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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00515
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00515

Full Text

NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE M


IISLANDER


IT IN R


Gulf Drive improvements topic of May 25 hearing


A public meeting on proposed improvements to
Gulf Drive is set for Wednesday, May 25.
Mike Bartles, chairman of the special task force
formed to address traffic congestion, drainage, parking,
curbs and landscaping along State Road 789, will hold
the meeting to allow public comment on the group's
recommendations.
The hearing will begin at 7 p.m. at the Bradenton
Beach City Hall.
Bartles told The Islander Bystander the meeting will
feature a visual representation of the task force recommen-
dations through charts, maps, a video tape of improve-
ments and other graphic aides. He urged all residents and
business owners to attend the May 25 meeting.
Task force members have been studying the roadway
between the Longboat Pass Bridge and Manatee Avenue
for several months. They have come up with a number of
recommendations for improving the roadway, including:
* Creating an eight-foot-wide multi-use sidewalk
along the west side of the road on the beach from Fifth

Simches:


attorney to

review all


ordinances
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
At last week's Anna Maria City Commission meet-
ing, Mayor Ray Simches cleared up the question concern-
ing review of proposed ordinances by the city attorney.
"Nothing will be approved by this commission unless
it's reviewed by our attorneys," stressed Simches.
The question arose at a May 4 planning commission
meeting when members of the planning commission's
sub-committee presented a proposed ordinance to com-
bine the city planning and zoning commissions into one
board. The sub-committee's four page document was in-
tended to replace a 27-page document written by the city
attorney on the same subject
At that meeting, two members of the planning
commission objected when Chairman Tom Turner said
he would not send the proposed ordinance to the city
attorney for review.
Simches also read a letter from the city attorney
recommending adoption of the 27-page ordinance.
The attorney wrote, "I recommend the longer ordi-
nance with its greater detail because it does not leave room
for interpretation of the extent of the amendments."
Simches said commissioners would take no action
until reviewing all the documents.
In other action, members of the Police Study Com-
mittee sought a consensus from the commission con-
cerning which options for police services the city wants
pursued. The committee was asked to study options for
police services for the three Island cities that would cut
costs but maintain the current level of service.
The group had narrowed its options to five all
cities contract with the sheriffs department, the
Holmes Beach Police Department, the Bradenton


Street South to the Longboat Pass Bridge.
* Creating a one-way road along the beach with
angle parking from Fifth Street South to Coquina
Beach. The road would be separated from Gulf Drive
by landscaping and a low wooden barrier and would
have limited access to Gulf Drive.
* Developing a traffic circle to ease the flow of traf-
fic at Leffis Key and Gulf Drive.
"Except for our new beach, the 789 Task Force
recommendations will be the most dramatic change this
Island has seen," Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie
Pierola said.
Still to be decided, and sure to be a significant point
of contention at the May 25 public hearing, is the issue
of sidewalks and bike lanes along Gulf Drive and
the additional right-of-way needed to accommodate the
added improvements along the road.
Although the right-of-way along the busy highway
generally extends 25 feet from the road center, much of
that area is used by residents and businesses for parking.


Beach Police Department or the Longboat Key Police
Department; to establish an Island police district; or
leave everything as is.
The consensus was for the city to continue to con-
tract with the sheriffs department or have the commit-
tee explore an Island police district.


Kissick new MPO member?


The usually vocal and generally outspoken Bradenton
Beach City Councilman Jim Kissick may have an addi-
tional duty to perform: representing Anna Maria Island on
a regional transportation planning board.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola announced
Monday she intended to resign from her position on the
Island Transportation Planning Organization, and rec-
ommended Kissick to replace her.
Since the chair of the ITPO also serves on the
Sarasota Manatee Metropolitan Planning-Organization,
Kissick would therefore be able to provide his thoughts


to transportation matters on a regional scope.
"I believe that with all the work Jim Kissick's done
on the bridge problems here, he would be best to serve
on the MPO," Pierola said.
Anna Maria and Holmes Beach officials will con-
sider the matter later this month.
Kissick has been an outspoken opponent to the pro-
posed 65-foot high, fixed-span bridge to replace the Anna
Maria Island bridge at Manatee Avenue. His opposition
may put him at odds with other members of the MPO,
who have endorsed the concept of the big bridge.


If right-of-way improvements are approved, that ex-
tra parking would be eliminated or dramatically reduced.
A recommendation last month by Manatee County
Bicycle & Pedestrian Advisory Board Chairman Steven
J. Sibert calls for use of much of that right-of-way for des-
ignated bike lanes, sidewalks, curbs and landscaping.
SAnother topic that may be controversial is intersec-
tion improvements to Manatee Avenue at both East
Bay Drive and Gulf Drive. Both intersections are
bottlenecks in traffic flow during peak traffic times.
Bartles has suggested a traffic circle, or roundabout, at
the intersection near the Manatee Public Beach to im-
prove traffic flow there.
Recommendation by the 789 Task Force will be
presented to the Manatee County Commission June 7.
The county commission will then make recommenda-
tions to the Metropolitan Planning Organization based
on suggestions by the task force. MPO members will
in turn make recommendations to the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation.


CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION THIS WEEKEND






The

S Centennial

1 comeS to

S 22 town
Carolyne Norwood and
Jane Adam of the Anna
Maria Island Historical
S- Society are ready to usher
in this weekend's Island
..-Centennial Celebration,
. ,(, May 21-23, with three days
of Island-wide activities and
events. For more informa-
tion see inside.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


Centennial Special
Section, Page 14-19







SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Community in Crisis .................. Page 2
O pinions .................................... Page 6
The Way We Were .................... Page 7
Play review................................ Page 8
Stir-it-up................................... Page 20
Streetlife .................................. Page 22
Outdoors ................................. Page 26


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


MAY 19, 1994






I'F PAGE 2 0 MAY 19, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Drug, sex education: keeping one step ahead


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Sixth in a series
County drug and sex educators agree that drug use
and sexual activity is on the rise among middle
schoolers and their curriculums are continually being
revised to address such trends, as well as integrate new
information as it becomes available.
Mara Leyva Stone, drug education specialist for the
Manatee County School Board, said, "The second part of
the Community in Crisis series, 'Teens talk: everything
you never wanted to know,'[I/B, April 21, 1994] is areal
good idea of what kids know and parents don't"
Stone, who recently joined the school board, was
previously the director of drug and alcohol services at
Manatee Glens and is a licensed clinical social worker,
a certified teacher and guidance counselor and is bilin-
gual. She cited statistics from a 1993 national survey
completed by the University of Michigan.
"What they're saying is that the drug use in eighth
grade that they documented showed the trend is kids
are using earlier and earlier," she confirmed.
The following are some of the survey results:
Sixty nine percent reported they had tried alcohol.
Of these, about 27 percent had been drunk at least once.
Nearly 50 percent had smoked cigarettes.
About 17 percent had used inhalants. Five percent
reported using them in the last month.
About 11 percent had tried marijuana and four
percent had used it in that month.
Relatively few use other illicit drugs: cocaine, 2.4
percent; LSD, 3.2 percent; tranquilizers, 4.1 percent.
"Some of the causes of this increase," said Stone,
"are pressures to grow up, pressures to have a good
time, television and movies that make drug and alco-
hol use seem attractive and pressures to fit in with the'
other kids. Also kids want to feel older and one of the
ways they think they're acting older is to use drugs."

Drug awareness important
Stone had some advice for parents to address these
problems.
"I believe we as parents need to help our kids re-
sist peer pressure to use drugs by being aware of where
they are, who their friends are and continuing to talk to
them about what their interests are and what their prob-
lems are keeping those lines of communication
open, as much as possible," she stressed.
"It's tough with teenagers. Don't push too much
and don't crowd them but be available and keep an eye
on them. They're still kids and there's a lot going on
in their, lives, so we can't just let them go.
"Parents need to teach standards of right and wrong
and demonstrate through their own example what a
positive lifestyle should be. Parents should be knowl-
edgeable by knowing what the symptoms are in refer-
ence to alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. There's
plenty of information out there on what to look'for if
you're not sure and how to go about getting help. Don't
overreact but get some help and understanding."
Stone also had some advice for school administrators.
"Schools need to establish clear and specific rules
regarding drug use so that everybody understands what
the limits are," she said. "Schools need to enforce their
policies fairly but consistently and my experience is
that is being done. Another part of that is to implement
security measures to eliminate drugs on school pre-
mises and at school functions. School grounds are ar-
eas for learning and they should be safe."
Stone said drug curriculums for the county's
schools are selected by a committee of teachers for
each age group. An advisory committee of parents,
community leaders, medical and law enforcement per-
sonnel, educators and clergy aids the teachers' commit-
tee. New material is added as necessary.
"For drug education, there is local funding and fed-
eral funding that comes through the state as part of
Drug Free Schools and Communities," said Stone.
"One of the requirements for the federal funding is that
we keep our programs current."
Anna Maria Elementary uses the program "Here's
looking at you, 2000" in K through third grade, said
Stone. Materials are available for fourth and fifth grade
teachers to integrate into various subject areas. Fifth
graders have the DARE (Drug Awareness and Resis-
tance Education) taught by sheriffs deputies, and a
sixth grade DARE program is being started in some
schools. There are other programs for sixth through


c im crisis


m crisis.


Second forum

on teen

problems set

May 26
The second forum to address the problems
of drugs, sex and Island teenagers has been set
for May 26 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia
Ave., Anna Maria.
All elected officials, school and law en-
forcement personnel, health care professionals,
youth leaders and parents who attended the first
forum are invited to attend. The forum is also
open other interested residents.
AMICC Executive Director Pierrette Kelly
will outline programs that have been initiated to
address the problem and others in the planning
stage. Group members will share solutions and
concerns and develop a time line for an Island
needs assessment.
The first forum was the kick-off for the se-
ries Community in Crisis.



eighth graders that are taught in science or physical
education classes.
"Our K-12 drug curriculum should be kept
throughout the system and have a strong no-use mes-
sage," Stone pointed out. "We have some people who
are not real sure we need to be doing this in kindergar-
ten. I'm saying we do, but it should be equal to the age
of the child."
High schoolers get their primary drug and sex edu-
cation through LMS (Life Management Skills) class in
10th grade. The program includes drug identification
and misuse, decision making and resistance skills and
medical problems, social impact and legal conse-
quences associated with drug use.
A series of drug education activities has also been
developed for use in other subject areas in high school.
There are related programs such as peer facilitation,
which teams seniors with at-risk freshmen, and stu-
dents who are trained to tutor elementary students in
math and reading skills as a preventative measure.
"There is parent education at all levels," said Stone.
"which is designed to address the needs of parents in spe-
cific areas of the community. The schools, the parents and
the entire community we all have to work together."

Sex education vital
Judy Griffin, health education resource specialist
for the county's schools for the past eight years, is in
charge of sex education. The schools use the Human
Growth and Development program, which is mandated
by the state, in kindergarten through high school.
"Our course was in place before the legislation was
passed," she explained. "In 1979, a group of people
came to the school board and said we see teen casual-
ties in the community and we need to do something. A
committee was formed to study the issue and a curricu-
lum committee, along with an advisory committee of
community members, developed the curriculum."
Griffin said the program was piloted and evaluated
in 1980 and revised in 1981. The implementation phase
took four years.
"We continue to add to it as new topics and con-
cerns develop," said Griffin. "One addition was AIDS
education."
The kindergarten program is very basic, said Grif-
fin, and includes getting along with others, taking re-
sponsibility for self, abuse prevention, self esteem and
decision making skills.


AIDS education is introduced in the first grade and
continues throughout high school. Instruction includes
how it is spread, ways to prevent its spread, how to
protect the immune system, effects of the virus, risk
factors, treatment and control and consequences of
contracting AIDS and other sexually transmitted dis-
eases
Plant reproduction is introduced in the second
grade and animal reproduction and male and female
reproductive terminology in the third. Fourth graders
discuss reproduction and parenting in mammals and
puberty is introduced. Fifth graders discuss the struc-
ture and function of their own reproductive systems.
"In the fourth and fifth grade, we try to help them
understand that everybody grows at different rates and
to be comfortable with that," said Griffin. "We want
them to be aware of the changes that will be occurring
in their bodies and we want parents to talk to them
before those changes begin to happen."
At the middle school level, students have three
weeks of instruction in each grade level through health,
science or physical education classes.
Sixth graders have more in-depth study of the re-
productive system including the process of fertilization.
In seventh grade, emotional characteristics of adoles-
cence are introduced and in eighth grade, students re-
view the reproductive process. Also included at this
level are refusal skills, male responsibility and double
standards.
All grade levels also discuss various aspects of
family life such as the purpose and characteristics of a
family, conflict and resolution, health needs, the effect
of changes such as death and divorce, heredity, rela-
tionships, etc.
Parent outlines are sent home at each of the above
grade levels detailing the objectives of the course and
suggestions for parent-child discussions at home to
augment the lessons.
"In the eighth grade, we have a panel of parenting,
teens who visit various schools," said Griffin, "and talk
about the realities of being a teen parent. We're inves-
tigating how to use, and at what levels, a panel of
people with AIDS. We'd also like to have a panel of
teens who have made a commitment not to have sex to
show other teens that this is a choice to think about."
High school students have sex education in LMS
classes in 10th grade. Family Living and Human
Growth and Development are electives offered to 11th
and 12th graders through home economics classes.
Griffin said parents' concerns prohibit the inclu-
sion of alternative life styles, distribution of condoms,
demonstrating the use of condoms and abortion in sex
education programs.
"State law asks that programs be abstinence-based
but not abstinence only. We try to stress the value of
waiting for sexual activity. We want them to look at the
risks and to encourage them to postpone it until there's
more maturity. We also want them to realize that once
they become sexually active, they don't have to con-
tinue they have a choice."
Mark Pierpont, AIDS educator for the Manatee
County Health Department, spoke on the increase in
HIV among teens.
"The greatest incidence of HIV transmission is in
teens and women of childbearing age," he said. "One
out of every four persons newly infected is under 22.
In 1992, the number one cause of death in Manatee
County for ages 15 to 34 was HIV/AIDS."
Pierpont cited a recent University of Florida study
that showed that one of every 111 school age youths 15
years old and up in Florida is infected with HIV. In a
school the size of Manatee High School, that would
translate to 20 students.
"There are many obstacles to safe sex," he pointed
out "We should be giving teens good, practical education
on how to protect themselves. Many teens don't use pro-
tection because they feel they are invincible. For some
there are financial considerations they can't afford or
don't want to spend their money on a box of condoms."
A particular problem for middle schoolers, said
Pierpont, is that "they aren't prepared to be sexually
active, so there's no thinking ahead."
Pierpont, who gives presentations to schools and
civic groups, said he is not allowed to show a condom
or how to use one in the county's schools.
"It's very frustrating to have your hands tied in key
areas."
Next week: Teen forum: resisting the pressures.








Mark Ratliff joins

The Islander

Bystander staff
Mark Ratliff, a well-known Island journalist, has
joined the editorial staff of The Islander Bystander.
Ratliff, who has been reporting Island news for
more than 12 years, will be covering Anna Maria City
Hall and the Anna Maria Is-
land Community Center, as-
suming the beat which has
been handled by Jeannie
Friedman. Friedman is tak-
A_'7 ing a summer sabbatical to
spend more time with her
family.
"Each of the Island
cities has its own unique at-
traction as far as news
Ratliff goes," Ratliff says, "but I've
always had a special fond-
ness for covering Anna Maria. It's probably because I
live within shouting distance of city hall, but whatever
the reason, it's an assignment that's hard to beat."
A former editor of The Island Sun and The Island
Free Press, Ratliff cut his teeth in the news business
working as a reporter and photographer for the old Is-
lander. While at that paper, Ratliff was honored by two
Florida Press Association awards one for general
excellence in writing, the other for best public service,
given for an extensive series of articles and editorials
he wrote on boating safety in the aftermath of an acci-
dent which killed a swimmer off Bean Point.
An Island native, the 35-year-old Ratliff lives in an
historic old Anna Maria house that his been in his fam-
ily for decades. It's the place where Ratliff grew up.
"The roots are pretty deep," Ratliff admits. "Now
that I'm the last of my tribe in these parts, sometimes
there does come an urge to wander. But then you redis-
cover the magic of a quiet spring night on the beach or
the pier and you've got to ask yourself where in the
world it gets any better.
"I think I'll hang around for a while," Ratliff says.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 19, 1994 A PAGE 3 EB

Pier 'trolley' proposed


in Anna Maria
By Pat Copeland brought his conc
Islander Reporter ber of seats perm
John Home of the Anchorage restaurant sought the establishment
permission from the Anna Maria City Commission to Kelly mainti
use a golf cart to transport those with physical limita- licenses issued to
tions to the restaurant at the end of the city pier. and the mayor f(
At last week's work session, Horne said the "We have r
restaurant's lunch business has been consolidated and only," he said. "
is currently served only on the pier. While directing Simches tol(
people to the pier in the past few weeks, Home said he public works de
has heard comments concerning fear of the structure. department's occ
"I have had an unbelievable number of people that building but the
have told me they are scared of falling off the side of spaces. He further
the pier," he said. "Some people would like to enjoy the cense permits 25
pier but have physical limitations and can't get to the
end of it. I would like to propose a golf cart to get
people to the end of the pier."
The cart would be for passengers only and could
transport four per trip, said Home. It would be used 5/24,7:3
year 'round from 11:30 a.m. through the dinner hour. 5/25, 9
Commissioner Max Znika said he would consider
the cart a safety feature. Commissioner Doug Wolfe
asked that the commission set a trial period. 5/19.
Mayor Ray Simches said the commission would 5/19,7 p.m.,
take no action because the request was not an adver-
tised agenda item, but commissioners will take public 5/24, 7
comment on the matter in the next week. A vote on the Commu
request will be taken at the May 24 meeting.
In other action, Edgar Kelly of Ato's restaurant 5/19,7:3
5/24, 7 p.]
Community police 5/23, 7 p.n
meeting May 24 special m
St
The Holmes Beach Police Department will hold the 5/24, 1 to
second in a continuing series of community police meet- Maria
ings on May 24 at 7 p.m. in the Holmes Beach City Hall. 407 M
Sgt. Dale Stephenson will speak on the Night Out Against 5/25, SR 78
Crime, a crime prevention community relations program
to be held nationwide Aug. 2. The public is invited. Bra


City
ems to the commission over the num-
itted in the restaurant and what meals
>t is licensed to serve.
gained that he had several occupational
o previous owners by the fire marshal
)r 30 or more seats.
never heard of the 25 for breakfast
And we do not serve dinner."
i Kelly the issue is in the hands of the
apartment. He explained that the fire
upancy permit is based on the size of the
city's is based on available parking
r explained that the restaurant's state li-
seats, not the 40 sought by Kelly.



