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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00514
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00514

Full Text


NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


I i s


Bradenton Beach fence 'moratorium' declared


By Paul Roat
A "zoning in progress" designation has been
implemented within Bradenton Beach, putting a halt to
any more fence construction while city officials and
planners wrestle with what to do about a growing
walled ambiance within the city.
Fences have been sprouting up like weeds within
the city of late. Of particular concern is a six-foot wood
fence surrounding property owned by Allan Bazzy near
the Bradenton Beach Marina, just south of the Cortez
Bridge, and another chain-link fence surrounding the
former Trader Jack's Restaurant site near Ninth Street
North at Gulf Drive. Both fences were legally erected,
but have drawn the ire of residents, who have stated the
fences are unsightly and not in keeping with the casual
atmosphere of the city.
"I have had so many complaints about fences,"
Mayor Katie Pierola said when she brought the matter
up at Thursday's city council meeting. "I'd like to have
an open-air community."


Subcommittee:

put Anna Maria

city attorneys

out of loop
Charging that city attorneys are a waste of the
taxpayer's money, Anna Maria Planning Commission
Chairman Tom Turner announced last week he will ask
city officials to empower a subcommittee with the au-
thority to draft future ordinances.
At a sparsely attended meeting, Turner read a four-
page draft ordinance his four-member committee had pre-
pared to replace a 27-page document on the same subject
recently written by city attorney Jim Dye. The ordinance
is intended to replace the city's planning commission and
board of zoning appeals with a
new board which would combine
'The problem is the functions of both boards.
ourpresent After reading his version of
attorneys pre- the draft, Turner said, "The city
pare 27page attorney will not see this docu-
ordinances and ment. If the city attorney sees it,
you still don't it's a dead document."
have afree- The commission approved a
stands motion to accept Turner's draft
standing by a margin of three to two. Both
document.' Doug Copeland and Luanne
Collins voted against the motion.
Turner said the shortened document was an example
that City Attorney Dye and City Planner Bill Brisson use
excess and unnecessary language and write ordinances
which are more complicated than they need to be.
"Ordinances didn't use to have all these whereases
and wherefores," Turner said. "The problem is our
present attorneys prepare 27 page ordinances and you
still don't have a free-standing document."
Turner said his version of the ordinance was pre-
pared with the help of "a very learned and knowledge-
able attorney who is a resident of the city." He declined
to name the attorney.
Members of the committee are Turner, Jimmy
Nichols, Wallace Storey and Chuck Shumard who acts
as a liaison with the city commission. Storey is a retired
attorney.
The original purpose of the committee was to re-
view ordinances which have been passed by the city
but have not gone to state officials for codification.
Committee members were to look for excessive and
repetitious language in the documents and check the
clarity of the ordinances.
Copeland voiced his concern about passing ordi-
nances without the advice of city attorneys.
"I was surprised tonight," Copeland said. "It was
not my understanding that ordinances were going to
come out of this subcommittee. I have a problem with


The suggestion to impose a "zoning in progress"
designation in the city was prompted by City Planner
Bill Brisson. "Upon identifying that the city will be
studying certain aspects of its zoning regulations,"
Brisson said in a memo to Pierola, "and that there is an
'emerging plan' as to what the new regulations will
entail, ... 'zoning in progress' is in effect. At that point,
the city issues no development permit that would be in
violation of the 'emerging plan.'"
Brisson proposed changing the height of permitted
fences from the current six feet to three.
"Personally, I don't like the Bazzy fence," Vice
Mayor Herb Dolan said. "It was put up legally, but we
should put a stop to this."
City council members unanimously agreed to the
fence moratorium-by-another-name "zoning in
progress" designation for the city. A joint meeting with
the city's planning and zoning board, community rede-
velopment agency and city council will be scheduled
soon, council member agreed.


never letting lawyers review the ordinance once it is
written."
Turner retorted, "As long as I chair this commis-
sion, the mail from this body to the attorney will be
extremely limited."
Collins asked, "What is the purpose of your pro-
posal (not to have the attorneys review drafts). Why
have attorneys if we're not going to use them?"
Turner said the city has already paid $33,000 to
Dye and at least $23,000 to Brisson this year, even
though $20,000 was budgeted for legal expenses. The
city's fiscal year ends in October.
Turner was to ask city commissioners to approve
his draft ordinance at Tuesday night's workshop. He
also planned to ask that his committee be granted the
authority to re-write an ordinance pertaining to city
rights of way.
The Islander Bystander went to press while the
meeting was in progress.


The six-foot fence surrounding Bazzy's property may
have been the result of a glitch in a 1990 revision to the
city's land development regulations. Brisson explained
that "the city's old zoning code did not allow fences over
three of four feet along the property line. However, either
the Planning and Zoning Board or the City council was
concerned over the need for higher fences around swim-
ming pools, and suggested the heights be changed.
"While it may be appropriate to require a minimum
height fence around a pool, in retrospect it was not nec-
essary to increase the allowable height offences along the
property line to do this," Brisson said. "Unfortunately, the
ramifications of increasing the allowable fence height
were not recognized back in 1990 when the changes were
adopted. This resulted in this section allowing an impen-
etrable fence up to six feet high anywhere on the property,
but limiting the height of open-weave fences to four feet
in the front yard setback.
"Obviously, this does not make sense," Brisson con-
cluded. "Nevertheless, that is how the ordinance reads."


SKYWAY DISASTER, MAY9, 1980


Residents throughout the Island and state were rocked
14 years ago with news of an early morning collision,
a freighter striking the Sunshine Skyway Bridge. More
than 150feet of the span collapsed into Tampa Bay,
leaving a gaping expanse into which several cars and
a bus tumbled. More than 30 people were killed.
Pictured is the gap in the collapsed span and the
freighter "Summit Venture" with a portion of the
bridge superstructure draped across its bow where
the lone survivor landed in his pick-up truck. Left,
a car which slid to within a few feet of the edge.


Islander Photos: Paul Roat


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Community in Crisis .................. Page 2
Gov. Chiles & wetlands ........... Page 3
Opinions .................................... Page 6
The Way We Were .................... Page 7
Centennial stuff ....................... Page 10
Announcements .................... Page 14
Silver Kings coming! ............ Page 15
Streetlife ................................. Page 18
Outdoors .......................... Pages 20-21


I


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


MAY 12, 1994






liE PAGE 2 0 MAY 12, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Educators: working within limits


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Part 5 in a series
Teachers and administrators at all three levels -
elementary, middle and high school must work with
what they learn about students within the framework of
the school day.
Behavior, academic progress and interaction with
teachers and other students are good indicators of how
a student is functioning in life. However, knowledge of
a student's family situation or a specific social pressure
may not be as apparent. Therefore, educators must
closely monitor the information available and often
cultivate a sixth sense in order to judge when interven-
tion is needed.
Administrators of three schools serving the Island
discussed the increase in drug use and sexual activity
among teens, how they identify and aid troubled stu-
dents and what can be done at the school and commu-
nity levels to address the problem.

