalski, Jared Lee, Jenna Maroney, Katie Payne and Jordan Bowers. Back
row, left to right, are Justin Weng, Charles Kyle and Mark Stroud.

y Courtney
Joy Courtney


Guard duty over
Anna Maria Elementary Coach Gene Burr, center,
treats his first semester and second semester school
patrol to a subway sandwich party to mark the end of
a safe school year.


Super Stars celebrate
American Association of University Women offers an
elective, advanced "Super Stars" math program to
students in first through fifth grades. Elmo Torres,
parent and coordinator of the "Super Stars" program
at Anna Maria Elementary, in conjunction with the
school's PTO, treated the school's 240 participants to
an ice cream party. Congratulations go to fifth-graders
Lisa Comkowycz and Mike Armstrong, not pictured,
who represented Anna Maria at the Super Star compe-
tition with Comkowycz coming in fourth in the county.
Fv


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU* FULL BAR
CRIBBAGE
TOURNAMENT
EVERY SUNDAY NOON TIL?

BRITISH-STYLE
FISH & CHIPS
ALL YOU $g95
CAN EAT
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY
OPEN 7 DAYS 11AM TO 10PM
901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


THE HUNT CLUB
RESIMRANT
BIG MAMA & EDDIE
SUNDAY & MONDAY
6-10 PM

DUANE DEE
TUESDAY- SATURDAY


BAR LOUNGE MENU
Open 4 pm
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key
383-0543


Simply ... the soul of Europe in the
heart of Longboat Key.






Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor

Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
% An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2065 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


"I have a theory
that lunch
tastes better at
the beach.:





---------- .-- -, ,-I


And we're proving it right here on beautiful
Bradenton Beach. At the Beachhouse. Lunch
and dinner. Nightly entertainment. Volleyball.
Great deck. Great playground. Bring the family.



tac!Houge
great food. great beach.
2o0 Gulf Drive North, Anna Maria Island, 813-779-222


c,#S ICE

Take OuJ wiches
For t ach


-


Freshly Cut &
Made to Order
Deli Sandwiches,
Soup &
Salad Bar


Fresh Bagels Ice Cream Cakes
EVERYTHING HOMEMADE!
Mon-Sat 10 AM 9 PM Sunday 12 9 PM
Eat-In or Take-Out
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
(813) 778-7386


'A little treasure of a restaurant ... Inven-
tive, fresh, well executed."
SFat Benson Bradenton Herald
IThis week...




qhfe YMutiny Inn


'We 'Clbe offering...
MAINE LOBSTER TAILS, VEAL CHAUSSER,
BEEF WELLINGTON
ALLIGATOR SCAMPI ON ANGEL HAIR PASTA,
KEY WEST JUMBO SHRIMP
... in addition to our Creative Menu already
featuring the area's finest Angus Steaks, the
widest selection of pastas, and the most
imaginative Fresh Catch Preparations.
For a unique and memorable dining experience
chart your course for the
"Little Treasure' at The Mutiny Innl
Serving Dinner 5:00 10:00 Tuesday thru Saturday
EarlCyDinner 5-6 p.m. nighltly
Sunday Champagne Brunch 10-2
lspjvations Suggestet -Avai6fforPrivate Parties
605 Manatee1venue at East Bay Dr.
Hol'mes Beach
(813) 778-5440
~~.


Bridge Tender Inn
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bay Inn
Come and Enjoy our
LUNCHEON SPECIALS
SERVED 11:30 to 4:30
Dinner
Served
5p.m. o *f
Till?










J unc*. it
Deckside



Open 7 Days Call for Reservations
778-4849
Convenient Docking come by land or by sea (Marker 49)
Bridge Street Bradenton







iEJ PAGE 20 E JUNE 9, 1994 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Mote slammed by eco-regulators; happy safe boating week


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
It's hard to know whether to laugh or cry. Sarasota's
venerable Mote Marine Laboratory finds itself awaiting
action by the Florida Department of Environmental Pro-
tection for trimming mangroves without a permit.
No, this isn't a dark-of-night bulldozer job by some
high-buck developer or herbicidal slaughter by ignorant
and selfish ground-floor condo-dwellers too cheap to ac-
tually pay for the view they want. I feel like this was "us."
Apparently somebody reported Mote to the DEP
last month for trimming the lower branches of man-
groves on their property so employees and visitors
could get a better view of Sarasota Bay. To his credit,
Mote Executive Director Dr. Kumar Mahadevan
frankly admits the trimming somehow took place, and
is perfectly willing to make amends.
"We made a mistake," Mahadevan said. "We will
be meeting with the DEP to see what they want us to
do. We will do what they say, and we will do more."
DEP investigator Ted Murray says only that he'll
be meeting with Mote officials, and won't speculate on
what the settlement might be.
It's Safe Boating Week (June 5-12), and you
should know that boating accidents claimed 63 lives
in Florida last year. My good friend Earl was one of
the unfortunate statistics.
Earl was an outgoing, smiling man in his 50s, eas-
ily one of the most popular guys I was working with at
the time. Then one day he fell out of his boat while fish-
ing alone in New Pass and, you guessed it, the boat
circled around and hit him.
My old friend suffered brain damage severe
enough to ruin his life and make most of those around
him miserable.
When Earl finally died last year the accident
happened seven or eight years ago I'm sure a lot of
people were relieved. His saintly widow for one,
though she'd never admit it.
But the truth is that accident didn't need to happen.
You can fish alone and not have your own boat run
over you if you tumble out. There are ways to prevent
that, if you know how.
Sixty-three people died in Florida boating accidents