Anna Maria City
;0 p.m., Commission meeting
a.m., Planning Commission
Sub-Committee
Bradenton Beach
1 p.m., Council meeting
Council workshop with Planning
and Zoning Board
p.m., Council workshop with
nity Redevelopment Agency
Holmes Beach
0 p.m., Council work session
m., Police community meeting
Of Interest
i., Anna Maria Fire Commission
meeting to approve the tax rate,
ation 1, Holmes Beach
3 p.m., Hurricane Forum, Anna
Island Community Center,
[agnolia Ave., Anna Maria
89 Task Force public presentation
of recommendations,
identon Beach City Hall


Read all about it! The complete Centennial schedule and
a map of historic places are in this issue pages 14 to 19.


CAR SERVICE SPECIALS FOR MAY

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up to 5 qts. fluid, filter, and gasket kit.

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CONGRATUIALIONS

BOSS.

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PERCIFIELD
"New Small
Business
Person I
Of The Year"
Awarded by the Manatee Chamber of Commerce
and the Bradenton Herald

From the Staffat ...

CAFE ON THE BEACH
"The happiest employees on the beach"


includes






IJij PAGE 4 M MAY 19, 1994 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Sandbar issue on planning docket Wednesday


By Mark Ratliff
Islander Reporter
Restaurant owner Ed Chiles' latest bid for alley
vacation will be heard by the Anna Maria Planning
Commission Wednesday evening. The request will be
at the top of the agenda for the planning commission's
meeting, May 18 at 7:30 p.m. at Anna Maria City Hall.
Chiles is asking for the blessing of the planning com-
mission on his request that the city relinquish claim on an
alley that runs along the east side of the Sandbar building
at 100 Spring Avenue. According to Chiles, the alley was
abandoned long ago by the city, but the city says it has
never given up its rights concerning the thin strip of land.
The issue brought heated debate in the past, with
a number of citizens raising various objections to the
alley vacation. For the most part, Chiles' detractors
have charged that if he is successful in his land


squabble with the city, he will expand his restaurant
and that noise and other nuisances will follow. Others
maintain that the public could lose a valuable passage-
way for people and cars.
Chiles has offered to give the city another piece of
land to be used as an alley, a proposition City Attorney
Jim Dye says should not be quickly dismissed.
"The city's code does not require an applicant to pro-
vide a replacement street or alley," Dye wrote in a May
12 letter to the city administration. "It is important to note,
therefore, that this offer is beyond the minimum the code
requires. At the same time, because the applicant has made
the replacement part of the application package, it can and
should be fully considered during planning commission
and city commission hearings."
Dye goes on to say the city should consider what
he sees as differences between what city officials are


being asked to give up and what is being offered. Es-
sentially, Dye says, both strips of land can accomplish
a number of the same purposes, but the replacement
that Chiles is offering is a "non-exclusive easement,"
while what Chiles seeks to gain is clear title to a "pub-
licly dedicated alley." Dye notes that the location of the
easement could be moved at the discretion of the Sand-
bar, where the alley can't be touched even by the
city without public hearings.
Dye concludes by saying, "these are significant dif-
ferences," and counsels the planning commission and city
commissioners to decide if the proposed swap is a good
one. If not, he suggests the two commissions "seek to
change (the differences) during the approval process."
The planning commission serves solely as an ad-
visory board. Final word on the Sandbar debate will
come from the city commission at May 24 meeting.


Sgts. Anderson, Cosby named Officers of Year


Sgt Charles Anderson of the Holmes Beach Police
Department and Sgt. John Cosby of the Bradenton
Beach Police Department were named by their chiefs
to be recipients of the Manatee 100 Club's Officer of
the Year award. Anderson was then named Officer of
the Year for the county at the club's banquet last week.

Sgt. Charles Anderson
In Anderson's nomination, Chief Jay Romine ex-
plained the following:
"On July 23, 1993, at 3 p.m., upon reporting for his
tour of duty, Sgt. Anderson reviewed all of the BOLO
(be on the lookout) information that had been received
from the computer system. Sgt. Anderson noticed a
BOLO from the FBI office based in Indianapolis, Ind.
that had been issued earlier the same day.
"The BOLO provided the names of four subjects that
were wanted in reference to a homicide that had occurred
in Muncie, nd. The BOLO also gave two separate vehicle
descriptions that the subjects could be operating. The
BOLO provided no mention that the subjects were in the
Florida area, and for that reason, the BOLO could have
been easily overlooked by many officers.
"Approximately an hour-and-a-half later, while on
patrol, Sgt. Anderson observed both of the vehicles,
occupied by the four described suspects, with two fe-
males and a young child, traveling out of the city. Sgt.
Anderson confirmed the information on the vehicles
and then conducted a high risk felony traffic stop and,
with assistance from other officers, apprehended all
four suspects.
"The suspects were also charged with possession
of narcotics and were extradited to Indiana to face ho-
micide charges.
"This action on the part of Sgt. Anderson is typi-


Bradenton Beach Sgt. John Cosby, named Officer of
the Year by Police Chief Jack Maloney.


cal of his dedication to the profession and part of what
makes us proud to have him as a member of the
Holmes Beach Police Department. Anderson's perfor-
mance in this particular case is not an isolated incident,
as it is no coincidence that he also received this award
from his department in 1990 and 1992."
Anderson has been with the department since De-
cember 1988. In October 1992 he was promoted from
patrol officer to sergeant.
Anderson was also nominated by Romine for the
Florida Retail Federation's Officer of the Year award.

Sgt. John Cosby
In Cosby's nomination, Chief Jack Maloney wrote:
"This is an official commendation for Sgt. John
Cosby for excellent and meritorious police action. He
observed and apprehended two teenage felons as they
committed and left the scene of a strong-arm robbery
on Coquina Beach on Nov. 3, 1993.
"While checking Coquina Beach with his night scope
and on foot patrol, Cosby observed two 16-year-old, white


Edward "Skip" Nunn has been nominated to
receive Kiwanis Club of Manatee's Officer of the
Year award by Holmes Beach Police Chief Jay
Romine.
Romine noted that the nomination was unusual
because Nunn is an auxiliary officer rather than a
full time officer.
Romine wrote, "Edward 'Skip' Nunn had been
an integral part of the Holmes Beach Police Depart-
ment as an auxiliary officer.for almost 20 years.
Skip joined the auxiliary in September 1975. Since
that time, he has served unselfishly, without com-
pensation, in any capacity requested of him.
"As anyone involved with a small law enforce-


Manatee County
Officer of the
Year
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger, at left, and
Holmes Beach Police
Chief Jay Romine, at right,
congratulate Sgt. Charles
Anderson, named Manatee
County Officer of the Year
by the Manatee 100 Club
last week. Anderson was
honored by city employees
with a party Friday at city
hall.
Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


males rob Timothy Cleveland of Bradenton of his wallet
and money. One of thejuveniles fought Cleveland to the
ground and held him while the second youth took his
wallet containing $6. They then ran toward Cosby, who
they didn't see because of the darkness.
"Cosby ordered them to stop but they kept running.
Cosby gave chase, retrieved the wallet when it was
thrown by one of the defendants and then caught that
defendant, wrestled him to the ground and handcuffed
him. As he walked the defendant toward a parked
truck, the second defendant, not noticing Cosby, ran by
him and was grabbed and apprehended by Cosby while
he still held onto the first defendant."
The complainant and his girlfriend came up to
Cosby to report that they had been robbed and were
surprised to see that the juveniles were already in cus-
tody. They identified the juveniles.
"Sgt. Cosby's actions are in the highest tradition of
police service," continued Maloney. "He brought honor
to himself and the department, but most importantly, ap-
prehended two violent felons caught in the act of robbery."


ment agency is aware, the benefit of an active aux-
iliary is immeasurable. They serve in support roles
to the full time officers as 'ride alongs' providing
needed backup for officer safety. They provide
needed manpower in times of natural disasters,
civic activities, parades and similar events. Skip
Nunn embodies all that an administrator could ask
for as an example to all volunteer members."
Nunn has been employed by the Holmes Beadh
Public Works Department since 1977. He is a
graduate of Manatee High School and Tompkins
Cortland Community College in Dryden, N.Y. He
resides in the city with his wife, Virginia. They
have two children and one grandchild.


Edward 'Skip' Nunn nominated as

Kiwanis Officer of the Year


EE NG






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 19, 1994 A PAGE 5 IP


Hurricane safety
seminar set Tuesday
The American Red Cross, Manatee County Chapter,
will conduct a seminar on hurricane preparedness on
Tuesday, May 24, 1 to 3 p.m., at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave, Anna Maria.
The seminar will cover boat safety, the psychologi-
cal impact of disaster, evacuation, shelters, pets, trans-
portation and other issues.
Speakers include Chief Andy Price, Anna Maria
Fire District; Dan Sobier, National Weather Service
meteorologist; Chief Karen Windon, Manatee County
Emergency Management; Petty Officer William Carl,
U.S. Coast Guard; Greer Peters, Manatee Glens Senior
Center; and Sarah Jones, director of emergency ser-
vices for the Manatee Chapter of the Red Cross.
The public is invited to attend. For more informa-
tion call 792-8686.
Sandbags to be
delivered this week
The Island Emergency Operations Center (EOC)
expects delivery of four pallets of sandbags this week.
A pallet of sandbags will be stored with each member
agency the fire district and the three Island cities -
for use in emergencies.
IEOC Director and Fire Chief Andy Price also an-
nounced at last week's meeting that the videotaping of
the Island's streets, city buildings and public property
is nearly complete. The videotaping is strongly recom-
mended by the Federal Emergency Management
Agency for use in receiving aid following a disaster.
Price announced that hurricane guides are now avail-
able at the fire station and each city hall. He said a Hurri-


Planners prepare for hurricane forum Islander Photo: Pat Copeland
Left to right, Alan Johnson, executive director of the Manatee County American Red Cross; Billie Martini,
Holmes Beach councilwoman; Andy Price, fire chief and chief of the Island Emergency Operations Center;
Dr. Frances Smith-Williams, Red Cross volunteer; and Dan Sobier, meteorologist with the National Weather
Service plan their presentations for the Island Hurricane Forum May 24 from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.


cane Forum for residents is planned for May 24 from 1 to
3 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Community Center.
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger asked
Who is to make command decisions during an emer-
gency situation. Price said the IEOC director and the
three mayors will make joint decisions.
"The whole concept of the IEOC is that we are all
informed of the decisions being made and there's one
control point," said Price. "Everybody has equal input"
Holmes Beach Code Enforcement Officer Mike
Heistand asked about mutual aid between the Island's
public work's departments during an emergency.
Heistand said he was concerned about use of taxpay-
ers' dollars and insurance and liability for employees.
Price explained, "There are no city limits during an


emergency. When the IEOC makes a decision and
sends you out, you're covered anywhere because your
officials approved the decision."

Longboat holds storm
education meet
The town of Longboat Key will hold it's annual
hurricane education meeting at the Holiday Inn,
Longboat, on Wednesday, May 25, at 7 p.m.
Representatives of the emergency management de-
partments from both Manatee and Sarasota counties, the
National Weather Service and the American Red Cross
will make presentations and answer question.


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pl PAGE 6 M MAY 19, 1994 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

e -


Here's one meeting you

shouldn't miss
Islanders will have a chance next week to look at
the results of a special task force charged with devis-
ing a new look for Gulf Drive in much of Bradenton
Beach and Holmes Beach.
The "789 Task Force," chaired by Anna Maria's
Mike Bartles, will make a presentation to the Island
Wednesday, May 25, in the Bradenton Beach City
Hall. The meeting begins at 7 p.m.
Preliminary plans call for bike lanes and a sidewalk,
landscaping, curbs and gutters, an innovative parking con-
figuration at Cortez Beach which will allow motorists
one-way travel and smooth the haphazard parking in the
area, as well as a host of other changes.
What Bartles believes will be the most controver-
sial of the issues is the matter of easements. Gulf Drive
right-of-way generally runs about 25 feet from the
center of the highway. That stretch of public right-of-
way is indeed used by the public for parking, mail-
boxes and other uses. If the plans are approved by all
concerned, those uses may be prohibited or dramati-
cally altered.
We concur with Bartles that the right-of-way matter
will be controversial. Comments made in the wake of a
proposal by Bradenton Beach officials to limit parking
along Gulf Drive were vocal and definitive: don't take our
parking was the cry from the Moose Lodge, Smurfs and
other businesses along the highway.
Other comments made about the 789 Task Force
have dealt with process and make-up of the group.
Critics have blasted the group for not being comprised
of enough Island residents. The group is staffed by
Manatee County's Department of Community Affairs,
others have said, and suspect some type of collusion
or wrongdoing due to that.
In reality, the group is a far cry above and beyond
historic decisions made to Islanders regarding trans-
portation or other infrastructure matters. The task force
has been meeting regularly on the Island, discussions
have been lively and recommendations thoughtful.
Next week's public hearing will be the first of a mara-
thon series of meetings before elected officials on the
Island and elsewhere. Island comment will be solicited
and welcome, all have agreed.
We urge Islanders to consider the product, not the
process, in gauging the recommendations of the 789
Task Force. Consider the overall picture presented by
the group.
We look forward to seeing you next week.


ISLAND R al
MAY 19, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 26
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Rick Fleury
Jeannie Friedman
David Futch
Mark Ratliff
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster
tl U,.




With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK By Egan

9 N


AMICC thanks community
Thank you for supporting our 10th Anniversary Auc-
tion. The event is the cornerstone of our annual budget
For the past 10 years, local businesses have given
generously to partner with the Community Center in
providing child care, sports and recreation, and now
counselling, cultural, educational and social programs
for all residents. Our youngest participant may be a
toddler, our most senior a chess player and all are
welcome through our doors.
This year's Auction was very successful we
raised nearly $27,000.
Thanks go to Christine Holmes and Linda Loken,
who worked endless hours organizing as co-chairper-
sons, and to their committee: Jeanette Cashman, Dot
Hinley, Trudy Moon and Susan O'Connor.
Thanks also go to the talented volunteers, generous
businesses, inspiring angels, the media, and everyone
who supports us by contributing time, talent or treasure.
On behalf of the staff and the board of directors, we
look forward to providing quality programs to meet
your needs: to promote inner growth and outer fitness
through quality programming for all ages; to encour-
age self esteem, positive leadership skills and personal
growth; to develop understanding and respect between
generations; and to facilitate the spirit of volunteerism
in children, adults and senior citizens.
It is your kindness, generosity and love that make
our Island a paradise.
Pierrette Kelly, Executive Director,
Anna Maria Island Community Center
Much talk about bridges,
no place to go
Let's talk about a new bridge from the mainland to
Anna Maria.
The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)
wants a gigantic bridge north of the Manatee Avenue
bridge. The Florida Department of Transportation (DOT)
wants a gigantic bridge south of the current bridge.
These are government agencies and they have an
ax to grind.
The people of the area want to repair the existing
bridge and limit the flow of traffic from the mainland
because traffic has no place to go except turn around


and come back from a barrier island, and that's where
it has to go.
You folks who decide to stay on Anna Maria sev-
eral days after a major storm is headed your way de-
serve a lot of credit for courage, and should you decide
to leave at the last minute for the relative safety of the
,mainland in a heavy blow, I suggest that you have
waited much too long! Under those conditions the wind
velocity at 65 feet has got to be fierce.
Like all town meetings in this country, you have the
right to say what you want. As for me, I say tell DEP and
DOT to go about their business and leave us alone. But
why you would encourage more people to come out here,
look at the Gulf, find no place to park, turn around and go
back to the mainland, is beyond my understanding.
E. Neal Eaton, Anna Maria
Thanks for library donation
On behalf of the Island Branch Library I would like
to thank you for your recent generous donation of the two-
volume bound set of 1992-1993 Islander Bystanders.
We appreciate your generosity in making these
volumes available to the citizens of Manatee County
through the Manatee County Public Library System.
John C. Van Berkel, Manatee County Library
Thanks to Islander Bystander
Thank you and The Islander Bystander for pre-
senting us with the bound copies of your newspaper.
Those of us associated with the Tingley Memorial Li-
brary are pleased and proud to have this valuable re-
source for our patrons. These volumes have been
placed in our reference collection. They will indeed
become the core of our Island History Section.
We also thank you for the support that you and the
staff of The Islander has given the Tingley Memorial
Library. Many of our visitors have come to us because
of your articles about the library. Your efforts have
helped make our first two months a success.
Finally, thank you and The Islander Bystander for
your continuing support of all the activities which take
place on our busy Island. Many good and powerful
things are taking place and your reporting allows us all
to feel a part of what is going on.
John Sandberg, Tingley Library Chair,
Bradenton Beach










TfS WERE THE AYS
_ Part 8, Anna Maria Island and the Seminole War, 1835-1842
by June Alder


U.S. troops hunted Indians with bloodhounds in the Seminole war.


SLAVE CATCHING


In early spring of 1837 Gen. Tho-
mas Jesup, new American army com-
mander, succeeded in persuading most
of the Seminole chiefs except
Osceola and old Sam Jones to end
their year-long fight against deportation


from Florida.
Soon, in groups large
and small, their people
were drifting in to Fort
Brooke where ships were
waiting to take them
West. The main induce-
ment was that they would
be able to take their Ne-
gro allies with them.
It appeared that the
war would soon be over.
But then Jesup
double-crossed the Semi-
noles. Giving in to pres-
sure from slave holders,
he-decreed that the Indi-
ans would have to return
all runaway slaves to
their rightful owners.
Professional slave-
catchers were delighted.
But Northern anti-slavery
factions and the Indians
were outraged. The
Seminole chiefs claimed
that the blacks living


among them were freed slaves or had
been legally purchased or in many
cases ought not to be interfered with
since they had been with the Seminoles
for generations.
Slave catching was nothing new.
(The story is told that Osceola's beauti-
ful wife Morning Dew was stolen away
from him as a slave, and that's why he
went on the warpath.) But Jesup's policy
attracted hordes of scoundrels who fig-
ured that any black or mixed breed with
the Seminoles could be grabbed.
It got so bad that Jesup barred all
outsiders from the detention camp at the
gates of Fort Brooke, where heat and
disease were making conditions unbear-
able.
To make things worse, the discon-
tented Seminole chiefs began to claim
the wives and children of rancho fisher-
men as tribal descendants. They de-
manded that these people go with them
to Arkansas territory. They might not
leave Florida after all if Jesup didn't
back them up, the chiefs threatened.
By now Jesup was so eager to get
the Seminoles out of Florida and out of


his hair that he was ready to do almost
anything. His decision to send soldiers
into the fishing villages to seize the
women and children caused another up-
roar up North.
William Bunce, whose Mullet Key
fishery was the largest rancho on the


Gulf coast, put up a fight.
He was a justice of the
peace and knowledgeable
about the law. He argued
that former Spaniards
and their wives were
American citizens under
the terms of the 1821
treaty by which the U.S.
got Florida from Spain
and therefore were en-
titled to every right and
privilege of citizenship.
He had Judge Augustus
Steele, the top official in
Hillsborough County, on
his side.
But Jesup was ada-
mant. The rancho fisher-
men, he claimed, had
"enticed the women from
their Indian
protectors...no matter by
what name you call them
whether husbands, mas-
ters or employers."