Jim Kronus, principal,
Anna Maria Elementary
Kronus, who has been principal at the school for 19
years and is a resident of the Island, said he has not seen
an increase in drug use or sexual activity at the elemen-
tary level.
"I see a lot of potential that these things will tran-
spire," he said. "Looking at a variety of factors, I see
a number of at-risk children. I could have almost pre-
dicted it with some of those children now in middle
school by things we saw when they were students at
Anna Maria."
Society's tolerance for such behavior is a great part
of the problem, said Kronus.
"Every generation has done things that are taboo
for that generation. In our generation, if a child was
caught smoking, it was unacceptable. Now people say,
'Isn't that a shame,' and don't think any more about it.
As time has progressed, we have condoned certain
behaviors as being acceptable and our taboos have be-
come increasingly more dangerous."
Kronus maintained that the fragmentation of the
family has created problems for many students.
"Ask any reader where their family members are
today and where they were a generation ago. A genera-
tion ago, there was a support system for parents and
children the family, the church, the neighbors. If a
mother needed help, she had relatives to help. Today,
there aren't those kinds of support."
Kronus noted that many children also lack a sup-
port system and good role models within the family,
thus they regard their peer group as a family, and turn
to that group for support and acceptance.
"Kids get into drugs and sex as a form of accep-
tance by the group or they model what they see as ac-
ceptable at home. They need to have the proper role
models, as our parents were for us, so they know the
appropriate behavior," he stressed. "If they see parents
smoke pot or curse at a police officer, they will think
that's okay. A child is a mirror of his environment."
Another factor is that kids are expected to grow up
too fast, said Kronus.
"Kids at 12, 13, 14 are still babies and yet we put
so much responsibility on them," he said. "For ex-
ample, mom gets divorced and tells 10-year-old Johnny
that he's the head of the household. How can you put
that kind of responsibility on a child?
"We've lost the perspective of what adults are and
what children are. We ask our children to become
adults very quickly. Parents should never relinquish
their responsibility. Too often parents want to be
friends with their children, which puts them on the
same level and they lose their authority."
Kronus said the DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance
Education) used in the elementary schools is a good
program but he would favor an expanded program.
"The program offers students exposure to situa-
tions that may come up," he said. "We will not bring
every horse to water, but we will have the water avail-
able. I'm not adverse to putting more emphasis on drug
education because the more information they have the
more they can process. Fire prevention is continuing;
drug prevention should be continuing too."
When a student having problems is identified, Kronus
said, the school's guidance counselor is asked to investi-
gate talk to the child and make a determination as to


m crisis
^^___




1N CY I
/ ,


what the problem is and offer resources to help.
To address the problem at the community level,
said Kronus, there must be a concentrated, united ef-
fort among all agencies to provide activities for kids.
"I'd like to see activities for kids on a weekly ba-
sis where kids have opportunities to be with kids their
own age. Activities at the beach, at school, at church at
the community center, in the cities so many activi-
ties that they are not lacking for things to do. It takes a
community to raise children and we need to have this
community raising our children."

Nancy Carson, principal,
King Middle School
Carson's experience with middle and high
schoolers is vast. She has been principal at King since
it opened in 1978. Prior to that, she was dean of stu-
dents and assistant principal at Manatee High School
from 1974 to 1978. She also lives on the Island.
"Having been through the '60s with high school
kids," she recalled, "I've seen drugs and alcohol come
and go. It was alcohol, then pot, then acid, then back
to alcohol. In the last two or three years, I've seen a
resurgence of pot and acid, not in the school, but in the
community and in all ages of teenagers."
She cites a variety of reasons for the resurgence,
from television glamour to lack of activities for teens
"The glamour they see on TV plays a large part in
it," she said. It is the fashionable thing to do. And they
want to feel good. Often they hear, 'Take a pill for it.'
It's instant everything and it carries over to the kids.
"Another part of the problem is the lack of activities
for young people in this county. There are few places that
cater to that age group and no organized recreation pro-
gram in the county for 12-to-17-year-olds."
In addition to cleaning up television and discour-
aging the glamorization of drugs and alcohol, Carson,
like Kronus, suggested a variety of activities to involve
teens in their free time.
"Ask the kids what they want and provide it," she
stressed. "Consolidating the youth programs in the Is-
land churches is a step in the right direction. Open a
weight room at the community center for the boys and
offer dance or aerobics for the girls. Ask the library to
provide special teen programs. Have the community
center arrange a mentoring program with merchants."
Carson said parents need to take more responsibil-
ity for their children.
"I often refer to kids on the Island as 'little heads
of household,' because they're on their own so much,"
she noted. "Parents need to work to make a living and
when the kids get to middle school, parents don't feel


they need child care anymore. The kids end up with a
lot of free unsupervised time.
"I also see people who don't want to be responsible
for their children, then they don't know what to do with
them when they cause problems. Kids are a lot like
puppies you don't wait until they're 14 to teach
them what you expect out of them."
When she learns that a child is abusing drugs, Carson
said she feels an obligation as an educator to inform the
parents, but the facilities to help drug-and alcohol-addicted
youth and those with emotional problems are limited in
this county and treatment is expensive.
If a student begins to gravitate toward a crowd that
is known for such activities, Carson said she would ask
the guidance counselor to arrange a meeting with the
parents and teachers. The group would discuss the
student's behavior, academic progress and associates.
"The major thing we're concerned with is why that
child chose that type of friends," she said.
The drug education program is good, Carson said, but
what's really needed is a comprehensive health course.
"We piecemeal health through middle school, a bit
here and a bit there. There's no coordinated effort. This
is the age where kids formulate the skills they need the
rest of their lives and we don't capitalize on that in
middle school.
"We need a health course that includes drugs, sex,
peer relationships, life management skills, nutrition,
etc.," said Carson. "Start it as a semester course in sixth
grade and offer it as an elective in the seventh and
eighth grades. Give them what it will take to have a
successful, meaningful life, free of disease and abuse
and be an asset to their community.
"There are still parents out there who think we
shouldn't tell the kids anything, but the world we live
in will never get any better until we educate. If we spent
half as much money on education as we do on incar-
ceration, we wouldn't have to keep re-educating."

Mike Home, associate
administrator,
Manatee High School
Home has been in the county school system for 17
years and at the high school since 1985.
He said at the high school level, it is more difficult
to detect whether or not there is an increase in drug use
and sexual activity. With 2,200 students, administrators
often have limited contact with them at school.
"An increase in drug use is not evidenced by stu-
dents being caught on campus with drugs," he noted.
"Professionally, I haven't seen it, but personally I feel
there is an increase. But I feel in this age group alco-
hol is still the number one problem."
Intervention with this age group is also trickier.
"I can't call up parents and say that I think their kid
is hanging out with the wrong crowd," he said "That's
* unprofessional. But if I see it happening, I can call that
student in for a one-on-one talk and tell him I think he's
making a mistake. We want to teach our kids to make
the right choices and decisions."
Home said guidance counselors watch a student's
progress at the academic level. If a students grades
begin to decline, the counselor will call the student in
for a session. Home said teachers may also identify and
counsel a troubled student or find someone else who
can relate to that student.
"A lot of kids can't talk to their parents," he noted,
"because it's awkward, so we try to find someone they
can talk to. There are resources available for many dif-
ferent kinds of problems."
Home said the school resource officer is a valuable
resource.
"Many students seek her advice and it's usually
about things that are happening outside of school," he
explained. "It may be about something the student has
done but hasn't gotten caught at yet All conversations
with her are confidential."
Drug and sex education is given through Personal
Fitness, a required class for ninth graders, and Life
Management Skills, a required class for all 10th grad-
ers, said Home. Values and critical thinking skills are
introduced in other courses, such as literature.
"I'm still appalled when a student comes into my
office and she is pregnant," Home said, "but I don't
know how we can educate them any more."
Next week: Drug and sex education: Keeping one
step ahead.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 12, 1994 M PAGE 3 1R]