last year, but I wonder how many Earls there were. Ac-
cording to the statistics, 73 percent of the people involved
in the 1,017 reported Florida boating
accidents last year had no formal boat- On June 11-L
ing education. freshwaterfisi
Think of the innocents your without a licet
family, my family and all the inno- doesn't mean,
cents. with one, but i
Take a safe-boating course.
They're offered constantly by the
Power Squadron, the Coast Guard Auxiliary and oth-
ers. No matter how experienced you may be, I guaran-
tee you'll learn something new.
I don't know if they planned it this way or not,
but June 5-12 is also National Fishing Week. And in
Florida, at least, that gets you a little treat.
On June 11-12, anyone can go freshwater fishing
in Florida without a license. I know, this doesn't mean
much to folks who've never bought one in the first
place, and I guess it doesn't mean much to those of us
with a license, but it's still a cute gimmick.
So anyone, even non-resident, can fish in any pub-
lic freshwater lake or river in Florida without a license
those two days. And, yes, the usual laws on fish sizes
and limits still apply.
For all you gearhead scuba divers out there, (I
used to be one, too), here's the very latest piece to carry
when you next do the backward roll off the side of
some diveboat somewhere.
It's a dive watch you can later connect to your per-
sonal computer for dive analysis and print out.
Called the Promaster Hyper Aqualand (don't you
just love the macho names they give this stuff?), and
made by Citizen Watch Company, this device mea-
sures and records all sorts of data. That data includes
the dive date, starting time, ending time, number of
dives, maximum depth reached, average depth and
lowest water temperature.
The watch also automatically measures the dive pro-
file data (depth every five seconds and water temperature
every five minutes). In surface mode, it counts the elapsed
time spent at the surface after finishing a dive.
When dives are completed, (it can log up to 30 of
them), the watch is placed into a Communication Inter-


2,
hin
nse
mu
it's


face Unit and transfers the data into any IBM-compat-
ible personal computer.
The cost? It's $495 retail.
anyone can go I think I'll just start saving my
ig in Florida money for that new snorkel I've
?. I guess it been wanting.
ich to those of us Cuba, here we come. At ex-
a cute gimmick. actly 2 p.m. Friday, Paul Collins
and I plan to bring the bow of his
32-foot Erikson across the starting
line off Lido Beach and head south to the "Queen of the
Caribbean."
An Anna Maria Realtor, Paul acquired "Akela" just
a few weeks ago and decided the Sarasota Sailing
Squadron's race to Marina Hemingway would be a
darn good sea trial for the boat. We'll probably find a
little bit of most every kind of weather and sea condi-
tions somewhere in the roughly 500-mile round-trip.
But what we're mostly going to need is air wind
to a non-sailor. Summer weather has struck, and there
just isn't much air moving around on the water most of
the time. Of course, there're always squalls, but in
squalls there's usually too much wind.
Most of the boats taking part in the regatta are plan-
ning on about a 50-hour run each way, with the course
taking us down to Rebecca Shoal and then a slight jog
west as we across the 90-miles-or-so of the Gulfstream
to Cuba. The jog is to allow for the push of the Steam.
To me at least, the trick looks to be making landfall
in Cuba during daylight hours. It won't be much fun look-
ing for that sea buoy out there in the dark with a four-knot
current trying to take us to Miami or Norway.
But the fact of the matter is that with about 100
other boats looking for the same sea buoy, we shouldn't
have much trouble finding it.
Our schedule only calls for us spending a couple of
days in Cuba, as we all have jobs and such. But I'm
interested in seeing how bad things have gotten down
there, and Paul has never been there, so it will be time
well spent.
You can be sure there will be plenty of sea stories
when we return, and like it or not, you'll be seeing
some of them here in The Islander Bystander.
See you in two weeks.


c -n
GALATI
YACHT BASIN

kkl-


SUN GLASSES


OPEN AND COVERED BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE!
... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN DAYSAWEEK-8TO5 *


Just visiting our Island paradise? Don't forget a subscription to the "best news on Anna
Maria Island," The Islander Bystander. A subscription form appears on page 7, this issue.


$5 000.00

' CASH


; oCOn, rss I an- .'t ain







Proceeds Fishin te Entry
to benefit IS LA DS Forms
the TOURNAMENT are
ANNA Available
MARIA in
ISLAND I June Edition of L R
COMMUNITY "FISHING TR
CENTER THE ISLANDS"


SATURDAY, JUNE 18


INFORMATION: 778-7688 I

WEPUTTHE TOo
MORE CASH &
EVERYONE MERCHANDISE FUN

IS INVITED PRIZES BACK IN
than we can FISHING
TO FISH! list here! TOURNAMENTS!


0 -=11







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 9, 1994 M PAGE 21 1E


Reds coming on strong; permit frenzy offshore


By Paul Roat
Redfish season has begun, and early indications
point to this being a banner year to catch the big fish.
Reds, also called red drum and channel bass, are usu-
ally found in the under-10-pound weight class, although
some have been reported tipping the scales at 60 pounds.
The fish is distinguished with a black spot at the upper
base of the tail. They are bronze-red in color.
Redfish spend the first three years of life in canals
and mangroves in bays and creeks, growing up to about
24 inches in length. As they get bigger, they move to
more open bay waters, schooling on grass flats, along
bars and around the passes until they reach about 34
inches in length.
Big reds, three-feet long or more, are open Gulf
fish, where they roam in large schools.
Redfish are a regulated fish. It's illegal to take fish
under 18-inches in length, or more than 27-inches long.
You can only take one redfish per day per fisherman, and
no reds may be taken during March, April and May.
By the way, redfish can live to be more than 30
years old.
Reds will hit on about anything, with shrimp and
crabs being popular bait.
Don't forget the Fishing the Islands tournament

Capt. Mike Heistand is on special assignment. His
fishing column will return soon.

SSnook Trout Redfish Flounder *

0 _LIGHT TACKLE
|a SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
1 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
S Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308 .
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia *


