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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00517
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 06-02-1994
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00517


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NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


IISLANDER


Hurricane experts tell residents to be prepared


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
All the hurricane experts agree the most impor-
tant step Island residents can take at the onset of hur-
ricane season is to be prepared.
At last week's Hurricane Forum, experts on emer-
gency management, meteorology, boat safety, public
health, socio/psychological impacts and evacuation
gave presentations and fielded questions from residents
on disaster preparation.
Karen Windon, director of the county's emergency
operations center (EOC) said that, following Hurricane
Andrew, emergency managers did such a good job of
scaring people that many now regard any preparation


Lukewarm

reception greets

Gulf Drive

proposals
A less-than-enthusiastic audience provided a luke-
warm reception to plans to change Gulf Drive in
Bradenton Beach and Holmes Beach last Wednesday.
Technical difficulties did not help the presentation
by the 789 Task Force as the group tried to convince
the community that alterations to the roadway were the
way to go.
Task Force Chairman Mike Bartles outlined major
*proposals the group has recommended while county
workers scrambled to find a back-up television set to
show a videotape of the proposals. Video equipment
malfunctioned seconds into the presentation.
Bartles said the group hoped to receive public sup-
port for:
Adding two traffic circles, or roundabouts, on the
Island. One would be created at Coquina Beach near
Leffis Key, the other in front of the Manatee Public
Beach at Manatee Avenue and Gulf Drive.
Improving the drainage at the curves near 20th
Street in Bradenton Beach.
Improving traffic flow at the intersections of Gulf
Drive and Cortez Road as well as at East Bay Drive and
Manatee Avenue.
Revising the parking and traffic flow at Cortez
Beach to angle parking and one-way traffic
southbound, with abarricade separating the beach from
Gulf Drive.
Expanding sidewalks, bike paths, curbs, gutters
and lighting along most of Gulf Drive from Manatee
Avenue south to the Longboat Pass Bridge.
No cost estimates have been made for any of the im-
provements. If approved by the Manatee County Commis-
sion, the Metropolitan Planning Organization and the
Florida Department of Transportation, improvements
could begin within the next four to five years.
About 125 people were in attendance to listen to
the task force recommendations.
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger was less
than enthusiastic about the proposed roundabout at the
public beach, stating city residents had told him they
did not favor the traffic circle.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola was enthu-
siastic about the task force proposals. "I think we're on
the right track," she said.
"The proposal would take my home," said Karen
Klosky, "and I would like to keep the quaintness of
Anna Maria Island retained."
Frank Root of Palma Sola said "you can't solve the
traffic problem on the Island without building a third
bridge."
Bradenton Beach Councilman Jim Kissick said
there is a "profound drainage problem at Gulf Drive
and Cortez Road" that needs to be addressed.
Bartles said he would make presentations to each of
the city councils or commissions on the Island prior to a
June presentation to the Manatee County Commission.


Special section

'Hurricane:


Islands of storm'
begins on page 13
as a futile effort.
"That's obviously not what we want people to be-
lieve," she stressed. "There are a lot of things we can
do as individuals to our homes and businesses that have
a minimal cost impact but have an incredible impact on
what our lives are like after the storm."
She said covering windows is very important to


keep the "building envelope intact" Once windows are
blown out, she said, the force of the hurricane winds
can blow out the roof. She recommended that shutters,
plywood or a newly developed film be used to cover
windows.
Other home preparations include bracing garage
doors and gable ends on roofs. She said the Red Cross
and Home Depot have made a video on retrofitting
older homes in disaster areas.
Another important area is family planning, she said.
"Sit down with your family and talk about where
you're going to go when you evacuate. Call your rela-
PLEASE SEE HURRICANE, PAGE 4


Work in progress, in progress, in progress slander Photo: Bonner Presswood
Peggy Potter's portion of an outdoor mural at the Island Shopping Center started taking shape last week.
Potter's casual "reader in argyles" is looking at the Island's first newspaper, Anna Maria Key Notes, circa
1948 You'll be able to watch other artists work on their space in the large-scale painting throughout the
coming weeks.

Island-wide police study committee to disband


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Police study committee members agreed last week to
ask the Island cities to release them from their duties.
Committee members John Kaufmann of Bradenton
Beach, Vince Mercadante of Anna Maria and Don
Howard of Holmes Beach agreed that to date their
study has shown that all three Island cities are content
with their current police service and to pursue other
options would be a waste of time and money.
In a letter to the three Island city councils, the com-
mittee wrote:
"After researching other cities, both in Florida and
out of state, as to how they handled this situation (re-
ducing the cost of police protection while maintaining
a high level of service), and after meeting with Island
elected officials for their collective input during the
April Island elected officials meeting, our committee
developed criteria and options."
The letter noted that the committee met with each
city council to determine what options each would like
pursued. The committee found that each city preferred
to keep its police services as is. Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach were also willing to offer police service
contracts to the other two cities.
The letter further noted that the cities expressed


interest in an Island police district but that option is not
possible under current state law.
In closing, the committee wrote, "Since there was
no unanimous interest in any option that the commit-
tee could pursue, we recommend to the respective city
councils or commission that any files be returned to the
respective cities and the commission be released."
i'


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Community in Crisis ............................. Page 2
Beach ban debate continued ................ Page 3
Opinions ..................................................... Page 6
The Way We Were................................. Page 7
Anna Maria meeting changes? ............. Page 8
Announcements ...................................Page 10
Insurance facts..................................... Page 12
HURRICANE SECTION..................... PAGE 13
Outdoors .............................................. Page 24


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


JUNE 2, 1994


,






El] PAGE 2 M JUNE 2, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDtR


The solution: get mad and get involved


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Part VIII series conclusion
This series on the increase in drug use and sexual
activity among Island teens came full circle with a sec-
ond community forum last week at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center (AMICC) to develop aplan
of action to address the problem.
As Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay Romine said at
the first forum in April, "We thought things were bad
10 years ago. Look at them five years ago. Look at
them today. What's it going to be like 10 years from
now? You think it's (the increase in juvenile problems)
out of control now you haven't seen anything yet.
"People have to recognize there's a problem.
People go to community meetings and sit around and
get real mad about it. As soon as they leave, get in their
car and go back home, they forget about it We have to
get people mad enough to get involved and do some-
thing about it."
Islanders have accepted the challenge. The com-
munity forum group has doubled in size to about 40
concerned elected officials, school and law enforce-
ment personnel, health care professionals, youth lead-



Island teen and
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Many new programs to address the concerns of
Island parents and teenagers have been initiated in
the community or are in the planning stages. Sev-
eral are the result of needs expressed by partici-
pants in the Islander Bystander series, Community
in Crisis.
Programs are being offered through the
churches and the Anna Maria Island Community
Center. The programs are:

Anna Maria Island Community Center
Summer basketball league, ages 13 16, Tues-
days from 7 to 8:15 p.m. and Fridays from 6 to 9
p.m.
Summer softball league, ages 11 17, sign-in
June 13.
Girls softball league, ages 11- 17, sign up June
13.
Teen girls summer talk group, ages 11 16,
Thursday from 4 to 6 p.m., group counseling ses-
sions and activities with Susan Montgomery, clini-
cal social worker.
Teen boys summer talk group, ages 11 16, in
planning stage.
Teen job referral service in cooperation with
the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce,
ages 14 and up, fill out application at the center.
Teen summer jobs, under age 14, fill out appli-
cation at the center.
Teen peer counseling training, age groupings
include fourth and fifth grade, middle school and
high school. Interested teens contact Susan Mont-
gomery. Class size is limited.
Summer camp for teens, in planning stage. In-
terested teens contact Susan Montgomery.
Open night for teens, Fridays beginning at 6
p.m. Call center for starting date.
Summer group youth counseling on topics
such as divorce, making good choices, self-esteem
and substance abuse prevention, ages five to 12.
Interested youths or parents contact Susan Mont-
gomery.
Presentation of "The First Time Club," a play
dealing with peer pressure and the AIDS epidemic,
June 15, 7 p.m., followed by question and answer
period.

Roser Memorial Community Church
Tennis practice, all ages, 10 to 11 a.m. at the
community center, June 14, 21, 28 and July 12,19
and 26, no fee.
Chapel Players Summer Workshop, training for
musical theater productions, ages 8 14, June 13
through 24, 1 to 3 p.m., participants taken by church
van to Carty Academy of Theater Dance in
Bradenton, $15 registration fee, class size is limited.


M crisis

ers, ministers, parents and community members.
Members selected a name Community Action
Program and brainstormed ideas on ways our com-
munity can aid parents and guide our teens to become
happy, healthy, productive citizens. Each idea was
written on a 3x5 index card and taped to the wall. The
wall was shortly filled with more than 100 cards.
Idea cards were categorized under headings such as
school, organization, community center, business, po-
lice, support and peer groups, youth corps, churches,
youth activities, parents, government and newspaper.
Pierrette Kelly, executive director of the AMICC, will
use these to develop a mission statement and future
programs. Ideas requiring the leadership of other enti-
ties will be shared with those entities.
Another phase of the group's function will be to


parent programs
Roser Chapel Theater production of "Belles on
Their Toes," roles for young people ages 6 20
available, auditions June 26 at 7 p.m., rehearsals in
July and August three to four evenings a week at
7 p.m., contact Dottie McChesney at 778-3045.
Swimming at G.T. Bray Park, all ages, Thurs-
day afternoons on June 16 and 23 and July 7, 14,
21 and 28, 2 to 4 p.m., transportation by church
van, van to leave church at 1:15 p.m. and return
between 4:30 and 5 p.m., $1 fee per visit.
Art classes, ages 8 to 14, July 6, 13, 20 and 27,
10 a.m. to noon or 1 to 3 p.m., $5 registration fee
includes materials. Class size is limited.
Environmental service project to clean up Is-
land sites, all ages, June 24 and July 8 and 22, 9 to
10 am. Transportation is by church van.
Variety series, crafts, games and videos from
10 am. to noon on June 24, July 8 and 22. On al-
ternate weeks there will be special trips: June 17,
9 am. to 1 p.m., Manatee Village Historical Park,
bring picnic lunch; June 30, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., boat
trip to Egmont Key, bring lunch, sturdy shoes,
bathing suit, $5 fee; July 15, 9 am. to 2 p.m., roller
skating, bring lunch, $2 fee; July 29, 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., South Florida Museum and Planetarium,
bring lunch, $3 fee.
Family Days: baseball card club, sharing and
trading, June 25, July 9 and July 23 from 10 a.m.
to noon; marine biology talks and field trips, July
11, 18, 25 from 10 a.m. to noon; planting an herb
garden, July 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
Contact Roy McChesney at 778-0414 for reg-
istration. Scholarships are available.

Community
Concerned Island Parents, Sundays, 9 a.m.,
Roser Church. The first Sunday of the month will
be Bible study for parents and all other Sundays
will be open programs. The goal of this group is to
support Island families in their efforts to raise the
children in our community to become successful,
productive and happy citizens. There are four ob-
jectives: to educate parents and assist them in de-
veloping effective parenting skills; to assist parents
in need of material, emotional or spiritual support;
to create a community responsive to the needs of
its children; and to address the problems that con-
front youth in the community.
All Island Youth, 7th through 12th graders,
Wednesday from 6 to 8 p.m., in June at Gloria Dei
Lutheran Church, in July at Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church and in August at St. Bernard's
Catholic Church. Leaders from five Island
churches conduct a program of fun, worship and
learning. Teens select topics for discussion ranging
from divorce to drug use. The group's goal is to
offer teens a variety of activities and guide them in
making healthy choices.


conduct a community needs assessment.
Joan Pettigrew, mother of two teens, said, "I am very
grateful for Pierrette and this group for coming together,
and I think what you are doing is a wonderful thing.
"I've heard over and over that 'everybody is doing
it' I'm here to assure you that of the young people on
this Island, everybody is not doing it (using drugs and
engaging in sexual activity). There are wonderful kids
growing up on this Island making the right decisions.


Some of the top students in
the county come from this
Island. We just have to fig-
ure out how to get the ones
who are falling through the
cracks."
Kelly said she would
like to encourage these stu-
dents who are making good
life choices to help those
who are not.
Resident Melody
Kramer pointed out, "There


New

counselor

starts at

Community

Center

see page 5.


are also many children who are excellent students and high
achievers who really don't believe that they have a prob-
lem and don't believe that they are doing anything wrong.
They could be leaders in the community and school and
yet they have their head buried in the sand. I have taught
school and known high achievers who have been into
drugs but didn't believe they were."
Forum facilitator and resident Mark Ratliff noted,
"There are a lot of things right with the Island. We all
refer to this as our Island paradise, but there is trouble
in paradise. This Island community has incredible re-
sources. Once people understand what the problem is
in their hearts and they really give a damn about it, if
it can be solved through resources of talent, money and
time, it will be solved."
After the forum, Kelly said, "Both forums were
very good in the numbers of people that came and the
interest. I think the level of participation was really
strong. What's very exciting to me is that I'm not just
a small voice crying in the darkness. There are so many
other people working on it with mie.
"Even though we've been starting and working on
a lot of new programs, I don't want people to think that
by putting a big band-aid on it, it will go away.. The
community must respond and work together as parents,
businesses, government officials, ministers, schools,
police, etc. It's a community effort, not a community
center effort."
Kelly cited a 1993 study written by the National
Commission on Children which stressed, "Adolescents
are a smaller portion of the U.S. population than any time
since 1900. This means that over the coming generation
a shrinking labor force will be called upon to support an
expanding elderly population in its retirement The major-
ity of adolescents grow into competent individuals able to
meet the successful challenges of adult life. However a
disturbing number do not. Today's youth are an increas-
ingly valuable national resource."
Kelly noted, "If we don't take care of the kids that
are here now, we won't have a country. If there's one
child out there who's falling through the cracks, we
should respond to that child's needs. If we lose one of
them, I blame us.
"Every time you pick up a newspaper and read
about a juvenile getting busted for drugs, it affects all
of us. We have to pay for them in the system if noth-
ing else. Why should they have to go that far? Why
can't we do something for them now?"
The biggest and best step the center has taken to
address the needs of youth and teenagers, said Kelly,
is to hire Susan Montgomery, a clinical social worker.
Montgomery is currently developing teen programs to
begin this summer.
"But we won't have it until we get the kids," cau-
tioned Kelly. "We have to find ways to pull them in and
keep them. Then we need to be here with the choices and
the support and a positive group of peers. We need to have
them involved in those choices and recognize we are try-
ing to make a serious effort to reach out to them. We need
to let them know we consider it serious enough to be det-
rimental to their health, even if they don't yet."
The next meeting of CAP is set for June 9 from 1
to 3 p.m. at the center. Island teenagers are invited to
this meeting to detail types of community activities and
programs they would like to have initiated by the ac-
tion group.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N JUNE 2, 1994 A PAGE 3 Ij

Beach activities ban debate continues in Bradenton Beach


Don't plan to play paddleball, throw a Fribee, fly
a kite or drink a cold beer on the public portion of the
beach in Bradenton Beach.
City Council members are debating an ordinance that
dramatically restricts beach activities. The council will
continue debate on the proposed law June 2 at 7 p.m.
The ordinance calls for offenders to face a second-
degree misdemeanor, which carries up to a $500 fine
and 60 days in jail, or a citation for non-criminal vio-
lations with a $75 fine.
The ordinance has 23 clauses of prohibited activi-
ties. The most controversial probably is a prohibition
in operation of Jet-skis on the public beach without a
special exception to the zoning code. Several busi-
nesses have operated or requested permits to operate
Jet-ski rentals in the city.
Current laws prohibit most of the beach-side activi-
ties in Coquina and Cortez Beach. The new law would
extend the prohibited acts to all of the public beach in
the city.
The public portion of the beach is the strip of land

Commission passes

fire assessment rate
The Anna Maria Fire Commission passed the fire
tax assessment rate for 1994 at last week's commission
meeting. The rate represents no increase from the pre-
vious year.
Assessment charges are as follows:
Vacant platted lot and unsubdivided acreage $4
Residential parcels base rate of $65 for the first
1,000 square feet and 1-cent per square foot above 1,000.
Mobile home or travel trailer parks base rate of
$32.50
Commercial/Industrial parcels base rate of
$112.50 for the first 1,000 square feet and $ .032 per
square foot above 1,000.


between the erosion control line and the water.
Included among the proposed prohibited activities:
Carry, possess or discharge a firearm, firecracker
or similar device without a permit;
Disturb any tree, shrub, plant, vegetation exclud-
ing noxious vegetation, seawall, groin, fence or sign
without a permit;
Catch, molest, injure, capture or kill any wild birds
or wildlife except poisonous reptiles, rats or vermin;
Distribute, post, erect, solicit or place any adver-
tising materials without a permit;
Start or kindle any fires unless in designated areas;
Camp or sleep overnight either on the beach or in
parking lots;
Indulge in riotous, boisterous, threatening or in-
decent conduct or behavior or disturb the public peace
and tranquillity;
Sell, offer for sale, lease, rent or otherwise distrib-
ute any merchandise, goods, products, articles or other
things within the nature of retail, commercial or busi-
ness activities or enterprises unless associated with
Manatee County's approved franchise operations at
Coquina Park. The possession of a city occupational
license relating to activities occurring on adjacent or
contiguous private property does not allow, qualify or
extend any special right, authority or permission to
carry on such activity;
Litter;
Clean any fish;
Discharge any wastewater or sewage;
'* Drive any vehicle in speeds greater than 15 mph
off the paved surface of city or state roads;
Park motor vehicles that would block another, or
park any semi-trailer or tractor-trailer rigs without a
permit;
Place any building or locate any public utilities
without permits;
Remove any rip-rap, rock or other erosion con-
trol materials without permits;


Possess or consume any alcoholic beverages
whether on the beach or in any public parking areas;
Throw, propel or push any objects, stones, balls,
arrows, javelins, kites or model aircraft which disturbs
the public peace, or endangers or unreasonably inter-
feres with the activities of other persons in the enjoy-
ment of the public beach and recreation areas;
Fish from any area of the beach designated only
for swimming;
Jump from any jetty or pier;
Drive or operate any vehicle, including bicycles,
within any area of the beach, piers or groins, except for
city-approved vehicles;
Pets on the beach, although they are permitted
within the parking areas if on a leash;
Being on the beach between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.
except for night fishing on the piers.