Wetlands bill signed by Gov. Chiles


Lawton Chiles full-time governor, part-time
resident of Anna Maria Island used Sarasota Bay as
a backdrop to sign into law a bill defining wetlands.
"Wetlands are critical," Gov. Chiles told a small
crowd gathered at Sarasota's BayWalk Thursday, "and
their protection is vital. But there has been a problem
with regulating wetlands, and there is no signle defini-
tion of what a wetland is."
Chiles said that water management districts, local
governments, and various agencies in state government
often have different definitions of what constitutes a
wetland. The Wetland Delineation Bill will change all
that, he said, and provides the first sole definition and
methodology for state, regional and local agencies to
define and delineate wetlands.
A side benefit to the legislation, Chiles said, will
be streamlining of permits to alter or change wetlands.
Currently, with different agencies working with differ-
ent rules, a permit may be issued from one agency only
to have another department deny a wetland alteration
application.
"Who gets stopped is a small businessman who is try-
ing to develop a piece of property," Chiles said. "They
deserve quicker and easier answers to their questions."
Chiles said environmental integrity will be retained
through the testing process of determining wetlands.
Three steps will be followed to determine if an area is
a wetland:
A 1,400-species plant list will be used to identify
types of plants commonly found in wetland areas.
Soil samples will be taken to determine water
intensity in the ground.
Historical data will be assessed to determine
long-term flood patterns.
"I believe this is a fair and workable law," Florida
Department of Environmental Protection Assistant
Secretary Dan Thompson. "This will make wetland
protection less complicated and more effective."
Thompson said the law will be reviewed by various
state and regional agencies during the rule making process.


I I


Wetland signing ...t. A w. A.
Gov. Lawton Chiles came to the area last Thursday to
put pen to paper and turn into law a bill which will
standardize the definition of wetlands in Florida

Final rules governing wetland delineation should be com-
pleted within two months, Thompson said.
Wetlands have been likened to a human's kidneys,
cleaning water before it enters an estuary system. Wet-
lands also reduce flood and storm damage and provide
important fish and wildlife habitats. Scientists believe
that, acre for acre, wetlands constitute the most ecologi-


cally productive biological community on earth.
The signing ceremony took place at a recreated
wetland area on City Island. BayWalk is a 4.5 acre site
that once was the home of exotic vegetation such as
Brazilian pepper and Australian pines. A number of
federal, state, regional and local agencies participated
in clearing the land of the noxious plants, developing
a winding system of small creeks and ponds, and re-
planting the area with native vegetation.
Scientific study of the area has revealed a large
number of juvenile fish and other marine life use the
area as home or nursery.
Boardwalks and nature trails are used by visitors to
the site to view and learn more of the estuarine
exosystem. Total cost of the project is $200,000.



Anna Maria City
5/12, 7:30 p.m., Signage Committee
5/18, 9 a.m., Planning Commission
sub-committee
5/18, 7:30 p.m., Planning Commission

Bradenton Beach
5/17, 10 a.m., Charter Review Committee

Holmes Beach
5/17, 3 p.m., Planning Commission
5/17, 7:30 p.m., Council meeting

Of Interest
5/12, 7 p.m., Citizen's Advisory Committee
to the Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
5/16, 10 am., Island Transportation Planning
Organization, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
5/18, 10 am., Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials, Longboat Key Town Hall.


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l] PAGE 4 K MAY 12, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Suhre appointed to


Bradenton Beach council


Dick Suhre has been appointed to the Bradenton
Beach City Council to fill the Ward 1 seat va-
cated by Jack Charlton when he moved from
the Island.
Suhre, 62, has been a resident of the city
since 1987. It was his longevity within
Bradenton Beach that appeared to sway coun-
cil members to appoint him to join their ranks
over two other candidates for the seat. Dan
Goodchild and Mark Claire had also requested
serving on the council.
"I feel Richard would serve the city better
now, but I hope the other candidates would run Dick S
against him in the next election and let the
people decide," Councilman Bill Campbell said.
Campbell was joined by Mayor Katie Pierola and Vice
Mayor Herb Dolan in unanimously endorsing Suhre's


I want my
mommy
A lone baby raccoon,
obviously separatedfrom
its family, was spotted 1 ,
hiding behind a large ..,
plant in Holmes Beach
last week. Some ."
beachgoers found the '
frightened infant and H
called Wildlife Rescue
Service.
Islander Photo:
Jeannie Friedman


appointment to the council.


uhre


"Thank you," Suhre told council
members and audience after being
sworn into office. "It's rather awesome,
actually." He thanked council members
for their unanimous support of him, add-
ing that "we need strength and unity to
get things done."
Suhre represents the northern portion
of Bradenton Beach. His duties on the
council will include serving as liaison
with the Tingley Memorial Library
board, planning and stormwater and
drainage.


Suhre will retain the Ward 1 council seat until
December, when he will have to campaign for office if
he desires to keep the council position.
1177w


Myriad beach activities ban proposed


A proposed law establishing a host of prohibited
beach activities including Jet-ski rental without a
special exception has stalled in Bradenton Beach.
Council members agreed last Thursday the pro-
posed ordinance was too restrictive and needed more
review. The matter will be the topic of a workshop later
this month, and is scheduled to be decided June 9.
The proposed law expands existing ordinances that
control permitted activities on Coquina and Cortez
Beaches to all beach areas within the city, from
Longboat Pass to the Bradenton Beach-Holmes Beach
city limits.
Rental of Jet-skis would be prohibited without a
special exception by the city under the proposed law.
City Attorney Alan Prather said his interpretation of the
law would prohibit rental or sale of the controversial
watercraft at the waters edge.
Within the long list of prohibited beach activities
are simply.being on the beach between 10 p.m. and 7
a.m. Prompted by a resident who said he likes to walk
along the shore at night, Police Chief Jack Maloney
said "I don't believe in being draconian about it. As
long as people aren't complaining, it will be okay."
Another concern was voiced by Gil Pierola, Jr.,
manager of the Catalina Beach Resort, who said he was
uncomfortable with someone being denied the right to
walk to the waters edge of their own property with an
alcoholic beverage.
Pierola's concerns were echoed by Community Re-
development Agency Chairman Clem Dryden, who told
council members "I believe you are stepping over our
boundaries by trying to stop someone on their own private
property to go out to the waters edge with a beer."
As outlined in the proposed law, "declared unlaw-
ful and in violation of this ordinance" the following are
prohibited.
Carry, possess or discharge a firearm, firecracker
or similar device without a permit;
Disturb any tree, shrub, plant, vegetation, seawall,
groin, fence or sign without a permit;
Catch, molest, injure, capture or kill any wild birds
or wildlife except poisonous reptiles, rats or vermin;
Distribute, post, erect, solicit or place any adver-
tising materials without a permit;
Start or kindle any fires unless in designated areas;