FLORIDA
SAITWATERI
FISHING
LAWS:
AMBERJACK: 28-inch min. fork
length; 3 fish daily possession limit.
BLACK DRUM: 14- to 24- inch
slot limit; 5 fish daily possession limit;
cannot possess more than one of more
than 24 inches.
B BLACK MULLET: no minimum
length; 50 fish limit.
BLUEFISH: 10-inch min. fork.
COBIA: 33-inch min. fork
length; 2 fish limit.
DOLPHIN: 10 fish daily limit
FLOUNDER; 11-inch min. length.
GROUPER: (black, gag, red, yel-
lowfin, yellowmouth, scamp): 20-inch
minimum length; 5 fish limit; no har-
vest of Nassau grouper allowed.
JEWFISH: illegal to possess.
KINGFISH: 12-inchminimum fork
length in state waters; 20-inch mini-
mum federal waters: 2 fish limit in
state and federal waters.
MANGROVE SNAPPER: 10-inch
minimum; 5 fish limit.
PERMIT:Nobaglimitfishflessthan
20inches;2fishbag andpossessionlimit
for fish more than 20in.
POMPANO: 10-inch min. length.
REDFISH: 18- to 27 inch slot;
closed in Mar, Ap, May. 1 fish limit
SEABASS: 8-in. min; no bag limit
SHARK: daily bag limit-one; max.
possession; two. Harvest of sawsharks,
sawfish, basking sharks, whale sharks,
spotted eagle rays: prohibited.
SNAPPER: 20-inch min. on red
snapper, 12-inch min. on cubera, dog,
silk, queen, mahogany, blackfin and
yellowtail; 10-inch min. on gray or
mangrove snapper, 8-inch min. on ver-
milion and lane. Bag limit 10 daily (no
limit on lane or vermilion). Limit may
not include more than 5 mangrove or
2 red snapper daily.
SNOOK: 24-inch minimum length;
closed Jan., Feb., June, July, Aug.; 2
fish limit; cannot possess more than
one fish or more than 34 inches.
SPANISH MACKEREL: 12-inch
minimum length; 10 fish limit
* SPECKLED TROUT: 14-to 24-in.
min. length; 10fish limit; cannot pos-
sess more than oneof more than 24in.
* TARPON: 2 fish limit; requires $50
tarpon tag to possess or kill.
For questions on rules in state wa-
ter, call the Florida Marine Fisheries
commission at (904) 487-0554 or
call Florida Marine Patrol informa-
tion line (813) 893-2221 for current
regulations.


June 18. Registration deadline will be at the mandatory
captains meeting June 17 at Shells Restaurant in
Holmes Beach starting at 6:30 p.m.
Entry fee is $150 per boat, with a maximum of five
people on each vessel. First prize is $5,000, with prof-
its benefiting the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter. Information, call Island Discount Tackle at 778-
7688.
Rick at Island Discount Tackle said a little of
everything is being caught right now. Offshore, there
are some good reports of 100-pound tarpon being
caught, as well as grouper, snapper, amberjack and
cobia. Permit are still near the three-mile reef, with
anglers going crazy over them: Saturday saw more than
30 boats in the area. Backwater fishermen are catching
reds, trout and catch-and-release snook.
Bill at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishing is great.
Fishers are bringing into the pier some good-sized
mackerel, plenty of redfish, drum, pompano and even
some sheepshead. Bill said there are plenty of white
bait around to attract bigger fish. He said there have
even been a few tarpon around the pier he counted
six one morning but they just seem to be teasing the
pier anglers and aren't taking any bait.
Ken at the Anna Maria City Pier said Sunday
Sanders had a terrific day last week, catching and re-
leasing a 60-pound tarpon from the pier. Fishers are
catching mackerel, some redfish that were too big to



L ec te f P-

OFFSHORE FISHING
ALL BAIT, TACKLE & EQUIPMENT INCLUDED
NO LICENSE REQUIRED
Fishing Diving Island Excursions

Anna Maria Island io1 77-54


SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.

T778-2761
6 Sightseeing

.& 4P Water Taxi


CRUISE SPECIAL!
On our Covered 28 ft. Pontoon Boat
(with bathroom)
1 1/2 Hours $10 perper person




Problem with


Insurance?


Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center .*
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 .


Fish Tales
Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear your
fish stories, and
pictures are welcome
Just give us a call at
778-7978 or stop by
our office in
the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


keep, and even a three-foot shark one evening.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said wade
fishermen are having the time of their lives right now
with those big keeper reds on the flats as well as some
nice-sized trout. Offshore, permit are still to be caught
in deeper water, say 30 feet or so. Live shrimp seem to
be the preferred bait.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said he's able to get his cus-
tomers onto tarpon near the beach, and permit on the
reefs offshore. He's also been hooking some nice co-
bia, grouper and barracuda.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II is putting his char-
ters onto limit catches of redfish on almost every trip,
with the big reds coming in at the 25- to 33-inch range.
He's also been able to get some nice trout, Spanish
mackerel, cobia near-shore, and catch-and-release
snook. Capt. Zack said he's been having good luck
with tarpon, too, mostly early in the morning near the
beaches.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip is averaging 115-head of Key West
grunts 10-15 miles from shore. The six-hour trip is
averaging 110-head of mangrove snapper, vermillion
and lane snapper, Key West grunts, porgies and grou-
per about 15-20 miles out. The nine-hour trip is aver-
aging 20-head of mangrove snapper, red grouper and
vermillion snapper'about 20-35 miles from shore.
Good luck and good fishing.

WE'RE OVER 800!
Join the throngs and subscribe to
The Islander Bystander today!
Call 778-7978 for details.

Family Owned and Millwork &
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size





Open
Mon' r AND
7:30 to5
SSat 8to 12 HARDWARE
We specialize in custom cabinet making *
Sformica tops entertainment centers
Svanities kitchens
213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center


SALES & SERVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


Five O'Clock Marine
:"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave '
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu 6/9 2:20 1.4ft 4:38 1.3ft 11:58' 2.6ft 7:27 -0.1ft
Frl6/10 2:51 1.4ft 5:13 1.3ft 12:34 2.7ft 8:03 -0.1ft
Sat6/11 3:29 1.4ft 5:52 1.3ft 1:12 2.7ft 8:38 -0.1ft
Sun 6/12 4:05 1.4ft 6:44 1.3ft 1:54 2.6ft 9:17 0.0ft
Mon6/13 4:40 1.5ft 7:48 1.3ft 2:40 2.5ft 9:56 0.1ft
Tue 6/14 5:22 1.6ft 9:05 1.3ft 3:35 2.2ft 10:36 0.2ft
Wed 6/15 6:01 1.8ft 10:36 1.2ft 4:42 2.0ft 11:18 0.4ft
North end tides Cortez high tides 7 minutes later-- low tides 1.06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL






IBM PAGE 22 M JUNE 9, 1994 T THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Frederick L. Barth
Frederick L. Barth, 82, of Bradenton Beach died
May 30, in Bay Pines Hospital.
Born in Newark, N.J., on Dec. 21,1911, Mr. Barth
moved to Bradenton Beach from New Jersey. He was
a member of Harvey Memorial Church in Bradenton
Beach. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars in Holmes Beach and the American Legion. He
was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II.
He is survived by two nephews, Charles Gilbert of
Lenexas, Kan., and Tom Gilbert of Willow Grove, Pa.