Anna Maria City
No meetings scheduled

Bradenton Beach
6/2, 7 p.m., continuation of council work
session on Ordinance 141B
6/7, 10 am., budget work session with council
and department heads

Holmes Beach
6/7, 7:30 p.m., council meeting
6/8, 2 p.m., Police Retirement Board

Of Interest
S6/8, 7:30 p.m., Anna Maria Civic Association,
Anna Maria City Hall


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BI PAGE a JUNE 2, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Fixing a
hole where
the rain

gets in
Roofing crews sometimes
get challenging assign-
ments, and this one at
Island Baptist Church
sure makes the point. We
wonder, though, if the
leak hadn't been caulked
what would have been the
harm since when have
Baptists been scared of
getting wet?
Islander Photo: Mark Ratliff


Hurricane

preparedness
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

tives and tell them, so someone out of the area knows
where you're going to be. What if all your family mem-
bers are not together when an evacuation occurs?
Know where you're going to go and meet.
"Think about the things that are really important to
you and decide what you will take when you evacuate.
Put together a disaster supply kit. Get a trash can and
fill it with batteries, canned food and non-perishables,
a flashlight, a radio, bottled water, etc."
She warned that the 911 emergency number will
not be operative after a disaster and residents should be
prepared to be self-sufficient for 72 to 96 hours at a
minimum.
Forum facilitator Gale Carter added that the post
hurricane economy will be cash and residents should
plan to take cash when they evacuate.
Andy Price, Anna MariaFire Chief and director of the
Island Emergency Operations Center (IEOC) said the
center was created several years ago by the three Island
cities and the fire district to increase the level of prepared-
ness and coordinate disaster response and management.
"We found that throughthe county EOC, sometimes
the information was very hard to disseminate between the
four agencies. We decided to create an arm on the Island
to coordinate all the emergency functions here. We meet
during the hurricane season on a monthly basis with rep-
resentatives from each of the cites to look at potential
problems and coordinate our efforts."
Price said one of the group's recent projects was to
order sandbags for all the member agencies. He said the
group has also streamlined communications through
the 800 MHz radio system and is working on establish-
ing a direct line to the county's EOC for instant com-
munications.
Dan Sobien, a meteorologist with the National
Weather Service in Ruskin, said the office "used to be a
step-child to the Miami office" but is now being upgraded..
"In the next couple of years we will be taking over
all the local forecasts and the marine forecasts," he
explained. "It will be easier to access information from
our office, plus we're getting a lot of new technology."
Sobien said hurricane information passed to the


public from his office comes from other sources -
emergency management, fire and police departments
and the National Hurricane Center. However his office
monitors squall lines and tornadoes in the area.
He said one of the best ways residents can be pre-
pared for a hurricane is to purchase a NOAA weather
radio which broadcasts all information from the Na-
tional Weather Service to the county's EOC. Radios are
available at local electronics stores for about $30. He
recommended purchasing a model with a tone alarm.
Hurricane damage includes flooding and flash
flooding from the intense rainfall, strong winds and
tornadoes and coastal flooding from storm surges, said
Sobien. A category three hurricane would create an 11-
to-12-foot storm surge, a category four hurricane would
create a 13-to-14-foot surge and a category five hurri-
cane would create a 16-to-17-foot surge.
Petty Officer Paul Curtis of the U.S. Coast Guard
spoke on preparations for boat owners.
"If your boat has a trailer, take it with you," he
advised. "Take it as far inland as you can. If you're
going to leave the boat on a trailer in your yard, tie it
down like you would a mobile home .and fill it with
water for ballast.
"If you are going to keep the boat in the water, head
for a safe harbor on the leeward side of land. If you're
going to leave the boat tied up to a dock, anchor the
boat away from the dock so the boat can pitch and roll
freely and not hit the dock.
"To tie the boat, use a forward line from the bow
to the dock and a stern line from the stern to the dock,
then crisscross two spring lines, one aft on the boat to
a space forward on the dock and aft on the dock to for-
ward on the boat. Then we recommend two anchors,
one off the bow and one off the stern, to spring the boat
off the dock."
Greer Peters of Manatee Glens Senior Center ad-
dressed socio/psychological aspects of a disaster for the
elderly.
"One of the biggest fears is losing control," she noted.
For the elderly, she recommended keeping essential
medication in supply or making arrangements to get a
supply and having aplan to follow. She encouraged neigh-
bors of the elderly to watch out for them if a disaster is
impending and be patient in dealing with them.
RN Sharon Willis of the Manatee County Health
Department said the department's role in a disaster is pre-
vention, such as giving immunizations to prevent diseases
that follow disaster, assessing water and food for contami-


Anna Maria City

gets respect,

identity sort of
With the change of a logo, the City of Anna Maria
has received a sudden blast of recognition by the
Bradenton Area Convention and Visitors Bureau.
In a May 16 letter, tourism director Larry White
said he would change the logo of the bureau to reflect
the municipal status of Anna Maria.
The previous logo stated "Bradenton & Florida's
Gulf Island Beaches" and listed "Anna Maria Island,
Longboat Key, Bradenton Beach and Palmetto.'
The City of Anna Maria was not mentioned.
The new logo, White said, will list "Longboat Key,
Anna Maria, Holmes Beach, Bradenton Beach and Pal-
metto."
As he explained it, "Grouping the cities this way
will place the cities of Anna Maria, Holmes Beach and
Bradenton Beach together. In addition'to that new
wording, the underscoring will be bolded with an in-
creased type size so that those communities and islands
might be better recognized."
Recognition at last? Then why's Longboat Key listed
first, when half of the Key is within Sarasota County?

Junior Chamber of

Commerce forming
The Anna Maria Island Junior Chamber of Com-
merce is an organization being created for children and
young adults. The program is designed to involve young
people in the business community. Activities will include
Chamber and community-wide projects fund raisers,
Island enhancement and maintenance drives, educational
programs and locally scheduled festivities.
Bret McMahan of Island West Apartments will
head the program. For information call 778-6569.


nation and evaluating communities for medical needs.
She said adults routinely need a tetanus shot ev-
ery 10 years but if you are injured, you need one if it
has been more than five years since your last shot. -
Moody Elementary School on 59th Street is desig-
nated as the special needs shelter for people "who are
not sick enough to be in a hospital but not well enough
to be in a regular shelter," she said. It will be manned
by public health nurses. Anyone who must evacuate to
a special needs shelter should contact the IEOC, which
keeps a list of those who will need help and transpor-
tation during an evacuation.
Sarah Jones of the Red Cross said residents should
consider a shelter as their last choice during an evacu-
ation. There are 225,000 people in the county and
146,000 of those live in a possible evacuation area.
There is shelter space for only 38,000 people.
"There are not enough hurricane-strong buildings
in this county to accommodate all the people who must
evacuate," she noted. "We have 28 shelters and at 20
square feet per person, that's not much room."
Jones said one way to guarantee a spot in a shelter
is to be a shelter volunteer. Training is provided by the
Red Cross. To volunteer, call Jones at 792-8686. She
said a variety of printed material on hurricane prepa-
ration is available at the Red Cross office on 59th Street
in Bradenton.
All of the forum's speakers said they are available
to speak to civic groups, clubs and neighborhood
groups on disaster preparedness.
A question and answer period followed the presen-
tations.
Q: Should a boat that is raised and under cover be
filled with water?
A: Yes, if the hoist can hold it
Q: Why not use 1-75 in an evacuation?
A: It will become the world's biggest parking lot.
Q: Can the rest of the family accompany a special
needs person to the shelter?
A: We prefer that one care-giver respond, but will
work with families with unusual circumstances.
Q: What's the shelf life of bottled water?
A: The shelf life is about a year. If you fill your
own, don't use milk jugs because they contain a petro-
leum product that breaks down and gets in the water.
Discount stores have five gallon collapsible containers
that are very good for water.
Q: Can we take our boats to shelters?
A: It is not recommended, as parking is limited.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JUNE 2, 1994 N PAGE 5 H


Montgomery helps with 'tough choices in a tough world'


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
Susan Montgomery was hired for an important job
on the Island primarily because of her expertise, but
indirectly due to her appearance, her age and her point
of view on life.
She is a counselor a clinical social worker with
a masters degree and a self-proclaimed punk rocker.
Montgomery has five earrings in one ear and three
in the other. She wears long dresses with boots and is
known to occasionally show up for work with a purple
streak running through her blonde hair. She also has a
tattoo, she says, but won't show it.
"I wanted someone young enough to relate to ado-
lescents and teenagers someone who could appeal
to that age group," says Pierrette Kelly, executive di-
rector of the Anna Maria Island Community Center,
"but someone who also had the right experience."
She certainly seems to have a way with kids, relat-
ing to them in the way they sometimes can't relate to
a parent, teacher or any other grown-up.
For now, Montgomery is a part-time employee at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, providing
individual and group therapy to Island children and
families at no charge. She hopes to make herself indis-
pensable, she says, and eventually work her way into
a full-time position.
The Community Center already has a part-time
therapist, Margo Burchim, who counsels individuals
and families, also at no charge. Burchim recently cut
her counselling time at the Community Center back to
one night a week.


Susan Montgomery
"There were 20 families on a waiting list to see
Margo," says Montgomery.
"Margo is wonderful," says Pierrette Kelly, execu-
tive director of the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, "but her time is limited."
So Kelly began looking for another counselor who
could specifically address the needs of Island adoles-
cents and teens.


Controversial play comes to Center


"The First Time Club" was written by Sarasota
playwright K.T. Curran and is performed by local
actresses with The Source, a teen theater group sup-
ported by Planned Parenthood Association of
Southwest Florida. The play was delayed from be-
ing performed in Manatee County Schools last year
by the school board, who decided they wanted cer-
tain portions removed from the script But this year,
with local support and having received both na-
tional attention and awards, the play in its en-
tirety is being seen in Manatee County schools.
The play follows the lives of four teen girls, one
who is exposed to the HIV virus which causes


AIDS. Dialogue centers around serious issues such
as cigarettes, alcohol and sex.
Following the play, the actresses, who are
trained peer counselors, will discuss the play's con-
tent and take questions from the audience. Mont-
gomery will also explain her plans for her new teen
activity groups.
Barbara Zdravecky, director of Planned Parent-
hood Association of Southwest Florida and Anna
Maria resident, will also be there.
"I was really impressed by the counselor (Mont-
gomery) who is enacting all these wonderful pro-ac-
tive programs into my community," says Zdravecky.


Montgomery was hired in May and has already put
together a line up of programs and services to attract
one of Community Center's large population of youth.
"We will be centering our approach around preven-
tion," says Montgomery. 'We're really trying to build
self esteem and social skills how to make tough
choices in a tough world."
Depending on the community's needs, future
groups may include children of divorce, anger manage-
ment skills, social skills such as dealing with feelings
or how to make good choices, substance abuse preven-
tion, self-esteem and how to deal with grief and loss.,
Montgomery believes that smaller groups of five
or six children are more effective and she uses meth-
ods such as role play, art therapy and play therapy,
techniques which teach children new skills, encourage
self-esteem and self-understanding. And the kids will
meet for 30 to 45 minutes once a week.
Montgomery, says Kelly, "makes it fun for the kids
- she's very creative. She employs creativity with
problem solving."
One of the first things Montgomery did was to sched-
ule a free performance of a teen-related and somewhat
controversial play called "The First Time Club" on
Wednesday, June 15, from 7 to 8 p.m., at the Center.
For now, Montgomery spends 25 hours at the Com-
munity Center, Tuesdays through Thursdays, 2 to 8 p.m.
"But," she says, "I will treat emergencies by ap-
pointments. For instance, I can come in on a Saturday
if someone is in need."
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is lo-
cated at 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. For more
information call 778-1908.


Benefit June 12 to help
Tommy Tanner
A benefit for Tommy Tanner will be held Sunday,
June 12, from 1 to 5 p.m., on Bridge Street, next to the
Drift-In, in Bradenton Beach. Activities include food,
a cash bar and live entertainment. Proceeds go toward
medical expenses for Tanner, a long-time resident,
employee of Bradenton Beach, and former Privateer.
The $5 food ticket includes Barbecue chicken
cooked by Mickey Banyas and Kenny Price, mullet
smoked by the Anna Maria Island Privateers, salads
and accompanying fare.
For more information call the Drift-In at 778-9088.


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B13 PAGE 6 I JUNE 2, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER




They'll be dancin'

in the streets
Last year we kicked around the idea of sponsoring
teen dances at the community center during the sum-
mer. How the idea would be received is a mystery,
because it never got off the ground. What band, what
kind of band, how late, noise problems, whether the
center would open in the evening, whether or not kids
would just stay out late after the dances all became
too mind boggling. Summer came and went.
Then came the Centennial committee, offering to
stage a street dance right in front of our office. The
excitement of bands and beer in the parking lot inspired
us to offer to hire the entertainment as our contribution
to the event. We even hosted an open house for the
evening. It was all a great success.
"Kids of all ages" came, mingled, and spent the
evening enjoying music and each other, even dancing,
at the Island Shopping Center. Maybe it was the atmo-
sphere under the stars with no threat of being
"stuck in the gym." Kids seemed to have fun with par-
ents, and parents were having fun with the kids. The
oldsters were right in the thick of it.
Since then, people keep asking us to do it again.
Heaven knows it was successful for the few businesses
that stayed open late.
So, we're proposing to do it again every month
if you'd like. At the very least, we'd like to kick off the
Fourth of July weekend on Friday night with a good old
fashioned, come one, come all party for Islanders.
What do you think? Please take a moment to com-


p


Name, (
(Name not r
i Mai
stander,
Marina
34217.

m...m


LEASE COMMENT a -

for Street dances

against Street dances





City
required)
I or drop off to The Islander By-
Island Shopping Center, 5408
Drive, Holmes Beach, Fla.
1U


ISLANDERFI[ L W
JUNE 2, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 28
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
SV Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Rick Fleury
Jeannie Friedman
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster


With a lot of help from our friends, 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK ByEgan


I me- e f^N J


Don't leave trash on beach
We who live on the Island do appreciate our
beaches and surroundings.
I'm assuming that the bags of trash I pick up each
morning while on my walk to Bean Point (paper cups,
bottles and junk) are left by our visitors. It's funny that
people can carry those heavy bags of groceries to the
beach but it's too heavy to carry back when empty.
And usually there's a trash bin close by.
At the end of Magnolia Drive under the big pines,
where the holes are behind the rocks, people are leav-
ing trash as if it's the local dump. Why can't that be
filled in with sand? Mother Nature washed that out al-
most two years ago.
We need it to be nice like it used to be. Thanks for
the Islander.
E. B. Evans, Anna Maria

Sale helped raise funds for
children hospital
I would like to thank everyone who came to my
garage and lemonade sale on Saturday. My friends
Heather and Courtney Taylor helped me a lot. We
raised $109 for All Children's Hospital.
Alex Murphy, Holmes Beach, Age 7

Centennial was a success
The success of the Island Centennial was largely
due the great coverage in The Islander Bystander. The
large map was invaluable to those wishing to take the
tour of historic places.
Photographs and news storied piqued the interest
of those who saw the paper. Thanks from all of us who
worked so hard and for so many months to make the
Centennial an event to remember.
Carolyne Norwood, president,
Anna Maria Island Historical Society, and
Centennial Steering Committee member

Centennial was Island success
On behalf of the officers and directors of the Anna
Maria Island Chamber of Commerce, the Centennial
Executive Committee and its industrious volunteers, I


want to thank The Islander Bystander for participating
in the grand success of the past weekend's celebration.
This commemorative celebration was truly reward-
ing and enjoyed by a phenomenal number of people. It
was sponsored and run by Island residents, organiza-
tions and businesses, including the Anna Maria Island
Historical Society and the Island Chamber. All partici-
pants benefited in some nature, and both the Anna
Maria Elementary School and Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center will now be able to have their "long-
desired" signs.
We appreciate the publicity on the Centennial -from
its inception, to opening through closing ceremonies. Your
endorsement certainly helped us attain our goals.
Darcy Lee Marquis Migliore, executive director
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce

Centennial thank you
The Centennial Executive Committee, would like to
thank all individuals, clubs and civic organizations who
participated in the Anna Maria Island Centennial and
made the weekend a huge success. Seeyou in 100 years!
Luke Courtney, chairman; Bub Stewart;
Carolyne Norwood; Jane Adam; Pat Copeland


Enjoys Island, enjoys Islander
My family has enjoyed vacations on Anna Maria Is-
land for the last 40 years. I own property in Holmes Beach
and we are contemplating retirement here. It would be
great if we were to receive the paper in the interim.
We enjoy The Islander every time we come to the
Island and are certain we would find it exciting to receive
it while we are still living in New York. Would it there-
fore be possible for you to put me on the mailing list?
F. D. Coleman, New York
Editor's note: The Islander Bystanderis on its way.

Have your say
The Islander Bystander welcomes and encourages
your letters to the Editor.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to Editor,
The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping Center, 5408
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217.


ment.




E...
m



M,


U
U.


U










THOSE WERE THE BAYS
_ Part 10, Anna Maria Island and the Seminole War, 1835-1842-
by June Alder


An American scout of 1836.

RAID ON MULLET KEY


Seminole hero. Osceola's daring
midnight raid at Tampa Bay's Fort
Brooke on June 2, 1837, freed 700 of his
people from the grasp of Gen. Thomas
Jesup and dashed the American
commander's hopes of a quick end to
the year-long war.
In fact, this exploit of Osceola's fol-
lowed by his subsequent treatment by
Jesup so enraged the Indians that they
fought on for six more years. The Sec-
ond Seminole War would turn out to be
the United States' longest war until the
Viet Nam war of this century.
Jesup was so humiliated by being
made the fool that he asked new Presi-
dent Martin Van Buren to relieve him of
his command. But he changed his mind
quickly and stayed on for another year.
(He would spend the rest of his life try-
ing to redeem his reputation.)
It wasn't long before Jesup found a
scapegoat to vent his anger on. He
would have his revenge on that
wretched rancho owner William Bunce
and the renegades who, he was con-
vinced, had abetted the Great Escape.
In June 1837 the quartermaster at
Fort Brooke was a 28-year-old West
Point lieutenant named John Casey. In
pre-war days he was on good terms with
Bunce and his "Spanish Indians."
Two days after the exodus of the
700, Casey was paid a visit by "two of
Capt. Bunce's Indians." Some of the
fishermen at the rancho, they said, were
planning to move their Indian wives and
children to the camps of the Seminoles
"so they wouldn't be taken away to Ar-
kansas."
Casey dutifully passed the informa-
tion on to Gen. Jesup.
Jesup went into a rage. He ordered
Casey to go to Bunce's fishery on Mul-
let Key and seize everyone there.
Casey might have thought this was
an extreme measure. But he was not one
to question orders. He loaded 30 soldiers
onto a steamer and sailed down Tampa
Bay.
The rancho was quiet. The people
were going about their normal summer-


time activities. (Bunce was not there.
As usual in the off-season.He was at
Key West.)
Casey was a professional and con-
ducted the round-up in an orderly fash-
ion. No doubt there was some resistance,
but apparently there was no violence.
All told, some 30 fishermen, their
wives and 68 children (33 boys and 35
girls) including Bunce's trusted
foreman, Pedro were taken to Fort
Brooke.
Jesup himself questioned the pris-
oners. What they told him, we don't
know. But not one of them was charged
with a crime. Eventually Jesup allowed
them all to return to the rancho. But he
warned them sternly that in future he
"would hold the whole of them ac-
countable for the acts of each indi-
vidual."
About the same time perhaps on
the same day as the raid on Mullet Key
- a squad of Marines landed at the
rancho Bunce had abandoned the year
before at the start of the Indian
"troubles." The entire place was burned
to the ground except for the "tabby
House" (the concrete and shell ruin that
still exists today at De Soto National
Monument).
Jesup had to justify his actions to
Secretary of War Joel Poinsett. He
rummaged through his files on Bunce
and came up with a year-old piece of
hearsay information.
Bunce supposedly had told his In-
dians in an unguarded moment: "You
Indians are allfools and have no sense.
The whites only want to get you all in.
They will send you away off to a very
bad country where all of your old
people and children will die. You Indi-
ans don't know anything about reading
and writing, but I look into all the pa-
pers and see it all."
Jesup fumed to Poinsett, "If the
war should recommence, I am clearly
of the opinion that the individual whose
name is mentioned in the statement
(Bunce) should be removed from the
country."