Camp or sleep overnight either on the beach or in
parking lots;
Indulge in riotous, boisterous, threatening or in-
decent conduct or behavior or disturb the public peace
and tranquillity;
Sell, offer for sale, lease, rent or otherwise distrib-
ute any merchandise, goods, products, articles or other
things within the nature of retail, commercial or busi-
ness activities or enterprises unless associated with
Manatee County's approved franchise operations at
Coquina Park. The possession of a city occupational
license relating to activities occurring on adjacent or
contiguous private property does not allow, qualify or
extend any special right, authority or permission to
carry on such activity;
Litter;
Clean any fish;
Discharge any wastewater or sewage;
Drive any vehicle in speeds greater than 15 mph
off the paved surface of city or state roads;
Park motor vehicles that would block another, or
park any tractor-trailer rigs without a permit;
Place any building or locate any public utilities


Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key have a
number of commonalties:
Both Islands are mostly comprised of resi-
dential homes, either condominium or single fam-
ily;
Both Islands have a large segment of their
population within the "senior citizen" age cat-
egory;
Both Islands have a limited number of com-
mercial uses within their boundaries;
Both Islands have a new, wide, renourished
beach although Longboat Key has not fared as
well with its beach sticking to the shore as Anna
Maria;
And both Islands now have three gasoline
stations which dispense fuel to motorists.
Anna Maria Island has undergone a spate of


without permits;
remove any rip-rap, rock or other erosion control
materials without permits;
Possess or consume any alcoholic beverages
whether on the beach or in any public parking areas;
Throw, propel or push any objects, stones, balls,
arrows, javelins, kites or model aircraft which disturbs
the public peace, or endangers or unreasonably inter-
feres with the activities of other persons in the enjoy-
ment of the public beach and recreation areas;
Fish from any area of the beach designated for
swimming only;
Jump from any jetty or pier;
Drive or operate any vehicle, including bicycles,
within any area of the beach, piers or groins, except for
city-approved vehicles;
Pets on the beach, although they are permitted
.within the parking areas if on a leash;
Being on the beach between 10 p.m. and 7 a.m.
except for night fishing on the piers.
Violation of any of the above is subject to second-
degree misdemeanor, punishable by imprisonment for
no more than 60 days and a $500 fine.


gas station closings of late. Consider:
J.D. Food Mart on Pine Avenue in Anna Maria
City has been having computer problems and
stopped dispensing gasoline recently. The problem,
according to an employee, may be resolved within
a week or month, depending on glitches.
Huffines on Marina Drive in Holmes Beach is
up-grading fuel tanks and pumps, and may be
closed for gasoline dispensing for upwards of two
months. The garage will remain open in the in-
terim.
That leaves the Circle K in Bradenton Beach
and the Citgo and BP stations in Holmes Beach as
the last refuges for gas-hungry Islanders.
Or the mainland gasoline stations.
Better watch those fuel gauges, and don't wait
too long between fill-ups ...


Fire taxes not

expected to

increase this year
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Following the first work session.on the 1994/
95 budget last week, it appears that the Anna Maria
Fire Commission will forego a tax increase this
year.
A draft of the 1994/95 budget reviewed by
commissioners showed a total income of
$1,025,176 and expenses of $855,887, creating an
excess or reserve of $169,289. The income shows
an increase of $205,782, which includes a
$197,776 cash carryover from the 1993/94 fiscal
year, and the expenses show an increase of
$36,493 from the 1993/94 fiscal year.
A breakdown of proposed income is as fol-
lows: $809,000, tax receipts, fees, permits, etc.;
$10,400, interest; $8,000, utility reimbursements;
and $197,776, cash carryover.
The breakdown of proposed expenses is as
follows: $481,787, wages and benefits; $49,000,
repairs and maintenance; $83,000, insurance;
$11,500, training; $7,500, office expenses; $5,250,
supplies; $32,000, utilities; $1,500, fire prevention;
$40,000, capital expenses; $37,850, special ser-
vices; $75,000, debt reduction; and $31,500, mis-
cellaneous expenses.
Bradenton Beach resident Mollie Sandberg
questioned the district's expenses for lawn water-
ing and suggested commissioners consider con-
verting the lawn to a xeriscape landscape of native,
drought resistant plants.
Commissioners welcomed her suggestion and
asked her to meet with them for further discussion
on a plan to do so.


Don't go too far between fill-ups






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 A PAGE 5 Im

Tempers flare in Building Official-CRA dispute


City council, the building official and members of
the Community Redevelopment Agency will meet
soon in an attempt to iron out differences that have
erupted in Bradenton Beach.
At issue is an apparent conflict between Building
Official Joe Romano and members of the CRA, the
group responsible for coordinating much of the work
involved in the redevelopment effort on Bridge Street
and elsewhere in the city.

Letter carriers to pick
up food on Saturday
Letter carriers throughout the United States will
collect non-perishable food donations on their mail
routes Saturday, May 14. This is the second year for
what letter carriers hope to become an annual Food
Drive Day to help stock food banks for those in need.
Residents may place non-perishable food
items at their mailbox on Saturday for carriers to
pick up during regular mail delivery. The food will
be taken to a redistribution point for local food
banks.


tII1 ISLAND

CENTENNIAL

PARADE


SATURDAY MAY 21ST

LEAVES
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In BRADENTON BEACH
10A.M.

ENDS BAYFRONT PARK ANNA MARIA CITY
WHERE AN OLD TIME PICNIC WILL BE IN FULL FORCE
Sponsored by
THE ANNA MARIA ISLAND PRIVATEERS
FOR INFORMATION OR TO ENTER THE PARADE CALL
794-6889 OR 778-5934



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on our parade trolley. 778-7978.
*Seating is Limited call right away!


WE'VE GOT ESP*
AND WE WANT YOU TO HAVE IT TOO!
Our ESP* (ENERGY SAVINGS PLAN)
is a twice-a-year inspection, lubricating, .adjust-
ing, and cleaning of your heating/cooling system
to keep it running at peak efficiency.
At $48.00 for both visits, it's a bargain you
won't want to pass up.
NO high pressure sales.
NO unneeded parts replacement
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You'll have to call us or we'll never meet.
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Romano cited the CRA board as part of the reason he
submitted a letter or resignation to Mayor Katie Pierola
last month. Romano later rescinded his resignation and
will retain his position as building official in the city.
Vice Mayor Herb Dolan last month said he wanted
to put the CRA board "on notice," stating Romano's
case that the CRA members were "overstepping the
bounds of their advisory capacity and diminishing his
authority as building inspector.
"I would like to put the CRA on notice that any
more interference or overstepping of authority could
cause the board to be dissolved and its duties reas-
signed to the council," Dolan wrote in a letter regard-
ing Romano and the CRA.
CRA Chairman Clem Dryden said he was upset
and angered by Dolan's charges.
"I believe volunteer organizations hold this city
together," Dryden told the council. "I believe volun-
teers need the cooperation of people who work for the
city. We need to work together as a team," he said.
The issue that sparked the firestorm of accusations
apparently was the issuance of a permit by Romano to
Allan Bazzy to erect a six-foot wooden fence surround-
ing his property near the Bradenton Beach Marina just


south of the Cortez Bridge, according to Pierola.
Romano said he was legally obligated to issue the
permit, pursuant to city codes. Dryden and other CRA
members had requested a clarification of the codes regard-
ing the fence, in a response to citizen complaints about the
unsightly appearance the high wooden fence gave the city.
Romano, backed by City Planner Bill Brisson and
opinions by City Attorney Alan Prather, was prepared to
meet and discuss with CRA members the fence issue.
However, lack of a quorum postponed the meeting.
Dryden said "everything was blown out of propor-
tion. I thought it was a simple question," Dryden said,
"but then it became an issue that we were trying to take
over [Romano's duties]."
CRA member Ida Cuthbertson told council mem-
bers "it's important to continue the work of city devel-
opment." John Chappie, another member of the CRA
board, stressed "the best thing we can do it clear the air,
get it out, and move on and talk about future goals and
objectives."
Romano remained silent during the discussion,
commenting that he "has nothing to say at this time."
No date has been set for the workshop between
council and CRA members.