Kent G. Chetlain Sr.
Kent G. Chetlain Sr., 97, of Rancho Palos Verdes,
Calif., and a winter resident of Holmes Beach died May
30 at home. He was the father of County Commissioner
Kent Chetlain Jr.
Born in Chicago on Feb. 13, 1897, Mr. Chetlain
practiced law in Chicago for 59 years. He was a naval
aviator in World War I. He was a graduate of North-


The Island Poet
Mom, the kids will soon be out of school but
don't let them drive you out of your mind,
For you will have to change your life around,
and leave peace and quiet behind.
All year long the teachers have been right there
to guide your child,
And now it's up to you, to be a pal and see she
doesn't go wild.
I know it won't be easy, for there are no books
to tell you what to do.
Just show her how much you love her, and
somehow you'll muddle through.
I know at times it will be so difficult, for kids
have a mind of their own.
But I bet she will love you for it when she is
fully grown.
Bud Atteridge





FUNERAL HOMES
KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager
BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459


STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


Gy Yatros, D.M.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY

Now Accepting
New Patients

3909 East
Bay Drive
Suite 205 "
Holmes Beach
778-2204
MONDAY thru THURSDAY 8:30 to 5:30
FRIDAYS by APPOINTMENT


western University, Evanston, Ill., and the Northwest-
ern University Law School.
Other survivors are a daughter, Mae Landauer of
Rolling Hills Estates, Calif., nine grandchildren; and
four great grandchildren.

Mae T. Hribick
Mae T. Hribick, 95, of Bradenton died June 2 at
home.
Born in Jersey City, N.J., Mrs. Hribick came to
Bradenton from Clifton, N.J., in 1971. She was a home-
maker. She was a member of St. Bernard Catholic
Church, Holmes Beach.
Brown and Sons Funeral Home is in charge of ar-
rangements. Burial was in Palmetto.


Harry Edgar 'Pop'
Huffine
Harry Edgar 'Pop' Huffine, 83, of Holmes Beach
died June 1, in Freedom Care Pavilion.
Born in Van Wert, Ohio, Mr. Huffine came to
Holmes Beach in 1951.
He founded Huffine's
Auto Service in 1959 in
Holmes Beach. He was a'
breeder of walking horses in
Van Wert. He was a carpen-
ter and a member of the Al-
lied Gasoline Retailers As-
sociation.
He is survived by his
three sons, Terry, Tom and Huffi
Rex, all of Holmes Beach; a
sister, Fern O'Dell of Van Wert; a brother, Russell of
Charlotte, N.C.; eight grandchildren, Renee, Kerri,
Kelli, Christopher, Joshua, Sarah, Lindsay and Adam,
all of Holmes Beach; and three great-grandchildren.
Memorial services were held at Island Baptist
Church with Rev. Jim Killoran officiating. Universal
Cremation Society, Bradenton chapter, is in charge of
arrangements. Memorials may be made to Anna Maria
Island Community Center, P.O. Box 253, Anna Maria,
FL 34216.

Christian Science-Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS


READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.



Your Local Agent
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Progressive offers, preferred
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"Your One Stop Insurance Agent"
5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL.


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PODIATRIC MEDICINE
and
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Ed


A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment

in~fLrMrR.


Island grandparents double
proud
Anna Maria City residents Ed and Lee Callen
recently earned double bragging rights when
their son Jim and wife Cathy became theproud
parents of twin boys. Appearing a little unhappy
about all the hoopla are Daniel Patrick and
Matthew Lee Callen, pictured recently on the day
of their christening.

Carl Hufnus
Carl Hufnus, 88, of Holmes Beach died June 3 in
Arcadia.
Born in Chicago, Mr. Hufnus came to Holmes
Beach from Fox Lake, Ill., in 1959. He was retired
owner of Island Bakery in Holmes Beach. He was a
member of St. Bernard Catholic Church. He was a
former member of the Moose Lodge in Bradenton
-Beach and former vice president of the shuffleboard
club and master of ceremonies of the breakfast club at
Sandpiper Mobile Home Resort.
He is survived by two daughters, Cookie Perkins of
Arcadia and Susan Ray of Bradenton; a son, Carl Jr. of
North Dakota; a sister, Betty Josephson of Chicago; a
brother, Mike Sr. of Bradenton; 19 grandchildren; and 20
great-grandchildren.
Mansion Memorial Funeral Home is in charge of
arrangements. Burial will be in Mansion Memorial
Park, Ellenton.


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778-2206








R A A ETE AL


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 9, 1994 A PAGE 23 l[]



1Elil M


What used to be called the "mosquito pond" at 715
North Shore Dr. is now a Gulffront cottage with its
own lake. It was marketed by Michael Saunders and
sold by Fenton Realty. The $850,000 price tag was
the most ever paid for a single family residence on
Anna Maria Island

Percifield wins county
business award
Loma Dee Percifield, owner of Cafe on the Beach and
The Beach Shop at Manatee County Beach, Holmes
Beach, and the Coquina Beach Cafe at Coquina Beach in
Bradenton Beach was honored as Small Business Person
of the Year in the category "running a business for three
years or less, but is already successful." The Manatee
County Chamber of Commerce announced the award last
week at a special luncheon at the Manatee Civic Center
catered by the Beach Bistro of Holmes Beach.





Weekl Monhly Yealy Dwd, roke

F 778-101


The Anna Maria Motel at 806-12 N. Bay Blvd sold
recently for $525,000. Arie and Kathleen Colon are the
new owners of the 8-unit Gulf side motel built originally
in the 1940s. The motel was marketed and sold by Dolly
Young of Prudential Florida Realty. It was previously
reported sold in the May 12 issue with an incorrect
photograph that of a cottage on Marco Island

Prudential's tops
The Prudential Florida Realty has announced the
company's top listers and sellers for the month of May.
Among top listers is Carol Heinze, Anna Maria Island
office. Karin Stephan, Anna Maria Island office, is a
top seller for May.

I STEAL A DEAL!