Bunce must turn over to the military
"all the Indians and their children
whom the chiefs may demand" whether
of full or mixed blood.
Then Jesup made a terrible mis-
take. He threatened Osceola.
"I intend to send exploring parties
into every part of the country," he or-
dered an aide to tell Osceola, "and take
all Negroes who belong to the white
people, and he must not allow the Indi-
ans or Indian Negroes to mix with
them.
"I am sending to Cuba for blood-
hounds to trail them, and I intend to
hang every one of them who does not
come in."
He carried out his threat for a short
time. But the use of bloodhounds to
track down fleeing Negroes and Indians
was brought to a halt by a horrified
American public. Jesup was derided as
a monster in newspapers from New
York to Paris.
Through all this turmoil Osceola
was biding his time. He would take ad-
vantage of Gen. Jesup's mistakes -
when the time was ripe.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 19, 1994 M PAGE 7 Bi3


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SThe discontented
Seminole chiefs began
to claim the wives and
children of rancho
fishermen as tribal
descendants. They
demanded that these
people go with them to
Arkansas territory. By
now Gen. Thomas
Jesup was so eager to
get the Seminoles out of
Florida and out of his
hair that he was ready
to do almost anything.
His decision to send
soldiers into the fishing
villages to seize the
women and children
caused another uproar
up North.


"9






I[ PAGE 8 0 MAY 19, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


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T-Shirts Cards Toys Souvenirs Beach Supplies
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A PIECE OF HISTORY


The Islander Bystander donated a double set of
bound volumes of the newspaper to the Tingley Me-
morial Library and the Island Branch Library.
The volumes encompass the period of time from


the first publication of The Islander Bystander in No-
vember 1993 through December 1994.
The volumes are available for reading in the
reference sections of both libraries.


Joy Courtney (center),
writer for The Islander.
Bystander, presented
the two bound volumes
of newspaper to (left to
right) John Sandberg,
president of the library
board; Charlie Grace
and Betty Kissick, board
members; Luanne
Collins, library consult-
ant; Michael Price,
library volunteer; and
Sue Barreda, board
member.


Islander Photos: Tomara Kafka


Sara Bicknell (left),
Island Branch librar-
ian, looks through
past issues of The
Islander Bystander
with Publisher Bonner
Presswood and
Islander columnist
June Alder.


'Educating Rita' is strong finale

for Island Players


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
"Educating Rita" closes the 1993-94 Island Play-
ers season with a bang. The Willy Russell play, which
continues through May 22, was first produced in 1980
by the Royal Shakespeare Company in London.
People tend to be more familiar with the 1983 film,
starring Michael Caine and Julie Walters, which was
a popular success.
In the two-character play, harder edged and more
biting than the film, Rita and Frank temporarily cross
paths one going up the ladder of life, the other de-
scending the stairway of self-destruction.
Rita, played by Georgina Willmott, is an enthusi-
astic and undereducated hairdresser who "wants. to
learn everything everything." The rapidly-deliv-
ered humor and determination to get an education cre-
ate Rita's/Willmott's strong characterization.
Frank, played by Geoffrey Todd, is the self-dep-
recating alcoholic professor who reluctantly decides to
teach Rita, a new student in the British open univer-
sity system, because of the money.
Both Todd, who also directs Educating Rita, and
Willmott are from England and give the British pro-
duction a decidedly British authenticity.
With only two characters, the play's action is up-
held by not only the quick conversational exchanges
between Rita and Frank, but by the many short scenes
(not to mention Rita's unbelievable number of cos-
tume changes) in this two-act play.
Willmott is fabulous, carrying the role with ease
and sparkle. And she shines next to the polished per-
formance of Todd.
The fast-talking Rita, who asks Frank to go with
her to see her first play, says, "You won't go see them
just because they're amateurs? You've got to give
them a chance. They might be good."
I agree. These are fine performances by both


Willmott and Todd that shouldn't be missed.
The Island Players is located at the corner of Pine
Avenue and Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. Tickets are $9
and available at the box office or by calling 778-5755.
The box office is open daily, 10 am. to 3 p.m., except
Sunday, and one hour before show time.


Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka
"Educating Rita" runs through May 22 at the Island
Players Theatre, Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue, Anna
Maria.Geoffrey Todd plays Frank, a self-hating poet
professor who encounters Rita, played by Georgina
Willmott, an undereducated hairdresser who goes to
college.


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 19, 1994 0 PAGE 9 IM


Yes, that's Willard Scott
No, Willard Scott did not recently visit Anna Maria Island, but Albert Armstrong (on the right) did. Albert,
manager of the University Club in Washington D.C., visited his parents Bob and Chi Armstrong afew weeks
ago. The Armstrongs have lived in Holmes Beach since 1978. Armstrong says people like Willard Scott come
to the University Club all the time.


wl 119w =


Horseshoe competition
still going strong
In spite of the recent rise in temperature, the Island
horseshoe competition continues to draw ringers.
SLast week winners were Bob Hinch of Anna
Maria City and
Ruth Foehrkolb of
Bradenton Beach.
Runners up
were Jim Spencer
and George
McKay, both resi- s
dents of Anna
Maria City.
Because of the Illustration by George Landraitis
Centennial Parade
scheduled for Saturday morning, this week's matches
have been moved to Sunday afternoon. Everyone is
invited to join the competition on Sunday from 1 to 4
at the Anna Maria City Hall.

Volunteers get awards
All volunteers of the Anna Maria Island Historical
Society will be presented awards at the last meeting of the
season on May 19 at 7:30 p.m. at Anna Maria City Hall.

Sign language to be
taught at Brain Gym
Beginning sign language classes will be offered at
the Brain Gym book store by owner Donna Harris.
Harris was a teacher at the Indiana School for the Deaf
for 16 years.
One session is offered Tuesday evenings beginning
May 24,7 to 8 p.m. A second class is offered Saturdays
beginning May 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. Each course lasts
four weeks. The fee is $35 for the first person and $30
for the second family member or friend. Children aged
five and older may register with an adult.
Brain Gym is located at 5340-F Gulf Dr., Holmes
Beach. Call 778-5990 to register.

Players to hold annual
meeting and banquet
The Island Players will hold an annual meeting on
Wednesday, May 25, 7:30 p.m., at the Island Players
Theatre, corer of Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue, Anna
Maria. The meeting is open to all members and yearly
subscribers.
The annual banquet buffet will be held on Satur-
day, May 28, 6:30 p.m., at Pete Reynard's. Tickets are
$15 which includes a rum punch fountain. Reserva-
tions, 778-3755.


Oops
Mrs. Dorothy Simches is the in-coming president
of the Off Stage Ladies. Simches was incorrectly iden-
tified in anlslander photo last week.


RIB to hold luncheon
May 24 at Lido
The Retired Insurance Brains (RIB) of Manatee/
Sarasota will hold it's monthly luncheon on Tuesday,
May 24, at the Lido Beach Holiday Inn, 233 Ben
Franklin Dr. Social hour starts at 11 a.m. followed by
lunch at noon.
All retired insurance industry people and their
guests are welcome. For reservations or information
call Fred Mischler at 778-6766.


High Twelve to meet
All Masons are invited for a luncheon meeting at
Pete Reynard's on Thursday, May 26. The speaker is
Dr. Joe Wright, photographer, who will present a slide
show on Germany and Austria.


Watercolor classes to
begin at Guild
A five-week watercolor class will be held
Wednesday mornings with instructor Barbara Singer
beginning May 25 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the
Artists' Guild Gallery, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes
Beach.
A supply list is available at the gallery. Cost is $45
which includes a $10 deposit. For more information
call 778-6694 or 778-3036.


Reception to be held
for Sister Nora Brick
The friends of Sister Nora Brick will hold a recep-
tion in her honor on Sunday, May 22, from 10 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. in Welsmiller Hall, St. Bernard Catholic
Church, Holmes Beach.
Sister Nora, a Franciscan order nun, has worked
in the migrant ministry since 1975 and wishes to start
a new program called Project Light whose mission is
to teach English and scripture to migrants.
A long-time advocate for migrant workers, Sister
Nora puts in long hours daily tending to the spiritual
as well as physical needs of the migrant population.
Contributions may be presented to Sister Nora at
the reception or sent to Project Light, c/o Sister Nora
Brick, 510 7th St. W., Palmetto, FL 34221.


B0 RAr IDN



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UM PAGE 10 0 MAY 19, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Center is winner ~___ __ _



They hooped and hollered (it was required, actually), and when the hay
dust settled, the Anna Maria Island Community Center found itself more
than $26,000 richer. This year's country them for the annual dinner
auction drew hundreds offolks (many in western duds) who came to dine
and bid on items to benefit the not-for-profit organization. Pictured
clockwise from top left:
Center program director Scott Dell ascends the throne to start the
bidding on items donated by LaPensee Plumbing;
Sean "Hop-a-long" Murphy inks in a bid during the silent auction;
Center volunteer Shannon Whitfieldfound herself employed as a picture
pitcher;
A sedate (?) group of Privateers applaud their form of poetic justice.
Members of the Island's somewhat rowdy service club pooled their
resources to win the bid at $200 for the "mayor for a day" prize offered
by Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnnenberger. They plan to allow Rick
Maddox, former Holmes Beach Police Chief, to enjoy the prize. Maddox
was rendered speechless but later told The Islander Bystander: "The
Privateers felt Holmes Beach needed some counseling, and they felt I
would be the ideal person to provide it.
i-:--- -- -- -- -Bonner Presswood
Islander Photos: Bonner Presswood


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Praiseworthy
performance
These are the "Students of
the Week" at Anna Maria
Elementary School for the
week ending May 6. First
row, left to right, are
Ryane Wickers and
Charlie Michael. Second
row, left to right, are
Chana Cannon, Jamie
Milks, Marisa Stein, Billy
Goldschmitt and Michael
Wallen. Back row, left to
right, are Cara Perinetti,
Jamie Edwards, Erin Van
Leeuwen, Jon Kent,
Ottavia Oddo and Joshua
Sato.



Joy Courtney


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 19, 1994 0 PAGE 11 FI

Anna Maria School


menu


Monday, 5/23/94
. Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Orange Juice
: Lunch: Toasted Cheese Sandwich or Burrito, Green Beans,
Fruit Crisp, Ice Cream
o Tuesday, 5/24/94
S Breakfast: Hot Sausage Pocket or Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Sloppy Joe on Bun or Cheese Pizza,
S"Carrots, Peaches, Cake
* Wednesday, 5/25/94
Breakfast: Pancakes w/Syrup or Cereal, Juice
* Lunch: Breaded Chicken and Mashed Potatoes or Mini-Chef
. Salad, Broccoli, Cinnamon Apple Slice, Hot Roll
Thursday, 5/26/94
. Breakfast: Scrambled Egg and Toast or Cereal, Juice
: Lunch: Tacos or McRibs, Chopped Lettuce & Tomatoes,
* Pears, Oatmeal Raisin Cookie
Friday, 5/27/94
Breakfast: Hot Cheese Pocket or Cereal, Juice
. Lunch: Pizza or Nachos & Cheese, Corn,
Applesauce, Bar Cookie
All meals served with milk.
* UI


Hooked on education
You have your way to say "thank you" and then there is Joanne
Trovato-Brown's way. During Staff Appreciation Day at the
school, Joanne, left, thanked Anna Maria Elementary School
teacher Maureen Loveland with a corsage. After Trovato-Brown
pinned the corsage on Mrs. Loveland the moment was further
celebrated with a big hug, which somehow pinned the parent and
teacher together. The surprised duo broke into a resounding
rendition of "Stuck on You." Photo courtesy of Karen LaPensee


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IP~ PAGE 12 1 MAY 19, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Dorothy J. Beaumont
Dorothy J. Beaumont, 72, of Arlington, Va., and
formerly of Holmes Beach died May 5.
Ms. Beaumont is a former member of the
Bradenton Country Club; the Seven Lakes Country
Club and the Members Club, Pinehurst, N.C. She at-
tended Ohio University. She was a member of the First
Congregation Church of Elyria, Ohio.
She is survived by two sons, William E. of Alex-
andria, Va., and Timothy S. of Roswell, Ga.; a sister,
Margaret J. Lyons of Bradenton (formerly of Holmes
Beach); and three grandchildren.
A memorial service will be held on Saturday, May
21, 3 p.m. in the Island Chapel at Griffith-Cline Funeral
Home, 6000 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach. Memorial do-
nations may be made to the American Lung Associa-
tion, 2201 Cantu Ct., Ste. 119, Sarasota, FL 34232 or
to Gilmour Academy, 34001 Cedar Rd., Gates Mills,
OH 44040.
Lawrence E. Byers
Lawrence E. Byers, 60, of Bradenton, died May 14
at home.
Born in Cookville, Tenn., Mr. Byers came to
Bradenton from there in 1940. He retired in 1980 as man-
ager of Whitney Beach Foodway on Longboat Key. He
was a member of West Bradenton Baptist Church. He was
a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean conflict.
He is survived by his wife, Mary (Dobbe); a son,
Gary E. of Bradenton; a stepson, Danny K. Brown of
Bradenton; a sister, Allie V. Scott of Tallahassee; and
five grandchildren.
Memorials may be made to Hospice of Southwest
Florida, 406 43rd St. W., Bradenton, FL 34209.

W. Graham Claytor Jr.
W. Graham Claytor Jr., 82, of Washington, D.C.,
and Holmes Beach, died May 14 in HCA/L.W. Blake
Hospital.
Born in Roanoke, Va., Mr. Claytor was a part-time
resident of Holmes Beach since 1968. He was secretary
of the Navy from 1977-79 during the Carter administra-
tion, acting secretary of transportation in 1979 and deputy
secretary of defense from 1979-81. He was former chief
executive of Amtrak and Southern Railway. He was a
U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, and a lieutenant com-
mander of two destroyer escorts, the USS Lee Fox, 1943-


44, and the Cecil J. Doyle, 1944-45.
He is survived by his wife, Frances Murray; a
daughter, Murray of Atlanta; a son, W. Graham III of
Alameda, Calif.; a brother, Richard A. of Bethesda,
Md.; and two grandchildren.

Teresa Hamilton
Teresa Hamilton, a 15-year-old Manatee County
resident, died last week of cardiac arrest after falling
into a coma in January and attracting national attention
over her medical treatment.
Last week, The Islander Bystander featured
Charlie Tuppen, Holmes Beach licensed massage
therapist, who volunteered nearly every day, his time
and healing energy, to help the comatose Hamilton
with neuromuscular vibration and reflexology.
Tuppen followed the daily news reports of
Hamilton's sudden dependence on life support at
Sarasota Memorial Hospital after falling into diabetic
shock and coma, the doctors' prognosis that she was
"brain dead," and her determined family who brought
the young girl home against the odds hoping her
condition would one day improve.
Hamilton's case drew national attention when her
parents, Sharon and Scotty, decided to take Teresa home
when doctors wanted to remove the ventilating equipment.
Eventually, hospital officials backed down and allowed
Teresa to go home with 24-hour nursing care.
"I can't thank him enough," said Sharon Hamilton
of Charlie Tuppen' s help.
At about 11 a.m., May 11, Teresa went into cardiac
arrest. Paramedics revived her and her condition stabi-
lized until about 5 p.m. when her heart stopped again,
this time permanently.

Theodore Miller
Theodore Miller, 64, of Bradenton died May 13 in
Manatee Memorial Hospital.
Born in Pittsburgh, Mr. Miller came to Bradenton
from Cleveland 16 years ago. He was a plumber for
Armstrong Brothers Plumbing. He was a Protestant.
He is survived by his wife, Carol; three daughters,
Ramona Hale of South Haven, Mich., Linda Kusmak of
Albuquerque, N.M., and Tami of Bradenton; three sons,
Bruce of Sarasota, Tom of Bradenton, and Charlie of
Devils Lake, N.D.; his mother, Pauline of Bradenton; two
sisters, Jessie Hinkson of St. Petersburg, and Vicki
Withrow of South Haven, Mich.; three brothers, Larry of
Myakka, Bill of Cortez, and Tom of Bradenton; 10 grand-
children; and five great-grandchildren.


Francis J. O'Hara
Francis J. O'Hara, 77, of Holmes Beach died May 12.
Mr. O'Hara was born in Winthrop, Mass. and
moved to this area in 1978 from Cub Hill, Md. He was
an accounting clerk for the Pennsylvania Railroad for
30 years. He was a member of St. Bernard Catholic
Church. Mr. O'Hara was a sergeant in the U.S. Army
Air Force in World War II.
He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Bullock; two
daughters, Judy Covert of St. Petersburg Beach and
Hannah Maloney of New Freedom, Pa.; four sisters,
Helen of Riverview, Jayne Dougherty of Ocala, Eliza-
beth of Hawthorne, Calif., and Rosemary Ford of Sil-
ver Spring, Md.; one brother, William of South Paris,
Maine; and two grandchildren.
Memorial donations may be made to St. Bernard
Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach, FL
34217.

The Island Poet
Mother has been to the hospital and came
home with a brand new baby boy.
And all the neighbors have come over and
seem to jump for joy.
But why did they bring all those gifts and
shower him with clothes,
When he is such a scrawny kid with hardly
any nose.
And they all pick him up and say he is so
sweet.
When some of the things that kid does I
wouldn't dare repeat.
And all the while they pass me by and no
one cares for me,
When I am such a great big boy and I am
only three.
Bud Atteridge





Islanders honored as Prudential's
top producers for April
The Prudential Florida Realty has announced the
company's top listers and sellers for the month of
April. Top listers include Carol Heinze of the Anna
Maria Island office. Robert St. Jean is among top sell-
ers at the Island office.


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Weider to hold one-man art exhibit
Joe Welder, a 17-year-old junior at Manatee High School, will hold a one-man
art show on Friday, May 20, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Art League,
5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach.
The show is to display the extraordinary talent of this young man and to help
him raise money for a special endeavor Welder has been invited to attend the
Summer Pre-college Program at the Pratt Institute of Art in New York City for July
through August.
Weider, a graduate of Anna Maria Elementary and King Middle School, must
raise $2,500 plus travel expenses for the New York program.
Weider has been an art scholarship student in the Art League's program since
its inception. In 1993, Weider won first placein Winterfest and a best of show award
at the Green Bridge Art show. Recently, Weider won first place in both the Free-
,dom Village art show and the Green Bridge show.