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 2, 1994 E PAGE 7 EI


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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408 Marina Drive
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(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
.E .778-7978
i II i i i iI Ii i I II N' I I i i I i II.I Ii i







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Anna Maria considers new


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By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
You've got to have rules. If you don't like the rules
you can change them, but you've got to have rules.
That statement is pretty much the viewpoint of
Anna Maria Mayor Ray Simches. Responding to re-
cent criticism that the planing commission and city
commission have been turning a deaf ear to the pub-
lic when controversial issues arise, Simches called the
board together Friday to take a look at how they've
been conducting their meetings
and to find ways that might his is
make the public happier. (This is) so t
"My only purpose in asking not placed in
for this meeting is to once again
clarify (the rules) for the com- tion ofatteml
mission," Simches said. "(This conduct a me
is) so that I am not placed in the
position of attempting to con- on the rules I
duct a meeting based on the rules lived were es
that I believed were established,
then to find that in many cases then to Jind
the commissioners aren't aware many cases t,
of the same rules I'm operating
under, and so the public feels an COmmissione
inconsistency." aware of the
Simches stated that six or I'm operain
seven years ago Roberts Rules of
Order had been adopted by the and so the pu
commission as a guide to con-a inconsiste
ducting business. If the commis-
sion would like to do things an-
other way, Simches said he
would listen to suggestions.
"The commission determines the rules, and I only
carry them out," Simches said. "It's not fair to any-
one not to operate in an orderly way."
For the most part, what drew the wrath of citizens
was the May 18 meeting of the planning commission,
and the May 24 meeting of the city commission. The
subject of concern at both meetings was the vacation
of an alley sought by Sandbar Restaurant owner Ed-
Chiles. In both meetings, those running the meetings
stifled the comments of some residents opposed to the
alley vacation.
Although both times it was explained that the citi-
zens had been cut off because their remarks were not
considered material to the issue, there were accusa-
tions made that city officials on both boards were not
interested in hearing the public's concerns.
Simches said that assessment is not true. Setting
limits on how the city receives citizen testimony is es-
sential to the orderly conduct of a meeting, and with-
out such limits, meetings can get out of hand.
Simches said the public has to understand the
rules as well, and he reiterated a couple of them. He
said the city is always ready to hear what citizens have


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to say, but it has been city policy for quite a while for
input from the public to be received primarily at work
sessions, while commission action is only taken at
regular commission meetings.
The mayor also said it's necessary people respect
the rights and feelings of others when they get up to
speak.
"No action is taken at the work session -'it's a
public hearing," Simches said. "But there is full discus-
sion for as long as you want to. I'm a late sleeper, so I
can stay here until one or two o'clock
in the morning. There's no need to
at I am turn the meeting off I enjoy the
he posi- dialog as long as the dialog is respect-
ful, it isn't rude and it isn't arrogant."
ing tO Among some of the things the
ting based commission discussed as possible
ways to improve meetings:
at I be- If needed, an opening state-
ablished, ment will be made to explain how
public input will be received.
at in Strict adherence to the
policy of accepting public comment
arena' primarily at the work sessions only.
arSome sort of time limit is
Ime rules needed for speakers, but it should not
under, be overly restrictive perhaps be-
tween two and five minutes. Time
lic feels limits should be established on a
cy. meeting-by-meeting by basis depend-
Sing on how many speakers desire to
address an issue.
Each speaker should have a
chance to speak once before anyone is given the floor
to speak a second time.
All dialog should be directed to the chair so that
audience members are not conversing with each other.
Discussions should try to deal with only one subject
at a time and the end of meetings should be reserved for
the public to comment on any matter of concern.
At any time a motion may be made to end public
input and return the issue to the commissioners for their
discussion of it, but a majority vote of the commission
would be necessary at that point for the floor to be
closed to further public comment.
Speakers should not be required to take an oath
unless the commission is receiving testimony in a
quasi-judicial matter.
So-called "town hall meetings," at which rules of
conduct are more informal and which permit any sub-
ject to be discussed, should be held at least four times
a year.
Even with specific rules, the commission must
remain flexible in its conduct of meetings.
The commission agreed it will consider these sug-
gestions and finalize them in the form of a resolution
which will be discussed and voted on later.


AM boards gain, lose members


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Of the City of Anna Maria's five governmental
boards which serve as an adjunct to the city commis-
sion, three have either gained new members or are in
the processing of losing them.
The code enforcement board met May 26 to
swear in Patricia Barber as its newest member, and to
elect Leon Kramer as that board's chairman. Barber
is filling the vacancy Tom Turner created when he left
to join the city planning commission.
The seven-member code enforcement board
meets when needed. At press time, there were three
issues that may come before the board:
Encroachments on city right-of-way at the Sand-
bar Restaurant, 100 Spring Ave. According to Anne
Beck, administrative assistant to the city's director of
public works appointed to oversee code enforcement
at the Sandbar, the restaurant has been granted a 60-
day extension to remove the alleged encroachments
before the matter is turned over to the code enforce-
ment board for a hearing. The extension will expire
June 25.
License violations at Ato's Restaurant, 111


South Bay Blvd. Building Official/Director of Public
Works Don Tarantola says last week the owners were
served an "affidavit of violation," which means the
code enforcement board has been requested to arrange
a hearing date. The city alleged the restaurant operates
without an occupational license.
Encroachments on a right-of-way at 202 Coconut
Ave. The city alleges the owner of this property, John
Dooms, has unlawfully landscaped a city right-of-way
which is a beach access. Tarantola says Dooms has also
been sent an "affidavit of violation." Dooms has indi-
cated he will comply with the city codes he is allegedly
violating.
The board of zoning appeals currently has one
open seat, and will have two by the end of this month.
The existing vacancy occurred when Jimmy
Nichols left the board to join the planning commission.
Vice Chairperson Bunny Garst has tendered her resig-
nation, effective the end of June.
The planning commission lost Pierre Reynaldo
May 23. Reynaldo resigned because he is planning to
move to Holmes Beach.
Members of city boards must be residents of the City
of Anna Maria. Applications are available at city hall.


r
OPEN
Thur- Sat 10-5
Sun. 11:30-5


F 509 PINE AVE






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 2, 1994 A PAGE 9 1J


Commission delays vote on


Sandbar Restaurant


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
The stage was set for what was billed to be the last
act in the Sandbar alley vacation controversy. The pe-
titioner was present along with his lawyer, and a group
of disgruntled citizens was also in attendance with le-
gal representation.
When the curtain went up, city commissioners
didn't like what they saw and said they wanted time to
look at the petitioner's amended petition which had not
been provided.
Before a nearly packed house-May 24, the Anna


Maria City Commission
heard arguments for and
against Sandbar Restau- I cannot see
rant owner Ed Chiles' re- vote on a
quest for an alley vacation voe on a
at his establishment at 100 an alley when t
Spring Ave. It was a re-
hash of the debate which that was agreed
dominated a planning lann com
commission meeting two l Cm
weeks ago and neither side not been incor
would claim a definitive
victory after this airing of paper I'm look
the issues.
The city commission pected a new pi
found Chiles' petition
lacked critical wording
and therefore felt uncomfortable voting on it. The com-
mission tabled the matter and said it would be heard at
its work session June 14, and postponed a vote to the
regular meeting June 28.
The meeting began as Planning Commission Chair-
man Tom Turner addressed the city commissioners, re-
porting his board met May 18 and unanimously recom-
mended the city grant Chiles the alley vacation he seeks.
Besides Turner, the only other member of the plan-
ning commission in attendance was Jimmy Nichols.
Vice Chairperson Luanne Collins, who did not attend
this night's meeting, met previously with members of
the city commission to explain her position on her
board's recommendation. Collins met with the city
commissioners individually.
Turner told the city commission Chiles had agreed to
several conditions requested by the planning commission.
According to Turner, Chiles had promised if given
clear title to an alley that runs north and south along the
east side of the Sandbar building, he would give the city
an easement on another piece of land about 80 feet to
the east. Turner said Chiles agreed this easement could
be used by utilities as well by people and cars, and it
would never be moved without permission of the city.
After hearing Turner, Mayor Ray Simches asked
City Attorney Jim Dye for his opinion.
"I don't have any specific advice for the commis-
sion other than a reminder that the application for va-
cation of the alley is governed by the city's land devel-
opment codes," Dye said. "That's what the discussion,
and the testimony we receive tonight, should be on."
Before that discussion could begin, City Commis-
sioner Dottie McChesney voiced her concerns Chiles'
paperwork was not in order.
"These verbal agreements took place at the plan-
ning commission (meeting), and they are not incorpo-
rated in the petition for vacation of the alley they are
only in a motion," McChesney said. "I cannot see how
we can vote on a petition to vacate an alley when ev-
erything that was agreed upon by the planning commis-
sion has not been incorporated in this paper I'm look-
ing at. I expected a new paper tonight."
Dye said that earlier in the week he had received
an amended petition from Chiles' lawyer, William
Strode.
"I believe that with that action it's safe to say that the
petitioner is agreeing with those conditions," Dye said.
"Mr. Dye, I really wish you had given us that in-
formation," McChesney said.
At this point, Strode offered the commission cop-
ies of the amended petition. As the papers were passed
forward to the dais, City Commissioner Chuck
Shumard who is known to be against the alley va-
cation suggested the commission not be hasty in
coming to its decision.
"I think we should table it until we can get the
proper papers and have time to look it over," Shumard


or


d i
I0





ni


al


said. "I know the planning commission worked hard,
and I thank them for their efforts, but I have ques-
tions."
Vice Mayor Max Znika said he would also like
to review the amended petition. City Commissioner
Doug Wolfe took exception.
"It seems to me that what this commission is at-
tempting to do is to reread the petition," Wolfe said.
"It has been read and studied by the planning (com-
mission.) What has been presented to us is a motion
by the planning commission to accept the petitioner's
request for the vacation of an alley."
Wolfe then issued a warn-
ing.
)w we can "I believe that it would be
t to vacate absolute folly for this city
commission to deny this peti-
eerything tion, because we would be in
court in a minute," Wolfe
upon by the said.
Wolfe asserted his opinion
ssion has the Sandbar building had en-
)rated in this croached upon the alley for
more than 70 years, and the
lg at. I ex- city had never challenged the
er tonight.' encroachment.
"I am assuming that
(Chiles) does not want to as-
sume an adversarial position
and take the city to court," Wolfe said, but I'm sure
he has four or five different avenues for relief. I see
no reason for the City of Anna Maria to spend one
copper penny defending something which this city
could in no way win. It would be absolutely ludicrous
for us to deny this petition."
Wolfe referred to Shumard's suggestion to table
the matter as lollygaggingg," and went on to say, "I
think we should jump in with both feet, commit our-
selves and do it."
"I agree that we shouldn't drag it out,"
McChesney said, "I totally disagree that the city
doesn't have a leg to stand on." McChesney ex-
plained a previous owner of the Sandbar had been
told by the city the restaurant could use the alley, but
ownership of it would never be relinquished by the
municipal government.
The commission voted 4-1 to table the issue un-
til its June 14 work session. Wolfe cast the dissent-
ing vote.
Chiles and his lawyer left the meeting, but the
crowd remained anxious to speak.
Turner objected to allowing the audience to
speak to the matter since it had been tabled.
"I feel that to open this to the public would be a
disadvantage to Mr. Chiles and (his corporation), be-
cause they will have no chance to respond," Turner said.
Similar to the planning commission meeting, no
one spoke in favor of granting Chiles request A rep-
resentative sample of the sentiments expressed
against the petition follows:
"It appears this thing is being railroaded." -
Sinclair "Bubba" Stewart
"This is detrimental to the public interest of Anna
Maria citizens. I have rights, and one of these is to ex-
pect that the City of Anna Maria will protect public
properties. Maintaining alleys that bisect the city is criti-
cal to upholding current zoning laws." Judy Adams
"When you vacate an alley, you permit the
combining of commercial properties into larger sec-
tions so there can be expansion. The petitioners told
us they didn't have any plans for building'... they
failed to tell the truth." Bill Worth
"I feel that the planning commission meeting
last week was very biased in favor of the petitioner.
As (people who were opposed to the alley vacation)
tried to express their concerns, they were interrupted
many times by the chairman of the planning commis-
sion, Tom Turner ..." Ruth Elliott
Dye interrupted Elliott, and said her remarks
were not material to the alley vacation application but
were more in the line of criticism aimed at the way
Turner ran the May 18 meeting.
Apparently responding to the number in the au-
dience who voiced similar grievances, Simches later
called for a special meeting of the city commission
to address the way meetings are conducted.


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June 1, 1994
'Thanks" from Earl and Pat

778-1703


AMY
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ANNA MARIA ISLAND, FLORIDA 813 778 6877






lij PAGE 10 0 JUNE 2, 1994 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A^m ijw M ^i~


Summer program at
Island Library
The Island Branch Library summer program for
children begins on Monday, June 6. Registration for the
reading and listening clubs will be held on or after that
day. The program includes activities for preschoolers
and first graders in one group and grades 2 and older
in another group.
On Wednesday, June 22 and 29, July 13 and 20, at
7 p.m., preschoolers and 1st graders can wearpajamas and
bring their stuffed animals to evening story time.
For 2nd grade and older, the library will have pro-
grams on Tuesdays and Wednesdays through July 26.
Jim Moone, scuba diver, will uncover "Creatures
under the Sea," on Wednesday, June 15, from 7 to 8 p.m.
Registration for programs is necessary due to limited
attendance. Register at the library or by calling 778-6341.
Rummage sales set for
Saturday in June
St. Bernard's Guild will hold its annual rummage
sale from 9 am to 2 p.m., every Saturday in June, in the
St. Bernard Catholic Church Activity Center, 43rd
Street, Holmes Beach.
Merchandise for sale include clothing for the
whole family, household items, linens, small appli-
ances, lamps, furniture, kids stuff, books, magazines,
miscellaneous items and refreshments. New items will
be added weekly. Contributions are welcome.
Writers to meet at
library Monday
The Gulf Coast Writers Group will hold a workshop
on Monday, June 6, 10:15 am., at the Island Branch Li-
brary, 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. Bring original
material to read. For information call 778-6879.
REAP to cruise Bay
The Institute for Retired Executives and Profes-
sionals (REAP) will cruise Sarasota Bay in the Seafood
Shack's Showboat on Friday, June 10. Passengers will
meet at the Seafood Shack at 3:30 p.m., the boat de-
parts at 4 p.m. The cost is $10 per person which in-
cludes a $7 discount for full dinner following cruise.
Make reservations at least one day in advance. Call
794-5979 or 792-7813.


Swanberg to give art
demonstration
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will
present a program on Monday, June 6, at the Guild
Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. Dorothy
Swanberg will give an introduction to Rosemalling, the
Norwegian folk art of painting or carving floral designs
on furniture or woodwork.
Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. The pro-
gram will begin at 7 p.m. and a general meeting will
follow.
The public is invited to the free program. For more
information call 778-6694.
Safe boating course
offered
A course in boating safety will begin Tuesday,
June 7, 7:30 p.m., at the Flotilla #81 Training Center,
4208 129th St. W., Cortez.
The three-week course Is conducted by certified
Coast Guard Auxiliary instructors and includes boat
handling, navigation, legal requirements, weather and
radio. The class is twice a week on Tuesday and Thurs-
day evenings. Except for a nominal fee for materials,
the class is free.
For more information call Flotilla Staff Officer
Shirley Northrop at 722-6971.


I EXPIRO'SES *
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b 10519 Cortez Road A
C 792-5300 ISLA
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM

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Just visiting? Don't forget to sign up for your subscription to The Islander
Bystander before you leave! We're in the Island Shopping Center,
right next to Chez Andre and D.Cey Ducks.


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"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
Open Daily *
8 am. to Closing
Same Menu and
Prices as Below
r Air-Conditioning r
Restaurant- Seating
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Draft Beer Wine
Car Parking
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50 Guarded Bike Holders!
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one: 778-7964
ext to Huffine's Amoco)
a Drive Holmes Beach


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
on our casual outside patio."
P.S. We have the very best sunsets.

Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting)
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


I


SNew officers for
Art League
The Anna Maria Island
Art League recently
elected new officers and
board members for 1994-
95 at-the April 27 annual
meeting. Pictured are (left
to right) Sydney
McKenna, board of
directors; Trudy Moon,
president; John DeFazio,
board of directors; Ann
DeBellevue, co-vice
president; Susan Thomas,
co-vice president; and Sue
O'Conner, treasurer.
Photo courtesy Betsy Smith

Kids to perform in
library puppet play
Interested 3rd-5th graders may audition on Thurs-
day, June 9, from 4 to 5 p.m., for a puppet play, "Wiley
and the Hairy Man," in the meeting room of the Island
Branch Library, 5701 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
The play will be presented as part of the children's
summer programs at the Island Branch Library. For
more information call Mary Kay at 778-6341.
Blooze Cruise sails
Saturday
Bigg Wigg's Blooze Cruise will be held on Saturday,
June 4, at 7:30 p.m. from the Miss Cortez Fleet dock,
12507 Cortez Rd. W., Cortez. Entertainment is by the
Telephone Kings playing classic rock, funk and rhythm
and blues. Cost is $12 and the cash bar will offer drink
specials. For more information or to makereservations call
794-1223.
Herbal Hour to.be held
Learn the historical uses of natural remedies and
herbs at the Brain Gym bookstore, 5340-F Gulf Dr.,
Holmes Beach. The free educational seminars will be
held on Tuesdays, June 7 and 21, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.; and
Wednesday, June 8 and 22, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
For more information call 778-5990.


Daily Specials:
MON: Goulash, Salad, Roll ........................ $5.25
TUES: Meat Loaf, M. Potato, Gravy, Veg......$5.25
WED: Hot Turkey Sandwich, Mashed Potato,
Gravy, Vegetable .............................. $4.95
THUR: Prime Rib, Potato, Veg., Salad, Roll .... $6.95
FRI: Seafood Specials, Potato, Cole Slaw.. $5.75
PLUS many other specials for Breakfast & Lunch.
Our regular menu: Cheese Blintzes, Homemade
SSoup, Pies, and Biscuits,

IslandInn

Restaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 778-3051
S 1701 Gulf Dr. N Bradenton Beach





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 2, 1994 M PAGE 11 I I


I9 O IU ?


H. Prentice Browning Jr.
H. Prentice Browning Jr., 40, of Bradenton died
May 25 at home.
Born in Worcester, Mass., Mr. Browning came to
Bradenton from Davis Island in 1972. He was city editor
for The Longboat Observer for three and a half years.
He is survived by his parents, H. Prentice Sr. and
Jane of Holmes Beach; two sisters, Penny Fortune of
Indianapolis and Nancy Afield of Tampa.
Memorials may be made to Christian Appalachian
Project,322 Crab Orchard Rd., Lancaster, Ky. 40446-
0001.

Bertha Boldt Keith
Bertha Boldt Keith, 70, of Bradenton died May 24
in Freedom Care Nursing Pavilion.
Ms. Keith was born on Oct. 19, 1914, in Altoona,
Pa. She was a graduate of Altoona High School in
1932. She received her nursing degree from St. Lukes'
and Children's Hospital School of Nursing in Philadel-
phia. She joined the U.S. Army in 1943. She served on
the hospital ship "Shamrock." She was a veteran of
World War n, serving in the European and Pacific the-
aters. She retired as a U.S. Army major in 1963 from
the Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. She was
a member of Key Royale Club of Holmes Beach.
Funeral services were held on Friday, May 27, at
the Griffith-Cline Funeral Home, Holmes Beach, with
the Reverend James Meena officiating. Inurnment will
be in the Rose Hill Cemetery in Altoona.
She is survived by two sisters, Ethel M. Boldt of
Altoona and Delores I. Marx of Bradenton; and a
brother, John Henry Boldt of District Heights, Md.
Memorials may be made to the American Lung As-
sociation, 2201 Cantu Ct, Suite 119, Sarasota, FL 34232.


Eugene R. Lambert
Eugene R. Lambert 78, of Holmes Beach died
May 25 at home.
Born in Cloquet, Minn., Mr. Lambert came to Holmes
Beach form Wichita, Kan., in 1984. He was a former di-
rector of personnel and labor relations at the Pioneer Press
in St. Paul, Minn., and former president and publisher of
the News Tribune in Duluth, Minn., and The Wichita
Eagle in Wichita. He was a member and lector at St. Ber-
nard Catholic Church. He was a U.S. Army veteran of


World War II, serving in the European and Pacific the-
aters. He was a former mayor of Duluth.
He was active in association management and labor
negotiations for Associated General contractors of Min-
nesota, Duluth Builders Exchange and Home Builders
Associations of Minneapolis and Duluth. He was active
in redevelopment projects for the cities of Dulut, Wichita
and St Paul. He was a lifetime honorary member of the
Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus.
He was past president of Key Royale Club, past
member of Anna Maria Moose Lodge 2188, former
member of Holmes Beach Code Enforcement Board
and former member of Rotary International.
He is survived by his wife, June; two daughters,
Judith Leigh of Berkeley, Calif., and Mary Lynn of
Boynton Beach; two sons, Eugene Joseph of Bradenton
and Laurence Louis of St. Petersburg; a sister, Marjorie
Delyea of St. Paul; and five grandchildren.
Memorials may be made to the American Cancer
Society, P.O. Box 10459, Bradenton, FL 34282, or to
a favorite charity.