HEALTH & SAFETY

,a' A\ I /A. iMI --1







BIJ PAGE 6 0 MAY 12, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Ima *-r


Gazebo for all
Random House calls it "a structure, a pavilion,
built on a site affording an enjoyable view."
Enjoyable to gaze from and upon if all goes
well according to yet another beautification plan conjured
up by Councilwoman Billie Martini for Holmes Beach.
She offered to pay for a fountain at city hall first.
But the idea of a gazebo has met the voice of op-
position before it has even had fair consideration.
The thought of a summer series of outdoor band
concerts on the grounds behind city hall sounds all too
favorable to us.
Surely some of you are familiar with this scene in
the northeast. Many of the little towns on Cape Cod
host such events on the village green. Starry night.
Blankets and lawn chairs on the grass. Kids cavort and
neighbors greet neighbors and newcomers. The con-
ductor lifts his baton and the magic of summer on the
Cape musically drifts over the audience.
It's small town America, as genuine and good as it
gets.
Most of the concerts are free, supported by town
funds or civic organizations. They sell beer, wine and
sodas rent picnic tables before the concert. Some
groups even offer gourmet picnic baskets for sale and
make money?!?
How could we consider such an atrocity.
Indeed, how could we turn down the idea.
A bandstand would be an enhancement to many of
the other events held at the field. What once was a grass
airfield can stand a little beautification. (Can we come
up with a park-like name? Bandstand Park?)
The art festivals would surely enjoy utilizing such a
facility and it shouldn't interfere with the annual circus.
With the proper regulations and we already have
an appropriate noise ordinance we can enjoy some
notoriety as the only island or key in at least Manatee and
Sarasota Counties with such a unique facility.
The Van Wezel in Sarasota has looked to this type
of enhancement to their facility for some time. We
could be first!
For a change, let's hear from the people that arefor
something. Vf-


SLICK By Egan


e *~ e


SL- ---
Artwork courtesy of Best Read Guide, Cape Cod, Mass.


MAY 12, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 25
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Rick Fleury
Jeannie Friedman
David Futch
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Kristy Hatfield
V Advertising Services
andAccounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster
4I.Vlo t,




With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


Bandstand will contribute to
noise pollution
Whatever the structure that has been proposed by
a member of the Holmes Beach City Council may be
calledd bandstand and/or gazebo it will create
noise pollution in a residential area if entertainment
such as band or rock concerts are permitted uses.
Traffic congestion, lack of adequate parking facili-
ties, cost of maintenance and clean up, and the possi-
bility of liability insurance claims are major concerns.
It is a fair assumption that most of those who are per-
manent residents and our winter visitors or tourists enjoy
it here because Anna Maria is a relatively quiet Island
without movies, bowling alleys and other places of enter-
tainment that are available within close proximity.
The craft shows and other permitted uses conducted
on city-owned property do not seem to generate problems,
but the prospect of band or rock concerts that would bring
in many people from the mainland is disturbing.
The issue of noise disturbance for those residents in
the immediate vicinity of the proposed bandstand/gazebo
is not the only concern for the city. This proposed activ-
ity is not in the best interest of our community.
Charlotte Long, Holmes Beach
A judgment call
Recently, I have come across a serious problem
with a "judgment call." My daughter, a good student at
Anna Maria Elementary School, has been the brunt of
a judgment call on three separate occasions.
Recently, she went to her teacher not feeling well
and she was not allowed to either go to see the school
nurse or contact me. She was forced to go through the
day with a headache and upset stomach. By the time
she got off the school bus she was crying in pain.
The first time it happened, she was sent to the nurse
who told her to rest for a few minutes then returned her
to class. I was not called. This resulted in a doctor's
visit and two prescriptions.
My all time favorite was what my husband and I
call the chicken pox episode. I left work early to sur-
prise my daughter, but I was the one surprised. When
my daughter got to the office, I took one look at her and
realized she was covered head to toe with chicken pox.


I asked to see the principal and nurse who seemed as
surprised as I was. I did inquire how something like this
could happen. I was told my daughter'didn't let anyone
know.
All anyone had to do was look at this child. The ex-
planation was that when a child is ill, it is a "judgment call"
that maybe the child wants to get out of a test Not my
child. All I ask is to be called let me make a judgment
call. I can tell over the phone if my child is ill. I think
this is borderline neglect.
Sheila Hurst, Anna Maria

... and AME principal responds
The safety and well-being of every child at Anna
Maria Elementary School is paramount to every staff
member.
Should a child be absent, we ask each parent to
contact the school to inform us of the absence. If we do
not hear from the parent we contact them to make sure
that the child is safe and that the parent is aware that the
child is not at school.
No child is allowed to go home in a different man-
ner unless a parent has notified us. Even when children
miss the bus we contact the parent and if they are un-
able to come for the child we will transport the child to
a safe location.
Children will generally inform their teacher if they
are not feeling well and teachers will then send them
to our clinic for a determination of their illness. Some-
times all they need is tender loving care. Sometimes it
is necessary for us to contact the parent and let them
know that the child is ill and for them to determine how
they would like us to proceed with the situation. If the
parent is unable to pick up their child we have, when
necessary, transported the child home so that they will
have the care of the parent.
We are responsible for nearly 400 boys and girls each
day and it is a difficult task to insure each child is receiv-
ing the individual attention that they deserve. Yes, there
are instances when human error takes place and miscom-
munication in any of these situations may exist.
Again, we make every effort to make sure each child
is safe. Miscommunication? Perhaps. Neglect? Never!
James P. Kronus, Anna Maria School principal










THOSE WERE THE" AYS
Part 7, Anna Maria Island & the Seminole War, 1835-1842,
by June Alder


In this circa 1837 U.S. Army map of Tampa Bay, Anna Maria was called "Long
Island" and Passage Key was as large as Egmont Key. Besides the temporary
Bunce rancho on Mullet Key, the only other settlement on the whole bay was up
by Fort Brooke where the Seminoles were gathering to be deported.