Hurricane Hunter plane

comes to Airport Friday
With Hurricane Season less than two weeks off, Island residents need to begin to
prepare.
As a way to "greet" the five-month fret, national Weather Service Hurricane
Center Director Dr. Bob Sheets will be on hand Friday for a Town Hall meeting on
hurricane preparedness. The meeting will be held at Sudakoff Center on the Univer-
sity of South Florida New College Campus starting at 10 a.m.
Sheets and Rocky Lopes, Disaster Education Association with the American Red
Cross, will host the meeting.
Also coming to town will be a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra-
tion Orion P-3 "Hurricane Hunter" aircraft. The plane is scheduled to arrive at Dol-
phin Aviation, adjacent to the Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport, at 9 a.m.
Friday.
The Red Cross-sponsored event will also feature hurricane preparedness litera-
ture and refreshments.
Information, call 792-8686.
Island Professional Service
Personal Care

Grooming MiNTEE
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT .-- -iTEE
778-2095
107 7th St. N., We Groom Dogs
Bradenton Beach AND CATS
ALSO WE FEATURE ALL NATURAL FLEA PRODUCTS


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 19, 1994 U PAGE 13 jM


receive
plaque
Norma Markham (left),
out-going president of
the OffStage Ladies,
presented a plaque to
Ruth W. Stevens
:. : : (right), president of
Island Players, as part
of the Island-wide
Centennial Celebra-
tion. The historical
marker commemorates
the theater as the old
Community House
used for social events,
city government
..'- "meetings, church
.- groups, clubs and
organizations.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka

Island Players schedule


new season


A French farce, a murder mystery, a
musical, a social drama and a comedy
make up the 1994-95 program of the Is-
land Players, now in its 46th season.
"A Flea in Her Ear," by Georges
Feydeau opens Oct. 14 and continues
through Oct. 23. There are two versions
of the play, translated by Barnett Shaw
and John Mortimer; the Players will
blend the two. A period (circa 1910)
bedroom farce, it is fraught with misun-
derstandings, mixed-up letters and mis-
placed characters, working up to a
madly comic brouhaha.
"Murder Among Friends," a com-
edy thriller by Bob Barry with a New
Years Eve background, runs from Dec.2
to 11. It involves double-dealing murder
plots involving two couples out-
wardly friends at cross purposes,
with the planned outcome falling apart
and resulting in an unplanned murder.
The musical offering is "And the
World Goes Round," Jan. 20 through
Feb. 4, a revue of songs by John Kander
and Fred Ebb, creators of "Cabaret,"
"Chicago," "Zorba" and the current


"Spider Woman." It promises a musical
evening of gems from the Broadway and
TV careers of these two American
songwriters, a satisfying mix of sugar
and spice, sentiment and contemporary
jazz.
March 17 to April 2 brings the much-
discussed "Other People's Money," a topi-
cal tale of Main Street vs. Wall Street A
charmingly rapacious financier plots the
takeover of a vulnerable stock, planning to
liquidate the company, take the money and
run. The play gives its audience an inside
view of what sometimes goes on in the fi-
nancial life of the country.
"The Cemetery Club," a comedy by
Ivan Manchell, opens May 12 and
closes the season May 21. It concerns
three Jewish widows who meet once a
month for tea before visiting their hus-
bands' graves. The women, all decid-
edly different in style and temperament,
are close friends.Then an attractive wid-
ower comes on the scene, causing a cri-
sis in their relationship.
Information, P.O. Box 2059, Anna
Maria, FL 34216.


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Insurance?

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Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


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PM PAGE 14 a MAY 19, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By June Alder


ANNA MA-REE-A OR ANNA MA-RYE-A?


When Harry Varley founded The Islander newspa-
per in 1951 he heartily espoused the position of Island
pioneer Captain John R. Jones that our Island's name
was Spanish in origin and should be pronounced "Anna
Ma-ree-a." Hardly a week went by that somewhere in
his paper he'd publish a blurb holding up to scorn those
who said it "Anna Ma-rye-er."
People took sides on the issue in the letters column.
Varley's opponents argued that the Island wasn't
known as Anna Maria at all until after Florida became
a part of the United States. And the U.S. was still fight-
ing the Seminole War and wasn't on good terms with
the Spanish, because they were supplying guns to the
Indians. So why, at that time, would anyone name an
island or anything else after anything Spanish?
One Islander who took on Varley was Frances
Livingstone, a fascinating character. She was, among
other things, a canny real estate agent, a three-time county-
wide tennis and golf champion; a noted tarpon fisherman;
and, as an Anna Maria City Commissioner for several
years in the '50s, a match for any male politician.
She certainly had better credentials than Yankee
Varley when it came to local history. Her family went
'way back to Civil War times in the South. And she was
born in this area, the daughter of George Riggin, a promi-
nent Braidentown citizen at the turn of the century.
Mrs. Livingstone and Varley engaged in a sort of
"dueling doggerel" competition. For example, one time
Varley wrote:
How Gounod would hate it
If in the church choir,
The soloist warbled it -
"Ave Mar-eye-er. "

To which Frances shot back in two stanzas:

The sunshine is hot
And life is much freer
For all of the tourists
On "Anna Mar-ee-ah."

But to the Crackers -
Let yell the town crier!
They'll bask in the sunshine
Of "Anna Mar-eye-yer. "

This was how matters stood when Al Robson came
to live on the Island. He was an architect and lived in
a big house on the corner of North Shore Drive and
Palm Avenue. A keen student of Florida history, he
became fascinated with the controversy over the
Island's name.
One day at the post office, Robson got to talking
with a woman who was quite amused at a notice posted
by the Island Women's Club insisting on the Spanish
pronunciation of Anna Maria.
That was nonsense, said the woman, Mrs. J.B.
Johnson. Turned out her grandfather was Madison
Post, the fourth mayor of Tampa, elected in 1858. Mrs.
Johnson told Robson how government surveyors came
to map Tampa Bay around the time Florida was admit-
ted to the Union in 1845 and stayed in the home of Post
and his wife.
Because there were so many Palm or Long islands
scattered along the Gulf coast (our island was called by
both names in years past) the surveyors needed to pick
another name. As a gesture of appreciation to Post for
his hospitality, they offered to name the island after
him. However, Mrs. Johnson said, her grandfather sug-
gested naming it after his wife. But she, in turn, wanted
her sister, who lived with the Posts, included.
You guessed it. Mrs. Post, of Scottish descent, was


Few things have prompted Island
disagreements more than the
correct pronunciation of Anna
Maria. Is it 'Ma-ree-a' or 'Ma-rye-
a'? Here's the definitive
explanation of how the names
came about you decide how to
say 'em yourself.


named Anna and her sister was named Maria. Put the
names together and you have Anna Maria with the
"I" rhyming with "cry."
At least, that was the story handed down to Madi-
son Post's granddaughter. Was it true? Robson, a keen
student of Florida history, was determined to find out,
if he could.


THE SCOTTISH

LASSIE THEORY
Al Robson drove up to Tampa and spent several
days in the historical society rooms in the Hillsborough
County Courthouse. There he located some interesting
clippings from the Tampa Herald the first Florida
West Coast newspaper in which Madison Post and
his wife Maria were mentioned prominently. Robson
was beginning to feel he was on the right track.
A front-page story in an issue in 1843 really got
Robson excited. It told about the Post family entertain-
ing officers from the federal schooner engaged in sur-
veying the coastline in preparation for Florida state-
hood. This article not only mentioned Maria Post but
her sister Anna, as well.
That pretty well convinced Robson, but to be thor-
ough he paid a visit to the National Archives in Wash-
ington, D.C. He pored over maritime maps of Tampa
Bay in the 18th and 19th centuries and not a one of
them showed an island called Anna Maria Island until
1848. To top it off, Robson unearthed an 1842 letter
issued by the Commerce and Postal Departmerit to all
government surveyors sent to Florida. They were spe-
cifically instructed to "establish names for locations as
used by local citizens to facilitate the establishment of
post offices and to help in recording tax lists."
That was enough for Al Robson. He maintained
steadfastly from then on until he moved off the Island
in the '70s that the Scottish lassie theory was correct.
But his research didn't win the day. Now, nearly 50
years later, it's rare indeed to hear anyone speak Anna
Maria Island's name with a Scottish accent; the only
ones I know of are retired Anna Maria Assistant City
Clerk Elizabeth Moss, and retired City Engineer
Charlie Kehm.
Oh, well. As I've said before, Anna Maria's a
beautiful name no matter which way you say it.

OTHER PLACES,

OTHER NAMES
Having said about all that can be said about the
"Anna Ma-ree-a versus Anna Ma-rye-a" controversy
- without settling it one way or the other I turn now
to names of other places hereabouts.

Holmes Beach
Formed 27 years after Anna Maria City, Holmes
Beach was literally "the city that Jack built."


Jack Holmes came to the Island from New Jersey
during the Depression and bought land in the vast empti-
ness south of Anna Maria City. As soon as World War II
was over he began to fill the acreage up with concrete-
block houses, selling them at reasonable prices to war-
weary Northerners (200 were built between 1948 and
1950). When 62 residents voted to incorporate on March
13,1950, the winning name was Holmes Beach..Runner-
up was "Coquina Beach," which in the 1960s became the
name of Anna Maria Island's second public beach.

Bradenton Beach
Originally known as Cortez Beach, the city was
given its present name by a newspaper reporter.
Frances Warttig was Anna Maria mayor and post-
master in the '50s and '60s. In the '40s she wrote for
the Bradenton newspaper. In her stories everything
south of Anna Maria City was headed "Bradenton
Beach." This pleased the Bradenton Chamber of Com-
merce though many Island residents didn't relish being
tagged as a Bradenton adjunct. Nevertheless, when 84
property owners who lived south of 27th Street voted
in 1951 to form a municipality, they stuck with
Bradenton Beach.
In an interview she gave to Varley towards the end
of her life, Mrs. Warttig confessed she was sorry about
what she'd done. Cortez Beach would have been a
nicer name, she decided when she was older but wiser.

Cortez
Cortez was a thriving fishing village long before
Anna Maria Island was populated. Fishermen from
North Carolina started coming in the 1880s to what was
then called Hunter's Point where Indians and Spaniards
had camped in past centuries. The hamlet was named
Cortez in 1896 by U.S. postal officials (perhaps in the
offhand way it's said Anna Maria Island was named).
Ben Green, in his book about his hometown, "Finest
Kind," speculates that officials may have had Hernando
DeSoto in mind. But there were already several DeSoto
post offices in the state, so maybe someone in Wash-
ington who wasn't much of a student of American his-
tory thought Cortez would do as well.

Longboat Key
The well-to-do, fashionably-slim key to the south
of our Island, got its name from the gap that comes be-
tween us. That narrow slit, which has shifted about con-
siderably over the years, has been called Longboat Pass
for centuries. It probably was called that because the In-
dians used to paddle their long dugouts through it on
their fishing trips.
Also, there's a high probability that DeSoto and his
chief scout Juan Anasco used the pass in 1539, having
first put in on the shore of either Anna Maria Island or
Longboat Key. (Read the book Narratives of DeSoto
available at DeSoto Memorial Park and decide for
yourself.)
Possible evidence for Longboat Key's claim to
DeSoto fame was found on the Key's north end back
in 1941. A crew building a road were digging into a
swampy area when their shovels hit something solid.
Gradually there emerged a 30-foot ribbed portion of a
ship's keel. It had iron bolts and its design suggested
that it was the skeleton of a Spanish galleon.
Longboat resort owner Gordon Whitney had some
of the relics analyzed by experts at the American Mu-
seum of Natural History in New York City. Their opin-
ion was that the ship was between 200 and 400 years
old. So it could have been the wreck of one of DeSoto's
vessels. It also could have been a pirate ship or simply
the wreck of an unlucky trading vessel.






PAGE 15 0 MAY 19, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER iM


CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION



SCHEDULE OF EVENTS


Friday, May 20
Street Dance
and Grand Opening Ceremony
A street dance at the Island Shopping Center,
5400 Marina Dr., Homes Beach, from 5 to 10 p.m.
will kick off the Anna Maria Island Centennial
Celebration. Dean (formerly with the DTs) and the
Hammerheads, sponsored by the Islander.By-
stander, will play and food and drink will be
available. Grand Opening ceremonies will take
place at 8 p.m. Contests include a George Bean
Look-Alike Beard contest and a costume contest.
An auction will be conducted and prizes will be
awarded throughout the evening. A $2 donation is
requested.

Saturday, May 2
Grand Parade
The Grand Parade, sponsored by the Anna
Maria Island Privateers, will begin at Coquina
Beach on Gulf Drive at the south end of the Island
at 10 a.m. It will traverse the Island and end at
Bayfront Park on North Bay Boulevard in Anna
Maria at approximately 11 a.m.
The honored guest of the parade will be
Miriam Murphy, 94, the only living grandchild of
George Bean, the first homesteader on the Island.
Other featured guests in the parade include Audry
Seller, Bean's great granddaughter; Blanche Hall,
widow of Bean's grandson, the late Clarence Hall;
and Eugene Breazeale, Bean's great grandson. All
will ride in open convertibles from Bill Graham
Ford and Cox Chevrolet.

Family Picnic
A Family Picnic will take place in Bayfront
Park from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Members of the Island
Rotary will cook hot dogs, hamburgers and other
treats and cold drinks will be available. There will
be children's games from 1 to 2 p.m. and local
entertainment.

Trolley Tour
Free trolley rides will be available from the
park every half hour from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. to take
visitors on a tour of historic sites in Anna Maria.

Excursion Boat Tour
At the historic Anna Maria City Pier at the end
of Pine Avenue, excursion boat rides will be
available from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for $2 per person.
The Miss Cortez will cruise the bay and Gulf
waters, leaving the dock every half-hour. Brian
Beebe will entertain.

Flavors of the Island
The Flavors of the Island Dinner and Enter-
tainment Show, sponsored by First National Bank
of Manatee, will be held at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria, from 6 to 10 p.m.
The following Island restaurants will offer
specialties: Anchorage, Chez Andre, Domino's
Pizza, Gulf Drive Cafe, Joe's Eats and Sweets,
Rotten Ralph's, Sandbar, Beach House, Ato's,
Shells, BridgeTender Inn, Vienna Castle, Rod and


Tudor home on Beach Avenue. on the historic tour.


Reel Pier, Sign of the Mermaid and Crown and
Thistle British Pub.
Entertainment will begin at 6:30 p.m. with
Jim Kronus performing a clarinet solo, followed at
6:45 p.m. with.the Roser Community Chorus. The
chorus will be followed by Miss Lisa's Dance
Recital at 7 p.m., Paulette Kilts' Piano Studio
Recital at 7:30 p.m. and the Manatee High School
Jazz Band from 8 to 9:30 p.m.

Sunday, May 22
Centennial Sunday
Island ministers will to bring the early history
of the Island to their congregations and choirs will
sing several old Anna Maria songs.

Craft Marketplace
A Craft Marketplace, featuring artists and
crafts persons, will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


"Duffy's Trolley" will be availablefor historic tours.
at Coquina Beach on Gulf Drive at the south end
of the Island in Bradenton Beach.

Trolley Tour
Free trolley rides will be available from
Coquina Beach every half hour to take visitors on
a tour of historic sites in Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach.

Fishing Tournament
A Fishing Tournament for kids and adults will
be held on the Bradenton Beach City Pier at the
end of Bridge Street from noon to 4 p.m. Kids-fish
free and adults (age 16 and over) pay $5 to enter.
First place prizes for kids, rods and reels donated by
Island Discount Tackle, will be awarded for the
longest fish, heaviest fish, most fish, longest pin fish,
most unusual fish and the best catch.
Adults must catch trout, flounder, redfish, snook,
grouper, sheepshead, mangrove snapper or black
drum. Points will be awarded for (and participants
may keep) all legal-sized fish. First prize for adults is
one-half day of fishing aboard Capt. Mike Heistand's
charter boat "Magic."


Horseshoe Tournament
A Horseshoe Tournament will be held at Anna
Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria,
from 1 to 4 p.m.


Shuffleboard Tournament
A Shuffleboard Tournament will be held at
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna
Maria, from 1 to 4 p.m.

Other Centennial offerings

Centennial Photographs
Island photographer Jack Elka will take
centennial photographs in costume Saturday at the
Anna Maria City Pier from noon to 4 p.m. and at
the Flavors of the Island from 7 to 9 p.m. Photos
are $5 and will be in color.

Centennial Postage Stamp
Cancellation
An Anna Maria Island Centennial Celebration
Cancellation will be available at a special mock
post office at the Family Picnic on Saturday and
the Craft Marketplace on Sunday. Anything, such
as historical booklets or programs or postcards,
can be canceled. Pre-canceled envelopes and
souvenir sheets on parchment paper will also be
available for collectors.

Tour of Historic Sites
A drive-by Tour of Historic Sites will take
place all three days. On Sunday, homes at 301 N.
Bay Blvd. in Anna Maria, 601 Gulf Dr. S. in
Bradenton Beach and Duncan House at 1703 Gulf
Dr. N. in Bradenton Beach will be open to the
public from 2 to 4 p.m. A $1 donation is re-
quested. Maps and information are available at
the Island Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria, and at The Islander Bystander, 5408
Marina Dr., Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach.

Museum Open
House
The Island Historical
Museum, 402 Pine Avenue,
DUE Anna Maria, will hold open
house all three days of the
centennial celebration from -10
a.m. to 4 p.m. The Bean
Family will be the featured
exhibit.

Time Capsule
Anna Maria Elementary School students are
preparing a time capsule to be buried near the old
school bell on the school grounds. The ceremony
will take place on May 20 at 11 a.m. The capsule
will include mementos, photographs, school
yearbooks and students' impressions of what life
on the Island is like in 1994 and what it will be
like in 25 years. The capsule will be opened in 25
years.

Centennial Souvenirs
Centennial souvenirs including mugs, post
cards, buttons, T-shirts and polo shirts will be
available at all event locations and the Island
Historical Museum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria.


Bill Worth, George Norwood, Jeanne Blassingame,
Carolyne Norwood and Elnora Worth at the Histori-
cal Museum.






j[ THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 19, 1994 N PAC
... (813) 778-2253

MIXON a. p

INC.

5412 Marina Dr.
Island Shopping Center
MARK C. MIXON Holmes Beach, FL 34217,


-HISTORCAL S-ITE TOlR



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"We A REtSnI1OE SR MSe dg



05 Guff Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216P l b
-778-4655 778-9182


5348B Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-5622


Sportswear
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Alexis Plaza
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Happy 100th Birthday
Anna Maria Island
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PAGE 17 I MAY 19, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER P1



Please oinus in

HiAD INGTON celebrating
k HOU6E Anna Maria Islanb's
Bed Iootb Birtbay



5626 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beacb
778-5444
2soi Create Memories New & 01O witb Gift Certificates


AND LOCATOR MAP


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7 Island Players, 1912
8 Four Houses Gulf Blvd., Prior 1916
117 Palm Dr., Stone House, 1939
9207 Gulf Dr. Stone House 1927
9 121 Maple, Stucco, 1928
10 104 Beach, Mediterranean, 1924
107 Beach, French Normandy
Tudor, Demolished 1928
11 7405 Gulf Dr., 1924
Island Colonial, 1929
12 5626 Gulf Dr., Harrington House,
1924
13 5607 Flotilla Dr., Wimpy House,
1948
14 Cobb's Marina, 1896
15 4700 Gulf Drive, School bell tower
16 Sportsman Harbor, 1896



/S9E __ Since 1982






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3500 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach
(813)778-0773
FAX (813) 778-2835


17 3716 Gulf Dr., built by Escalante,
1913
18 Site of Old Gulf Park Hotel, 1909
19 1703 Gulf Dr., Duncan House,
1890-1900
*1604 Gulf Dr., Haunted House 1923
20 Original Cortez Bridge -
BridgeTender Inn
21 601 Gulf Dr., Old House, 1927
22 1101 Gulf Dr. 1940
104 11th St., 1912
105 1 th St., 1917
112 1 Ith St., 1926
1205 Gulf Dr., 1936


Holmes Beach Shopping Center, circa 1960.