Eva Vera Paul
Eva Vera Paul, 76, of Holmes Beach died May 23
in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Hague, Holland, Mrs. Paul came to Mana-
tee County from Detroit as a winter resident in 1977.
She became a full-time resident in 1986. She was a
homemaker.

Lucien J. Troxler
Lucien J. Troxler, 87, of Bradenton, died May 24,
in Manatee Memorial Hospital.
Born in Taft, La., Mr. Troxler came to Bradenton
from Houma, La., in 1975. He was an attorney. He was
a Catholic. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, serving in the
Civil Air Patrol during World War II. He received the
Air Medal Award for wartime flying and taught flying
for more than 5,000 hours in New Orleans. He was a
member of Anna Maria Island Moose Lodge 2188 and
American Legion Post 24.
He is survived by his wife, Helen R.; a daughter,
Kathleen Gaines of Bradenton; two sons, Dr. Thomas
C. and Dr. Robert W., both of Bradenton; four broth-
ers, Elmore of Reserve, La., Ferdinand of LaFitte, La.,
Richard of Metairie, La., and Roland of Flagstaff. La;
two sisters, Myrtle Miano of Reserve and Theresa of
Germantown, Miss.; and eight grandchildren.


Holmes Beach
dominates horseshoe
contest
There must be something lucky about living in the
Island's middle city, for residents of Holmes Beach
walked away with three-fourths of last Saturday's honors
at the weekly horseshoe game at Anna Maria City Hall.
Winners were Ruth Foehrkolb and Herb Ditcel,
both of Holmes Beach.
Runners-up were Ed Callen of Anna Maria and
Gene Snedeker of (you guessed it) Holmes Beach.
This week may see Anna Maria pitchers try for
revenge, or Bradenton Beach may be the force to be
reckoned with. It's hard to say, but one thing's for sure:
If you have a yen to play horseshoes, you're always
welcome at the games, every Saturday at 10 a.m.

Kratzmiller installed as
AAUW president
At the installation dinner of the American Associa-
tion of University Women, Bradenton Branch, on May
17, Joann Kratzmiller of Holmes Beach was named
president for 1994-95. Other Islanders serving on the
board of directors for the year ahead are Anne Bugbee,
education; Luanne Collins, women's leadership; Ricki
Cunninghis, newsletter; Pat Cobb, small-group dinners;
and Pat Thompson, public information.


The Island Poet
You kids who feel you get no respect and
must run away from home,
Have no idea how cold life can be when you
are on your own.
Remember you haven't missed a meal and
have a roof over your head.
When you are alone, you'll go hungry. And
who cares if you drop dead?
How about leaving your girlfriend and all
your friends at school?
I am sure if you talked to them they would
think you were a fool.
Talk your troubles over with someone and I
am sure that you will find,
That you have a lot going for you that you
will leave behind.
Bud Atteridge


r~ i&I *.. *I i~


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MON & THURS: Sons of the Beach B :,
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I


L .R






j[3 PAGE 12 M JUNE 2, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Regulations, insurance, building to meet storms


The onset of hurricane season brings up an onslaught
of insurance fever for many barrier island residents.
Perhaps angst is a better term, as most residents
usually have too little or outdated insurance for their
homes and belongings.
Remember that new television set you got re-
cently? How about the computer? The new watch and
bracelet? Chances are, you haven't modified your in-
surance policy to reflect the new purchases and, in the
event of a loss, only minimum amounts may be paid for
your new acquisitions.
Insurance is basically the transfer of risk. For a
small premium, you transfer the risk for a larger loss to
an insurance company. Even if your insurance is very
high say $1,000 a year you would have to pay the
premiums for 100 years before you would approach the
replacement value of an average Island home.
Insurance agents advise all property owners to re-
view their insurance polities annually to make sure the
coverage is adequate. An increase in a few dollars a
year could mean a savings of tens of thousands of dol-
lars if your home is destroyed.
You don't want to pay more in premiums? Insurance
agents offer a cost-cutting suggestion by increasing the
amount of the deductible you would pay after a disaster.
Another strong suggestion insurance carriers make
is to photograph your home and belongings. For insur-
ance to be paid in many instances, both proof of pur-
chase and value should be provided, and a photograph
will take care of both those requirements.

Changes after Hurricane Andrew
Insurance providers in Florida have been rocked in
the wake of Hurricane Andrew's 1992 landfall south of
Miami. An estimated $25 billion in damage resulted
from the storm; insurance carriers have paid out $16.5
billion to date.
Many insurance companies have gone out of busi-
ness in Florida, financially unable to withstand the cost
of restoring people's homes and property. Many oth-



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ers have limited policies in some areas, such as barrier
islands. And some people have had their policies can-
celed because the risk of coverage is deemed too great
from actuarial standards.
Very few insurance companies, if any, will write
new homeowner policies for houses within 1,000 feet
of the water most of Anna Maria Island.
In an effort to provide insurance to all, Florida In-
surance Commissioner Tom Gallagher instituted an
insurance "pool." The Florida Residential Property and.
Casualty Joint Underwriters Association allows agents
to write policies, with the companies paying out of the
pool the amount of money they have in coverage for a
region of the state after a hurricane or other disaster.
Although the state insurance pool has only been in
existence for two years, it currently is the third largest
insurer in Florida, accepting properties other insurance
companies deem too dangerous.
The days of "one-stop shopping" for insurance
appear to have ended for most homeowners in Florida.
Besides the state insurance pool, carriers have pooled
coverage for wind damage and flooding.

Federal intervention, too
The Federal Emergency Management Agency is also
involved in hurricanes, both before and after the fact.
FEMA has imposed strict guidelines for home con-
struction and reconstruction. The most apparent of the
FEMA rules governs home repair in high-hazard areas,
such as barrier islands. If you plan to remodel your
home at more than half of its appraised value, you will
have to meet current FEMA regulations regarding el-
evation and construction.

Construction, redesign can help
Dr. Bob Sheets, director of the national Hurricane
Center, has pointed out that many home builders do not
take natural conditions into account when the develop
houses in high-hazard areas.
Wind and flooding are two of the biggest problems

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residents face in Florida during hurricanes. Flooding
can be alleviated by elevating the house, as is required.
But constructing a house to withstand high winds is
often ignored by builders. Eves, gables, porticos all
become wind traps during hurricanes, Sheets said, concen-
trating the wind and causing massive destruction.
Showing slides of the aftermath of Hurricane An-
drew in Dade County, Sheets said "instead of learnign
from Andrew, we've just said 'shoddy construction
was the probelm' and buried our heads again. The facts
are that most walls and roofs are safe if they are built
right, but windows and doors inevitably fail.
"Once that happens say, a double-wide garage
door buckles in the wind the roof literally explodes
up and off the house," Sheets said.
The solution: hurricane shutters, reinforced doors,
internal barricades on garage doors, Sheets said.
Straps and clips often are not used by builders to
firmly affix trusses to beams, Sheets said, although the
expense of the straps and clips adds only a few dollars
to the overall cost of the house.
Pierre Renaldo, a local builder, said changes in build-
ing standards in Florida require all high risk areas of the
state to have buildings designed to resist winds of at least
110 mph on the barrier islands, 90 mph on the mainland.
"The geometric shapes of buildings will be an im-
portant consideration in designing to conform to code
requirements," Renaldo said. "Hip roofs will be looked
upon more favorable than gabled styles because they
resist high winds more efficiently than gables. More
vertical wall area requires additional structural appli-
cations that help to resist wind force more effectively.
"All of these new requirements will undoubtedly
result in additional expense for your building program,
but it is probably the cheapest insurance you can buy,
and it will stay with you," Renaldo said.
"Sooner or later, those of us who insist on build-
ing and living in the coastal areas are going to be put
to a tough test by nature," Renaldo said. "Let's hope we
get a passing grade."


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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND NEWS HAPPE




ISLANDER


:NINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


I AII


Hurricane


ISLANDS


-OF


SSTORM


'Above average'
A hurricane prediction expert says the next few
months will be about average as far as the number of
big storms are concerned.
But during the next two to three decades there will
be some of the most destructive hurricanes ever re-
corded.
That's the prediction from Dr. William Gray, a
Colorado hurricane researcher who has a 90 percent
success rate for his prognostications on bad storms.
Gray predicts 10 named storms and six hurricanes,
with two of the hurricanes being major storms.
Global climate changes and an increased knowl-
edge of the cyclical patterns of hurricanes has caused
the prediction that more and worse storms are brewing
for the next 30 years.
Patterns are now being discovered that indicate we
have been through a "mild" period during the past few
decades a pattern that will shift as the 1990s wind

Leave, and

avoid becoming

a statistic
Mention tropical disturbances or hurricanes like
Donna or Elena or Andrew and everyone has common
ground to tell a story:
"We looked out on the flooded golf course and
saw one of the tees moving. Literally moving, squirm-
ing. wriggling. With binoculars you could see that the
tee was covered with snakes trying to get out from the
flooded roughs onto higher ground."
"We walked down flooded Gulf Drive to watch the
storm-driven waves crash through the broken glass
fronting the old Trader Jack's Restaurant in Bradenton
Beach. The waves crested somewhere inside the building
and washed out in a rush of swirling water onto the road."
"We were awakened to a peaceful sound with
frightening overtones: the gentle lapping of waves.
Against the side of our bayfront house as the storm
surge, greater than anticipated, inundated the Island."
"We went out to check on the status of the storm
and, going out the front door, stepped in ankle-deep
water. One more inch and it would have been inside the
house and this was a storm that no one expected to
amount to anything."
Storm stories are as numerous as the people on the
Island. And therein lies the biggest problem we've got
to face when not if, but when Southwest
Florida's own Hurricane Andrew comes calling.
There are too many of us living in too vulnerable
places.
We've been playing the lottery with our houses on
the beaches, going against the odds year after year with
our property and our savings on a barrier island un-
suited for habitation in times of high winds and waves.
Hurricane experts warn us not to test the elements
with our lives.
We've all watched the devastation that Homestead
and Cutler Ridge suffered after their own version of
Hell Hurricane Andrew came ashore in 1992.
The $20 billion in damages and the 15 dead are a grim
reminder of what can happen here.
Yet despite the doom and gloom of what you will


storm season predicted for 1994


down and we enter into the 21st Century.
Gray bases his prediction on three factors: a 20-
year drought in Africa that appears to be ending, a dy-
ing El Nino system in the Pacific Ocean, and strato-
spheric winds.
Gray believes that a wetter west-African region
produces more tropical fronts that move off the coast,
cross the Atlantic and become tropical storms. "After
20 years of drought, close to normal rainfall means it
will be pretty wet, Gray said. "When it's wet there,
intense hurricane activity goes way up."
Gray's predictions have been echoed by Dr. Bob
Sheets, director of the National Hurricane Center, who
said "rainfall in Africa is becoming more normal, and it
seems to bring more hurricanes, the wetter it gets there."
Another pattern that may cause greater Atlantic
Ocean storms in 1994 has its foundation in the Pacific
Ocean. An abnormality known as El Nino has been


occurring for the past few years. Barometric pressure
aberrations off Peru's coastline cause warming of the
Pacific Ocean across two-thirds of the body of water,
heating up wind currents. The warm winds heading east
keep storms from forming over the Atlantic and com-
ing west.
With El Nino declining, greater storms are possible
here. The question is how much and how soon El Nino
will wane.
The pressure changes occur around the Christmas
season, hence the name El Nino, or "The Child".
The third factor Gray uses in hurricane predictions
is winds in the stratosphere. The winds run in 18-month
cycles and should be heading east during hurricane
season, shearing off the tops of strong storms and
weakening them. However, forecasters admit that the
high winds are the least of the factors working for, or
against, storms.


f there is to be hurricane damage, le it only be to property, not lives leave, and avoid becoming a statistic.

If there is to be hurricane damage, let it only be to property, not lives leave, and avoid becoming a statistic.


look at and read in this special hurricane section, it
won't hit home until your house, your belongings, your
priceless mementos of 10 or 20 or 50 years of living are
scattered across what is left of your neighborhood.
But don't let things take the place of lives.
When the warnings come, take heed and leave.
Don't think to stay and save your property.
Your home.
Your precious "stuff".


Disaster preparedness officials have probably the
best answer to anyone who elects to stay on the Island
in the face of a major storm.
They ask for names of those remaining.
And names of next of kin, so they can be contacted
to identify the remains.
When hurricane warnings come to this part of the
coast, leave the Island as soon as possible.
Don't become a statistic.


-~ S- 4 gl
silo=~I~~: ~I


JUNE 2, 1994





Iim PAGE 14 M JUNE 2, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Storm, hurricane terms to clip


Confused between gale force and hurricane
force winds? Unsure of the difference between a
gale warning and a hurricane warning?
The definitions below may help you keep your
terminology straight this hurricane season.
Flash flood warning a flash flood has been
reported or is imminent. Take immediate action.
Flash flood watch flash flood conditions are
possible. Be alert.
Gale warning storm conditions are expected
that include winds of up to 54 mph and heavy rain.
Hurricane a central low pressure system
with very strong and pronounced circulation, winds
in excess of 74 mph, heavy rain, high seas and a
storm surge. Hurricanes can generate winds of
more than 200 mph and create up to 40-foot waves.
Hurricane eye the area of relative calm in


the center of a hurricane. Expect winds to come from
the opposite direction when the eye passes.
Hurricane warning hurricane conditions may be
expected within 24 hours in the area. Begin making prepa-
rations for a hurricane when a hurricane warning is issued.
Hurricane watch-hurricane conditions are a real
possibility in the area within 36 hours. When a hurri-
cane watch is issued, residents in the area should be
prepared for a hurricane.
Small craft cautionary statements boaters are
advised to remain in port when a small craft caution-
ary statement is issued due to strong winds and rain.
Storm surge a dome of water pushed ahead of
the eye of a hurricane, often reaching 20 feet in height.
The storm surge is in addition to the high waves gen-
erated by the hurricane.
Tropical depression a low pressure system gen-


erally characterized by closed circulation and
winds of less than 38 mph.
Tropical disturbance a moving area of thun-
derstorms in the tropics that maintains its identity
for 24 hours or more, generally characterized by
slight circulation and no strong winds.
Tropical storm a low pressure system gener-
ally characterized by strong circulation, winds ofless
than 73 mph, heavy rain and waves. Tropical storms
are named by the National Hurricane Center.
Tropical storm warning storm conditions
are expected when there is a threat of a tropical
storm making landfall within 24 hours.
Tropical storm watch storm conditions are
expected when there is a threat of a tropical storm
making landfall within 36 hours.
Tropical wave a line of weak low pressure.


Before You Build Or Remodel


Call



Popular Anna Maria Builder

Pierre Renaldo, Inc., specializes in building
throughout the coastal flood zones of southwest
Florida, using materials and technology designed to
produce "Sturctural Integrity" at competitive prices.


ISLANDER #9295-A
Base Price $91,900* (1544 Sq. Ft.)


ANNA MARIA #9233
Base Price $108,500' (1768 Sq. Ft.)


* Durability

* Timeless

Stylings


* Affordability


THE KEYWESTER #9232
Price $119,500* (1743 Sq. Ft.)
Drive by this home under construction.
9301 Kingfish St., S.Venice. Call for directions.


SILVERTON #9286
Base Price $103,500* (1816 Sq. Ft.)


ST. KITTS #8920-B
w/Window's Watch
Base Price $105,600* (1936 Sq. Ft.)
Drive by this complete home -
10 Palm Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach
Adjacent to S.Bernard's Catholic Church.
*On your lot, with standard foundation,
does not include site work.


The following are standard house features included in the purchase price:
* 4'x4'x12" concrete footings; 12"x12" poured concrete columns; 12"xl2" formed and
poured concrete beams, all with steel reinforcing for strength. The foregoing represents
the most updated foundation system for coastal areas subject to high winds, storm
surges & potential wave action or flooding.


* All concrete is 3000 PSI.
* Truss joist floor system.
* Interior stairs to parking level.
* Parking slab under living area.
* Maintenance free vinyl siding & trim.
* Victorian style windows w/screens.
* Ceramic tile entrance foyer.
* Vaulted ceilings where possible.
* S.E.E.R. 11 heat pump-A/C.
* Energy efficient fiberglass insulation.
* 20 year fungus resistant roofing.
* 200 AMP electrical panel.
* Dishwasher, disposal, space-saver
microwave oven range, self cleaning
oven, all appliances white on white.
* Ice maker line to refrigerator.


* Hook-up for washer & dryer.
* White Decora plugs & switches.
* Bright brass finish interior lock sets.
* Ceramic tile shower & tub alcove as per plan.
* Textured finish wall & ceilings for durable beauty and easy
upkeep.
* Colonist/Classique doors & trim.
* Trough lighting in kitchens.
* Ceiling fans in breakfast room/kitchen, living room and
master bedroom.
* Color styled kitchen cabinets and vanities with concealed
hinges and choice of hardware.
* Non-wax vinyl floors in kitchen, baths, and laundry rooms.
* STAINMASTER carpet with 9/16" rebound padding in
balance of house with wide choice of colors.
* Solid brass entry handle set on front door.


Expertise In Renovations, 2nd Floor Additions & Room Add-Ons.

PIERRE RENALDO, INC.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR CG CA 0349


(813) 778-0083/FAX (813) 778-1155

A Leader in the Construction Industry for Over 30 Years.

PROFESSIONAL CUSTOM BUILDING SERVICES


I
















































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This is not the
flood coverage you need!
If you live or conduct business in a flood prone area,
you need flood insurance coverage, not water coverage.
You're all wet if you think your homeowners or business
insurance policies provide flood coverage. It must be
purchased separately.
Your local independent agent who represents Auto-
Owners Insurance is the person to see for flood insur-
ance. And, with Auto-Owners, you get "no problem"
service when you need it.
Flood coverage will be "no problem" if you have your
flood insurance coverage with Auto-Owners, so see your
Auto-Owners agent today. .
Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.
Island Shopping Ctr., Holmes Beach, FL 778-2253 7'A1,/ 6&.mP.'e-


Professional Medical Center
WALK-IN CLINIC
Medicare & Medicaid Approved
Minor Emergencies
k Family Practice
503 Manatee Ave. W., Holmes Beach
778 07 1 Next to Neal-Mannausa
778 071 Real Estate Office
Open: Monday thru Friday 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM
Doctor on call 24 Hours
Call for an appointment or walk-ins are welcome anytime.










HOME AA A

GLASPARATRENONS
HARDWARE
S Mirrors L-IST OF SUPPLIES
H FOR STORM

PREPARATIONS:
Q Lanterns & Fuel Q Hand Tools
3O Flashlights U Non-electric can
" Batteries openers
" Candles .03 Portable Radios
"3 Tapes u Coolers
U Plastic Bags ID Propane Cylinders
3 Nails for Stoves & Grills
When preparing for a storm come in and we'll help
you with all the supplies you need.
ISLAND SHOPPING CENTER 778-2811
OPEN: MON. thru SAT. 9 to 5


ISLANDERf


1994


Tracking Chart


NOTICE:
BE SURE TO GET AN
EVACUATION
VEHICLE STICKER
AT YOUR LOCAL CITY HALL.