A SECURE POSITION


On Sept. 11, 1836, the watch com-
mander of the USS Grampus wrote in
the ship's log: "Captain Bunce and his
fishing party shifting their fishing estab-
lishment to Mullet Key." And on Sept.
14: "Got underway with the first of the
flood, and a light breeze from the west,
and made sail for the Anchorage inside
Mullet Key. Capt. Bunce sloops in
Company."
Once settled at the large island to
the north of Egmont Key, William
Bunce took pen in hand to thank Com-
modore Alexander J. Dallas (com-
mander of the West India Squadron,
aboard his flagship, the USS Constella-
tion, Pensacola Bay) for preventing a
Seminole attack on Bunce's on his old
camp on Passage Key.
His letter is most poignant in view
of the deterioration in the relationship
between Bunce and the military that was
to take place in 1837:
"Sir, Permit me to communicate to
you my Sense of the Great Service the
U.S. Schooner Grampus has rendered
me and those under my protection at this
Rancho We are in number 163 men,
women and children- 25 only capable
of bearing arms.
"Fortunately we discovered that
Albertar Ha-jo, (or alligator chief) with
about 150 Indians and the assistance of
boats from Charlotte's Harbour would
make a descent on the Island for the
purpose of destroying us all.
" "'t: i he Grampus lay at some distance.
SCor. Cassin with great exertion hauled
NI vessel within musket distance of our
houses, Sent an officer and men on
shore to assist and keep guard at night.
'Tis they continued to do until I could
remove to a more secure position which
I affected a few days since,
"This particular service of the
Grampus was commenced in my ab-
sence, and to the energy of the officers
and men alone I feel confident we owe


our lives at this moment.
"I have located on the Inside of
Mullet Key, the north side of the mouth
of Tampa Bay.
"I must add that we have been uni-
formly and constantly treated with great
kindness by the officers and seamen of
the several ships on this station. I beg
you will continue to give us the protec-
tion we so much require.
"Your Humble Servant, William
Bunce."
Commodore Dallas was so pleased
with Bunce's letter that he enclosed it in
a report to Secretary of the Navy
Mahlon Dickerson on Oct. 4, 1836.
There was really very little of mili-
tary significance for Dallas to report to
Washington then. For the year-long
Florida Indian War had reached a stale-
mate. Angry and frustrated, President
Andrew Jackson changed commanders
for the fifth time. His choice was Major
General Thomas S. Jesup stubborn,
colorless but an Indian fighter like Jack-
son and supremely confident in his abil-
ity to carry out Jackson's "Indian re-
moval" policy.
In the spring of 1837 Jesup man-
aged to get together a conference with
the important Seminole chiefs (all ex-
cept Osceola, about whom Jesup knew
little). Jesup suspected that many of the
chiefs were tired of the war. And he was
right.
At the new Fort Dade, erected on
the spot between Tampa and Fort King
where the Dade Massacre took place in
December 1835, Jesup browbeat the
chiefs into agreeing to stop fighting and
get out of Florida.
The main inducement was that they
would be able to take their Negro allies
into exile with them.
But there was a catch to this arrange-
ment that would have disastrous conse-
quences both for Gen. Jesup and the
Bunce fishery people on Mullet Key.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 12, 1994 0 PAGE 7 IED
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S. . . U . . . . . l . . I .






i[] PAGE 8 M MAY 12, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A I. .


Holmes Beach council okays

beer, centennial donation


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SsHLTon





51


CREATIVE FASHIONS
FOR WOMEN


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council gave the nod for
beer to be served at the Centennial grand opening cer-
emonies and street dance May 20 at the Island Shop-
ping Center parking lot. Council also okayed a $500
donation to the centennial.
Luke Courtney, councilman and chairman of the
centennial executive committee, introduced both mo-
tions at last week's meeting.
"We requested a temporary use permit for the
street dance in the shopping center," he said. "Every-
thing has been approved except for the sale of beer. In
the past the council has approved a special exception
for events to sell beer in that shopping center."
Courtney made a motion for the special exception.
Both Councilwomen Pat Geyer and Mary Ellen
Reichard said the question should be discussed at a work
session. Councilwoman Carol Whitmore felt it could be
done at the current meeting but asked for written permis-
sion from other merchants in the shopping center.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said if council is to
make an exception to the ordinance, it should consider
changing the code to provide for such exceptions. He
also felt that extra police should be provided for the
event.


Signs up in
Bradenton Beach
Historic Old Town has been
designated throughout much of
the Bridge Street area of
Bradenton Beach via new street
signs. The yellow-and-blue signs
follow the same motif of signs at
Bradenton Beach City Hall and
the Tingley Memorial Library.
The signs are the newest element
of the revitalization effort of the
city's "downtown" area, recipi-
ent of a $500,000 grant. Work
should be completed along
Bridge Street by the end of May.
Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Courtney amended the motion to include extra
police and written permission from merchants.
In seeking the $500 donation to the centennial,
Courtney noted that the other two island cities and the
county, through the Tourist Development CounCil,
have donated $500 each.
Bohnenberger said it could only be taken from the
contingency fund for emergencies and the donation
was approved.
On the subject of Jet-skis, Bohnenberger said the
city attorney researched the state and county statutes
concerning the city's ability to control the operation of
personal watercraft.
The attorney's recommendation is to first encourage
the responsible agencies, the Florida Marine Patrol and
sheriff's office, to enforce the existing laws, according to
Bohnenberger. Another option would be to establish a
restricted zone under existing law that would restrict ves-
sel operation within 100 yards of the beach.
Bohnenberger said he had directed the police chief
to make a formal request to Manatee County Sheriff
Wells and the Marine Patrol to conduct routine patrols
along the city coastline.
In other business, council approved a resolution
authorizing investment of the city's reserves in U.S.
government securities.


Gazebo for Holmes Beach

still under consideration


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Council agreed to con-
sider building a gazebo in the field behind city hall as
part of the planned renovations to city buildings.
As proposed by Councilwoman Billie Martini, the
structure would be an ideal place for concerts and other
forms of entertainment. The council sought feedback
from residents with the results both pro and con.
At last week's work session, Martini presented a
draft of rules for the gazebo's use, as requested by
council. These included the following:
Users must clean up after themselves.
No amplification of instruments or boom boxes.
No use before 10 a.m. or after 8 p.m.
City permit required for gatherings of 20 or more
persons.
Sign-in at city hall to reserve the gazebo.
Anyone not observing the rules will be fined
$100 after proper notification of a violation.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore asked that a per-
mit be required for gatherings of 10 or more people,


that the city charge a fee of $50 for use of the gazebo
and that events be scheduled in advance.
City Clerk Leslie Ford read the council a letter of
opposition from Charlotte Long of West Bay Point &
Moorings.
Councilwoman Pat Geyer said she had received
calls in opposition to the structure if taxpayer's money
is used.
At that point, Martini was ready to drop her proposal.
"There haven't been too many people who have
really voiced their opinion but those in opposition have
been clear that they don't want it," she said.
Councilman Luke Courtney said he liked the idea.
"I'm envisioning a civic center here which will
incorporate the veteran's fountain, sports areas, etc. It
would be nice to sit out there on a Friday evening and
listen to some music and I think that's the majority
view. You've only heard from a few people out of more
than 4,000," Courtney said.
Resident Bob Jones agreed with Courtney.
"I'm much in favor of it," he said. "It helps add to
our character."