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Lic. Real Estate Broker (813) 778-2246
Serving Anna Maria Since 1939
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J~I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 19, 1994 A PAGE 18


Proud of Ou
Community
Since 1946

CONGRATULATIONS
Anna Maria Island
For Withstanding a Century of Time
Happy Birthday!
9807 Gulf Drive Anna Maria 778-1925


ir
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101 South Bay Boulevard Anna Maria 778-9611
and Anchorage Oyster Bar Historic City Pier


When it comes to service,
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o First Union National Bank
of Florida
5327 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach
813 798-2708


ANNA MARIA ISLAND


CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION


HISTORICAL SITE TOUR


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[BTT


ANNA MARIA
1. Near the intersection of Alamanda and North
Shore Drive This is the site of the house built by
George Emerson Bean in 1894. Supplies came by boat
to a small dock built near the present Rod and Reel Pier
at the same intersection. Bean homesteaded 160 acres
from the north point of the Island (Bean Point) to Mag-
nolia Avenue.

2. 227 North Bay Boulevard This house, built prior
to 1916, was once the residence of Charles M. Rour. It
is presently the home of Island sculptor Woody
Candish and is pictured in the book, Anna Maria Island
in Days Past.

3. 301 North Bay Boulevard This cottage was built
in 1920 and was recently restored by its present owners.

4. At the intersection of Bay Boulevard and Pine
Avenue, Anna Maria City Pier The Anna Maria
City Pier was built by the Anna Maria Development
Company in 1911 to provide dockage for ships from St.
Petersburg and Tampa. Capt. Mitch Davis, one of the
island's earliest builders, constructed buildings on each
end of the "T" portion of the pier. One building was the
Lotus Cottage, the other an ice house which later be-
came a fish cannery and then a cottage named Belle
Haven. Both structures fell into the bay in the late
1920s. Although parts of the pier were damaged by
storms in 1918, 1935, 1974 and 1988, it has been re-
stored each time to its approximate original form.

5.519 Pine Avenue, Roser Cottage Roser Cottage
was built in 1912 by Capt. Mitch Davis. Legend says
John Roser was watching the sunset from this front
porch when he decided to have a church built across the
street to honor his wife, Caroline.

5. Across the street from Roser Cottage, Roser
Chapel Roser Chapel was built in 1913 by Capt.
Mitch Davis. The sum of $3,100, to be paid out to the
contractor at different stages of construction, was sent
in an iron safe by boat from St. Petersburg and stored
in Roser Cottage. Roser had stipulated the chapel be a
union place of worship, not connected to any denomi-
nation, and ministers of different denominations came
by boat from the mainland to conduct services. They
were entertained in various Island homes and returned
to the mainland the next day.

5. 503 Pine Avenue, Cozy Corner Cozy Corner
was built by or for John Rour in 1913. It shows the
same solid cement block construction as Roser Chapel.
All construction materials were brought by boat from
Tampa.

5. 428 Pine Avenue, the Lakeside Cottage The
Lakeside Cottage was built in 1920 as a one-room
house and moved from Magnolia Avenue to its present
site on Lake La Vista. It was built for George Wilhelm
Bean by Capt. Mitch Davis.

6. 428 Spring Avenue, the Pioneer Cottage The
Pioneer Cottage is thought to be the first dwelling to be
built in the Anna Maria Beach Resort. It was probably
built in 1910 and was occupied for a time by developer
George Wilhelm Bean, son of George Emerson Bean.

6. 411 Spring Avenue This house was built about
1923 and was the home of Uncle Sam Ditmas, Anna
Maria's much photographed mailman. The house is
shown in Anna Maria Island in Days Past.

7. Corner of Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue, the Island
Playhouse The Island Playhouse was reportedly
sawed in and moved by barge down the Manatee River
from Parrish. County historical records indicate it was
in place in Anna Maria by 1912. In the past, it has
served as the community hall and a tourist center.


8. Gulf Boulevard (gp down Magnolia Avenue to
the Gulffront), the Red Houses On this short
street, five houses face the Gulf. Built in the early
1900s, these houses are shown from the back in an
early photograph titled "The Red Houses." The strip
of beachfront from Magnolia Avenue to Oak Avenue
is Anna Maria Gulf Front Park, bought by the city
from the Harvey Investment Company in 1933.

8. 117 Palm Avenue at Gulf Drive This house
was built in 1939 by Cary Schambers, a builder noted
for his unique style.

8. 9702 Gulf Drive This house was also built by
Cary Schamners..The 1927 house is constructed
largely of buttonwood with "tabby" style stonework.
Another Schambers house can be found at the corer
of Spring Avenue and South Bay Boulevard.

9.121 Maple at Gulf Drive This early "stucco
over frame" house was built in 1928. In an early photo
taken from Gulf Drive, there are no other houses
around it.

10. Beach Avenue In the year 1928, English ar-
chitect and builder A. I. Alhinson began construction
on three large homes on Beach Street a Mediter-
ranean style, a Tudor style (now demolished) and a
French Normandy style.
The Mediterranean house at 104 Beach Avenue
was the home of Miss Eddy, who came to live for six
months every winter between 1930 and 1960 and al-
ways brought her private secretary and retinue of ser-
vants. A native of Bennington, Vermont, she was the
daughter of the inventor of the printing ink used on
U.S. currency. It is now owned by a local resident and
is not for sale.
The Tudor house stood on the property where
Sunset Cove is currently being built. It was the home
of Talbot Munday, the English author who created the
popular radio series Jack Armstrong, All American
Boy. Munday died in the home in 1940.
At 107 Beach Avenue is the French Normandy
home now owned by a pioneer Manatee County fam-
ily. It was once the home of baseball player Earl
Torgeson and family.

HOLMES BEACH
11. 7405 Gulf Drive Called an Island Colonial,
this house does resemble a typical Southern planta-
tion home with its pillared portico. The house was
built from 1924 to 1929 with construction materials
shipped from Tampa by boat. The exterior walls are
travertine, a stone found only in Italy and Florida and
now considered too valuable to use in any surface
larger than a fireplace facing. Sbme of the heavy
beams used in the construction were taken from some
earlier structure and were supposedly 100 years old
when used. This home sits on a three-and-a-half-acre
site, the largest single family homesite on the Island.

12. 5626 Gulf Drive, Harrington House This re-
stored home is now called Harrington House, one of
the Island's two bed and breakfast establishments.
Built in 1924, it was the long-time residence of Max-
well Ingham, the second mayor of Holmes Beach.
After his death, his widow gave the small triangle of
property across the street to the city as a dedicated
park and installed a large rot&: with a bronze plaque
in her husband's memory.

13. 5607 Flotilla Drive, the Wimpy House 7n
1948, Jack Holmes built the airport (now the vacant
land behind city hall) for the movie "On An Island
With You" starring Esther Williams. After the movie
was completed, the field was improved and used as
a flying school airstrip and for use by commuter
planes until it was closed in 1973. A. E. Wimpy built
this house in 194 3 or 1949 and commuted to work in


i






PAGE 19 0 MAY 19, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER IIj


I
Bradenton Beach and the original Cortez Bridge to the Island.


Georgia using a four-passenger
Beechcraft Bonanza. He stored his air-
plane in a hangar built into the home.
The house is now under lease to Mote
Marine Laboratory.

14. Near 202 52nd Street, Cobb's Ma-
rine Ways Down the road to the bay
where the Holmes Beach Marina now
stands, is the site of the old Cobb's Ma-
rine Ways, founded in 1907 by Samuel
C. Cobb. It was the first commercial es-
tablishment on the Island. Samuel Cobb
and his wife Anna were the second
homesteaders on the Island in 1896.
Samuel's son Louis lived on the home-
stead and continued the business, fol-
lowed by his son "Humbug," until it was
sold in the late 1970s.

15. 4700 Gulf Drive, school bell tower
- The bell tower from the first Island
school sits on. the grounds of the Anna
Maria Elementary School. The one-
room Island school was located on Mag-
nolia Avenue in Anna Maria where the
Anna Maria Island Community Center
now stands.

16. 4700 Gulf Drive to the Manatee
Public Beach This land was the third
homestead on the Island, established by
Capt. John R. Jones in 1896. In the Island
Historical Museum is a photograph of his
house in the area of Sportsman Harbor in
1957. It was torn down shortly thereafter.

17. 3716 Gulf Drive Adjoining the
homestead of Capt John R. Jones was one
established by Spanish fisherman Jose M.
Cazanas. Cazanas and a man named
Gutierrez were instrumental in bringing
people from the cigar making industry to
the Island. This house as built in 1913 by
one of these, Frank Escalante, a Tampa
cigar manufacturer. Escalante had a young
son who was very ill and none of the
Tampa doctors he visited were able to cure
the boy. One doctor suggested he try regu-
lar bathing in saltwater, and the family
came to Anna Maria. The cure worked and
the family established residence here. The
house is still owned by one of the
Escalante daughters.

BRADENTON
BEACH
18. 2600 block of Gulf Drive North -
This is the site of the Gulf Park Hotel, first
called the Club House. Built in 1909, it
was one of the earliest buildings on the
Island. All materials for the construction
were shipped in by boat. The building was
destroyed by fire in the 1970s.
Rurick E. Cobb homesteaded in this
area. He surveyed, laid out streets and
called the area Ilexhurst. It eventually
became part of Bradenton Beach.
Further south was a 1904 home-
stead of 163 acres established by David


Rouch. This property was purchased
by Wyman and Green Real Estate and
developed as Cortez Beach. This ap-
pears to have been the legal name of
what we now know as Bradenton
Beach until 1941 when the post office
was established.

19. 1703 Gulf Drive North, Duncan
House The house was built in
Bradenton between 1890 and 1900.
Mr. Duncan had the house barged to
the Island in 1946. In 1988 it was pur-
chased by its present owners, restored
and opened as a bed and breakfast.

19. 1604 Gulf Drive North This
brown shingle house is celebrated in
local legend as the Island's "haunted
house." The first floor was once a gift
shop, "Romaine's Unusual Gifts." Ro-
maine was known for her unusual
dress and manner and said she felt the
presence of the ghosts.

20. 135 Bridge Street, the Bridge
Tender Inn The Bridge Tender Inn,
built in 1917 as the Bayside Inn by
"Old Man Stafford," offered home
brew, moonshine, slot machines, gam-
bling and two rooms to let. Below was
a sundry store with ice, ice cream,
candy, cool drinks and canned foods.
The Inn, the first commercial en-
terprise in Bradenton Beach, served
fishermen, retirees, tourists and Island-
ers. The Island could only be reached
by boat until 1922, when the Cortez
Bridge was built. The wooden struc-
ture stretched from the Village of
Cortez to the end of Bridge Street.
The building was remodeled as the
Bridge Tender Inn in 1991.

21. 601 Gulf Drive South This
home was built in 1927. The steps
were moved from Gulf Drive to Sixth
Street when Gulf Drive was widened
in 1950.

22. 104, 105 and 112 llth Street
South The house at 104 was built in
1912 and retains the original wood sid-
ing and windows. The porch and roof
over were added to the structure. Inte-
rior walls are tongue and groove. The
house at 105 was constructed in Pal-
metto in 1917 and floated by barge to
the Island and pulled to its present lo-
cation by a team of work horses. Exte-
rior walls are wood planking that has
been covered with vinyl siding. Some
interior windows are original. The
house at 112 was built in 1926. The
original exterior was replaced with alu-
minum siding in the 1970s. The win-
dows are original except for the sliding
patio door. The separate garage build-
ing was built at the same time. Both
buildings contain the original cypress
paneling and wood floors.


From generation to generation, we are an "Island of Memories."
Kid's & watermelon on the running board from Paul Roat's family album.



Join the party!

Centennial Grand Opening Ceremony
Street Dance, Beard Contest & Auction
Friday May 20 5 to 10 pm $2
Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach
Music by Dean from DTs and The Hammerheads -
provided by The Islander Bystander.


OPEN HOUSE:
Please stop by our office in the shopping center,
meet some of the staff and enjoy some old-fashioned
Island hospitality while you're at the street dance.


IISLANDE


mRlAi


DeSoto Parade, March 1949. "Rolling surf ridden by girls on surf boards while other
beach girls stood with giant tarpon on fishing lines." Photo by the late Don Roat of
Bradenton Beach. Beach girls: Carolyn Meeker, Carol Woods, Betty Sue Burton,
Charlene Miller, Sylvia Wiggins and Jeanne Roat. From Paul Roat's family album.


Join the parade!

Official Centennial Parade
May 21 Saturday 10O.am

From Coquina Beach in Bradenton Beach
to Anna Maria Bayfront Park
The Islander Bystander will be "parading"
in two trolleys. Watch for us and wave!
Sponsored by the Privateers.
Join the parade enter now!
Call Parade Chairman Will Stokes 794-6889


ISLANDER


.11BiS





IjI PAGE 20 0 MAY 19, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
It's the final countdown to the Anna Maria Island
Centennial Celebration. I don't know about you, but
I'm looking forward to a lot of the events including the
Friday night street dance at the Holmes Beach Island
Shopping Center parking lot and, on Saturday, the Is-
land-long parade and "Flavors of the Island" in the
evening at the Community Center.
On Sunday, an arts and crafts show at the south end
of Coquina Beach will include more than 50 artisans
from all over the state selling their wares at the free
event. Lots of barbecue, cotton candy, frozen ices and
other refreshments will be available.
The Anna Maria Island Art League is sponsor-
ing a one-man show for Joe Weider, a 17-year-old Art
League scholarship student and junior at Manatee High
School, on Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the League. Joe
has been invited to attend a summer program at the
Pratt Institute of Art in New York and needs to raise
money to make the trip. If you're going to the street
dance on Friday night, stop by the League (right around
the corer) and take a look at Joe's fantasy art.


0oes Eats & Swetl


The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays
219 Gulf Drive South; Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge






IS THE HUNT CLUB
WATERFRONT DINING RESTAURANT
FULL MENU FULL BAR
S.. ....... BIG MAMA & EDDIE
CRIBBAGE SUNDAY & MONDAY
TOURNAMENT 6-10 PM
EVERY SUNDAY NOON TIL?

OPTN FOR DUANE DEE
LUN H TUESDAY- SATURDAY


DI1VN
7 DAYS A WEEK BAR LOUNGE MENU
901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria 5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Anna Maria Yacht Basin Longboat Key
778-3953 383-0543


There is a very sad rumor going around about Pete
Reynard's restaurant. First its Pete's, then its Re-
Pete's and now it looks like its Dead End Pete's. The
business appears to have boomed since being taken
back over by the original owner, Eleanor Reynard
Tatakis, just months ago in a mortgage foreclosure sale.
According to Islander sources, the restaurant is closing
its doors on Sunday, May 22. The rumor hasn't been
confirmed or denied, since no one at Pete's returned
calls on press day.
Dee Percifield, owner of Cafe on the Beach, the
Beach Shop and the Coquina Beach Cafe, was honored
as the Small Business Person of the Year for running
a new business successfully for three years or less. The
Manatee County Chamber of Commerce announced
the award last week at a special luncheon catered by the
Beach Bistro at the Manatee Civic Center. Dee has
been in business less than two years, she tells me, and
is very excited about the award. She also wants to make
sure that everyone knows that her business partner is
Gene Schaefer, who works hard behind the scenes.
"We started with nothing," Dee Percifield says. "It's
a day-to-day process and we'veworked very hard to make
it a success." Dee also credits her great staff and "most of
all," she says, "our great customers. I must have gotten
over a thousand hugs and kisses this week."
The next step, says Dee, is to do some remodeling
- take out the windows in the dining room to open that


FINE MEXICAN CUISINE
q CO Now until May 31 Celebrate Cinco De Mayo!
co^ EVERY NIGHT 6-9 PM
with Poco Loco Dinner Entree
Mon. Wed. Tues. Thurs. Fri.&Sat.
Local Beer All Wine WineSangrias Mexican Beer
$1.00 1.00 $L 50 $1.50
SDeck Overlooking Bayou
A.- OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY11-9
387-0161 CLOSED SUNDAYS
i. a: - ,. |


area and put up a cover at the north end of the patio to
give it some shelter from the weather.
Patricia Petruff kicked off her campaign for Mana-
tee County School Board at the Beach House last
week. The outside deck was sectioned off for Petruff's
supporters including Barbara Zdravecky, director of
Planned Parenthood (and Anna Maria resident), Rich-
ard and Gale Carter, Bradenton Beach, and State Rep.
Julie McClure, among others.
The expanded deck and addition at the
BridgeTender Inn is not quite ready. Soon, promises
Kathy Eubanks, chef and manager.
Tia Lena's is doing their part to help celebrate the
Centennial by offering a complimentary pitcher of their
famous homemade Sangria (limit one per table) Friday
through Sunday (Centennial days). Chef Andrea will
also serve super specials those days.
The Anna Maria Island Historical Museum's
schedule has changed. They're summer hours are 10 am.
to 1 p.m., Tuesdays through Thursdays and Saturdays.
"We're cleaning our front porch," says John
Home, manager at the Anchorage, about preparations
for the upcoming Centennial. Brian Beebe is perform-
ing through mid-June. The Anchorage is running an
"end of the season" summer special with items such as
salmon, clams, chicken and grouper. A second entree
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE.


ROD 4 L



1/2 mile
* North of City Pier -
"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida "TM
ISLAND
COOKING
REASONABLE
PRICES
778-1885
875 NORTH SHORE DR.
ANNA MARIA


RODi 4VEL


"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
Open Daily *
8 am. to Closing
Same Menu and
Prices as Below
Air-Conditioning *
Restaurant Seating
* Full Breakfast *
* Lunch & Dinner *
Draft Beer Wine
Car Parking
ALSO
50 Guarded Bike Holders!
* Please come by bike *


If You've Tried The

CQM444 3Q On Sunday...
Viyi WA )hii \ .