PUBLIC NOTICE
EVACUATION
& RE-ENTRY
RESIDENTS: If you have special evacuation
needs, medical problems or need transporta-
tion off the island, you need to be registered.
BUSINESSES: If you operate a business on
Anna Maria Island that provides essential ma-
terials or services to the community you may
be given preferential return privileges after a
hurricane evacuation. Submit a request to your
city hall. If approved, you will receive a letter
authorizing your early return. Your request
should include a list of employees you would
need to return early.
EMPLOYERS: If your employees reside on
or off the island, they must have wrinten autho-
rization from your city hall to come on the is-
land to work after a hurricane evacuation.
To register, orforfurther information ...
call your city hall or the Island
Emergency Operations Center
(Anna Maria Fire District).
Emergency Operations Center.. 778-6621
Bradenton Beach City Hall........778-1005
Holmes Beach City Hall .............778-2221
Anna Maria City Hall................. 778-0781

WALDE POOL,


SUPPLIES SERVICE
778-2441 or 794-1543
REPAIRS PARTS REASONABLE PRICES
501 Village Green Parkway Bradenton
"Serving Florida Since 1959"

SEA BREEZE Dock Side
Service:
MRRINE
CANVAS CO. E,
ENCLOSURES
SHRINK WRAPPING
STORM DAMAGE REPAIRS
MOORING COVERS
TRUCK TONNEAU

6060 28th St. East* Bradenton FL 34203 747-6311


Searching

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Physician Referral Service
or
To receive a Free Guide to Active
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call 798-6140.
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nUM Hospital
2020 59th St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209
OUR FAMILY CARING FOR YOUR FAMILY


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER FEo SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION

A island= =
inJon sAnimal Clinic
Fuel S Live Bait 5343 Gulf Drive Suite 900 Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
Ship's Store BOAT RENTAL
Bottom Painting William V. Bystrom DVM
Wet/Dry Storage Jane Carolan DVM


Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave., Anna Maria
778-5577
AUTHORIZED SERVICE:
Johnson, Evlnrude. OMC
Sea DrIve & OMC Cobra Stern Drive


BUY DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND SAVE
FIND US IN THE SARASOTA YELLOW PAGES


r ONTRCIONC


-Since 1936 -
New Construction
Remodeling
Docks & Seawalls
Commercial Residential


CGC12233
CGCO12233


778-2924
Holmes Beach


Local # 927-1322 Sarasota


olsafe8
HURRICANE SHUTTERS
i Jasper Laster, Product Consultant
k I 5990 S. Tamiami Trail Sarasota
TOLL FREE 800 833-5486 Fort Myers Factory


* Diagnostics Boarding
* Medicine Bathing
* Dentistry Surgery
* Professional Grooming
* 24 Hr. Emergency

L= Palma Sola
Animal Clinic


15years service
to the Islands
and'
West Bradenton

778-2445


6116 Manatee Avenue West Bradenton, Florida 34209 794-3275


ISLANDERif


100 99 98 97 96 950 94 93 92 91 900 89 88 87 8685084 83 82 81 80079


A.









Gentiluomo Enterprises
STATE LICENSED CONTRACTOR CRC017380
New Home Construction
and Remodeling
778-3544 FREE
S S* fE ESTIMATESS


Come to us for the supplies
you'll need for storm and
hurricane preparedness.
OPEN 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M. 6 DAYS A WEEK
BRADENTON BEACH HARDWARE
T 117 BRIDGE ST.
BRADENTON BEACH
PHONE 778-2335


BRADENTON WINDOW
"Serving Bradenton Since 1953"
And Allied Products, Inc.
Installation Repair- Manufacture
Windows... Doors.., Screens... Custom & Standard
Residential Commercial Mobile Homes
Showroom at 1217 29th Avenue West
747-4695
e**..*.*. ***** ****


~OUTBOARD SA
OUTBOARD SALES


Family Owned and Millwork
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size




OPEN:
Mon.-Fri.
7:30to5 AND
atl0 tr 12r HARDWARE
We specialize in custom cabinet making:
formica tops entertainment centers
Svanities -kitchens
213.54th Street, Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just West of the Island Shopping Center


\ L \

The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven.'jiesl l-
3luffs, Pat Geyer, Owner. \ \-.._
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


glw





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER EIISPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION


78 77 76 750 74 73 72 71 70' 69


For your safety...is your car
ready for an evacuation trip?
Bring it to Grooms Motors for complete
mechanical service. Experienced mechanics
and reasonably priced, always.


Otey & Associates
COMPLETE \
COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING ,
BOOKKEEPING
AND
YEAR-ROUND
TAX SERVICE
IndividuaVCorporation pn
Parnerships and Estates .-
Shirley Otey, Enrolled Agent
Licensed by Ihe U. S. Government to represent
taxpayers before tne IRS.
778-61 18 3909 E. BAY DRIVE
8-6118 (SUITE 110) HOLMES BEACH


560S Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach


778-6045


34

33

32

31

300

29

28

27

26

250
24

23

22
21

200
19
18
17
16

150
14

13
12
11

100
9
8


68 67 66 650 64 63 62 61 60059 58 57 56


Call for appointment time:
Grooms Motors & Service Center


1A SeringSenng
Manafee Counir La m l
Glass, Mirror and Acrylics
REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT
COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL 792 441


LaPensee Plumbing
P 9Repairs Remodeling
S0 a Sewer & Drain
Cleaning
K Fixture Showroom
S.4 b Reasonable Rates
SrReliable Service
778-5622
LIC. #RF0049191 5348 B Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


I


o I


6'Cd$MtUV


our 22nd Year
serving the Island communities.
There must be a reason!
During any emergency,
we're there to serve you!


MWHET


REFRIGERATION -"
A[rfLl3 @ bDI T ~ I ..


CAC044365


778-9622 Holmes Beach


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
i One ol In Oldesl Red Eilale C npanles on e Isimna
Founaing Member ol Idid Co-Usbng Service
FAX 4
778-2307 or 778-1450 778-7035
BroKers: Nancy Unqgarsky Associates Frances V. Maxon, Prue Mj.on-Yosl,
Agnes TooKer, Klmnleon TooKer Granstaj, Janice Tressler,
Pal Jackson. KennoLn JacKson. Ro;'Gemry Schulle, Miue Scnulle.
Kay Kay Hardy and Darleen Hughes --
9 A.M TO 4:30 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M TO NOON
9701 GULF DII., P.O. BOX 717 -ANNA MARIA. FLORIDA 3-1216


Barnett Bank

Your Bank
For A Lifetime

Come see us
for the service you deserve.

699 Manatee Avenue West,
Holmes Beach 778-0412

Barnett Bank of Manatee County, N.A.
All Barnett Banks insured by FDIC

INU-Weatherside
of Florida, Inc.
L SINCE 1948 Rxooss4ss
WINDOW
*I REPLACEMENT
n VINYL SIDING
SOFFIT FASCIA
PORCH
ENCLOSURES
:: Financing Available
Genesis Windoms are easy to dean. 778-7074



SSALES RENTALS INVESTMENTS


Licensed Real Estate Broker

2810 Gulf Drive Bus: 813-778-7500
Holmes Beach, Fla. 34217 Res. & Fax: 813-778-5025


Stay Alert...
We are a 24-Hour
Emergency Service.

Since 1982


ECACO
d fu u56298
AIR CONDITIONING/HEATING SALES & SERVICE
FPL DUCT CLEANING
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR f 7G 78 0.773 ".


reen
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA

778-0455
Dependable Professionals You Can Trust
SALE RENTALS PROPERTY MGT.
9906 Gulf Dr. (next to Anne Maria Post Office)


@@ATr






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER II SPECIAL HURRICANE SECTION


778-7774
Full Service
Electrical
Licensed Insured
Residential
& Corhmercial
After Hours Emergency
Call 778-7774
Lic. #ER0010206

HOLMES BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-0791POLIcE
If you need further
information call
778-2221 crrY HALL


^fdo//vr
Inc.
FREE GIFT & MAIL WRAP
HOLMES BEACH 778-2024.
,jm= .t -,- i ----_-- .
_-
HOLMES BEACH
778-2169

BRADENTON
BEACH
POLICE DEPT.
Call our
Communications Number
for Evacuation Assistance
778-6311POLICE
If you need further
information call
778-1005CITY HALL

To slay in touch with
all the news on
Anna Maria Island,
including coverage of
major storms, you
need a subscription to
The Islander
Bystander.
Call (813) 778-7978.

Bi.OWN PELIcI/



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ANNA MARIA
Post Office Plaza
9908 Gulf Drive
778-1645








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Hurricane Safety Tips
Right now, before the hurricane season begins:
Enter each hurricane season prepared. Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batteries, non-perishable
foods and other equipment you will need to secure your home and prepare yourself for evacuation.
Prepare or update your Hurricane Survival Kit. The kit should include: medicines (at least a two week
supply) special dietary foods that are non-perishable blankets, pillows, sleeping bags flashlight and bat-
teries portable radio and batteries extra clothing lightweight folding chairs, cots personal items infant
necessities quiet game or favorite toy for children important papers, valid identification papers snacks.

If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a threatened region,
pay attention to weather broadcasts for updates.
Fill your vehicle with gasoline, check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Gather your Hurricane Survival Kit.
Moor your boat securely, or evacuate it to a safe mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to small win-
dows is mostly caused by wind-driven debris; damage to larger windows may come from debris as well as pressure.
Bring indoors all outdoor furniture, plantings, lawn ornaments and anything that can be easily moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be taken inside. Garbage cans, garden tools, toys, signs, porch furniture and
a number of other harmless items become missiles in hurricane winds.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs, bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water. Remem-
ber, water service may be disturbed for days or longer after a hurricane. You should have one gallon of water
per person per day, and you should have at least a three-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember that electricity may be off for days or longer and cooking
may be difficult, so make plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten cold. Check to make sure that
you have a can opener that can be operated without electricity.
Check all battery-powered equipment, and stock up on batteries. Hurricane experts recommend not us-
ing candles for light due to the threat of fire, and advise you to use flashlights instead.
Stock up on clean-up materials; mops, buckets, towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Remember, shelters do not allow pets, so animals will have
to be kept with friends or at a vet.

If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as a possible landfall
for a hurricane, begin making preparations for the storm.
Board all windows, or secure with tape or security shutters.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving the Island will be worse than you can imagine. Hurri-
cane authorities predict upwards of 12 to 17 hours to evacuate the Island, so plan ahead and plan to leave early.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for shelter openings.

If officials order an evacuation:
Leave.
Leave your swimming pool filled and superchlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise cover it.
Turn off electricity and water to your house.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where you are going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have a safe, timely ride out of the area.

After the hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be limited, and you may not be able to return to your home immedi-
ately. Roads may be blocked by trees and live power lines, and workers will need time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure you have valid identification showing your proper local address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't sightsee. Roads should remain clear for emergency vehicles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open windows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structure and contents.

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 2, 1994 M PAGE 19 l f


Hurricanes: what they are, how they form,


what they mean to YOU


From U.S. Department of Commerce
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Weather Service
American Red Cross
There are no other storms like hurricanes on earth.
Hurricanes are products of the tropical ocean and
atmosphere. Powered by heat from the sea, they are
steered by the easterly trade winds and the temperate
westerlies as well as by their own ferocious energy.
Around their core, winds grow with great velocity,
generating violent seas.
Moving ashore, they sweep the ocean inward while
spawning tornadoes and producing torrential rains and
floods.
Each year on average, 10 tropical storms (of which
six become hurricanes) develop over the Atlantic
Ocean, Caribbean Sea or Gulf of Mexico. Many of
these remain over the ocean. However, about five hur-
ricanes strike the United States coastline every three
years. Of these five, two will become major hurricanes.
Timely warnings have greatly diminished hurri-
cane fatalities in the United States. In spite of this,
property damage continues to mount There is little we
can do about the hurricanes themselves. However,
NOAA's National Hurricane Center and the National
Weather Service field offices team up with other fed-
-eral, state and local agencies, rescue and relief organi-
.zations, the private sector and the media in a huge
warning and preparedness effort.

Where they start,
how they grow
In the eastern Pacific Ocean, hurricanes begin
forming by mid-May. In the Atlantic Ocean, the Car-
ibbean and the Gulf, hurricane development starts in
June. For the United States, the peak hurricane threat
exists from mid-August to late October, although the
official hurricane season extends through November.
In other parts of the world, such as the western Pacific,
hurricanes can occur year-round.
Developing hurricanes gather heat and energy
through contact with warm ocean waters. The addition
of moisture by evaporation from the sea surface pow-
ers them like giant heat engines.
The process by which a disturbance forms and sub-
sequently strengthens into a hurricane depends on at
least three conditions.
Warm waters and moisture are two conditions. The
third is a wind pattern near the ocean surface that spi-
rals air inward. Bands of thunderstorms form, allowing
the air to warm further and rise higher into the atmo-




Hurricane

names for 1994
Every year, the National Hurricane Center
names the tropical storms that become hurricanes.
The naming is done to avoid confusion in the
event that more than one hurricane is in the Atlan-
tic Ocean at one time.
The practice of naming Intense storms has
been going on for several hundred years.
Women's names were used before the end of the
19th Century and, in 1953, was continued by the
U.S. weather services. In 1978, men's and
women's names were used to name Pacific
storms. A year later, the same practice was used
in hurricane lists for Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic and
Caribbean storms.
The 1994 names of Atlantic hurricanes are:
Alberto Leslie
Beryl Michael
Chris Nadine
Debby Oscar
Ernesto Patty
Florence Rafael
Gordon Sandy
Helene Tony
Isaac Valerie
Joyce William.
Keith


Barrier islands such as Anna Maria are highly susceptible to flooding, as this view of the Holmes Beach City


Hall illustrates.

sphere. If the winds at these higher levels are relatively
light, this structure can remain intact and allow for
additional strengthening.
The center, or eye, or a hurricane is relatively calm.
The most violent activity takes place in the area imme-
diately around the eye, called the eyewall. At the top
of the eyewall, about 50,000 feet, most of the air is
propelled outward, increasing the air's upward motion.
some of the air, however, moves inward and sinks into
the eye, creating a cloud-free area.

What hurricanes can spawn
Storm surge is a large dome of water, often 50 to
100 miles wide, that sweeps across the coastline near
where a hurricane makes landfall. The surge of high
water, topped by waves, is devastating.
The stronger the hurricane and the shallower the
offshore water, the higher the surge will be. Along the
immediate coast, storm surge is the greatest threat to
life and property.
If the storm surge arrives at the same time as high
tide, the water height will be even greater. The storm
tide is the combination of the storm surge and the nor-
mal astronomical tide.
Hurricane-force winds, 74 mph or more, can de-
stroy poorly constructed buildings and mobile homes.
Debris, such as signs, roofing material, siding and
small items left outside, become missiles in hurricanes.
Winds often stay above hurricane strength well
inland. Hurricane Hugo in 1989 battered Charlotte,
North Carolina, with gusts of near 100 mph about
175 miles inland from the Atlantic -causing massive
disruption.
Widespread torrential rains, often in excess of six
inches, can produce deadly and destructive floods.
Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979 brought 45 Inches of
rain to an area near Alvin, Texas. Long after Hurricane
Diane subsided in 1955, the storm brought floods to
Pennsylvania, New York and New England that con-
tributed to nearly 200 deaths. And Hurricane Agnes
fused with another storm system in 1972, producing
floods in the northeast which contributed to 122 deaths.
Hurricanes also produce tornadoes, which add to
the hurricane's destructive power. These tornadoes
most often occur in thunderstorms embedded in rain
bands well away from the center of the hurricane. How-
ever, they can also occur near the eyewall.

Our problem
All Atlantic and Gulf coastal areas are subject to
hurricanes or tropical storms. Although rarely struck by


hurricanes, parts of southwestern United States and the '
Pacific Coast suffer heavy rains and floods each year
from the remnants of hurricanes spawned off Mexico.
Due to the limited number of evacuation routes,
barrier islands are especially vulnerable to hurricanes.
People on barrier islands and in vulnerable coastal ar-
eas may be asked by local officials to evacuate well in
advance of a hurricane's landfall. If you are asked to
evacuate, do so immediately.
The nation has a significant hurricane problem.
Our shorelines attract large numbers of people. From
Maine to Texas, our coastline is filled with new homes,
condominiums and cities built on sand waiting for the
next storm to threaten its residents and their dreams.
There are now 45 million permanent residents
along the hurricane-prone coastline, and the population
is still growing. Florida, where hurricanes are most fre-
quent, leads the nation in new residents. In addition to
the permanent residents, the holiday, weekend and
vacation populations swell in some coastal areas 100-
fold.
A large portion of the coastal areas with high popu-
lation densities are subject to the inundation from the
hurricane's storm surge that historically caused the
greatest loss of life and extreme property damage.
During the past few years, the warning system has
provided adequate time for people on barrier islands
and the immediate coastline to move inland when hur-
ricanes have threatened. However, it is becoming more
difficult to evacuate people from the barrier islands and
other coastal areas because roads have not kept pace
with the rapid population growth.
The problem is further compounded by the fact that
80 to 90 percent of the population now living in hurri-
cane-prone areas have never experienced the core of a
major hurricane. Many of these people have been
through weaker storms, producing a false impression
of a hurricane's damage potential. This impression of-
ten leads to complacency and delayed actions which
could result in the loss of many lives.
During the 1970s and 1980s, major hurricanes
striking the United States were less frequent than the
previous three decades. With the tremendous increase
in population along the high-risk areas of our shore-
lines, we may not fare as well in the future. The dan-
ger potential will be especially true when hurricane
activity inevitably returns to the frequencies experi-
enced during the 1940s through 1960s.
In the final analysis, the only real defense against
hurricanes is the informed readiness of your commu-
nity, your family, and you.






II PAGE 20 E JUNE 2, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Roy Leep's hurricane predictions remain state-of-the-art


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
At many television stations, the weathercast comes
from the National Weather Service wires. In the Tampa
Bay area, it might just be the corner TV station that's
providing the scoop to the government.
The corerr" in this case is on Tampa's Kennedy
Boulevard, and the station is WTVT- more popularly
known as "Channel 13." The first station with its own
weather radar three decades ago, WTVT continues to
be at the forefront of severe storm forecasting with
millions of dollars invested in the latest state-of-the-art
technology.
Not long ago, the federal government launched a
new weather satellite. There were immediate concerns
it would not achieve its proper orbit That problem has
been solved, and later in the hurricane season Channel
13 will go on line with the most advanced eye-in-the-
sky to date.
According to WTVT Weather Director Roy Leep,
Channel 13 is already set up to get those satellite pic-
tures out to the viewing public faster than anyone. And
for those who remember Labor Day weekend 1985,
when Hurricane Elena taunted the Island, or watched
nervously in August 1992 as Hurricane Andrew blew
ashore to our south, the sooner someone can state
where a big storm is going (or not going), the better.
To explain more, The Islander Bystander inter-
viewed Leep.
Islander Bystander: What's the status with the
new satellite, GOES-8? (GOES is an acronym for Geo-
stationary Observational Environmental Satellite.)

I ,-,mod


Hurricane reconnaissance planes, such as the WP-3
Orion, fly into the eye of big storms to gather data.


Roy Leep, the
area's weather
icon, at left,
and his dog
Scud, above,
the mascot for
WTVT Channel
13.
Photos from
WTVT,
Tampa Tribune


Roy Leep: As of today, GOES-8 is in its desig-
nated orbit, and all of the systems are functioning well.
It's still undergoing tests and evaluation. We have
looked at the signal with our equipment, and it looks
very strong. We anticipate taking some test pictures
probably within the next week.
Operationally, 1 don't think it's going to be avail-
able for use until late September or October that's
a schedule the government satellite people have it on.
Islander: Is this satellite just a replacement for the
other satellites which are beginning to fail, or is it an
upgrade in technology?
Leep: It's both. It's a replacement for the old se-
ries, and the first of a new series of GOES satellites
which will take better resolution pictures more fre-
quently. We'll get about twice the resolution of the old
satellite, and it does some other sounding techniques
that the earlier ones could not do as well.
Islander: Is it true that Channel 13 is the only non-
government entity that's going to have direct access to
the satellite?
Leep: As far as I know, we're the only television
station that has a full earth station. We can pick up the
pictures directly, and we've been doing that since the
late 1970s.
Islander: What is the main advantage to viewers?
Leep: The main advantage is that since we have ac-
cess to the full satellite pictures immediately when they're
transmined, we receive the pictures before anybody else
in the television industry. Everyone else is using a middle-


1


Don't plan to weather any of these storms on Island


Hurricanes are placed into categories by the Na-
tional Hurricane Center based on the strength of the
storms. Storm categories allow emergency manage-
ment officials to determine time and need of evacua-
tion of areas of the coastline.
The Manatee County Division of Emergency Man-
agement notes that "a Category I hurricane will kill
you just as fast as a Category 5 storm, with the excep-
tion that in a Category 5 storm you will be under a lot
more water."
Hurricane veterans have noted it is extremely dif-
ficult to walk around in winds in excess of 50 mph -
24 miles an hour less than even a Category 1 storm.
Officials also plan to close the bridges to vehicles
trying to evacuate Anna Maria Island at winds of less
than hurricane force.
Hurricane forecasters use a "disaster-potential
scale" to assign storms into five categories. From least
to most powerful, the five categories and damage po-
tential are as follows.
Category 1
Winds of 74-95 mph. Damage is primarily to
shrubbery, trees, foliage and unanchored mobile
homes. Some damage may occur to poorly constructed
signs. Storm surge is expected from four to five feet
above normal, and flooding is expected a barrier is-
lands, and low-lying coastal roads are expected to be
inundated. Expect minor pier damage and small craft
to be torn from exposed anchorages.


Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a Category 1 storm,
leaving in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in dam-
age.
Category 2
Winds of 96-110 mph. Damage caused by winds is
considerable, with some trees blown down. Major dam-
age is expected to exposed mobile homes and poorly
constructed signs. Some damage to roofs, windows and
doors of buildings is expected. Expect considerable
damage to piers, marinas and small craft in unprotected
anchorages. Storm surge is expected to be six to eight
feet above normal, with accompanying flooding.
Hurricane Cleo in 1964 was a Category 2 storm,
devastating Florida's east coast and causing $500 mil-
lion in damage.
Category 3
Winds of 111-130 mph. Large trees will probably
be toppled. Practically all poorly constructed signs will
be blown down. Structural damage is expected to small
buildings, and many mobile homes are expected to be
destroyed. Storm surge nine to 12 feet above normal.
Serious flooding along barrier islands and coastal ar-
eas. Large exposed buildings will be damaged, and
smaller structures destroyed by wave action and float-
ing debris.
Hurricane Betsy in 1965 was a Category 3 storm
that killed 75 people and caused $1 billion in damage.
Category 4
Winds of 131-155 mph. Shrubs and trees gone.


Extensive damage to roofs, windows and doors, with
most roofs on small homes destroyed. Complete de-
struction expected on mobile homes. Storm surge 12-
15 feet above normal. Major damage is expected to
lower floors of structures near the coastline or on bar-
rier islands due to flooding, waves and floating debris.
Hurricane Donna in 1960 was a Category 4 storm
that killed 50 people and caused $500 million in dam-
ages. Wind gusts were estimated at 180 mph in Hurri-
cane Donna.
Hurricane Andrew came ashore on Florida's east
coast August 25, 1992 as a Category 4 storm. Sustained
winds topped 145 mph, with gusts more than 175 mph.
More than 60,000 homes were destroyed, 200,000
people homeless, more than 2 million people evacu-
ated, 15 people died and damage was estimated at $20
billion.
Hurricane Andrew was the third most intense hur-
ricane this century, and was caused the greatest loss of
property of any hurricane in the United States.
Category 5
Winds in excess of 155 mph. No trees, shrubs or
signs. No windows, doors, small buildings, mobile
homes. Storm surge greater than 15 feet above normal,
resulting in extreme damage to structures less than 10
feet above sea level.
A 1935 hurricane on Labor Day struck the Florida
Keys with winds in excess of 200 mph. A total of 408
people died as a result of the hurricane.


man of some type it goes through a production house
that adds value to the satellite picture, so there is a delay
before it gets to other television stations.
Our equipment processes the pictures directly, and
then we can also sectorize any view at any resolution
that we want we have total flexibility of use.
Islander: Wasn't Channel 13 ahead of the National
Weather Service in Ruskin in getting Doppler radar?,
Leep: We've had full Doppler radar for five years,
and Ruskin has just come on line with theirs.
We have equipment in our office which permits us to
see the new Doppler radar at Ruskin as well as those in
Melbourne and Miami. We have total access to the pic-
tures they're seeing, and that supplements our Doppler.
Islander: With all of this radar and satellite technol-
ogy, it can be assumed that the accuracy of hurricane land-
fall predictions has improved as compared with years past,
but how much has this lessened the danger to residents of
barrier islands? It's still important to heed warnings and
evacuate as soon as possible, correct?
Leep: That's true. Obviously, because you invest
in new equipment it doesn't make the danger go away.
There's still the same danger as last year and the year
before of being hit by a hurricane. Of course, we'll be
able to keep better tabs on its approach with the new,
sophisticated equipment that we have, but it certainly
doesn't lessen the danger.
Islander: As far as being able to predict landfall,
how accurate are forecasts now? Have they improved
much in recent years?
Leep: The National Hurricane Center will verify,
I'm sure, that while the accuracy has increased very,
very slowly over the last 10 or 15 years, the average
error at the end of 24 hours is still in the neighborhood
of 80 to 100 miles. That can make a great deal of dif-
ference on impacting the coastline, so the first word
you receive on the approach of hurricane shouldn't be
the last word you should keep up to date on exactly
where the main threat is going to be, because it's likely
to vary with time.
Islander: Let's talk a moment about some older
technology hurricane reconnaissance planes. A few
years ago the federal government was talking of elimi-
nating these planes, but you expressed your feelings
that the hurricane hunters obtain physical data on
storms not obtainable in any other way. Has the recon-
naissance program found the funding it needed?
Leep: It certainly has for this year, but like most
budgets, it's under review every year. There are no
replacement ideas for those planes, however. The Na-
tional Hurricane Center will receive a new, specially-
equipped jet aircraft, but that's not scheduled until
1996. Even when that plane comes on board, it won't
do the job of all of the reconnaissance aircraft that the
Air Force is currently using.
I don't see any change in the need for those recon-
naissance aircraft for the foreseeable future.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 2, 1994 0 PAGE 21 EiB


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
Say good-bye to May! What a busy, busy month.
I hope the Anna Maria Island Historical Society and
the centennial team can take some time to rest up now
that the Centennial Celebration is over. Good team
work, strong organizational skills, and a group of
people willing to put in lots of extra time and effort -
it all spelled success.
Crabby Bill's (a.k.a. Pete Reynard's) is keeping
the lounge only open for now as they remodel the
kitchen. They have some unusual specialty drinks (like
raw oysters in a shot glass with vodka a depth
charge), and they are serving a limited bar menu and
like $1 for a dozen raw oysters during happy hour.
Managers tell me that any club or social obligations
made while Eleanor Reynard was running Pete's will
be happily honored by Bill's. The Clearwater restaurant
is also moving into the old Sarasota Brewery in
Bradenton. They hope the town and Island businesses
will coexist nicely.
Speaking of Pete's, the chef has taken up residence
at The Anchorage. Their first weekend together initi-
ated a wonderfully lavish buffet, ala Pete's only better.
Italian specialties, seafood including peel-and-eat
shrimp and lobster "fra diablo," a carved round of beef
and many more goodies are included. The price is right
too. And Sunday buffet brunch promises to be a treat.
Peaches Ice Cream & Deli owner Ron Kilner tells
me he bought another shop in town, Christine's Ice
Cream in Cortez Plaza, soon to be known as Peaches
II. Kilner became interested in the shop because it hap-
pens to be where he buys all his ice cream and ice
cream cakes they make them there just like home-
made. He'll put a deli at the town location, and con-
tinue to carry his great ice cream here, and the two-day


Fine German & Polish Cuisine
OPEN- SUn. 12:00 BIER 1:00 DINNER SERVED
Mon Sat Dinner 4:30pm Til?
OUR DAILY SPECIALS
SUN: SAUERBRATEN OR ROULADE ....... 10.90
MON., TUES: GOULASH......................... 8.90
WED., THURS: PORK CHOP................ 8.90
ALL MEALS WITH POTATOES, SALAD OR CABBAGE
Happy Hour Everyday 4:30-6:00
DRAFT & HOUSE WINE 2 FOR 1
3246 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island-
778-1320 (Next To Walgreens)

5702 MARINA DR.
HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
OPEN DAILY AT 4 PM
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 til Midnight)
* Tuesday: NICKEL BEER NIGHT, 6 to 8 PM
* Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT- REGGAE
* Thursday: LADIES NIGHT-$5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP

Wednesday, June 2 Reggae "Ambush"
Fri. & Sat., June 3 & 4 "Winter's Ghost"
Wednesday, June 8. Reggae "Democracy"
Thursday, June 9* Alternative "Knucklehead"
Fri. & Sat., June 10 & 11 "Hammerheads"
Closed Mondays, For the Summer


delivery delay on ice cream cakes will disappear.
Chez Andre is closing for a mini-vacation in the
Carribean June 2 through June 6. A marked improve-
ment over last year's trip to "misery." (Lacking some-
thing in the translation, it turned out the trip was to
Missouri.)
At the Anchor Inn, Bobby Tingler tells me
they've got a big band coming next weekend, June 10
and 11: The Toler Brothers and Company, with Franky
and Dan Toler, formerly with the Gregg Allman Band,
will do performances with special guests including
Gwen Fogt, the blues singer from China Moon. A few
other players are expected more next week. Cover
will be $4 for the Friday and Saturday night gig.
Island artist Carl Voyles has an exhibit hanging in
the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Voyles'
work is worth viewing. He's a former physician who
took up art after retirement. It was a lot of years to wait
to find out you're that talented. His work is also on
display at the Artists Guild Gallery, Holmes Beach.
Dips Ice Cream is the newest parlor on the Island.
Vinnie DiPaola opened shop on Wednesday, May 25,
in what used to be Sue's Homemade Ice Cream at
Alexis Plaza in Anna Maria. Dips is open seven days
a week, but they're still trying to figure out the best
hours to open. For now, it's noon to 10 p.m. Check out
the grand opening this weekend. Root beer floats for
everyone!
Rotten Ralph's is serving their annual summer
special Fish & Chips, all-you-can-eat, Mondays
through Thursdays. Ralph's wife, Doreen Russell cel-
ebrated a birthday last week. Happy Birthday, Doreen.
The Russell family wanted to see Ato's Polynesian
show and thought they were going to have to go to
town to see Ato and her family perform at the Bali Hai
Supper Club, but no. They were able to see the show
at Ato's monthly luau last Wednesday right here in
Anna Maria!
It's all to strange when you consider that Anna
Maria code enforcement is saying that Ato's Restau-
rant is only licenced for breakfast, so I was a little
surprised to hear they are serving lunch and dinner. I
hear the all-you-can-eat luau also includes an all-you-


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Snooks Adams'
Kids Day June 18
The 40th Annual Snooks Adams' Kids Day
sponsored by the Anna Maria Island Privateers
will be held Saturday, June 18, 11 a.m. to 2
p.m., at Bayfront Park, Anna Maria.
The event is free to all youngsters from
Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key and Manatee
County. Free hot dogs, pizza and drinks will be
served.
Festivities include games, which begin at,
11 a.m.; the Best-Dressed Little Pirate
Contest,at noon; a Treasure Hunt, 12:30 p.m.;
Sandcastle judging, 1 p.m.; and meeting the
Privateers and boarding their ship.
The first Kids Day was organized by
Snooks Adams, former Holmes Beach Police
Chief, in 1954. He turned the event over to fel-
low Privateers in 1980 when he retired.
For more information call 778-5934.


can-drink rum punch that is drawing some attention,
too. You might want to check out Ato's everybody
seems interested from Tallahassee to Tarantola.

Our apologies to several readers who requested
numerous recipe favorites from Leverock's. Looks like
a "no show." Although we've talked to corporate folks
on several occasions, with promises, promises of reci-
pes to come, we never have received the first reply.
Stir-it-up is a weekly column covering events,
newsy items and fun things to do for Islanders, most on
the Island, some off-island. We encourage those who
provide food, drink and entertainment to send us infor-
mation of your upcoming event or tell us what's new.
You may FAX, mail or drop by The Islander By-
stander with a press release. The deadline is noon Fri-
day for the following week's column.
The office is located at 5408 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach, FL 34217, and the FAX number is 778-9392.



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lIE PAGE 22 0 JUNE 2, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
5/24, natural death, 100 block of Tuna
Bradenton Beach
5/20, trespass warning, 116 Bridge St., Sports
Lounge. The officer responded to a report of an intoxi-
cated white male who refused to leave the premises.
The bartender said the subject had been asked to stay
off the premises several times. The officer issued a tres-
pass warning to the subject.
5/21, stolen tag, 600 block of Gulf Drive North.
5/22, carrying a concealed firearm, possession of
marijuana less than 20 grams, possession of drug para-
phernalia, Coquina Beach. The officer on patrol ob-
served a vehicle parked in a no parking area and, upon
approaching the vehicle, noticed the passenger shoving
something between the seats. As the officer spoke to
the occupants of the vehicle, he noticed the lever to a
rifle sticking out from under a pair of shorts on the
passenger side of the floor board.
The officer ordered the subjects out of the vehicle
and took possession of the rifle. He searched the ve-
hicle and located a bag of marijuana and cigarette pa-
pers down the side of the passenger seat. The passen-
ger, Franklin D. Harrison, Jr., 21, of Bradenton said the
items were his. He was placed in custody.
The officer also found a field knife, a buck knife,
two clubs and several rounds of .22 ammunition and
confiscated the items.
5/22, stolen tag, 100 block of Seventh Street.
5/24, burglary, 200 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach
City Pier. A person unknown entered through a win-
dow screen and removed the keys to an empty cash
register, five pounds of cod and 50 cents in pennies.
Holmes Beach
5/20, burglary, 5424 Marina Dr., Island Produce.
A person unknown cut a wire holding a tarp, entered
the business and removed $30 in cash.
5/20, animal, 600 block of Manatee Avenue. A
dog was found and returned to its owner.
S5/20, disturbance, 2710 Gulf Dr., Cedar Cove. An
officer was asked to stand by while undesirable guests
were being evicted.


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5/21, noise from a loud party, 4400 block of Gulf
Drive.
5/21, disturbance, 8100 block of Gulf Drive. The
officer responded in reference to a disturbance. The
complainant said her ex-boyfriend was intoxicated and
yelling and screaming outside the residence. He was
gone upon the officer's arrival.
5/21, suspicious, 400 block of 28th Street. The
complainant observed a white male juvenile and a
white female juvenile acting suspiciously at a resi-
dence. They were gone upon the officer's arrival.
5/21, vandalism, 3800 East Bay Drive. A phone
was removed from an elevator.
5/22, disturbance, 400 block of 63rd Street. The
officer responded to a report of a disturbance. A father
and step-daughter were having an argument and were
advised to quiet down.
5/22, assistance, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Public
Beach. The officer responded to a report of an older
adult male trying to get little girls to play with him by
showing them sea shells. The officer spoke to the sub-
ject who said he would leave the beach.
5/22, suspicious, 2800 Avenue E. The officer re-
sponded to a report of someone stealing sea oats and
found the owner transplanting the plants.
5/23, suspicious, 3700 block of 6th Avenue. The
officer responded in reference to two juveniles who had
entered an apartment while the resident was on vaca-
tion. The officer located the key holder, entered the unit
and found two juveniles inside skipping school. They
said the son of the resident had given them the keys and
asked them to check the apartment. The officer called
the juveniles' parents and the juveniles were taken back
to school.
5/23, vandalism, 3700 block of 5th Street A slid-
ing glass door was broken by a stone.
5/23, suspicious, Marina Drive and 62nd Street.
The complainant reported a white male in a vehicle
with a gun in his hand. The officer located the vehicle
and the driver allowed him to search it. The driver told
the officer that he and a friend were playing with a
water gun. The officer cautioned him about such activ-
ity.
5/23, 200 block of 6th Street. The complainant


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advised the officer that his boat was being used as a
spring board by two juveniles. Upon the officer's ar-
rival, the juveniles said they thought the boat belonged
to a friend. They apologized to the complainant and
returned the boat. The complainant signed a waiver of
prosecution.
5/23, battery on a police officer, possession of
narcotic paraphernalia, resisting with violence, posses-,
sion of marijuana less than 20 grams, alley at 30th
Street and Gulf Drive. The officer observed a vehicle
driven by Susan Schneerer, 35, of Holmes Beach, cross
the center line, swerve and drive off and back onto the
roadway erratically.
Upon speaking with Schneerer, the officer in-
formed her she had too much to drink and could not
continue to drive. According to the report, she said she
had not had too much to drink and would continue to
drive. While the officer attempted to place Schneerer
in custody, she resisted violently and the officer
sprayed her with pepper spray.
After being placed in custody and placed in the
patrol car, Schneerer demanded that the officer get her
purse out of her vehicle. The purse was open and the
officer observed a bag of marijuana, cigarette papers,
scales, three film canisters containing marijuana and
residue and a pipe.
5/24, animal, 200 block of 70th Street The officer
responded to a report of a found basset hound and lo-
cated the owner.
5/24, suspicious, 200 block of 71st street. The
complainant reported that it appeared that someone was
trying to break into the house across the street. The
officer found the resident who had just returned from
vacation and had lost her keys.
5/25, lost property, 5327 Gulf Dr., First Union.
The complainant reported that he accidentally left a
Motorola, two-way transmitter/receiver with a collar
microphone on his vehicle and drove away.
5/24, DWLS, 2800 block of Avenue E.
5/25, traffic, 200 block of 85th Street. The officer
responded to a report of reckless drivers. The complain-
ant advised that two vehicles were racing down the street.
One vehicle was observed parked at a residence. The of-
ficer warned the driver about such activity.


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Praiseworthy performance Islander Photo: Joy
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna Maria Elementary School for the week ending May 20. K
ing, left to right, are Peter Dowling and Shawn LaPensee. First row, left to right, are Corey Blancet,
Sebastien Perez, Benjamin Klotz and Megahan Fleming. Back row, left to right, are McKenzie Wilkins,
Powell, Katie Holmes, Amber Johnson, Ben Sato and Rebecca Epright.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 2, 1994 M PAGE 23 Hi


SAnna Maria School
menu
SMonday, 6/6/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Pork Chop Shape or Beef Nuggets,
S Mashed Potatoes, Fruit, Vegetable
Tuesday, 6/7/94
School Dismissed at 1:30p.m.
S Have a safe and happy summer!
Breakfast: Hot.Sausage Roll or Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Hamburger or Hot Dog, Tater Tots,
Fruit, Vegetable
All meals served with milk.


Little Leaguers end
season with awards
It was more than a winning season for the Haley's
Motel and Betsy Hills Real Estate Little League teams
it was a championship season. The two teams took
the number-one titles for the 1994 season, with Haley's
standing on top of the mountain in the major league,
Courtney and Betsy Hills commanding the honors for the minors.
Last week the best of the best were recognized by
their peers, coaches, parents and fans at a ceremony at
the Community Center.
Tracy The 1994 Major League All-Stars are Gray
team: Scot Atkinson, Dusty Wagner, Derek Pettigrew,
Aaron DePaola, Jake Fara, Nick Foerster, Robbie Dou-
glas, Evan Purcell, Michael Smith, Colt Fletcher, Mike
Armstrong, Barry Andricks and Mark Huber.
Major League Blue team: Mark Pelham, Jacob
Becker, Paul Feeney, Greg Granstad, Travis Wicklund,
Greg LaPensee, Taylor Bernard, Logan Shields, Tom
Reiner, Forest Beall, Justin Wall and Bill Floto.
The Minor League selected All-Star teams. Gray
team: Kim Berrett, Nicole Bollettieri, Johnny Vroom,
Scott Redden, Meghan Miller, Dusty Andricks, Josh
Armstrong, Ben Miller, Michael Cagnina, Chad Alger,
Mario Torres and Jonathan Cannon.
Minor League Blue team: Amanda Cicero, Josh
Sato, J.C. Cicero, Justin Romeo, Jeff Comkowycz,
Mark Stroud, Stephen Yencho, Alex Brown, Brooks
McEldowney, Melissa Mixon, Jessica Foraker and
David Cramer.