a






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 12, 1994 M PAGE 9 II-


Councils want to keep police

department, offer contracts


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The only option they want to explore is whether or
not the other two Island cites wish to contract with
Holmes Beach for police services, Holmes Beach City
Council members said last week.
And in Bradenton Beach, council members indi-
cated a willingness to explore all options for a consoli-
dated police force except having anything to do with
Longboat Key.
Don Howard and John Kaufmann of the Police
Services Study Committee presented six options to
council members and asked which ones they would like
the committee to pursue.
Options are for all police agencies to contract with
the Manatee County Sheriffs Office, the Holmes
Beach Police Department, the Bradenton Beach Police
Department or the Longboat Key Police Department;
to establish an Island police district; or leave everything
as is.
In Holmes Beach, Howard told council, "We don't
want to be spinning our wheels if there's something the
city's not interested in."
Councilwoman Billie Martini said she favors an
Island district if it would not generate increased taxes.
Howard said a district is not possible under current leg-
islation and it would be a long process to have the leg-
islation changed.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger and council members
Mary Ellen Reichard, Pat Geyer and Luke Courtney all
favored Holmes Beach as the contracting service for
the other agencies or to continue the status quo.
Councilwoman Carol Whitmore disagreed.
"I don't feel the council is being open minded,"


Whitmore said. "We should quit being territorial and
be open minded enough to see what would be more
cost effective for the taxpayers. The residents I talk to
say it doesn't make sense to have three police depart-
ments."
Howard said, "Each city has its own identity.
The people of Bradenton Beach are very satisfied
with and complimentary of their police department.
Anna Maria has done some hard work and gotten the
sheriff's department and that is their identity. Holmes
Beach is very happy with their police department. If
it's a district or a contracting situation, two cities are
going to lose some of their identity."
Resident Jim Meena told council to "forget
Bradenton Beach and make a proposal to Anna
Maria."
Bohnenberger replied that Holmes Beach has
provided cost figures to Anna Maria and "they turned
it down."
In Bradenton Beach, Mayor Katie Pierola said
she hoped to discuss changing the Florida laws per-
taining to consolidated police forces with the state
legislative delegation from the area in a special meet-
ing in early June.
"I believe the only option to discard would be the
one to contract with Longboat Key," Pierola told
Kaufmann.
Bradenton Beach resident Dick Griffin told coun-
cil members "I don't know why you're even consid-
ering going out and changing anything. I like our
police department. I don't understand why we even
want to study it."
Committee members plan to poll the other two city
councils on the issue before deciding how to proceed.


Bridge Street parking may be

expanded with new lot


A city-owned public parking lot may be in the
works for Bradenton Beach.
Community Redevelopment Agency Chairman Clem
Dryden told city council members last week negotiations
are moving ahead to acquire a 100-by-106-foot parcel of
land at 105-107 First Street North. Owner BrunoFleck has
agreed to sell the lots for $100,000, Dryden said.
"It's close to the new library, Bridge Street, the
beach and the fishing pier," Dryden said of the land.
"This $100,000 investment will buy us something that
will go up in value. If the city decides to sell the land
at a future date, it will have made money on the invest-
ment." Dryden said the CRA board unanimously voted
in favor of the land acquisition.
Appraisers are assessing the property and should
have a decision as to the property's-value within a few
weeks, Dryden said. The funds to buy the land would
come from cash reserves within the city.
"Our auditors have said we have enough money to
do this," Mayor Katie Pierola said. "The biggest prob-


lem in the city [near Bridge Street] has been parking,
and I believe this purchase will help us with that."
Councilman Dick Suhre said "The two lots are in
an ideal spot, and if the money and opportunity are
there, this is the time to do it."
Dryden said the city's use of $100,000 to buy the
lots could be leveraged five-fold. He said the Florida
Department of Community Affairs the state
agency responsible for the $500,000 grant to the city
to revitalize the Bridge Street area would look very
favorably on a Bradenton Beach initiative to add pub-
lic parking in the area, perhaps aiding in an additional
grant to the city.
"If we can get enough points, we can get another
$500,000 grant, and can use the money to develop the
infrastructure for the parking lot," Dryden said.
The infrastructure Dryden mentioned includes
on-site drainage from paved surfaces, lighting, land-
scaping and other requirements set forth in city land
development regulations.


Lonely graffiti Islander Photo: Jeannie Friedman
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E13 THE ISlANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 I PAGE 10

Centennial celebration plans three-day

schedule of events May 20-22


Friday, May 20
Street Dance and Grand Opening Ceremony -
Entertainment includes Dean (formerly with the DTs)
and the Hammerheads. The beard contest, an auction
and raffle for prizes, souvenir sales, and food and drink
all outdoors at the Island Shopping Center; Holmes
Beach; 5 to 10 p.m. Opening ceremonies at 8 p.m.

Saturday, May 21
Grand Parade, begins at Coquina Beach in
Bradenton Beach at 10 a.m. and ends at Bayfront Park
in Anna Maria at approximately 11 a.m.
Family Picnic with food, games, entertainment
and photographs in centennial costume; Bayfront Park,
Anna Maria; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
*Trolley Tour of historic sites in Anna Maria every
half hour from Bayfront Park, 11 am.to 5 p.m.
Excursion boat rides on the
Miss Cortez entertainment, Anna
Maria City Pier, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Flavors of the Island, Anna
Maria Island Community Center; Lh d
specialties of 15 Island restaurants, r -
photographs in centennial costume
and entertainment; 407 Magnolia i,
Ave.; Anna Maria; 6 to 10 p.m. ISUR

Sunday, May 22
Centennial Sunday, Island
churches.
Craft Marketplace with
food, entertainment, raffles and souvenir sales; 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m.; Coquina Beach. Call Sandy Greiner, 778-
2864, to register for a booth.
Kid's Fishing Tournament, Bradenton Beach
City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. call Capt. Mike Heistand,
778-1990, for information. (See related story.)


Trolley Tour of historic sites in Bradenton Beach
and Holmes Beach every half hour from Coquina
Beach, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Centennial events
include fishing
tournament for kids
A fishing tournament for both kids and adults will
be held at the Bradenton Beach City Pier, Sunday, May
22, from noon to 4 p.m. as part of the Anna Maria Is-
land Centennial Celebration.
Kids under age 16 accompanied by an adult may
participate for free. First place prizes for kids, rods and
reels donated by Island Discount Tackle, will be
awarded for the longest fish, heaviest fish, most fish,
longest pin fish, most unusual fish and the best catch.
Register before the tournament for age categories:
five and under, six to 10 years old, and 11 to 15.
Ages 16 and older will be considered adults and
registration is $5. Adults must catch trout, flounder,
redfish, snook, grouper, sheepshead, mangrove snap-
per or black drum to be eligible for prizes. Points will
be awarded for (and participants may keep) all legal-
sized fish. First prize for adults is one-half day of fish-
ing aboard Capt. Mike Heistand's charter boat
"Magic."


"Duffy's Trolley" will be available for historic tours.,
Horseshoe Tournament, Anna Maria City Hall, 1
to 4 p.m. Call George McKay, 778-7469, for information.
Shuffleboard Tournament, Anna Maria City Hall, Bill Worth George Norwood Jeanne Blassingame, Carolyne
1 to 4 p.m. Call Robert Porter, 778-6229, for information. Norwood and Elnora Worth at the HistoricalMuseum.