Please Call For Preferred Seating
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39
38.3-2391


RESTAURANT
Fine German & Polish Cuisine
Open Sunday 12:00 Noon
Come Celebrate Anna Maria's 100th Birthday
Sunday Dinner Special at 1pm
Sauerbraten Roulade $10.90
Other Dally Specials
Monday & Tuesday : oulash $8.90
Wednesday & Thursday : Porkchops $8.90
All Specials include potatoes, salad or cabbage.
Regular hours Mon Sat Open for Dinner 4:30PM til?
Sunday Bar open Noon Dinner at 1PM
3246 East Bay Dr. Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island
778-1320


Bridge Tender Inn
Historical Site Of The 1917 Bayside Inn

"Quaint Bay-view Dining in An
old Florida Atmosphere"













? /~un~ ine Si.

Open 7 Days Call for Reservations
778-4849
Convenient Docking come by land or by sea (Marker 49)
Bridge Street Bradenton







Stir-it-up
CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE

is half price.
I hear Rotten Ralph's is busy, busy, busy. No off-
season slump there. Must be those famous fish and
chips or his key lime pie and don't forget about the
out-doorsy feeling of the place right on the water over-
looking the bay.
On City Island, at the south end of Longboat Key, the
Friends of Florida Folk present a free program of enter-
tainment with Connie Dillon on Monday, May 23, 8:30
to 9:30 p.m., and "open mike" from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. and
9:30 to 11 p.m., at the Sarasota Sailing Squadron.
In the "never mind" department: Old Salty Dog
has cancelled the Sunday band party with Dem Tings
because of some misunderstanding between owner and
band. For now, there's no live entertainment, but they
still have great atmosphere and serve good fresh fish.

Want to know what was in that
gourmet recipe?
If you're looking to try your hand at recreating that
great meal you enjoyed at one of the area's fine restau-
rants, but can't quite figure out what that secret ingre-
dient was, let us know at The Islander Bystander. We'll
contact the chef and run the recipe in the newspaper.

Stir-it-up is a weekly column covering events,
newsy items and fun things to do for Islanders, most on
the Island, some off-island. We encourage those who
provide food, drink and entertainment to send us infor-
mation of your upcoming event or tell us what's new.
You may FAX, mail or drop by The Islander By-
stander with a press release. The deadline is noon Fri-
day for the following week's column.


By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
Daryl Quinn hopes
some day to play in the Su-
per Bowl of soccer, the
World Cup.
For now, the 14-year-
old Anna Maria Island resi-
dent will settle for being
named to the State of
Florida Youth Soccer all-
star team. It's his second
consecutive year to earn a
position and compete na-
tionally on the state "select 'I
team."
Last month, the King
Middle School student went
through a series of three tri-
als to be selected as one of
36 boys who will represent
Florida against all-star
squads from around the
country. More than one mil-
lion Florida youths play in ryl
Daryl Quinn
some form of organized
soccer.
Quinn, who plays locally for the Division I
Manatee Magic, plays forward and averaged one goal
every two games this season.


ISIAND



SPECi( TIES

Fresh Live Maine Lobster & New England Fish
directly from Kittery Pt., Maine to you!

"Vacation Times"
We Will be Closed May 21st
Re-Opening Monday June 7th
New Summer Hours Tues.-Sat. 10-6
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH

An important part of Anna
Maria's history ...
An important part of the future.
-,. j Join Us at the Manatee Beach.
A place for memories &
great food.

Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting)
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!


"The best thing I do is score goals. I have
speed," he said. "I'd like to play professional soccer
some day and play in a World
Cup."
Training and diet are essen-
tial to a high level of play, Maria
Quinn said. Plenty of water and
carbohydrates.
"I eat a lot of past and
though I don't like them, I eat
a lot of bananas," Daryl said.
.... "Endurance is as big a part of
soccer as skill."
A difficult decision facing
Quinn is which country to rep-
resent should he qualify to play
international soccer. His fa-
ther, Tom, was born in Scot-
land and once played semi-
professional soccer. Quinn's
mother, Maria, is an English
citizen. Quinn may decide he
should play for the United
States.
Quinn says he hopes to par-
lay his skills into a college
scholarship. An A and B student according to his
parents, the future Manatee High School student
isn't picky about what school he goes to as long as
he gets "a good education."


ANCHORAGE
OYSTER BAR
on Historic City Pier'
Join us for lunch,
watch the porpoises
play while enjoying
the Island's best,
freshest grouper
sandwich.
Dine
inside
or
outside.


LIVE ENTERTAINMENT JOIN USI
S Tuesday SWING BAND Fridays & Saturdays Dance Band
Monday & Thursdays Dixieland "Sons of the Beach"
Sunday & Wednesdays Brian Beebe
Happy Hour Daily 4 to 6 p.m. $1.25 House Brands $1 Draft Beer
101 S. BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA 778-9611 *'* Oyster Bar on Anna Maria Pier 778-0475

YOU CAN FIND THE HOME OF YOUR DREAMS ...
Dozens of rental listings, lots of stuff for sale,
employment and volunteer opportunities. It's all
in THE ISLANDER CLASSIFIED ADS.
Call 778-7978 for information.



RESTAURANT
<'Coc(taiL Zll 19e8
778-9566
5325 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach


Served Friday & Saturday 4 to Close And now Sunday too!
PETE REYNARD'S ISp GETTING ASS
All The Crab Legs You Can Eat Monday Thru Thursday 4 to 9.

Served 10 to featuring 25 breakfast and lunch items to choose from
FULL MENU STILL AVAILABLE NIGHTLY -
Featuring Fresh Fish, Lobster Shrimp & Steaks.
Chuck Senrick at the Piano Bar Daily
Sons of the Beaches Dixieland Band
Sunday, Wednesday & Friday 5:30 to 8:30 PM
BANQUET SPACE AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS CELEBRATIONS RECEPTIONS


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 19, 1994 A PAGE 21 lij


Islander Quinn kicks way

to state all-star soccer team


U


C `4 OF
RESTAURANT
-, &LOUNGE OUR

END OF SEASON SPECIALS
CHICKEN ALFREDO
OR SALMON w/DILL
YOU PAY ONLY YOU PAY ONLY WITH PUR-
CHASE OF
$3.98 $4.98 ANOTHER
ENTRiE AT
Before 6 P.M. After 6 P.M. REG. PRICE
These entrees and 6 other delicious entrees
available at BUY ONE GET 2nd AT 1/2 Price
You don't even need a coupon...
WE MUST BE NUTS!






ItG PAGE 22 N MAY 19, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 8, four alcohol citations, three at Beach
Avenue and one at Bayfront Park.
Bradenton Beach
May 9, grand theft, 12th Street North. A person
unknown removed two Jet-skis and trailers valued at
$12,000.
May 7, disorderly intoxication, 116 of Bridge
Street, Sports Lounge. The officer responded to the
Sports Lounge in reference to a white male pounding
on the doors and windows. The officer observed the
subject screaming loudly at the window. When the of-
ficer asked him to calm down, the subject screamed
obscenities at the officer. After several attempts to calm
the subject failed, he was placed in custody.
May 7, burglary to an automobile, Coquina Beach.
A person unknown entered an automobile and removed
a wallet valued at $100, $30 in cash and credit cards.
May 8, grand theft, Coquina Beach. The victim
left his bag unattended while at the beach and it was
mmmhmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
COUPON I r Is
EXPIRES
5/26/94
I b 10519 Cortez Road
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
g 1I

LUNCH PIZZA BUFFET

$3.99/ 9$2.99
I /BUFFET I
* I

DINNER PIZZA BUFFET*

4 a.49/,EO$2.99:
m m m m BUFFET
I mmmmmm COUPON mmmMMm I

.3 6B HAPPY HOURI
Mon-Fri 4-7 PM
795-8083
SUNDAY: HAPPY
HOUR ALL DAY
11AM to CLOSE
TUESDAY NIGHTS
RESTAURANT APPRECIATION PLUS DART NIGHT
Soft Tip Blind Draw Cricket 7:30 PM Double Pot

KARAOKE
Thursday Nights 8 Midnight

BLUE HEARTS
Fri & Sat. May 20 & 21 9 pm 1 pm

The Best Burgers and
The Best Phillie Cheese Steaks
in Manatee County
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


gone upon his return. Missing were a camera valued at
$250, $100 in cash, the bag valued at $10 and beach
towels valued at $20.
May 8, criminal mischief, juvenile problem,
2502 Gulf Dr. N., Villa Del Sol. The complainant re-
ported that he approached four white males, approxi-
mately 18 years old, who were trespassing in the pool
area and asked them to leave. The subjects refused and
began throwing beer bottles and a gumball machine
into the pool before fleeing.
May 8, trespass, 1100 block of Gulf Drive North.
The officer on patrol observed a suspicious vehicle
parked in front of an abandoned house and the sliding
glass door open. He observed two subjects walking
around inside and asked them to come out. He asked
them if the house was theirs and they said no. They
were placed in custody.
May 9, burglary to an automobile, 100 block of
Bridge Street. A person unknown entered the vehicle
and removed two fishing poles valued at $225.
May 11, arson with human present, 400 block of
Gulf Drive South. The officer received a complaint
from a passerby that a residence was on fire. The of-



Cez Andre


Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Breakfast
Daily Special
Luncheon
Intimate Dinner


Breakfast and Lunch
Tyes thru Sat
8AM-2:30PM
Sun 8AM-1:30PM


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-10PM
Sun 5:30-9PM


Member American
Cullinarv Frederation


Reservations Suggestedfor Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


Join the

Lunch Hunch

At the Sand.ltr.

^ ^ *. .; f
As

I- "-. -1 "'


y fessea breezes while dining onrt
finest of food under the shade of our ive
umbrellas. It's the most beautiful time of year
to get together with friends
and family at the Island's A BA
traditional favorite restaurant. J
the Sandbar. Join the lunch .x .j
bunch! ('We serve dinner, too i
Entertainment nightly.)
100 Spring Avenue U Anna Maria, Florida N 778-0444


5702 MARINA DR.
jB THOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
S OPEN DAILY AT 4 PM
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
S ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 6 PM
TIL MIDNIGHT Plus Take Out
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 til Midnight)
Tuesday: NICKEL BEER NIGHT, 6 to 8 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT- REGGAE
Thursday: LADIES NIGHT $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP

Wednesday, May 18 Reggae "Jam-iya"
Thur. Sat., May 19, 20 & 21 The Other Band
Wednesday, May 26 Reggae "Jam-iya"
Thur. Sat., May 26, 27 & 28 Lifeguard
Sunday, May 29 Hammerheads
Closed Mondays, For the Summer


ficer contacted the fire department and upon arrival at
the residence found the front door, front wall and new
lumber in front of the house on fire. A strong odor of
gasoline was present, according to the report.
The officer found the resident of the dwelling with
a neighbor watching the residence burn. Upon the
officer's arrival, the resident got a hose and extin-
guished the flames. The fire department called in an
arson dog and found several spots that smelled like raw
gasoline. Samples were taken.
Holmes Beach
May 6, suspicious person, 4000 Gulf Dr., Mana-
tee Public Beach. A person on the beach observed the
subject throwing shells at seagulls. One bird was hit,
causing it to become disabled. The lifeguard requested
that an officer speak to the subject The subject said he
didn't mean to injure the bird but just shoo it away from
his family's picnic. He said it would not happen again.
May 6, suspicious, 6300 Flotilla Dr., Shell Cove.
The officer responded in reference to mail that had been
tampered with. The complainant found one card contain-
ing a check torn in half in the mailbox. Another card con-
taining a check was found in the maintenance room torn
and partially burned. The post office was advised.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE




ANNA MARIA
ISLAND PRODUCE.


NOw Open

Year Round
(Closed Sundays)

New Phone: 778-7964
(Located next to Huffine's Amoco)
5424 Marina Drive Holmes Beach


XCrL

@I DAILY
I T LUNCH SPECIALS
S WITH THIS AD BUY ONE LUNCH ENTREE GET
rI SECOND ENTREE AT HALF PRICE. I
L | EXP. 5/30/94 Lunch Prices Start at $3.95
DAILY EARLY BIRD SPECIALS 4:30 TO 6
CHICKEN AND DUMPLINGS FISH AND CHIPS
ROAST PORK WITH SAGE AND ONION STUFFING
BANGERS AND MASH SHEPHERD'SS PIE and more.
Authentic British atmosphere with
8 British Drafted Beers on Tap.
TUESDAYS Blind Draw Darts 8 PM
NEW BAR MENU
1APPM T) A TI V


BRITISH PUB
&
RESTAURANT


OPEN DAILY
BREAKFAST
SERVED SAT. & SUN.
FROM 8 AM
LUNCH & DINNER
NOON to 10 PM


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173









FRESH CATCH ... Sauteed or Chargrilled with Maitre'D
Hotel Butter, accompanied by saffron rice andfresh vegetables.
BAKED.STUFFED SHRIMP... accompanied bysaffron rice
and fresh vegetables.
SAUTEED CHICKEN BREAST ... with bacon, mush-
rooms, onions, and meltedMontereyJack Cheese, accompanied
by house potatoes and fresh vegetables.
SHRIMP PROVENCALE ... Sauteed shrimp withfresh to-
matoes and scallions in a white wine garlic butter sauce over
white rice accompanied by fresh vegetables.
SAUTEED SCALLOPS ... with scallions and black olives in
a Ramesco Sauceoverhomemadefettuciniandfresh vegetables.
MEDALLION OF VEAL ... sauteed with mushrooms and
scallions in a Cognac peppercorn sauce, accompanied by house
ttoesandles.


O -- 41 *7-- A

M N
B S
o THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
L INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI
2 FOR 1 EARLY BIRD SPECIALS L
P 4:30 to 6:00 PM Daily A
Ches's Delicious Nightly Specials C
Z K
z
A B
G A
R BN

E S


A mT
D
Hours: MON.-SUN. 8:00 AM-2:00 PM; & 4:30 PM-10:00 PM
778-4949 S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach 778-4949
Free Delivery Takeouts Available






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 19, 1994 0 PAGE 23 IJi


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
May 7, suspicious person, 7100 block of Palm
Drive. The complainant reported that teenagers waiting for
the school bus were taking the metro bench from across
the street and carrying it to the school bus stop. The com-
plainant wanted the bench returned for elderly metro pas-
sengers. The officer returned the bench.
May 8, service, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Public
Beach. The officer responded to an automobile lockout
and gained entry.
May 8 service, 200 block of 84th Street. The of-
ficer responded to an automobile lockout with an infant
inside and the automobile running. The officer was

Simply ... the soul of Europe in the
heart of Longboat Key.





Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine
383-8898 Ivo Scafa, Proprietor
Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on theGulf of Mexico
2065 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


unable to open the vehicle and a locksmith responded.
May 8, assistance, 2800 block of Avenue E. The
officer responded in reference to an upset female. He
found the subject sitting on the ground. She had been
drinking and was upset over family problems. The of-
ficer took her to a friend's house.
May 9, burglary, 200 block of 83rd Street. A per-
son unknown tore a hole in a screen on a bedroom door,
unlocked the door and entered the residence. The room
was disturbed, items were moved around and $400 in
cash was missing.
May 9, fire, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Public
Beach. The officer on patrol observed a fire in a
wooden trash bin in the picnic area and put out the fire
with his extinguisher.
May 9, larceny, 5324 Marina Dr., Home Hard-
ware. The victim reported that three black males came



ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR


EVERY MONDAY JAM NIGHT 9PM-1AM
(ALL MUSICIANS WELCOME)
EVERY TUESDAY 10PM-1AM
CUSTOMER APPRECIATION
WEDNESDAY MAY 25th
LADIES NIGHT WITH LIFEGUARD

FRI & SAT BUSTIN LOOSE
MAY 20 & 21 9PM 1AM

3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085

ANCHOR INN
PROUDLY PRESENTS
DENNIE KIDD
NEW KITCHEN NEW CHEF
Come Check Out Our
New Exciting Menu
Homestyle Daily Specials
Seafood Specials on Fridays
Sunday Breakfast 8 am-1 pm
TAKE-OUT WE CATER
Serving Lunch 11:30-3 Dinner 5-?
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


Q R DINNER SERVED 5:00-10:00 PM
DAILY EARLY BIRD MENU 4:00-6:00 PM
SUNDAY BREAKFAST BUFFET '5.95 10:00 -1:00
Cafe Robar
FINEST STEAKS &
FRESHEST SEAFOOD
ENTERTAINMENT NITELY
OPEN FOR LUNCH & DINNER SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
LARGE GROUPS & LUNCHEON PARTIES WELCOME
RESERVATIONS REQUESTED, NOT REQUIRED

204 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria
788-6969 -._ _

"Proof that great things come in small
packages, this comfortable & charming
restaurant has much to recommend it...'
SKrlstine Nickel Sarasota Herald-Tribune





CZhe Mtitny'Inn

'Titcairn'sslard"
A' restaurant

Intimate ,Celaxed Dining
Piano & vocal by Berni Roy, Thurs Sat.
Chef Chosen Fresh Catches Dailyl
Unique Black Angus Beef Selections
Imaginative Pastas & Salads
Serving Dinner 5:00 10:00 Tuesday thru Saturday
'Early Dinner 5-6p.m. nightly
Sunday Champagne Brunchs 10-2
atsrvatmonsSuaggstLt AvaiCaite forerivate Partius


605Manatee Avenue at East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach


into the store and one distracted her attention while one
removed a bank bag containing $100 in bills from un-
der the counter.
May 10, 3200 block of Gulf Drive. The officer
observed the trunk of a car open with many tools in-
side. No one would answer the door, so the officer had
dispatch call the residents. A woman came out,
checked the tools and closed the trunk.
May 10, noise from pressure cleaner, 3007 Gulf
Dr., Mr. Bones.
May 10, larceny of a Cadillac emblem, 3805 East
Bay Dr., Sunbow Bay.
May 10, burglary to an automobile, 5325 Marina
Dr., Pete Reynard's restaurant The victim reported that a
person unknown entered the vehicle trunk and removed
a briefcase containing personal papers and documents.
May 11, service, 6500 block of Gulf Drive. The -
officer responded to a vehicle lockout.




307 INE GENERAL STORE

Deli Delights
Boiled Ham.................................... $1.89 lb.
Boar's Head Bacon ............................... $2.49 Ib.
i -r OVER 50 SANDWICH SELECTIONS


BEERo
SPECIALS(HS
DAILY .L -....- -.. .
OPEN 7 DAYS For Fast Service...
7AM-9:30PM Call 778-4656
Deli Closes at 9PM A e A a Mara
307 Pine Avenue Anna Maria


"The best hamburgers anoa
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." iss
Puffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. .
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 1 lam-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501


"I have a theory

that lunch

tastes better at

the beach.