Make 'learning' not war Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
It "ain't" over until you see the graduating fifth-grade classes'presentation of "Carousel of Time. Reaching
back into the ancient history of the 60s and 70s, the students will salute their final-year at Anna Maria El-
ementary with a rousing presentation of period music peppered with historical skits. Parents and the public
are invited to join the fun on Wednesday, June 1, at 7p.m. in the school's auditorium. On the road, left to
right, are fifth-graders Lucina Courtney, Jonathan Kent, Janae Haupt Jessica Foraker, Melanie Doster and
Jeremy Purvis. Peace.


r 7.-'


Batting Champion Greg LaPensee (left) and Scot
Atkinson, recipient of the Joe Maggio Most Valuable
Player Award, congratulate each other. Not pictured
is Justin Wall, who was honored with the Bill Ogden
Sportsmanship Award
Islander Photos: Mark Ratliff


The Major League Champs of Haley's Motel are: (Front row, kneeling, left to Champs of the Minor League Betsy Hills team are: (Front row, kneeling ,left to
right): Nick Foerster, Alan Jenkins, Ricky Buckelew, Jason Loomis and Joey right)" Sarah Thomas, J.C. Cicero, Billy Bob Goldschmidt, Josh Sato and Chris
Mousseau. (Middle row, standing): Derek Pettigrew, Scot Atkinson, Aaron Meir. (Back row, standing): Bobby Cooper, Ryan Headrick, Justin Romeo,
DePaola, Dusty Wagner, Evan Goldsen, Tim Hasse and Jake Fara. (Back row, Amanda Cicero, Suzanne Wight and Debbie Tyson. Not pictured are coaches, Gib
left to right): Coaches Garnet Atkinson, Joe DePaola and Gary Wagner. Bergquist, Jeff Tyson and Sam Sato.


ELI-..
-t-" ..
^





IiD PAGE 24 0 JUNE 2, 1994 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Manatee money mightily managed


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor perspectives
"Ask and you shall receive."
No sooner did I raise the question in this space last
week of what happens to the $2.7 million a year gen-
erated by the manatee license plate than a answer ar-
rived in the mail. Not a complete answer, but an inter-
esting one, anyway.
"The Marine Scene," Florida Sea Grant's publica-
tion put out by John Stevely and company from their
Palmetto office, contains lots of facts about manatees
in the May-June issue.
For example, 147 manatee deaths were recorded in
Florida last year. The largest percentage of deaths were
newborns, at 39. Another 35 were confirmed kills by
boat collisions, and seven more by "other related hu-
man-related causes."
Canal locks somewhere in Florida crushed five
manatees to death last year, two were cold-stressed (a


Anglers, mark your calendars with a big excla-
mation point on June 18. That's the day the Second
Annual Fishing the Islands Tournament will be held.
Like last year, this event is sponsored by Is-
land Discount Tackle, and profits will benefit the
Anna Maria Island Community Center. In 1993,
$2,500 was turned over to the Center, but for an-
glers Jeff, Gary and Nancy Ellis it meant $5,000
(they caught two cobia and four redfish).
First prize this year will again be $5,000, and
there are a good many other major prizes consist-
ing of cash and merchandise which will be
awarded.
Entry fee is $150 per boat, with a maximum of
five people fishing in each vessel.
Last year, 80 boats fished in the all-species
tournament, and 21 species were hooked. Trout
and redfish, which numbered in the hundreds, were
released alive.
A captains' meeting will be held the evening
of June 17 at Shells Restaurant, where questions
will be answered. At least one representative from


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far cry from the 47 killed by a cold snap in early 1990)
and 22 died of "other natural causes." Finally, 35 died
of "undetermined causes."
So where does the money go? A good portion of
the revenue goes to the Florida Department of Environ-
mental Protection and its Marine Research Institute in
St. Petersburg. Dr. Scott Wright, a biologist at the In-
stitute, and Donna Banowetz, the marine research as-
sistant, head up the manatee protection program there.
To quote "The Marine Scene:"
"Scott is the Rescue Coordinator for the Southeast
United States. Donna records all the sightings and
deaths-each year. The operation of the Institute uses no
tax funds. Instead, the manatee car tag that so many
people are buying when they register automobiles is
supporting this program. A certain amount from each
manatee car tag, and $1 from each boat registration in
Florida, goes to support aerial surveys of manatees,
manatee sanctuary areas, manatee rehabilitation,


each boat must attend this meeting, but everyone
involved with the tournament is invited.
Fishing will get underway June 18 at 6:30
a.m., with weighing-in being allowed until mid-
night. Tournament organizers say this will allow
boats to fish offshore until dark and still have four
or five hours to arrive at the weigh station.
On June 19 the Fishing .the Islands Party will
be held at the Community Center. The barbecue-
style picnic get-together will begin at noon, with
tournament results being announced at 2 p.m.
There will be entertainment, and prizes will be
awarded every 15 minutes throughout the day.
Participants may enter the tournament as late
as the captains' meeting on June 17, but event
sponsors strongly urge anglers to try to enter in
advance.
Complete rules and entry form are in the June
issue of Fishing the Islands, Island Discount
Tackle's monthly newsletter. For more informa-
tion, or to have a copy of the rules and entry form
mailed, call 778-7688.


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Buy your distant friends and relatives a gift
subscription to the "Best News on Anna Maria
Island." A subscription form for The Islander
Bystander is available on page 7.






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necropsy equipment and refrigerated trailers, four field
stations and one marine lab."
Stevely goes on to say "The greatest threat to
manatees is still increasing boat traffic." Contrary to
what most of us think upon seeing those ugly prop scars
on manatees, most of them aren't killed by the props,
but from impacts with boats. Death comes from con-
cussions or some sort of internal injuries. And boats
aren't the manatees only problem.
"Manatees sometimes ingest balls of monofilament
fishing line while eating plants. If these balls of line are
small enough, they can pass out of the body. If not, they
may block the digestive tract. If a hook is attached to
the line, it usually lodges in the small intestine, caus-
ing a long cut" Grim stuff.
If you come on an injured or dead manatee, call the
Florida Marine Patrol at 1-800-DIAL-FMP. They'll
move the critter to the nearest boat ramp and notify the
Marine Research Institute. If the manatee is injured,
they'll probably take it to one of the three rehab facili-
ties in Florida, located at Sea World, Lowry Park Zoo
in Tampa or the Miami Seaquarlum.
If dead, the carcass goes to the marine Mammal
Pathobiology Lab in St. Pete via a refrigerated trailer.
There, they perform a necropsy and try to determine the
sex, age and cause of death.
Welcome to National Safe Boating Week begin-
ning Sunday, June 5. This year's not-so-ringing motto
is "Boat smart, boat safe, boat sober." While that may
not be great literature, it's still sound advice, so make
this the year you do something about safe boating.
If you haven't take a boating safety course, sign
up. Check your vessel for required safety gear and then
make it a point to add a little something extra that might
come in handy.
And be especially careful when you have young-
sters in your boat. Not only are you responsible for their
safety, they're watching you, too, as well as your atti-
tude and actions. The way you drive your boat could
well influence them for years to come.
No more bay scallop harvesting, at least for a
year, beginning July 1. That's the result of a vote by
the Governor and Cabinet last week to halt all scallop
taking south of the Suwannee River. I went over the
details in the May 5 column, but thought you'd like to
know final action has been taken.
Meanwhile, work continues in both Sarasota and
Tampa Bays to re-introduce scallops where they've
been virtually gone for 30 years or so. Clean-up of the
Bay waters in the past several years provide some hope
for those blue-eyed critters, and researchers are trying
their best to re-establish them in our local waters again.
Good luck to us all on this one.
See you next week.

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Registration underway for

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 2, 1994 I PAGE 25 E11


300-pound blue marlin caught offshore


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Sal Salvador takes the "Angler of the Week" prize
with a 300-pound blue marlin he and his son caught
while fishing in the Gulf. Wow! Other action includes
the wrap-up of snook season, and the report of big red-
fish continuing to lurk on the flats and channels.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
have been catching black drum, catch-and-release red-
fish, a few mackerel, pompano, some small sharks and
stingrays. Congratulations go out to Jonathan, who
landed a 35-inch snook Friday night.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said anglers
there have been catching big reds, which had to be re-
leased. There are also good catches of mackerel, and
Dave said they have been seeing a lot of snook under
the pier that have been teasing anglers without any
hook-ups.
Arkee at the Bradenton Beach Pier said a lucky
fisher landed a shark Saturday night off the south-Is-
land pier. Other action included a 33-inch catch-and-
release redfish, flounder and trout. He advises good
fishing in the evenings.
Capt. Zack at the Dee Jay II said snook season
ended June 1. Catching a few linesiders before the
deadline was Al Schram of Holmes Beach who caught
a 38-inch 20-pound snook Friday. Reds are plentiful,
with some bulls of up to 34 inches coming in. Trout and
flounder fishing has been steady, with a five-pound
flounder being the best catch of the week. Tarpon are
offshore, and Capt. Zack said that with the closure of
snook season he's going to start targeting the big sil-
ver kings.
Kelly at Galati Yacht Basin said Sal Salvador and
his sun caught the whopper of the week: a 300-pound blue
marlin while fishing about 30 miles out in the Gulf.
Libby at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said an-
glers have been catching lots of permit, hooking a lot
of reds as well as good catches of mackerel and trout.
She added that snook seem to be moving up the rivers.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip averaged 60 head of Key West grunts,
rudders and triggerfish. The six-hour trip averaged 150
head of Key West grunts, porgies, vermillion and lane
snapper. The nine-hour trip averaged 25 head of red
grouper, mangrove snapper and porgies.
On my boat Magic, we've been catching a mess of
27-inch trout. Dr. John Sharp from Key Royale caught
a 31-inch snook. John and Susy Dukes from Plant City
caught a lot of big trout as well, and Hank and Rosie
Webster from Arizona also caught a bunch of 27-inch
trout. I'm taking a couple weeks off, and won't be tak-
ing charters again until June 13.
Capt Todd Romine said snook fishing was excel-
lent, with fish up to 38-inches caught.


-9-

GALATI
YACHT BASIN


Capt. Rick Gross is still able to catch permit off-
shore, with plenty of snook, too. Redfish season began
June 1, and by the looks of things it promises to be
another great season.
Capt. Tom Chaya said his charters have been
catching snook, redfish, trout and permit.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said fishing is "hot,
hot, hot you name it, we've got good reports on it."


HOBIE
SUN
GLASSES


OPEN AND COVERED BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE!
... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
0 OPEN DAYS WEEK 8TO 5 0
M*1111lip I3 Ap A


* Last

linesiders

/ of the

I season
S Carroll Williamson took
P snook season out with a
: vengeance last week,
; catching 26- and 14-
pound linesiders while
fishing with Capt. Tom
Chaya. Snook season
ended June 1. By the way,
redfish season began
June 1, and reports
indicate some of the best
red fishing in years may
be in store for anglers.
















Among those good reports are tarpon, cobia, grouper,
trout, redfish and snook. Bill reminds everyone of the
redfish season June 1, and the Fishing the Islands Tour-
nament June 18.
Capt. Dave Pinkham said his charters are filling
the coolers with amberjack, snapper, cobia and some
very big grouper, some up to 20 pounds in size.
Good luck and good fishing.


SALES & SERVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'



BOAT GROUP QUALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD


I O- I IL


Starting at $6439.


Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'

Starting at $325.


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
": P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577

ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES I


DAY
Thu 6/2
Frl 6/3
Sat 6/4
Sun 6/5
Mon 6/6
Tue 6/7
Wed 6/8


AMHIGH
8:20 1.9ft
8:52 2.0ft
9:21 2.2ft
9:53 2.3ft
12:06 1.4ft
12:58 1.4ft
1:47 1.4ft


AMLOW
1:05 .06ft
1:47 0.8ft
2:22 1.0ff
2:54 1.1ft
3:23 1.2ft
3:44 1.2ft
4:10 1.3ft


PMHIGH
8:27 1.5ft
9:52 1.4ft
11:03 1.4ft

10:22' 2.4ft
10:54' 2.5ft
11:26' 2.6ft


PMLOW
2:29 0.9ft
3:25 0.6ft
4:17 0.4ft
5:02 0.2ft
5:41 0.1ft
6:20 0.0ft
6:55 0.0ft


SCortez High Tides 7 minutes later Low Tides 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


0



Fish Tales
Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear
your fish stories,
and pictures are
welcome! Just give
us a call at
778-7978 or stop
by our office in
the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


I


I ,






JIM PAGE 26 M JUNE 2, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


CITY
Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Anna Maria

Bradenton Beach

Bradenton Beach

Bradenton Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach


Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot
127 Crescent
75x100
207 Periwinkle Plaza
85x125
214 Oak
72x148-canal
715 N Shore Dr
145x80-Gulf/lake
806-12 N Bay Blvd
300x100
847 N Shore Dr
41x100x50x100
895 N Shore Dr
50x150-bay
522 Pine Av
6D Bayou Condo
523 Loquat
75x110-canal
121 Bridge St
50x100
2409 Av C
50x100
611 Gulf DrN
19 C Imperial House
2918 Avenue E
50x100
3701 5th Av
3 Gulf View Townhses
512 71st St
92x94-canal
620 Dundee Ln
95x115-canal
202 35th St
100x100-Gulf

5907 Flotilla
96x100-canal
600 Manatee Av W
205 Westbay Cove


STYLE/rooms
residential lot

ground home
2/2/lcar/pool
elevated home
3/2/2car
elevated home
3/3.5
ground motel
8 unit + 2/1 hse
residential lot
Gulf
2 story home
3/2/2car/lcp
upstairs condo
2/1-Canal
elevated home
3/2/3car
ground commercial
1/1
elevated duplex
4/4/4cp
condo
2/1
residential lot

elevated condo
2/2.5
ground home
2/2/1car
ground home
2/2/2car
elevated 4-plex
La Margarita Apts
5bed/4baths
elevated home
2/2/3car/pool
upstairs condo.
2/2bay


AGE/size



1958
1443 sfla
1981
1768 sfla
1988
3174 sfla
1948
4,343 sfla



1965/89
1885 sfla
1972
900 sfla
1980
2111 sfla
1945
884 sfla
1985
1798 sfla
1969
754 sfla



1982
1200 sfla
1961
1194 sfla
1968
1360 sfla
1976
3084 sfla

1989
1170 sfla
1973
1200 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when
Case/Brush
3/28/94
Williams/Mackenzie
3/28/94
Snyder/Behnke
3/28/94
Mautino/Evans
3/28/94
Busek/Colon
3/28/94
Newman/Shaw
3/28/94
McDuffee/Morton
4/4/94
Martindale/Orris
4/11/94
Leikensohn/Breiter
4/11/94
Circle Pan/Bartizal
3/28/94
Rymsza/DeGaris
4/4/94
Hickman/Grant
4/11/94
Holzapfel/Toale
3/28/94
Stockmann/Heri
3/28/94
Art/Romberger
3/28/94
Lundgren/Quade
3/28/94
Wood/Heymann
4/4/94

Cassell/Hendrickson
4/4/94
Hedworth/Henke
4/4/94


SALE$/LIST$
$72,500
list $72,500
$144,000
list $159,900
$213,000
list $229,000
$850,000
list $975,000
$525,000
list $595,000
$223,000
list $247,000
$335,000
list $350,000
$82,500
list uk
$270,000
list $285,000
$116,300
list uk
$114,000
list $119,000
$75,500
list uk
$59,000
list uk
$122,900
list uk
$157,500
list $175,000
$180,000
list $196,500
$480,000
list uk

$225,000
list uk
$129,000
list $149,000


Secaur joins
Scholfield Realty
Lee Secaur of Holmes
Beach has joined Scholfield
Realty as a real estate sales-
person. Secaur is a member
of the Manatee County Board
of Realtors and the Anna
Maria Island Kiwanis Club.
Scholfield Realty is located
at 5105 Manatee Ave. W.,
Bradenton. Secaur can be
reached at 792-2363, or eve-
nings at 779-1202.


Sears joins Island
Real Estate
Jean Lee Sears, Realtor
Associate, has joined the Is-
land Real Estate team. Sears
was previously with Michael
Saunders & Co. were she was
the top producer in 1993. in
the Anna Maria Island office
and received the Outstanding
Player award for two con-
secutive years 1992-93.
Originally from Massachu-
setts, she retains an active
Brokers license there. Sears
specializes in waterfront
property.


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist

Now Accepting Appointments

Qift Certificates Available
SHouse Calls

792-3758


SCOTT L.
KOSFELD, M.D.


Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


Don't forget...
to check the hurricane special in this issue to find out how to get your resident "evacuation re-entry sticker."
When you need to know, your community newspaper, The Islander Byatander, won't let you down.
Save the section for invaluable storm preparedness information.
i


Don't forget ...
if you have special needs, medical problems or need
transportation in an evacuation, check the hurricane
special in this issue of The Islander Byatanderto
find out where to register.



^I sLfcab Pobiatyr


CLARE H. STARREIT,
D.P.M.


PODIATRIC MEDICINE -
and
SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment
.ee $


ISLANDER



What's the
best news
on Anna Maria
Island?
THE ISLANDER
BYSTANDER
... call us when
you have news
to share.
778-7978


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING MEETINGS


READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.





SW FUNERAL HOMES

KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager

BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459


MASSAGE THERAPY


Specializing in Corrective Muscle Therapy *
Rachel Barber, LMT #MAo0015, MM0004539 778-8575
By Appointment Most Insurance Accepted




MASSAGE CAN HELP:
* Arthritis (non-inflammatory) Joint Immobility
* Back, Neck & Shoulder Pain Poor Circulation
* Chronic Headache & Migraine Sciatica & Tendinitis
* Hip, Knee, Leg & Foot Pain Sport Injuries
* Fibromyalgia Stress Related Problems
* Insomnia And More
Gift Certificates 9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza
V^_ ..^ ^_ ^^_ ^^^_ ^^^ .^^^ __^


MM0003995
MA0012461


" ig .

STEPHEN G.
PELHAM, M.D.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a JUNE 2, 1994 M PAGE 27 jDi


Real Estate Transactions continued from previous page


CITY
Anna Maria

Bradenton Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach

Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot
525 Bayview PI
60x110canal
611 Gulf Dr N-condo
21 C Imperial House
101 73rd St
1 Princess Martha
4255 Gulf Dr
222 Island Village
5608 Gulf Dr
105 Sun Plaza West
6300 Flotilla Dr
84 Shell Point


STYLE/rooms
ground home
2/2.5/1car

2/1
ground condo
1/1-Gulf
elevated condo
3/2
elevated condo
2/2
upstairs condo
2/2


AGE/size
1958
1445 sfla
1969
754sfla
uk
500 sfla
1982
1460 sfla
1981
1282 sfla
1973
992 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when
Ipsen/Vona
4/18/94
Werner/Miller
4/18/94
Moore/Lange
4/11/94
Garnes/Elsasser
4/11/94
Stevens/Coleman
4/11/94
Weber/Meesenburg
4/11/94


SALE$/LIST$
$157,000
list $179,000
$79,900
list uk
$121,000
list uk
$100,000
list uk
$145,000
list $149,000
$97,000
list $105,000


Real estate transactions are compiled by Doug Dowling,
Licensed Real Estate Broker, Anna Maria, 778-1222.
"COPYRIGHT damnit by Doug Dowling himself."
1994 The Islander Bystander.



NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION
North end of Anna Maria Island, 1,560 sq. ft.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. $172,000.
S OTHER HOMESITES
AVAILABLE


QUALITY
BUILDERS
-..].,. ,3m


778-7127
Fax 779-2602
#CRC047915


RENTAL Call Julie ...
NA A I A f-lROi-r


YAGiMEN I to rent your property quickly S ,-.
with complete confidence.
Call Eliot ...
when you are thinking about
buying or selling. Call for a
free market analysis.