Lynches Landing wins LBK
small business award
Ethna and Christine Lynch, owners of Lynches
Landing Bar & Grille, were chosen as the Longboat
Key Chamber of Commerce's Small Business Person
of the Year. The award ceremony was held at Cedar's
Cafe, May 4, during National Small Business Week.
The Lynch sisters, who began their Longboat Key
restaurant in 1986, came to the United States from
County Cork, Ireland, in 1972. The Lynches take an
active interest in older people, providing meals and
company. Other civic activities include Project Chil-
dren, All Faith's Food Bank, Pelican Man's Bird Sanc-
tuary, Asolo Angels, American Cancer Society and the
Muscular Dystrophy Association.
Other nominees for the award were Joyce Fuller
Brown, PaperChase Office Supply; Debbie Crowe,
Seafood Shack Showboat; Edith Barr Dunn, Shenkel's
restaurant; Kim Durocher, Isabelle's Southern Eatery;
John Gordon, Holiday Inn; Ralph and Clair Hunter,
The Longboat Observer; Titus Letschert, Cafe
L'Europe; Susan Vaught, Doreen and Ralph Russell,
Hunt Club restaurant; and Eilene Wozniak, Eilene and
Gene's Ceramic Island.


ANNUAL RENTAL
GULF FRONT CONDOS Efficiencies
1BR, 1BA and 2BR, 1 BA from $525 to
$700 mo. plus utilities.
EFFICIENCY APT. $425 plus electric.
SUN PLAZA WEST 2BR, 2BA, furn.
$1000 plus utilities.
BRADENTON BEACH DUPLEX 2BR,
1.5BA with Bay view. $595 plus utilities.


J BYAND,.ESFIAFI


Charming Key West Home 3BR/2BA,
vaulted greatroom open deck w/jacuzzi.
Ground level garage, storage & room. Walk to
beach. Priced to sell at $132,500. Sandy
Sutton, eves. 751-9923.
Sutton Group Properties 753-7751


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


--I I ~U


! 7R






JUNE 9, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ISLAND VILLAGE CONDO with peek at the Bay.
Two bedroom, two bath end unit tastefully deco-
rated with ceramic tile, Berber carpet and wallpaper.
Open floor plan. Close to beach, 2 pools, tennis
courts and covered parking. Shows like a model.
$109,500. Call Frank Migliore, 778-2662 eves.


HOLMES BEACH-WATERFRONT: Carefully
kept top-notch 3BR/2BA home with expansive
water view. Amenities include boat dock with
water and electric, vaulted ceilings, 3 walk in clos-
ets, 7 ceiling fans, Jacuzzi, 15 x 16 workshop, 3
car carport and many other extras. Prices at
$214,900. Call Carol R. Williams, 778-0777 or
778-1718 after hours.


WATERFRONT ZONED ROR: Tastefully deco-
rated two bedroom, two bath home on wide open
Lake LaVista. Greatroom, kitchen with custom
made cabinets, cathedral ceilings, open porch
that overlooks the water. Lower level paneled &
carpeted can be office/retail for resident/owner. 2
car garage. Owner anxious reduced to $259,000.
Call Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.
REDUCED: Bridgeport Condo. Two bedroom,
two bath, bright end unit with a great view of the
Bay and Gulf. Steps to beach, restaurants and
shopping. Now $89,900. call Zee Catanese,
794-8991 eves.


J REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MAIS i


IISLANDER


,iBYSTANER


See news happen?... call 778-7978.
We want to know!


~~en n


SUN CAY MOTEL ... charming, landscaped,
w/pool & only 1/2 block from beach! 6 units:
(3) 2 bedroom & (3) 1 bedroom. Excellent
rental history. $535,000. Earn approximately
10% ROI! Karin Stephan, 388-1267.
THE CROSSING ... Superb condition, great
landscaping. Fireplace in family room. 3 bed-
room, 2 bath, quality-built features in this
Gertz home. Large master suite. $142,900!
#57635. Call Sally Schrader, 792-3176.
MARTINIQUE SOUTH ... Bright & cheerful
with southern Gulf views! 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
turnkey furnished. Secured lobby, swimming
pool, tennis. $164,900. #55723. Call Carol
Heinze, 792-5721.
IMPERIAL HOUSE condos!
Wonderful location.
Priced from $75,500
(1BR/1BA) to $89,900
(2BR/1BA). Must be
seen! Pool, private
fishing dock on bay.
Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTORF
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


CL

.

0
CL





0

S








CD
.(D



"n


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


Karin Stephan
REALTOR"
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844


NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION
North end of Anna Maria Island, 1,560 sq. ft.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. $172,000.
S* OTHER HOMESITES
AVAILABLE
QU A L ITY 778-7127
BUILDERS Fax 779-2602
#CRC047915

TISLANDERiMMf J6 A;
It's the best news on
Anna Maria Island and it's FREE.


ovNERS



S'1 you have property to lease, now:
0 the time to contact the professional
Sprop-rtv management team at Micha
A Saunders & Company. Learn how yo
can earn the highest possible income
Son ,our property, in addition to extei
0 sive services provided to meet the re-
on quests of our sophisticated owners an
IL guests.
SContact Debbie Dial at our Anna
Maria Island office for personal
OV attention to your special residence.
A Michael Saunders
& Company
LUcemed Rel Etat Broker
3222 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
(813) 778-2275 or 800-881-2276


is

iel
u

n-
i-
d


Exclusive
Waterfront
Estates
Video Collection


S 419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
REALTOR (813) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
MLS EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813)778-2294 u=.-..--n ,


Congratulations!

To Betsy Hills
'Real Estate's
Little League
Baseball
Team


1 Again
For
1994


AFFORDABLE ISLAND
This charming 2 bedroom, 2 bath hc
in an attractive Holmes Beach r
within walking distance of a grea
Offers tiled floors in kitchen and
lovely oak kitchen cabinets, pretty p
done in a distinctive pattern, plus r
heater and driveway. Attractive la
cludes a wonderful Royal Poinciar
bloom Only $117,500! Don't miss


Associates After Hours Barbara A. Sat77 ChristionaT. Shaw...78-2847 Marcella Corne...778-591 Nancy Gulfif..778-2
AssociateS After Hours: Barbaa A. Sato...77B-3509 Christine T. Shaw...77B-2B47 MarcellaComet...778-5919 Nancy Gulflord...77B-;


Watch for our
listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.








) HOME
ome is located
neighborhood
t Gulf beach!
dining area,
laster ceilings
new hot water
ndscaping in-
nna tree is full
it!

WARRANTY


I /


-- C~C---;L;




2708 Ave. C., Holmes Beach 3BR/2BA apart-
ment upstairs. Turnkey furnished, workshop, stor-,
age room & carport. Close to beach & restau-
rants. $116,900. Call Harold Small 778-2261.
Harold Small *
Realtor@ Associate
Million Dollar Club Member
Ofc. 778-2261 Evenings 792-8628
r mrS C Toll Free
MS 1-800-422-6325


ISLANDER i Y A INB*
The Islander Bystander mails over 800
PAID subscriptions! Get yours on page 7.