'*c -C1'








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great food. great beach.
200oo Gulf Drive North, Anna Maria Island, 813-779-2222






jim PAGE 24 a MAY 19, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Man and turtles need to work out their differences


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspective
Jack Rudloe is my kind of guy. And as John
Lennon said in a song once, ..."I'm not the only one."
Former Sanibel light tackle guide-turned-novelist
and monthly columnist for "Outside" magazine Randy
Wayne White's marine scientist hero in books such as
"Sanibel Flats" and "The Man Who Invented Florida"
is suspiciously similar to Rudloe.
For example, both characters Rudloe and the
fictional one in White's books are marine scientists
on the west coast of Florida operating specimen labo-
ratories and doing a little writing on the side. Both are
outspoken conservationists.
Rudloe popped up in the press last week with a pretty
radical idea on how to help save Florida sealife. As you
might have guessed, there's a story behind the idea.
It seems a fisher brought an endangered Kemp's
Ridley sea turtle with a stainless steel fish hook in its
gullet into Rudloe's lab up in Panacea. He was looking
for help.
Kemp's Ridleys are the most endangered of the
world's eight sea turtle species, according to an article
Rudloe and his wife, marine biologist Anne Rudloe,
wrote in February's National Geographic magazine.
According to their article, fewer than 500 Kemp's Rid-
ley females laid eggs in 1992.
Being plenty smart enough to know he doesn't
know everything, Rudloe took the turtle to a veterinar-
ian in Tallahassee who treats sea turtles.
And as he traveled to Tallahassee, Rudloe got to
thinking. Tucking the turtle under his arm (it wasn't in
any immediate danger), Rudloe got some of the media
together and announced "It's time to put the fairness
back into fishing."
He went on to say the injured creature was proof
that, while sports anglers and commercial fishers are
fighting over whether to ban inshore netting, sea crea-
tures face many more dangers. He cited monofilament
fishing line, stainless steel hooks and monofilament
nets.
"Stainless steel hooks and monofilament line and nets
should be banned and fishing gear should be biodegrad-

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Conversing of
Cortez
Blue Fulford and Alcee
Taylor were on hand last
Friday for a trip on the
Miss Cortez, part of a
fundraising event for the
Saltwater Heritage,
Museum in the village.
About 30 people were on
the boat celebrating state
approval of the village's
inclusion in the federal
list of historic places.
Islander Photo: Bob Ardren


able," Rudloe proposed. "Just ask this Kemp's Ridley
turtle who may be facing life-threatening surgery."
I asked Alcee Taylor instead. Keeper of the Salt-
water Heritage Museum in Cortez, Taylor has seen the
changes from cotton to monofilament nets in the com-
mercial fishing industry along with a lot of other
changes.
"You serious?" he asked. As he pondered the ques-
tion, I swear his eyes kind of lit up when he said, "Well,
that means we'd have to have net houses again. It'd be
like the old days."
I don't think it would take too much to convince
Taylor there might just be a lot of sense in Rudloe's
approach.
As Rudloe said in parting to the Tallahassee media,
in referring to the proposed inshore net ban, "While
little boys are wrestling in the street, we need to worry
about our sea life."
Speaking of Cortez, state historical experts have
finally decided one of the oldest fishing villages in
Florida is worth preserving. That approval is critical to


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some day having the 200-year-old village included in
the National Register of Historic Places.
The officials federal designation will finally allow
the serious business of preservation and restoration of
the original community to get underway.
So all those folks who held all those fish fries and
made all that mullet spread to raise money to keep the
project going are seeing some fruits of their labor.
Approval of their application by the state should speed
the process in Washington.
The people of Cortez deserve that.
Chuck Shumard, savior of sea turtles nesting on
Anna Maria Island, reports things are off to a slow
start this season. Thus far, Shumard's beach watchers
have found only two "false crawls," with no nests as
yet
But it's a long season, lasting until Oct. 1 or there-
abouts, so if you spot a crawl or nest in your beach
walking, please don't disturb it and then be sure to alert
Shumard at 778-1156.
See you next week.


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/ V 6Sightseeing

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D-l I I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 19, 1994 U PAGE 25 IMG

Tarpon fever strikes, and don't forget linesiders


By Capt Mike Heistand
Tarpon are here! Rod and Reel Pier anglers landed
some of the first of the silver kinds of the season, prom-
ising a good run of the big jumpers. Offshore, permit
are schooling around the three-mile artificial reefs,
while backwater anglers are still reporting strong
catches of snook. And for those of you who are regret-
ting turning free all those catch-and-release redfish,
remember the season starts June 1, so take heart.
By the way, don't forget the fishing tourney for kids
and others this weekend at the Bradenton Beach Pier.
And mark your calendar for June 18 for the All-
Island Fishing Tournament See the folks at Island
Discount Tackle for the details.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said pier anglers
have had a good week, landing some of the first tarpon of
the year off the pier. Catch-and-release reds are also popu-
lar, as are alot of big mackerel, some upto 24-inches long.
There have been some big cobia lurking around the pil-
ings as well, munching on the glass minnows that have
been schooling around the pier.
Karen at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers there
have been catching a lot of snook, some pompano,
mackerel, blue runners, catch-and-release redfish, and
a few sharks at night mostly black spinners and
nurse sharks.
Bud at the Bradenton Beach Pier said fishermen
have been catching a few flounder, sheepshead and a
lot of trout, as well as some sharks.
Capt Zack on the Dee Jay I reports Alan Shram of
Holmes Beach brought home a grand slam last week:
snook, redfish and trout Capt Zack had a great week with
other charters, too: Wednesday brought in snook up to 14
pounds, reds of the same size, some 24-inch trout and
some four-pound flounder. Friday was even better, with
a one-hour fishing frenzy that resulted in three happy an-
glers catching and releasing 30 reds. By the way, the new
phone number for Zack is 795-5026.
Katie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip averaged 80 head of mostly Key West
grunts. The six-hour trip averaged 125 head of porgies,
beeliners and mangrove snapper. The 12-hour trip av-
eraged 40 head of cobia, mangrove snapper, amber-
jack, porgies, red and black grouper.
On my boat Magic we've done well offshore with


lots of red grouper, mangrove snapper and lane snap-
per. In the backwater, we've been able to bring in a
bunch of 26-inch trout, a few 10-pound snook and
some catch-and-release reds.
Capt. Rick Gross said snook, redfish and trout are all
out there for the catching, with linesiders seeming to be
running on the small size except for an occasional big one.
Capt. Tom Chaya said his clients have done well
with keeper snook and a lot of catch-and-release reds.
Capt. Todd Romine said he's been able to get his
customers onto all the reds you could ask for all
released, of course as well as some very large trout.


Keeper cobia
Joe Belovich, center, needed help from two Reef
Reacher crew to hold up his whopper of a cobia.


Capt. Phil Shields said his charters are still bring-
ing back to the dock lots of black fin tuna, as well as
lots of mangrove snapper, some red grouper and a few
amberjack.
Capt. Don Kyser said he's been able to get his
clients onto limit catches of red grouper and some very
big hog fish.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle has been fishing off
Costa Rica, and we're promised a Central American fish-
ing report when he returns. Locally, though, Rick said he's
hearing good reports of reds and lots of small sharks.
Good luck and good fishing.

AMICC Little League
League standings
(second half of season)
for the week ending May 14
"Major League"
Haley's Motel 7-1
AMFD 5-3
Westbay AC 4-3
D.Coy Ducks 3-4
Kiwanis 0-8
"Minor League"
Betsy Hills 7-1
Uncle Dan's Place 6-2
Bali Hai 4-4
Island Discount Tackle 4-4
Quality Builders 3-5
Tip of the Island 0-8
Major League player stats top 6 players
Name (Team) G AB H RBI BA
Scot Atkinson (Haley's) 17 41 22 35 .534
Greg LaPensee (WAC) 17 51 27 35 .529
Rickie Buckelew (Haley's) 17 49 24 18 .489
Robbie Douglas (Ducks) 15 41 20 19 .487
Jacob Becker (AMFD) 18 39 19 23 .487
Paul Feeney (AMFD) 18 57 26 29 .456

Last week's highlights
Jacob Becker of AMFD hit his third home run of
the year, a grand slam, against Kiwanis.
Westbay broke Haley's long winning streak with an
8 to 7 victory.


HOBIE
SUN
GLASSES


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FISH TALES WELCOME
Got a great catch? Rare catch? The biggest catch of your life?
Your fish stories, and pictures are always welcome at
The Islander Bystander. Just give us a call at 778-7978
or stop by our office in the Island Shopping Center.

ISLANDEIk lA r





SALES & StRVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
ThuS/19 8:30 1.8ft 1:06 0.3ft 7:59 1.6ft 2:02 0.9ft
Fr 5/20 9:01 2.0ft 1:52 0.5ft 9:32 1.5ft 3:15 0.6ff
Sat5/21 9:30 2.2ft 2:32 0.7ft 10:56 1.5ft 4:16 0.2ft
Sun5/22 10:02 2.4ft 3:11 1.0ft 5:06 -0.1ft
Mon5/23 12:15 1.4ff 3:43 1.1ft 10:38 2.6ft 5:58 -0.3ft
Tue5/24 1:27 1.4ft 4:08 1.2ft 11:16 2.7ft 6:47 -0.4
Wed5/18 2:34 1.4ft 4:31 1.3ft 7:55 2.8ft 7:35 -0.5ff
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later Low Tides 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
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* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
SConsignment/
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GALATI
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_






IM PAGE 26 N MAY 19, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Garden


Club


awards


Jim Rossi, owner of Island
Garden Center, Holmes
Beach, won first place for
a commercial property.


Ann Callan and Artie
Hopson won first place
for this residence in
Holmes Beach.


A special award went to Doug Copeland and Tom
Turner for their work on the Anna Maria Historical
Park.

NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION
North end of Anna Maria Island, 1,560 sq. ft.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. $172,000.
S OTHER HOMESITES
AVAILABLE


QUALITY
BUILDERS
IIasasa:1. 1


RENTAL
MANAGEMENT


Julie


778-7127
Fax 779-2602
#CRC047915


Call Julie ...
to rent your property quickly
with complete confidence.
Call Eliot ...
when you are thinking about
buying or selling. Call for a
free market analysis.
778-6665
1-800-749-6665


SALES
SERVICE


Eliot


neaL* mannausa
ACCREDITED MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATIONS REALTORS@


ISLANDER

Send The Islander
Bystanderto your
distant friends and
relatives. See the
form on page 7
to subscribe.







Gulf

Bay

Realty
ofAnna Maria Inc.
Sales
Associate
Wanted
Experienced
or thinking
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your License.
Dynamic
Company,
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Call Robin Kollar
778-7244
5402 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach


rw n Al%


JUST REDUCED!



-""'".j' ," --I '-




Excellent Rental In Gulffront Complex! 2Bd/2Ba
in recently updated building. Enjoy tennis, swim-
ming or watching sunsets in the open porch area.
Conveniently located in Holmes Beach close to
everything! Call now, this one won't last! Now only
$135,900!


Frank
Davis
Broker
778-6066


FOR SALE BY OWNER
205 57th St. Holmes Beach
2BR/1BA Home Large Lot
Close to Beach Duplex Zoning
Central Air/Heat Laundry Room
Screened Porch Carport
$112,000. Please Call For Appointment
778-4642
Owner is Lic. Real Estate Broker


It


I . 2..~~


I


- -
-:
6;1












Cindy and Robert Perinetti
won honorable mention
for this residence in Anna
Maria.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 19, 1994 0 PAGE 27 IE
-



Bystrom, Gross bring
home trophies
They say a bad day fishing is better than a
good day working. For at least two Islanders,
Sunday proved to be a good day period.
Bill Bystrom and Captain Rick Gross both
took home trophies in the 1llth Annual
Crosthwait Memorial Fishing Tournament,
with Gross claiming the "corporate" winner
prize aboard his "Fishy Business" and Bystrom
taking honors for his team.
Bystrom placed 9th out of 150 boats en-
tered in the event, while Gross walked away
from the competition in the category for profes-
sional guides.


Island Garden Club
Beautification Awards presented
Artie Hopson, Tom Turner, Cindy Perinetti, Robert Rossi, Doug Copeland and
Jim Rossi, left to right, received 1994 Beautification Awards from the Island
Garden Club at a dinner in their honor last week at the Church of the Annuncia-
tion. Hopson and Ann Callan, 2801 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, received the First
Place Residential award. The Perinettis, 506 Magnolia, Anna Maria, received
the Honorable Mention Residential award. The Rossis, owners of the Island
Garden Center, 5704 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, received the First Place
Commercial award. Turner and Copeland accepted a special award on behalf of
the City of Anna Maria for Anna Maria Historical Park on Pine Avenue.


ANNUAL RENTALS
BAYFRONT CONDO -2 BR, 2BA, unfurnished. $625 plus
utilities.
SANDY POINTE CONDO -2BR, 2BA, unfurnished. $725
plus utilities.
EFFICIENCY APT. $425 plus electric.
ANNA MARIA DUPLEX-2 BR, 2BA, W/D. $600 plus utilities.
SUN PLAZA WEST 2BR, 2BA, fum. $1,000 plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX -2 BR, 1BA, $575 plus utilities.
DUPLEX WITH BAY VIEWS Bradenton Beach 2 BR,
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(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


U U


Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner
Links
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Personal Caring Attention
Professional Knowledge
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Serving Manatee County & The Beaches
FREE Market Analysis No Obligation









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$209;60 $199,900.









Home With In-Law Apt.
2708 Ave. C., Holmes Beach 2BR/1BA. Turnkey
furnished, workshop, storage room & carport.
Close to beach & restaurants. $121,900.
Call Harold Small 778-2261

Harold Small
Realtor@/Associate
Million Dollar Club Member
Ofc. 778-2261 Evenings 792-8628
S Toll Free
8 ,. MLS 1-800-732-6325


m


MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS
TOP 700!
Thanks to our loyal readers who want
to keep up on Island news and hap-
penings while they are away, the May
19 issue of The Islander Bystander
will be mailed to a record number of
out-of-town subscribers!
Thank you all!


ISLANDER


WHEN IN PARADISE SEE...


5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522









REDUCED OWNER SAYS SELL! Exquisite
4BR/2BA Beach Townhouse featuring new carpet, ap-
pliances & decor. Is an absolute steal at $129,900. Call
Ken Rickett today, 778-3026.
GULF FRONT Unique opportunity to own Gulf front
property at a bargain price. This package includes: the
shell of a 1760 sq. ft home, plus a buildable Gulf front
lot. All forjust $300,000. Call Stan Williams, 795-4537.
BOATER'S DREAM! Only seconds to Gulf. Direct
Intracoastal view from this 2BR/2BA turnkey fur-
nished unit. Features include fireplace, boat dock,
heated pool and elevator. $159,000. Call Lynn
Hostetler, 778-4800.
WHAT A PLEASURE Spacious first class living in
this 3BR/2BA canal front home. We offer lush land-
scaping with fruit trees, large boat dock and one of
Anna Maria's finest streets for $229,000. Call Ken
Rickett, 778-3026.
BEAUTIFULLY DECORATED Split floor plan
3BR/2BA home in desirable area of Holmes Beach.
Deeded boat slip, oversized lot & plenty of storage.
All for $163,000. Call Dennis McClung, 778-7320.


I


I.BYS~3 1








IR PAGE 28 0 MAY 19, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ANNA MARIA ISLAND








3224 East Bay Drive / Holmes Beach, FL 34217









OLDER-STYLE home on beautiful lot w/huge
oak trees! Quiet cul-de-sac. 3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Double lot: house could be removed & 2 new
ones built. Call Don Pampuch, 778-3111.
#56478 ............................................ $62,900.
GAP CREEK SPECIAL! Citrus & pecan trees,
private 1/2 acre. 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, caged
pool, shed, garage, plus an In-Law apt! Home
warranty. Call Sally Schrader, 792-3176.
#57215 .......................................... $144,500.
PERICO BAY CLUB! Kingfisher model ... light,
bright & breezy! Enjoy beautiful sunsets over
tidal basin views. Pools, Jacuzzi, tennis. 2 bed-
room, 2 bath. Call Jack Backman, 779-2552.
#56775 .............................................. $97,500.
MARTINIQUE condos!
... miles of white sand,
blue water, breathtak-
ing sunsets. Priced
from $122,900 (1 BR/
1iBA) to $179,900
(2BR/2BA).
S Carol Heinze, CRS
S REALTOR
Million Dollar Club
778-7246

Karin Stephan
REALTOR
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche .
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844
GULF BEACH PLACE! Splendid value! Turn-
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storage, enclosed balconies, pool. Steps to
beach! #KS56901 ....................... $130,000.

20 Years Experience
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Customers/Clients

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to $225,000. Premier Circle

Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


IISLANDER


IBY A


If you want to be sure to receive The Islander Bystander in your
driveway EVERY WEEK, just call in your Island address, 778-7978.
Sorry, we can not home deliver to condos or trailer parks. If you plan to be away from
home, you may also call to stop delivery of the paper. We're here to please you!


GORGEOUS TOWNHOUSE, elevated w/3bed,
3bath, pool lush landscaping, 2 blks from beach. 3
sun decks, 2-car garage w/lots of storage. Brinks
security system, central vac, amenities galore.
%239,900 MLS#56669.
CALL DICK MAHER & TOM NELSON TODAY!
Eves: Office Eves:
778-6791 778-2261 778-1382


Toll Free
1-800-732-6325


_M. MLS


OV NERS


0




0
fO

men
gg


t vou have property to lease, now is
the time to contact the professional
property management team at Michael
Saunders & Company. Learn how you
can earn the highest possible income
on vour property, in addition to exten-
sive ser vices provided to meet the re-
quests of our sophisticated owners and
guests.
Contact Debbie Dial at our Anna
Maria Island office for personal
attention to your special residence.
Michael Saunders
&.Company
Licenced Rneal Etae Broker
3222 East Bay Drive
Holmes Beach, Florida 34217
(813) 778-2275 or 800-881-2276 .OI


-'i I"

*t~iiAl____ 'N 7"L


WESTBAY COVE
CONDOMINIUM
Direct Bayfront situated northwest in the com-
plex. Two bedrooms, two baths with white carpet
and tile throughout. Fabulous view of the bay.
$155,000. OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE.
Call Rose for details.
778-2261 or after hours 778-7780.
Toll-free 1-800-422-6325.


TOUR OF FINE HOMES
SUNDAY, MAY 22
1 -4 PM
514 75th St., Holmes Beach ............$304,000.
3BR/2.5BA canalfront southern style home. 10ft
ceilings, 70ft dock, swimming pool. Must see.
Judy Duncan, 778-1589 eves.
522 72nd St., Holmes Beach ..........219,000.
3BR/2BA canalfront home, completely remodeled
with new kitchen, carpet, roof. Great room design.
Carol R. Williams, 778-1718 eves.
4909 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach ............$74,500.
2BR/1.5BA villa close to everything in central
Holmes Beach, partially furnished. Frank Migliore,
778-2662 eves.
104 6th St. S., Bradenton Beach.....$223,500.
Duplex 2BR/2BA & 1BR/1BA with view of
Intracoastal and 1/2 block from Bay & Beach.
Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.
3916 Coconut Terrace, Bradenton.... $139,900.
San Remo Shores 2BR/2BA home with den on
a deep water canal. Open floor plan. Jennifer
Jones, 795-2865 eves.
1269 Edgewater Circle, Bradenton ... $141,500.
Perico Bay Club Condo directly on Bay, 2BR/2BA
tastefully decorated. Dick Rowse, 778-2003 eves.
911 Sandpiper Circle, Bradenton .. $110,500.
Perico Bay Club 3BR/2BA Blue Heron model
in model perfect condition on a lake. Carport,
near pool. Zee Catanese, 794-8991 eves.


r3 REALTORS
5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS O


ROSE
SCHNOERR
Realtor@
GRI, LTG
* Experience
* Commitment
* Service
* Results

i. Mis


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SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
SED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E MAY 19, 1994 0 PAGE 29 Ij


OW NER SELLING Lrrf Donurri
----------------^-^I ta leyzn~iD /'/if/'l~fW


620 Hampshire Lane
Key Royale Main Canal Golf Course frontage.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, Florida room, office, large liv-
ing room, fruit trees, 80' custom dock, 2 car garage,
metered sprinkler system. $289,000. Call 778-4252.