778-6665
Julie 1-800-749-6665 Eli


neaL mannausa


ACCREDITED MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS REALTORS


PHCaIt


ISLAND BAYFRONT Panoramic views from the 3-4BR-
2.5BA Bayfront residence with Bay and deep water ca-
nal frontage. Natural cedar construction with cathedral
ceilings throughout. Tropical setting with pool, gazebo and
lush landscaping. Short walk to Gulf beaches. Offered at
$379,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
778-2246 Office or 778-7976 Evenings
Serving Anna Maria Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive a Bradenton Beach


ANNUAL RENTALS
GULFFRONT CONDOS Efficiencies 1BR, 1BA
and 2BA,1 BA from $525 to $700 mo. plus utilities.
SANDY POINTE CONDO 2BR, 2BA, unfur-
nished. $725 plus utilities.
EFFICIENCY APT. $425 plus electric.
SUN PLAZA WEST 2BR, 2BA, furn. $1,000
plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX- 2 BR, 1BA, $575
plus utilities.
(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


MAP


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
SRetail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


Smith 1993
top producers
Smith Realtors, recently
held an awards luncheon recog-
nizing its top producers.
Marion Ragni, Zee
Catanese, Carol R. Williams
and Judy Duncan had combined
listings and sales totaling more
than $1 million in 1993.
Ragni was named Smith
Associate of the Year for 1993.


I


I


SAI FS


IL






jjj PAGE 28 JUNE 2, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


-5 6- L
RELOS


HOLMES BEACH Well kept Island home. Cen-
tral location, short walk to beach. 2BR/2BA with
large screened porch and fenced yard. To settle es-
tate. $134,900. Call Helen White, 778-6956 eves.
778-2261
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325
605-C Manatee Avenue Holmes Beach, FL 34217

1, MLs E.

What's the best news on Anna Maria Island?
THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Irn I


O vINERs


4,



0
O



VA
I


4
Li'


I you have property to lease, now is
the ume to contact the professional
property management team at Michael
Saunders & Company. Learn how you
can earn the highest possible income
on your property, in addition to exten-
i\ c senr ices provided to meet the re-
quests of our sophisticated owners and
guests.
Contact Debbie Dial at our Anna
Maria Island office for personal
attention to your special residence.
Michael Saunders
& Company
Licemned Real Estate Broker
3222 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
(813) 778-2275 or 800-881-2276


The Islander Bystander mails over 800
PAID subscriptions! Get yours on page 7.







SUBURBAN RANCH on one acre, Lorraine
Rd. 8 yrs. old, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, lanai, & air
conditioned 2 car garage! #57658, $129,900.
Call T. Dolly Young, 778-5427.
IMPERIAL HOUSE NEW LISTING! Enjoy
great Island breezes in this lovely, well-kept
1 bedroom unit w/many extra! Features:
heated pool, clubhouse, fishing dock &
deeded Gulf access. Just $75,500, #57658.
Call Carol Heinze, 792-5721.
SUGAR CREEK COUNTRY CLUB on
creek, very rare. Tastefully furnished & deco-
rated 1 bedroom, 1 bath mobile home. Commu-
nity pool, tennis, shuffleboard. Only $34,900!
#57449. Call Bruce Skorupa, 795-0303.

ISLAND DUPLEXES:
Each 2BR/1BA,
available together
"($289,900) or single
($149,900). Lovely,
bright & all updated!

Carol Heinze, CRS
REALTORD
Million Dollar Club
778-7246

20 Years Experience
Offering
Full Service
To Satisfied
Customers/Clients


WEST of GULF DR!
3BR/3BA home.
Light & breezy.
$209,000.


T. Dolly Young, IMS
REALTOR*
Premier Circle


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


- - ,'- .- -" .", "- I,0- .=:. : I
INVEST YOUR $$$ today in this modern elevated
Key West style duplex that is less than 10 years old!
Tons of storage plus 2 bedrooms/ 2 baths in each
unit. Gulf beaches, bay waters, shops and restau-
rants are only steps from your front door. All this for
$179,000. Call Sandy Greiner, 778-2864 eves.


ENJOY PANORAMIC VIEWS OF INTRA-
COASTAL: from this 5 years young duplex situ-
ated 1/2 block from bay and new beach! Superior
construction built on 25' pilings. Extras too numer-
ous to list, this rare find on Anna Maria is reduced
to $223,500. Call Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.

"424 ._'.


TAKE A LOOK AT THE INCOME POTENTIAL of
this Island duplex within walking distance to Gulf
water! Each unit has two bedrooms and two baths,
skylights, laundry hook-ups and plenty of storage.
West side has garage, east side has carport. Easy
to show. $127,900. Call Debbie Walther at 794-
6295 eves or Sandy Greiner, 778-2864.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK MLS 0b[1


Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner
Links
Buyers and Sellers
STogether and Provides
Personal Caring Attention
Professional Knowledge
Exceptional Service
Serving Manatee County & The Beaches
FREE Market Analysis No Obligation









r Resort
Management
Property
(813) 778-2277
Looking for a property management
company to rent your house, condo or
apartment? The Coconuts
Management Company is
accepting new rentals.
1-800-331-2508
100 73rd Street Holmes Beach, FL 34217


mriF











1~ 1.D*CI


SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR


When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive 778-2246
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217 Office


MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS
TOP 800!
Thanks to our loyal readers who want to
keep up on Island news and happenings
while they are away, the June 2 issue of
The Islander Bystander will be mailed to a
record number of PAID out-of-town sub-
scribers OVER 800! Thank you all!
|ISLANDE.- i lS I


0 S -







SUN CAY MOTEL ... charming, landscaped,
pool and only 1/2 block from beach! 3 buildings:
each has a 2BR/1 BA & 1 BR/1BA unit. $535,000.
Earn approximately 10% return on investment!


Karin Stephan
REALTOR"
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844


Watch for our
Exclusivee 419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida 0FQ listings on
S Estes REALTOR (813) 778-2291 P 0 Box 2150 Clasivision,
Video Collection MLS EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294 channel 19.


Just Listed! Secluded Island Retreat
This inviting 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is located on the tranquil north
end of Anna Maria, just steps to the finest sugar white beach in
Florida! Completely remodeled in 1988, this tastefully decorated
hideaway offers a sumptuous master suite with cathedral ceilings,
skylights, black slate fireplace, private lanai, and fabulous dove-gray
bath with Kohler cast iron tub, oversize shower, and his & hers
sinks. There is a fully equipped, country-style kitchen opening onto
a formal dining area. The cozy family room offers another distinc-
tive stone fireplace with raised hearth, vaulted ceiling and sliding
doors which open onto the sunny screened-in patio. Vinyl siding and
sprinkler system make for easy exterior upkeep. Truly a wonderful
place to call home! Asking $275,000, furnished.


D'i C' Jde ndj raoioEwfF10.fion SaazitLng in E76se., EJofiaaiFetyu. ONE YAR
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847 Marcella Cornett...778-5919 Nancy Gulfford...778-2158 ONE A Y


I : ]S FSe r v i n g n n a M a ia S i n c e1 9 3 9 C L L ( 1 3 ) 7 8 2 4 6 F X


HIH Ai P
I =Rfl'f^H' jjff ,. g


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JUNE 2, 1994 A PAGE 29 El




UII-.


REDUCED PRICE!
Attractive Anna Maria home includes additional space for
home occupation or Mother-in-law suite plus two bedrooms,
Florida Room with built-in BBQ, and cozy living room with
fireplace. On two nicely landscaped lots and docking privi-
leges. Asking $199,500. Call Marie Franklin.


Since
MARIE 5 LIC. REAL ESTATE
""'"FA REALTY BROKER
'We ARE the Island."
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250


. .. .. "1.11 0 9 M.,I


IMMACULATE GULF FRONT COMPLEX
Island living can be yours for only $84,900 in this
1 bedroom, 1 bath condo. A GULF beach is steps
away from this fully furnished unit. Eves. Call Pat
Jackson at 778-3301 or Ken Jackson 778-6986.


HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE Well maintained
Island home with good central Holmes Beach loca-
tion. Two bedroom, two bath with large garage and
storage area. One block to Gulf beaches. Priced at
$109,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


SHORT WALK TO GULF OR BAY from this
freshly painted duplex. 2 bedrooms and a second
bath on each side increase the desirability as ei-
ther your home or as rental. Large utility rooms
with washer/dryer hook-ups and a deck off the liv-
ing rooms add to the appeal. Priced at $109,000.
Call Tom Eatman for further details.


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR 2BA fully furnished, sec-
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club-
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded
beach access and excellent rental program.
Priced at $94,500. Call Dave Moynihan.
I 'a - I


ANNA MARIA ISLAND CLUB Direct Gulffront 2BR/
2BA, turnkey furnished unit in prime complex.
Heated pool and spa, secured elevator lobby, wide
walking beach. Well-maintained prime rental op-
portunity. Priced at $227,000. Call Dave Moynihan.
STOP IN FOR A FREE RENTAL BROCHURE
AND CALENDAR


. :1 1 11 1






I'B PAGE 30 0 JUNE 2, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


dm 'SCommercial Residential Free Estimates
SIany' Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
ServiCe .13 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
\ 78 1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
f 178 345 j AND SATISFACTION








Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630 L. No. 4467


Painting by
Elaine Defenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repairpopcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED -INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
S* MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558



Anna Maria Laundromat

Open 24 Hours
7 Days a Week
9906 GULF DRIVE
Launr ANNA MARIA
Laundry
facilities l In the Anna Maria
appreyou wilate Post Office Plaza



KIMB AL
HOME REPAIR CO.
Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior & Exterior
Tile & Marble Masonry & Stucco
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident* Local References
778-5354


S..e BUY IT! 0
** SELI IT! *

.FIND IT! *
The classified section in.
The Islander BUY-stander
really works. You get fast
results for little buck$.
y


NEW
CONSTRUCTION
Call
David Parrish
792-5207


DO-IT-YOURSELF
SUPPLIES
FREE EXPERT ADVICE
Call
798-3095


WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A
relentless rush! For skating information and sales
call 778-3880.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels ... and everything
else in The Islander Bystander.
WANTED: Kayak or Canoe, good condition, reason-
able price. Call Christy, 778-9392.
CAR CLEAN SPECIAL Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. We
come to you with fully mobile service. Call mobile
phone # 356-4649.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.
PORTABLE Kenmore dishwasher, formica kitchen
table with 4 chairs, computer/printer, dishes, TV,
cabinet & various other things. Call 778-3628.
WASHER & DRYER $75 each, window a/c $100,
toddler car seat $35 & youth bed w/mattress $30.
Call 778-4657.
WINDOW A/C $150, 2 bronze awning windows,
$50, featherweight sewing machine $150, 4 metal
ice-cream chairs w/table $100, twin beds. 778-1511.



RUMMAGE SALE Every Saturday in June. St. Ber-
nard Activity Center, 43rd St., Holmes Beach. 9 am
to 2 pm.

MOVING SALE Sat., June 4, 8am, (rain date: June
5). 211 72nd St., Holmes Bch. TV, microwave, Kirby
Vacs, misc. household items. 779-2413.
4 FAMILY Garage Sale. Sat., June 4. 9am to 12pm.
119 46th St., Holmes Beach. A little bit of every-
thing, twin beds, maple headboards.
YARD SALE. Fri., June 3. 9am to 2pm. 304 61st St.,
Holmes Bch. Bicycle parts, glassware, old jewelry,
other low priced items.
YARD SALE Sat. only, June 4, 9am to 3 pm. Some
new items. 712 Gladiolus, Anna Maria City. Not
before 9am please..


Effective May 25, 1994, R. Maureen Dowd is no
longer associated with Island Real Estate of Anna
Maria Island, Inc., and accepts no liability for trans-
actions involving said company as of this date.


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House
calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Call
mobile phone # 356-4649.


GRADY WHITE 21' w/305 chev. Cuddy Cabin. Call
778-0601 evenings $6,995.
1969 40' DRIFT-R-CRUISE. Strong factory made
hull, rebuilt decks. Kitchen and bath, sleeps 6. No
motor. Enjoy fishing from your deck. Lots of living
space. $9,832 or OBO. 778-8322.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. 1/2 & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.
SAILBOAT CHARTER Catalina 30, excellent con-
dition, fully equipped. $250. per day including cap-
tain/guide. 778-2939 or pager 569-8679.


Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Are you interested in
learning the history of Anna Maria Island? Get in-
volved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU!
Call Martha Stewart, 778-4362 if you can give a few
hours of community service.


AD PRODUCTION help wanted. Experienced in
Pagemaker and ad layout. Part-time. Call or stop in
The Islander Bystander.-
BOAT SALESMAN for new & used boat dealer, high
income potential. Call Ken at 778-5577.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Li-
brary. Three and six hour shifts. 778-9413 or 778-
6247.
HOUSEKEEPER needed at The Coconuts Beach
Resort, 100 73rd St., Holmes Bch. 778-2277.
PART TIME work selling arts, crafts and office sup-
plies. $6/per hr. to start. Call 761-0092 Monday thru
Friday.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.
HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath, handyman and
home repairs. Island resident, 23 years experience,
local references. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office, or
dock-at your convenience, complete detailing in-
cludes wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly
cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and much more. Protect your investment.
Call Damon on Mobile number 356-4649.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

CPD LANDSCAPING, INC. "Natural by Design".
Design Installation Renovations. Full-Service
Landscape Maintenance. Longboat Key 383-9212.

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE on regular basis rental
or private home owners. All aspects carpentry to paint-
ing. Island Property Maintenance, 779-2129.
HOUSEKEEPING, laundry, minor repairs, yard work,
shopping, errands, open or close your home or apt,.-
Thorough, dependable. For estimate call 779-1402.


HOME REPAIR SERVICE Professional tile instal-
lation, marble work, plaster & stucco. Interior/exte-
rior. All repairs. Excellent Island references, 23
years experience. Call Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentiaVCommercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional
installation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee
County resident 25 years. Call today for a free es-
timate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim
Bickal 778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island
Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and refer-
ences. Lic. #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free
estimates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repair.
778-4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-5183.
CARPET, TILE, vinyl, or wood. Mobile showroom
brings 1,200 samples to you Guaranteed installa-
tion. Day or eve. Island owned. Carpet Network,
778-7311.


I TESFO AL HL WNED f


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC


7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JUNE 2, 1994 M PAGE 31 -I[


WHY GET SOAKED? Dry foam, dries fast! We
never use steam. Fat Cat also cleans tile, wood &
terrazzo floors. Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning. 778-2882.
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, ceiling fans, painting int.,
ext., roof coating and repairs. Screen repairs, low
prices guaranteed. Call 778-0410 leave message.


COMMERCIAL STUDIOS 1sm/lIg. Gulf view.
Gulf Drive ideal for small business, office, crafts.
Neg. Anna Maria. Call Frank at 778-6126 Eves.
778-6127.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND ITI ISLANDER CLASSI-
FIED ADVERTISING WORKS REALLY
WORKS.

SUGAR MOUNTAIN North Carolina. 3BR/2BA, fully
furnished, near golf course. $1,200/mo. August -
Sept. No pets. 813-748-7611.

2BR/2BA Duplex apartment, West of Gulf Drive 3
houses from Gulf. Completely furnished, central a/
c & heat, Florida room. Yearly furnished $1,000/mo
+ util.- Season $1520/mo + tax & util. Call 778-2422.
DUPLEX seasonal or annual, 2BR/1BA. Boat space
available. See Pat at 104 7th St. S. or 750-8715.
WE HAVE GREAT RENTALS! Seasonal & annual
rentals. Gulffront condo, canal homes, duplexes.
Call Debbie Thrasher for all your rental needs now
at Prudential Florida Realty, 778-0766 or 778-3395.

ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach. 2BR/2BA Du-
plexes recently renovated. New tile, carpet & appli-
ances. 1 blk. from beach & shopping. Available
June 1st $575/mo + util. 813-689-8101.

RETAIL PROF. space available on "Historic
Bridge Street". Front Space Great Exposure! Call
Evenings, 778-8623.

DON'T FORGET to save this week's ISLANDER hur-
ricane section. It's all you need to know about storms.


ISLAND CONDO 2BR/2. 2BA lanais, eat-in
kitchen, washer/dryer, pool, walk to beach, low
maintenance fee and owner may finance! 99,900.
Call Yvonne Higgins at Island Real Estate 778-
6066 or 795-0105 after hours.

OPEN HOUSE TODAY. New home, 260 S. Har-
bor Dr., Holmes Bch. 3BR/2BA, quiet street, pri-
vate boat launch, 2 blocks to beach. $179,500.
778-1966.

THE SEARCH is over. Charming 2BR/2BA on wide
canal. Split bedroom plan. Five minutes to beach
and Intracoastal. Move-in condition. $149,900.
M56059. Call Jim Layfield, Neal & Neal Realtors.
383-3708.
BY OWNER at Perico Bay Club. $89,500. must see
to appreciate! Gorgeous Lake view. 2BR/2BA with
many up-grades. Security, covered parking, pool,
spa and tennis. 794-5085.
FREE HOT LIST "By Owner Homes" 100's com-
puterized & analyzed. Free mortgage card. Help-U-
Sell Realty Counselors. 795-0616.
"IMPERIAL HOUSE" condo. Fully furnished, move
right in today. 2BR/1BA, steps to wide sandy
beaches & Gulf waters. $79,900. Marilyn
Trevethan, call anytime. 813-792-8477. Neal &
Neal Realtors.

AUCTION 10am Sat., June 11 Anna Maria Is-
land. 2700 Gulf Dr., Ocean Park Terrace, Holmes
Beach, FL. Fully equipped & furnished 3BR/2BA,
1350+ s.f. Condo on the Gulf of Mexico. Previews:
June 5 & June 10, 1-4 pm. 10% buyer's premium,
possible owner financing. 813-644-6681,
Higgenbothan Auctioneers Int'l Ltd. Inc. FL Lic.
AU305AB158.


BY OWNER 4 unit rental complex two buildings
- oversized lot. 150 ft. from beach, flowing well for
watering. Owner operated for 25 yrs. Asking
$365,00. 111 36th St., Holmes Beach. 778-2071.


SUBSCRIBE NOW!

Of course you can have The Islander sent up north over
800 subscribers already do. A subscription
form appears on page 7. You'll love hearing from us
with all the news and happenings from around Anna
Maria Island. And it only costs $26 a year!
Don't miss another week. Do it right now.




HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in person and paid in advance at our office we do not in-
voice or handle credit card charges. Our office is located at 5408 Marina Drive, in the Is-
land Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. We're on the corner between D. Coy Ducks and
the laundromat. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday thu Friday, Saturday 9 to 2.


Additional


CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.


BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


S1iB3S


4 9 R CASSFID
IgHOM E IPOVMNTIRAL SAT9


J..
Painting
* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


UNCOMMON S
COLLECTABLES & GIFTS UN
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548

SIDE WORKS
778-1617



Specializing In Paint Touch-Up
Exotic Cars High Quality Honest Prices
David Zorko 5804 Marina Dr.
Hm. 778-6342 Holmes Beach


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you!




6C


Island Typing Service
| ComputerOperated
--T- FAX Service: Send & Receive
FAX # 778-8390
NOTARY PUBLIC :778-8390

778-2586 MA R / KA/- Eve: 778-6771

25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 6/8/94

SPERSONAL TRAINING
One-on-One Step/Circuit Training
& Body Sculpting
By Appointment: Call 779-2129

M. TANATEE
SI OWNERS
ISLAND LAWN SERVICE
Donnie Rivera (813) 778-7508

VmI II


SABAL I PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
o DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


ISLANDER


AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
Hand wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carriage, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. Everything included for $85 -
on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office.
Call the mobile service number 356-4649
or leave a message: 778-9392.




Im PAGE 32 0 JUNE 2, 1994 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island Foods
3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM' PHONE 778-4100 Every Friday
We Welcome Food Stamps 11 A.M.to NOON
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JUNE 7,1994



e e RIGHT s ON THE. ISLAND!


MEAT DEPARTMENT
MARKET STYLE
BACON

LB.


2LkesE2


LB. PACKAGE
GRILL
RANKS


BONELESS BEEF SHOULDER
STEAKS


COUNTRY STYLE
RIBS $1 2




DELI DEPARTMENT
Baked Chicken Dinner
ONE WHOLE CHICKEN


PLUS YOUR CHOICE:
1 LB. COLE SLAW
OR POTATO SALAD
AND 6 DINNER ROLLS


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


32 OZ. JAR


Cclau F