-1


I


The Prudentia
Flr daRelt


[a PAGE 24 a

















Looking for a property management
company to rent your house, condo or
apartment? The Coconuts
Management Company is
accepting new rentals.
1-800-331-2508
100 73rd Street Holmes Beach, FL 34217


I


JUST CALL ... 778-7978 for free.home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria Island. You don't want to miss the BEST news
on the Island. You may also call to stop home delivery if necessary. Mail subscriptions are also available (form on page 7.)
SSony, Individual unit delivery Is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.



ne;L &nf*qL EALORS


PERICO BAY CLUB CLOSE TO BEACH. From
$80's. 2Bed/2Bath, carports or garages. Gorgeous
setting. "0" maintenance. 24 Hr. security. Call Rose
Schnoerr, 778-2261 or 778-7780 eves.
ISLAND 6-PLEX Great location, close to beach.
2/2 each unit. Pool & laundry on site. Plenty of park-
ing. 5 units annual, 1 seasonal rental. $450,000.
MLS#98607. Call Mary Ann Schmidt, 778-2261 or
778-4931 eves.
WATCH SAILBOATS GO BYI Lanai overlooking
intra-coastal. An upstairs and downstairs unit. Ten-
nis, pool, great sunrises! $125,000 $130,000.
MLS#54983, 56000. Call Bobye Chasey, 778-2261
or 778-1532 eves.
OUTSTANDING KEY ROYALE HOME. 3Bed/
2Bath waterfront home, split design, auto. Sprinkler
on private well, boat dock w/water & power. Addi-
tional boat slip available. $249,900. MLS#53863.
Call Dick Maher, 778-2261 or 778-6791 eves.


I 1I
JUST REDUCEDI $125,000. Downstairs corner
unit, 2Bed/2Bath, bright and cheery. South side of
building. Lanai overlooks pool & Intra-Coastal. Great
Sunrises moon too! MLS#56000. Call Bobye
Chasey, 778-2261 or 778-1532 eves.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS 2Bed/2Bath
downstairs unit overlooking canal & docks. Includes
30' boat dock. Tennis, pools & Jacuzzi. $134,500.
#57538. Call Dick Maher, 778-2261 or 778-6791.
PRESTIGIOUS KEY ROYALE WATERFRONT
HOME. Enjoy easy, Florida living in this beautifully
maintained 3Bed/2Bath home located on a canal &
across from golf course. $289,000. MLS#56764. Call
Hal Gillihan, 778-2261 or 778-2194.
GORGEOUS TOWNHOUSE Elevated 3Bed/
3Bath, w/pool, 2 blocks from beach. 3 sun decks, 2
car garage, lots of storage, Brinks Security System,
central vac., amenities galore. Call Dick Maher, 778-
2261 or 778-1382 eves.


.605 -M"an e Av e s H -eac -0i ne-A n An

CALLTOL RE:6180322625 S
Sevn naMraSne13 AL 83 7-26FX7847
2217GulfDriv ASOCIAES ATER OUR
D I C KBra ento Be ch D ve oyni an .............. 778 797




WAGNER


GULF VIEW TOWNHOUSE Spacious Gulf view
townhouse with 3BR 3BA, private 2 car garage.
Over 3,100 sq. ft. under roof. Complex offers two
pools, tennis, and short walk to prime beach. Of-
fered at $139,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
Of


I, == .. . ... I | I.|.-

RUNAWAY BAY 2BR 2BA fully furnished, sec-
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club-
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded
beach access and excellent rental program.
Priced at $94,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


SPACIOUS 3BR 2BA canalfront home in Key DIRECT GULFFRONT Fully fumished 2BR -1 BA
Royale with a peek of the Key Royale Bayou. apartment on wide, sandy walking beach. Perfect
Structurally sound, but in need of modernization investment property or second home. Offered at
to bring it to the peak of perfection. Priced at $99,900. Call Dave Moynihan.
$179,900 to allow you to update in your own style
and taste. Call Pat Thompson for details. Eves at STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
778-6439 AND CALENDAR


MAGNIFICENT BAYFRONT HOME Enjoy the sparkling water
views from this fantastic elevated 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath house
on the northern end of Anna Maria. This Bayfront is of excep-
tional quality with a panoramic view from nearly every window.
Many extras including a jacuzzi, dumb waiter, 2 car garage, etc.
One of the best built energy efficient homes on the Island. En-
joy fishing, boating, swimming on our beautiful Anna Maria Is-
land. Won't last Call today. Eves. Agnes Tooker, 778-5287 or
Kathy Granstad, 778-4136. $434,900.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JUNE 9, 1994 U PAGE 25 i 3


Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner
Links
Buyers and Sellers
Together and Provides
Personal Caring Attention
Professional Knowledge
Exceptional Service
Serving Manatee County & The Beaches
FREE Market Analysis No Obligation

SUNBOW BAY CONDOMINIUM
3805 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Furnished unit
This convenientlv located complex is within walking






EI PAGE 26 I JUNE 9, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


SCommercial Residential Free Estimates
SandyaS Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
77f8.345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
SAND SATISFACTION








Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630 No. 4467


' Cavanagh Marine SRepair
MOBILE ENGINE REPAIRS DOCKSIDE
COMPLETE MARINE REPAIR
Cortez Rd. & 124th St. 727-7905

Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
p LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


KIMBAIL
HOME REPAIR CO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair* Interior & Exterior
Handicap Conversions Rails, Ramps, etc.
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident Local References
778-5354


Don't

forget!
We mail over 800
out of town subscrip-
tions every week.
If you want to keep
in touch with what's
happening on Anna
Maria Island, just fill
out the form on
page 7 in this issue
and send us a check.
Ik ANDEn.R l D]EB
5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 34217
(813) 778-7978