-~ I


.& Exclusive
SWaterfront
Estates REALTOR
Video Collection MLS


419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(813) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


w -w


Watchnfor our
listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.


s. 5'
jflaf lf -


SUMPTUOUS MEDITERRANEAN VILLA


This breathtaking 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath bayfront es-
tate offers top quality construction, superlative ap-
pointments, and spellbinding views! The spacious
great room floor plan offers a sensible Mexican tiled
traffic pattern, 12 ft. ceilings with 9 Hunter fans, built-
in entertainment and bar area, plus gourmet kitchen
with mauve Corian countertops, Jennair range, and
white GE Monogram appliances. The enormous
caged pool area is fully tiled and offers a built in gas
grill with cheerful, tiled backsplash and private pool
bath. The 16 x 13 ft. free-form swimming pool is gas
heated and offers four therapy jets and a continuous
chlorinator. The 25 ft. boat dock has an electric lift
and there is a new seawall cap. The bathrooms are


nothing short of luxurious, offering Eljer fixtures,
glass block and cultured marble showers, and brass
and chrome fittings. The master bath boasts a 6 ft
Jacuzzi, bidet, 2 large oval sinks rimmed in gold,
plus a fully mirrored wall of closets. This distinctive
Island hideaway is amazingly energy efficient, with
Anderson thermal pane low E window throughout
and a radiant ceiling barrier which reflects 98% of
the ultra violet sunrays. The easily maintained
pebbled landscaping is accented by many pretty
specimen plants and palms which are watered by a
continuous drip irrigation system. There is also a
central vacuum system and security system. Truly
one of a kind! Priced to sell at $575,000.


GULF VIEW LOT DRAMATIC PRICE REDUCTION This rare 60 x 85 ft. buildable lot is located
on the west side of North Shore Drive just one lot from the shimmering Gulf of Mexico on Anna
Maria's tranquil north end. Privacy'plus in a secluded wooded setting. Nothing compares at
$189,000 now only $169,000.


AssocatesAfter Hous Barbara A Sato778 ChrstineT. Shaw...778-2847 Marcella Cornett...778-5919 NancyGulford...778-2158
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...77B-2B47 Marcella Cornett...77B-5919 Nancy Gullford...77a-2158


ONE YEAT
WARRANTY


SevigAnaMaiaSnc 93 AL (1) 7-246FX 7-47

227 uf rveASOITE FTRHOR


HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE Well maintained
Island home with good central Holmes Beach loca-
tion. Two bedroom, two bath with large garage and
storage area. One block to Gulf beaches. Priced at
$109,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


SHORT WALK TO GULF OR BAY from this
freshly painted duplex. 2 bedrooms and a second
bath on each side increase the desirability as ei-
ther your home or as rental. Large utility rooms
with washer/dryer hook-ups and a deck off the liv-
ing rooms add to the appeal. Priced at $109,000.
Call Tom Eatman for further details.


ISLAND DUPLEX Well maintained 2BR/1BA on
each side. Close to gulf beach and with a peek of
the Bay. Fully rented on annual basis. Priced at
$112,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


ANNA MARIA ISLANU ULUB UDrect UUITlront
2BR/2BA, turnkey furnished unit in prime com-
plex. Heated pool and spa, secured elevator
lobby, wide walking beach. Well-maintained and
prime rental opportunity. Priced at $227,000.
Call Dave Moynihan.


SHOP AND COMPARE THIS GULFFRONT
HOME ... 849 N. Shore Drive in the city of Anna
Maria is a 4 bedroom 2.5 bath Gulffront home.
$275,000.


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICES! Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extend-
SIng both Personal AND Professional Services in New Construction &
- Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis,
Home Warranty, Free Networkto OtherAreas, Best Property Manage-
ment and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Expe-
rience AND Smiles!
1-i'F "I Dj 01ij y'iii^ :TTA


I


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0[-FK
IIU Io- nm






IM PAGE 30 0 MAY 19, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


e Jd'S Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
LaWn Hauling -By the cut orby the month.
Service .12 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
f l77 AND SATISFACTION


Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630 uL. No. 4467

M ANATEE

V OWNERS
ISLAND LAWN SERVICE
Donnie Rivera (813) 778-7508

Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"


S Don't miss the
-4 CENTENNIAL
SSee the special center section for a
S complete list of events.


BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A
relentless rush! For skating information and sales call
778-3880.
A LIFETIME of Security for home, vehicle or person.
High quality, hi tech, inexpensive security systems
available. Demonstrations upon request. 778-1353.
ETHAN ALLEN dark pine bedroom set. Head board
(single), end table, desk and captains chair, bureau
with credenza and small cabinet. Queen size poster
or canopy bed frame also dark pine. Older chest of
drawers and matching bureau. Make offer 778-7073.
3 WHEEL ELECTRIC motor bike. Like new, $285.
778-9588.


FRI. & SAT., May 20 & 21, 9:00 am. 600 Manatee
Ave., West Bay Cove Condo., Unit 117.778-3730. 2
bedroom condo. All must go.
FRI., MAY 20, 8:00 am 2 pm. 206 67th Street,
Holmes Bch. Double bed, glass dining table, 4 uphol-
stered chairs, mirror, household goods & more.
SAT. & SUN., MAY 21 & 22, 9:00 am 2:00 pm. 301
23rd W., Bradenton Bch. 3 family garage sale!
Cheap! Cheap! Electric organ $75, beds, tables,
household items, ect. Everything must go!


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Call
mobile phone # 356-4649.
90 COACHMAN MOTORHOME loaded, 48,000
miles. New $36,000 asking $18,000. 778-0751.
UTILITY TRAILER new 5X10 steel bed, wood & steel
beam sides. Cost $875 asking $700 OBO. 778-0751.


40' HOUSEBOAT Drift-R-Cruise. Classic design,
comfortable, accommodating live aboard. Slip in
quiet marina. Good condition, no motor. $10,500
OBO. 778-8322.
GRADY WHITE 21' w/305 chev. Cuddy Cabin. Call
778-0601 evenings. $6,995.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. 1/2 & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


BOAT SALESMAN for new & used boat dealer, high
income potential. Call Ken at 778-5577.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 778-9413 or 778-6247.
WAITSTAFF NEEDED part-time or on call. Knowl-
edge of wines preferred. Call the Mutiny Inn 778-
5440 and ask for Ken or Tina.
SEEKING INDIVIDUALS interested in selling high
quality, hi tech, inexpensive security systems. Part-
time, full-time or spare-time. All legal ages welcome.
Call 778-1353.
FULL-TIME dishwasher needed Mon. to Fri. at Rot-
ten Ralph's, 902 S. Bay Blvd. 778-3953.
PART-TIME 20 hrs per wk. Cleaning and light yard
work, includes weekends and holidays. Haley's Mo-
tel 778-5405.
FULL TIME 40+ hours running gift store. Must like
working with people and be able to work weekends.
Apply in person Pirate Pete's. 2219 Gulf Dr.,
Bradenton Bch. 778-5035.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.


HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath, handyman and
home repairs. Island resident, 23 years experience,
local references. Call Mark at 778-5354.

CPD LANDSCAPING, INC. "Natural by Design".
Design Installation Renovations. Full-Service
Landscape Maintenance. Longboat Key 383-9212.

ISLAND PAINTER clean, fast & reasonable. Call
Big Jim 778-5587.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.
BILL THE HANDYMAN is accepting jobs. For de-
pendable, quality work call 778-7675. A permanent
Island resident!
BOB-OF-ALL-TRADES experience in all aspects of
building. Install new to repair. Siding, soffet, facia,
ceramic tile, hardwood floors, dry wall, custom trim
and much more. Quality work in a timely fashion.
Free estimates. Insured. 758-8377.
HOME BUILDER CARPENTER Recently moved to
Anna Maria. Very discrete, Very dependable, extra
quality workmanship. 20 plus years experience. Would
like to work for individual homeowner or business, full
or part time. State license pending. 779-2129.


HOME REPAIR SERVICE Professional tile instal-
lation, marble work, plaster & stucco. Interior/exte-
rior. All repairs. Excellent Island references, 23 years
experience. Call Mark at 778-5354.

VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentialCommercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resi-.-
dent 25 years. Call for a free estimate. Ken 792-1084Z

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
LIC #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free es-
timates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repair. 778-
4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, ceiling fans, painting int.,
ext., roof coating and repairs. Screen repairs, low
prices guaranteed. Call 778-0410 leave message.
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-
5183.
CARPET, TILE, VINYL, or wood. Mobile showroom
brings 1,200 samples to you Guaranteed installa-
tion. Day or evening Island owned. Carpet Network,
778-7311.
HOME REPAIR, 24 hour service. Island resident for
22 years. Call Pete, 778-2812.
WHY GET SOAKED? Dry foam, dries fast! We never
use steam. Fat Cat also cleans tile, wood & terrazzo
floors. Fat Cat Carpet Cleaning. 778-2882.
CERAMIC TILE SERVICE. Father & son team. 30
+ yrs. experience. Island resident. Repair & new in-
stallation. We also clean floors. 778-4559.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, crafts, ect. Neg. Call
Frank at 778-6126 Eves. 778-6127.


JS AND9 -C ASSFID






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 19, 1994 U PAGE 31 IE


JS ANDER-C ASSFID
I ENALSCOTIUD I-ENALSCOTIUE


NOV. THRU APRIL Furnished 2/2 home in Holmes
Beach, steps from Gulf. J. Pollock & Assoc., Inc. 748-
8718 or 792-8340 eves. No pets.

ANNA MARIA, Gulf/Bay views. 1 bedroom, patio,
pool. Furnished or unfurnished. $550 incl. utilities.
211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
KEY ROYALE, CANALFRONT w/dock, 2/2,1560 sq.
ft. w/fam. rm., plus garage, shop & laundry. Unfur-
nished, annual $1000. mo. Call owner 778-5045.
BEACH RENTAL. 1 Bedroom, completely remolded,
carpeted. 100' to Coquina Beach. $115. weekly -
annual, includes utilities. 778-2036.
LOCATION: One lot from Gulf! 2BR/2BA comfortably
furnished doll house. Available June 6th. Call now to
reserve your vacation. Seabreeze, 778-4372.
HOLMES BEACH, very nice 1 bedroom apt., 100 yds
to Gulf, furnished or unfurnished. No pets, 778-5246.

ANNUAL RENTAL, Anna Maria City. Lovely 2/2 du-
plex, completely furnished. Cable, microwave, dish-
washer. 1 block to best Gulf Beach and shopping.
Sorry, no pets. $630, plus utilities. 778-2190.

2 BR/2 BA Duplex apartment, West of Gulf Drive 3
houses from Gulf. Completely furnished, central a/c
& heat, Florida room. Yearly furnished $1,000/mo +
util.- Season $1520/mo + tax & util. Call 778-2422.

NEED RENTAL for Jan., Feb., March. Write Anna
May Peet, 6665'Stillwater Blvd., Oakdale, MN 55128
or call Jack 778-6153.

DUPLEX seasonal or annual, 2/1. Boat space avail-
able. See Pat at 104 7th St. S. or 750-8715.
WE HAVE GREAT RENTALS! Seasonal & annual
rentals. Gulffront condo, canal homes, duplexes. Call
Debbie Thrasher for all your rental needs, now at
Prudential Florida Realty, 778-0766 or 778-3395.
BEACH FRONT large 1/1 unfurnished duplex. An-
nual. no pets, references $550. Call collect 813-988-
1344 or 985-s763.
ANNA MARIA DUPLEX in quiet neighborhood.
Clean, newly redecorated 2/1, annual. $490/mo plus
util. 778-1626 or 778-4497.
PERICO BAY CLUB, 2/2, waterside $825. West
bay Point & Moorings, 3/2, dock, $950 Island In The
Sun, 2/2 townhouse, pool, $600 2/1 house, 12007
45th Ave, $525 Neal & Neal Rentals, 813-778-9477
or 800-422-6325.
BEACH SUMMER RENTAL. Approx. 150 ft. walking
distance from Gulfl 3BR/2BA comfortably furnished.
Call for reservation 778-3267.
BEACH SUMMER RENTAL. Approx. 200 ft walking
distance from Gulf! Very nice 1Br apt. comfortably
furnished. Call for reservation 778-3267.
ANNUAL 2/1 & 1/1. New carpet, stove, & refrigera-
tor. Close to beach. 2/1 with balcony and undercover
parking. 778-1392.


WEST BAY Point and Moorings. 2BR/2BA condo
overlooking Bay unfurnished. 778-9285.
ANNUAL $400,1/1, good location. Annual or short
term 1 BR, charming condo, close to beach, partially
furnished. $650/mo annual, short term negotiable.
Call 778-7244, Gulf Bay Realty.
UNFURNISHED TROPICALLY landscaped 2BR/
1BA house. 100 yds to Gulf, porch, lanai, sun deck
& spa. No pets, $1000/mo. 778-5246.


ISLAND CONDO 2/2. 2 lanais, eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer, pool, walk to beach, low maintenance
fee and owner may finance! 99,900. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate 778-6066 or 795-0105
after hours.
SEE IT TODAY! Historic Cortez Village Charming 2/
1.5 cottage. Nice oaks, quiet. 1 blk from Bay. Great
seasonal rental or second home. For sale by owner,
794-1103. $62,500.

NEW HOUSE, Holmes Bch. 3/2, quiet street, private
boat launch, 2 blocks to beach. $184,500. 778-1966.

THE SEARCH is over. Charming 2/2 on wide canal.
Split bedroom plan. Five minutes to beach and
Intracoastal. Move-in condition. $149,900. M56059.
Call Jim Layfield, Neal & Neal Realtors. 383-3708.
BY OWNER at Perico Bay Club. $89,500. must see
to appreciate! Gorgeous Lake view. 2/2 with many
up-grades. Security, covered parking, pool, spa and
tennis. 794-5085.
OWNER FINANCE. 1Bedroom duplex, lot 1/2 near
bch. Fixer up. $89,000. 795-0873.
FREE HOT LIST "By Owner Homes" 100's comput-
erized & analyzed. Free mortgage card. Help-U-Sell
- Realty Counselors. 795-0616.
BONUS BRICK BEAUTY has wide deep water canal!
Maintenance free yard! Family room. 5 minutes to
beach & intracoatal! Estate Sale! #56059, $149,900.
Ask for Mike, 383-3708. Neal & Neal Realtors.
MONEY MAKER! Lowest priced 2BR/2BA in Holmes
Bch. Blocks to Beach. In area of Higher priced
homes. Great investment $88,900, #55046. Ask for
Mike, 383-3708. Neal & Neal Realtors.
IMPERIAL HOUSE condo. Fully furnished, move
right in today. 2BR/1BA, steps to wide sandy
beaches & Gulf waters. $79,900. Marilyn Trevethan,
call anytime. 813-792-8477. Neal & Neal Realtors.

OPEN HOUSE
812 SOUTH BAY BLVD.
ANNA MARIA
SUNDAY 2PM TO 4PM
Come and see this attractive beach front home lo-
cated just a half mile passed the Anna Maria Fishing
Pier. 3BR/2BA with one of the finest walking beaches
and gorgeous views. Family room, stone fireplace,
deck garage, and fruit trees. $425,000. Jeanette
Rampone 747-2244, Michael Saunders & Company
for more information.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
THE DEADLINE IS NOON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in person and paid in advance at our office we do not invoice or
handle credit card charges. Our office is located at 5400A Marina Drive, in the Island Shopping
Center, Holmes Beach. We're on the comer between D. Coy Ducks and the laundromat. Hours:
9 to 5, Monday thu Friday, Saturday 9 to 2.
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


IISLANDER


J Ho11BY


MB IslandTyping Service
.- ComputerOperated
,FAX Service: Send & Receive
FAX # 778-8390
Notary Public 778-8390

778-2586 MA RV KAY Eve: 778-6771

25% OFF


ISLAND CLEANING
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
VACUUM SALES & SERVICE
Mon-Fri 10-3, Sat 9-2 778-4988
5600 Marina Dr Holmes Beach

STEP AEROBICS
Anna Maria Island Community Center
Tuesday 6 7:15 pm Saturdays 5 6:00pm
For More Information Call 779-2129


UNCOMMON 7 n1,/ 5 ,
COLLECTABLES & GIFTS
Anna Maria Island Centre Holmes Beach 778-3548


SIDE WORKS
778-1617



Specializing In Paint Touch-Up^
Exotic Cars High Quality Honest Prices
David Zorko 5804 Marina Dr.
Hm. 778-6342 Holmes Beach


MOST CARS $85
and we come to you!






details


SABAL I PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Tear Island Resident


AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
Hand wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carraige, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. Everything included for $85 -
on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office.
Call the mobile service number 356-4649
or leave a message: 778-9392.






PID PAGE 32 0 MAY 19, 1994 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


154hlIS


' 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, MAY 24,1994


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


EACH DAY A COUPON SPECIAL


COUPON GOOD ONLY ON
THURSDAY "
I PRICE SAVER
BUTTER
S 16 OZ. PKG. QTRS.





LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
Iro I
I I


)I III


, COUPON GOOD ONLY ON I
I FRIDAY ^ 2


SHURFRESH
HOT DOGS


1.

112 O
I PKG. II
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE i
-- 1- -,- -,-------I

1 COUPON GOOD ONLY ON
TUESDAY l4th


COUPON GOOD ONLY ON
IM
SATURDAY Xl
CAMPBELL'S
CREAM OF
SMushroom
SOUP
1 10z. oz.
CAN
Crea o Creamof
49^ am of UShrOOI_
I EACH USoUE.AS
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
noon------snow----------l


SI COUPON GOOD ONLY ON
I WEDNESDAY 2


FRESH RIPE
BANANAS


Coke, Diet Coke
or Sprite
2 LITER
BOTTLES

990
LIMIT TWO PER
CUSTOMER PLEASE
ND FOODS ...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


U.S.D.A. CHOICE
BEEF CHUCK SHOULDER

London Broil


. LB.
.


f