JS ANDER C ASSFtDS
I9TESFO ALEI EP ANE


WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A
relentless rush For skating information and sales
call 778-3880.
CAR CLEAN SPECIAL Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. We
come to you with fully mobile service. Call mobile
phone # 356-4649.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.
ATTENTION KIDS! Video games Nintendo with 8
games, gun, powerpad $105; Super Nintendo with
4 games, 2 controllers $135; Genesis with 17
games, 2 controllers $265. Great Deal! Great
Games! 778-3171.
GRAB BAG! Small upright freezer $50, telescope
$75, Basketball backboard (graphite)/pole $80.778-
3171.
5 PIECE WICKER SET w/cushions, 2 chairs,
loveseat, end table & coffee table. Very good con-
dition. $125. Color television 19", $25.2 speakers 8
x 14, $25. 792-6844.
COUCH, 4 months old. $300. 778-6988.
ELEC. 24 voit scooter Fortaess Model 2000FS, with
battery charger $700. 107 1st St. N., Bradenton
Beach. 778-2844.
GOOD WATER is essential to healthy living. Ultra
CleanT System II Water Filtration. Exquisite
beauty, contemporary, styling, exemplary perfor-
mance, convenient, economical and easy to use.
4,000 gallon, warranty, electronic meter. For a free
presentation call Galaxy, 794-0507.
WALL AIR CONDITIONERS, two for sale, one with
heat. 779-2787.
RED FIBERGLASS CANOE 16' with wicker seats &
backrests, $325. 778-2167.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander.



RUMMAGE SALE Every Saturday in June. St. Ber-
nard Activity Center, 43rd St., Holmes Beach. 9 am
to 2 pm.

GARAGE SALE! Fri., June 10. 8-11am. 742 Jacar-
anda, Anna Maria. Baby items, clothing, TV, tele-
phones, furniture, & household goods.
MOVING SALE, everyday after 2pm. 304 2nd St. N.,
Bradenton Beach. Furniture and 77 Plymouth
Volare. 779-2305.
BIG YARD SALE! Sat., June 11. 526 56th St.,
Holmes Beach. 8am to 12pm. Items too numerous
to mention. Come see!


While picking up milk at Eckerds, my husband Big
Jim (The Island Painter) found a man's wallet full of
money and without hesitation turned it over to the
cashier. Way to go Honey! Jackie Estes Melanson.
SUMMER MUSIC. Piano and Keyboard lessons in
my studio or your home. New Island resident with
Masters degrees and 10 years experience is accept-
ing students at all levels. 778-3539.


CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Call
mobile phone # 356-4649.
76 SKYLARK: ideal 2nd car, 43,500 miles, economi-
cal 6 cyl., cruise control, AC, PS & PB. $1,995. 778-
4382.117 Maple Ave, Anna Maria.


SCUBA GEAR, excellent condition like new. Regu-
lator, BCs, tanks, wetsuits, computer speargun,
equipment bags, lights, etc. Call 778-6928.
CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. 1/2 & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Get in-
volved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU!
Call Martha Stewart, 778-4362 if you can give a few
hours of community service.
AD PRODUCTION help wanted. Experienced in
Pagemaker and ad layout. Part-time. Call or stop in
The Islander Bystander.
BOAT SALESMAN for new & used boat dealer, high
income potential. Call Ken at 778-5577.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-9413 or 778-
6247.
HOUSEKEEPER needed for beach front motel.
Part time, some weekends, start immediately. Ap-
ply in person at the Sand & Sea Motel, 2412 Gulf
Drive, Bradenton Beach.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.
HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath, all home repairs.
Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails, etc.
Island resident, 23 years experience, local refer-
ences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office, or
dock-at your convenience, complete detailing in-
cludes wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly
cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and much more. Protect your investment.
Call Damon on Mobile number 356-4649.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

CPD LANDSCAPING, INC. "Natural by Design".
Design Installation Renovations. Full-Service
Landscape Maintenance. Longboat Key 383-9212.

ISLAND PAINTER: fast, neat, reasonable. Call Big'
Jim, 778-5587.
HOUSEKEEPING windows, laundry, minor repairs,
yard work, shopping, errands, open or close your
home or apartment. Thorough & dependable. For
estimate call 779-1402.
CUSTOM FIBERGLASS, ETC. Repairs, gelcoat,
boats, decks & hot tubs. No job too big or too small.
All work fully guaranteed. 15 yrs. exp. 794-8896 for
free estimate.
AQUARIUM MAINTENANCE leasing, marine &
fresh water, new set ups, consultations, residential,
& commercial. Experienced, dependable & refer-
ences. 795-2185.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reason-
able, Island resident. Local references. Call Brew-
ers 778-7790.
SUPER SITTER: Homes, kids & pets. Available to
visit daily or live-in. Call, 795-2865.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath, home repairs.
Also handicap conversions: ramps, handrails, etc.
Island resident, 23 years experience, local refer-
ences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentiaVCommercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee County
resident 25 years. Call today for a free estimate.
Ken 792-1084.


LOCAL # 927-1322 SARASOTA
Jasper Laster, Product Consultant
5990 S. Tamiami Trail
TOLL FREE 1-800-833-5486 Fort Myers Factory


OOLMES
S BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JUNE 9, 1994 1 PAGE 27 iE


DE CL SSIFIDS
I OEIPO- N IRNALI


FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free es-
timates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repair. 778-
4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-
5183.
WHY GET SOAKED? Dry foam, dries fast! We
never use steam. Fat Cat also cleans tile, wood &
terrazzo floors. Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning. 778-2882.
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, ceiling fans, painting int.,
ext., roof coating and repairs. Screen repairs, low
prices guaranteed. Call 778-0410 leave message.


COMMERCIAL STUDIOS 1sm/llg. Gulf view. Gulf
Drive ideal for small business, office, crafts. Neg. Anna
Maria. Call Frank at 778-6126 Eves. 778-6127.
BUY ITI SELL ITI FIND ITI ISLANDER CLASSIFIED
2BR/2BA Duplex apartment, West of Gulf Drive 3
houses from Gulf. Completely furnished, central a/
c & heat, Florida room. Yearly furnished $1,000/mo
+ util.- Season $1520/mo + tax & until. Call 778-2422.
ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach. 2BR/2BA Du-
plexes recently renovated. New tile, carpet & appli-
ances. 1 blk. from beach & shopping. Available June
1st. $575/mo + until. 813-689-8101.

RETAIL PROFESSIONAL space on "Historic
Bridge Street". Front Space Great Exposure! Call
evenings, 778-8623.

DIRECT GULF FRONT vacation rental. 2 week
minimum, summer or fall. Beach, pool, tennis,
Jacuzzi, & sauna. 794-8877.
HOLMES BEACH, 2BR/2BA unfurnished. Annual,
references $600 plus utilities. 1BR/1BA furnished,
seasonal. Call collect 813-778-0405.
HOLMES BEACH. Walk to beach and shopping. 1/
1 elevated duplex. Furnished $400 month. 778-
4574.
HOLMES BEACH: Tropical landscaped unfumished
2BR/1BA house 100 yds from Gulf. Sun deck, large
canal, spa, carport $1000/mo. 778-5246.
ROOMMATE TO SHARE home on quiet canal on
north end of Longboat Key. $400/mo. 383-0639.


GULF FRONT BEACH HOUSE Beautiful 3BR/2BA
vacation dream house. Best on North Anna Maria Is-
land Beach. July 4th week available. $1,400. 778-
3171.


ISLAND CONDO 2BR/2. 5BA lanais, eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer, pool, walk to beach, low maintenance
fee and owner may finance! 99,900. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate 778-6066 or 795-0105
after hours.

OPEN HOUSE DAILY. New home, 260 S. Harbor
Dr., Holmes Bch. 3BR/2BA, quiet street, private boat
launch, 2 blocks to beach. $179,500. 778-1966.

BY OWNER at Perico Bay Club. $89,500. must see
to appreciate Gorgeous Lake view. 2BR/2BA with
many up-grades. Security, covered parking, pool,
spa and tennis. 794-5085.
FREE HOT LIST "By Owner Homes" 100's com-
puterized & analyzed. Free mortgage card. Help-U-
Sell Realty Counselors. 795-0616.

AUCTION 10am Sat., June 11 Anna Maria Is-
land. 2700 Gulf Dr., Ocean Park Terrace, Holmes
Beach, FL. Fully equipped & furnished 3BR/2BA,
1350+ s.f. Condo on the Gulf of Mexico. Previews:
June 5 & June 10, 1-4 pm. 10% buyer's premium,
possible owner financing. 813-644-6681,
Higgenbothan Auctioneers Int'l Ltd. Inc. FL Lic.
AU305AB158.

BY OWNER. 12+ acre reservoir frontage, 2 fish
ponds, cleared, very private with a beautiful south-
ern view and a furnished 3 bedroom holiday house
built by Jim Walter Homes. $110,000. On Bethany
Road, 1/8 + mile south from State Road 64 on left
side. 322-1263, B. Plichter.

BY OWNER 4 unit rental complex two buildings
- oversized lot. 150 ft. from beach, flowing well for
watering. Owner operated for 25 yrs. Asking
$365,000. 111 36th St., Holmes Beach. 778-2071.

PERICO BAY CLUB -2BR/2BA Villa on lake. Pools,
tennis, nature walks, clubhouse, & security. Flexible
terms or owner will finance. 795-4806.
DRASTICALLY REDUCED! Estate sale! 340' of
seawalll Water on 3 sides! Deep water canal! 784
Dream Island Road. $525,000, MLS #39478. Call
Mike Nink, Neal & Neal REALTORS, 383-3708.
NORTH LONGBOATI Just over bridge! Brand new
construction! Cathedral Ceilings! Pool! Barrel tile
roof. $289,000, MLS #33135. Owner finance! Call
Jim Layfield, Neal & Neal REALTORS, 383-3708.
BY OWNER 1105 Gulf Dr. N., 60 ft. to beach. 2BR/
1BA, 1 car garage, fenced yard & patio, sundeck,
ceramic tile/carpet, asking $135,500. Make offer!
778-6221.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in persori and paid in advance at our office we do not invoice or
handle credit card charges. Our office is located at 5400A Marina Drive, in the Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach. We're on the comer between D. Coy Ducks and the laundromat. Hours:
9 to 5, Monday thu Friday, Saturday 9 to 2.

CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.

Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


IISLANDEB


S"'IBYSITAkI


IM|i Island Typing Service
| ComputerOperated
FAX Service: Send & Receive
FAX # 778-8390
NOTARY PUBLIC ANNA MARIA 778-8390

778-2586 A MA R KAV Eve: 778-6771

25% OFF
SWITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 6/15/94 1


b,', 'V 3 :


[ Fc k. ISLAND
Donnie Rivera
*-



SABALPALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
*SMALL HOME REPAIRS
*CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Tear Island Resident


M ANATEE
OWERS


LAWN SERVICE
(813) 778-7508

'L ION

J.R.

Painting
*Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
Free Estimates
778-2139


UNCOMMON S P,
COLLECTABLES & GIFTS
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548


AMERIOCAN CAR WASH

& DETilLING

Self service or personal service
Pick up & delivery service available
Enclosed facility for added protection
of your vehicle
778-1617 5804 Marina Drive Holmes Beach


Bradenton Cleaning
DON'T Fuss Services
[L 761-0603 or
252-2304 (pager)
* Cleaning/Personal Services Commercial/Office
* Residential/Condominium Daily Maid/Housekeeping
* Laundry/Window Home-Check/Misc.
* New Construction Sites Free Estimates
* Owner Operated Manatee/Sarasota Co.
Call Russell or Renee for free estimates
761-0603 or 252-2304 Pager





details
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
Hand wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo Carpets &
Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black Under Carraige,
Engine Cleaned & Silicone Protected. Everything
included for $85 on a normal size car. By
appointment, at your home or office.
Call the mobile service number: 356-4649
or leave a message: 778-9392.


PERSONAL TRAINING
One-on-One Step/Circuit Training
& Body Sculpting
By Appointment: Call 779-2129


---




1E3 PAGE 28 M JUNE 9, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


d Foods


' 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
I PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JUNE 14,1994


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


BEEF
PARE RIBS


SUNNYLAND I
sh Sausage


Turkey Breasts
S4 to 7 lb. Avg.
s 59
S.LB.

BLESS PORK SIRLOIN
CUTLETS


59


/lkWe Meat
-Wieners


CAROLINA PRIDE PICNIC
SMOKED HAM

1B.
^^^^vCLB.


I U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Eye Round Roast


IDAHO
Baking Potatoes


490
LB.


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...
S, . \ j F .t


I r"PI;
fw.A 1


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


DELI DEPARTMENT
SLICED
TURKEY;
$099 L
n LB.


RED, WHITE or SPANISH
ONIONS

490
LB.


T~L-- ~B~UEYIB E~;



'alii?!