From generation to generation, we are an "Island of Memories."
Kid's & watermelon on the running board from Paul Roat's family album.



Join the party!

Centennial Grand Opening Ceremony
Street Dance, Beard Contest & Auction
Friday May 20 5 to 10 pm $2
Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach
Music by Dean from DTs and The Hammerheads -
sponsored by The Islander Bystander
OPEN HOUSE: THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
Please stop by our office in the shopping center, meet some
of the staff and enjoy some old-fashioned Island hospitality
while you're at the street dance.


IYllIM


DeSoto Parade, March 1949. "Rolling surf ridden by girls on surf boards while other
beach girls stood with giant tarpon on fishing lines." Photo by the late Don Roat of
Bradenton Beach. Beach girls: Carolyn Meeker, Carol Woods, Betty Sue Burton,
Charlene Miller, Sylvia Wiggins and Jeanne Roat. From Paul Roat's family album.


Join the parade!

Official Centennial Parade
May 21 Saturday 10 am
From Coquina Beach to Bayfront Park
The Islander Bystander will be "parading"
in two trolleys. Watch for us and wave!
Sponsored by the Privateers.
Join the parade enter now!
Call Parade Chairman Will Stokes 794-6889


ISLANDER


JISLANDE


;R


IBY1A






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M MAY 12, 1994 A PAGE 11 li


I YOUR 9elNIe


Thanks from Saggy Aggy 'and
traveling companion Charley'
Some people write, some people talk, some do both
or neither. My perception of the interview with Is-
lander reporter Jeannie Friedman and the article that
followed indicated that she has a combination of the
assets. Not only that, I felt I had found a new friend -
even if we never meet again.
I want to thank you for that, Jeannie. I also would
like to include a message of gratitude to The Islander
Bystander for the frequent inclusion of Saggy Aggy
pictures. Children and even some adults love a picture
of a clown that they have met or will meet.
I'm off to the World Clown Convention in Orlando
for five days, then heading north for summer.
With every good bye we learn.
Saggy Aggy (Kaye Stothers-Hopkins) and Charley,
Holmes Beach and Canada


Thanks to friends in paradise
I want to thank everyone for their concern regard-
ing my husband Stewart after his car accident last
week. He is recovering well.
Stewart never lost his sense of humor not even
while strapped in a stretcher for four hours and through
long hospital tests and checks.
I wish to thank our Island medics. These were the
same guys who were performing free blood pressure
tests at Island Foods the morning I was there selling
AMICC auction tickets. Their quick and sure action
was outstanding.
A special thanks to Holmes Beach Policeman
Chuck Anderson for his firmness and professionalism.
And thanks for the special trip to the hospital. Because
of people like you, we are safe.
To our dear and wonderful friends, I don't know
how to thank you enough. Steven Kring and Dale
Elfervig never left my side. George O'Connor kept
both me and my husband laughing at the hospital. Sean
Murphy fed us. The School for Constructive Play cared
for my son Stewart. And every friend there are so
many thank you from the bottom of our hearts.
If the joy of life is waking up in the morning,
knowing you live in paradise and having all your won-
derful friends close, we have it Thank you for caring.
Our Island is paradise.
Trudy Moon, Anna Maria







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Centennial is a
once-in-a-lifetime celebration
Many, many thanks for the Centennial page in last
week's Islander. Quite a few people have been plan-
ning and working hard on the Anna Maria Island Cen-
tennial since the first of the year.
It is our fervent hope everyone on the Island will at-
tend the events on May 20,21 and 22. We promise some-
thing for everyone entire families can participate.
If you're not in the parade on Saturday morning,
line the streets. This is going to be the biggest parade
the Privateers have ever staged. Floats from as far as
Tampa will start up the Island at 10 a.m. and end at
Anna Maria Bayfront Park where a great picnic, boat
rides and entertainment will be held. Don't forget the
free trolley rides to historic places.
Let's make this a once-in-a-lifetime celebration.
Anyone wishing to help call Luke Courtney, chair, at
778-5405.
Be sure to get your tickets for Saturday night's Fla-
vors of the Island at the Community Center. The food and
entertainment will be the best. Tickets are available from
the Island Museum and Chamber of Commerce.
Carolyne Norwood, Anna Maria Island
Historical Society president
Community Crisis series
is well done
A number of us are very appreciative of the re-
search and writing being done by reporter Pat Copeland
and the attention given by The Islander Bystander to
the subject "Community in Crisis," a comprehensive
report on the drug and other sociological behavior
problems permeating many Island young people.
This is commendable community service on the
part of the newspaper and excellent, thorough report-
ing by Mrs. Copeland. I hope the series gives us the
perspectives we need to meet the crisis.
Thanks also to Pierette Kelly of the Community
Center for having the spirit and drive to force the sub-
ject into the public eye.
Now it's up to the community, isn't it?
Bob VanWagoner, Holmes Beach
In defense of Jet-skis, Pierola
As an avid sport fisherman and Bradenton Beach resi-
dent, I'd like to respond to some concerns about Jet-skis
and undue charges against our fine Mayor Katie Pierola.
I used to abhor Jet-skis. While boating or fishing the


Intracoastal Waterway, the operators of Jet-skis were like
annoying insects: they buzzed around us making entirely
too much racket and endangering the safety of themselves
and others by trying to jump the wake, etc.
Then I took a good hard look at the operation of
Bradenton Beach Sailboat Rentals and realized this was
the ideal situation for watercraft activity. It's operated on
a private beach, far away from public areas and hordes of
swimmers. It's overseen and supervised by a professional
with great care, and they are not the loud and obnoxious
wave runners I'd seen on the Intracoastal.
I live less that one-third of a mile from the Catalina
and never have I, or the neighbors I've communicated
with, been bothered in the least by that business.
I've met Ralph and Beth Cole and they are fine,
upstanding citizens of Anna Maria Island. They live
here, pay taxes here and are an asset to this community.
They've helped rescue people and lent their crafts to
others for that purpose.
Shame on you if you think you're going to solve
any problems by taking away this family's livelihood.
Now, a new business comes to town. Great. Com-
petition is good for consumers. Revenue from new
business is good. But if the new business wants to op-
erate without regard to rules and codes (and common
sense) they must be stopped.
Katie didn't stop this new business, our codes did.
And yes, codes apply to everyone.
But comparing some out-of-town owner, who
owns no property here, shows no proof of insurance
and blatantly disregards our rules and codes is compar-
ing apples to oranges.
The Coles were granted their license under the
codes that were in existence at that time. The new
beach brought new sand and new rules. The Coles were
"grandfathered in" and rightly so.
The only complaint ever registered against that
business came from Wet Willy's. All those years and
not one complaint
If you still have a problem with personal watercraft
of the Jet-ski variety, stop by and observe the Coles. If
you believe that Katie Pierola would do anything as
ridiculous as "selective enforcement" or encourage said
enforcement, get on the phone and call her. You should
never pass judgment until you're informed.
Lisa M. Phillips, Bradenton Beach
Publishers note: Lisa M. Phillips is employed as
administrative assistant at the Catalina Beach Resort.


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IM PAGE 12 0 MAY 12, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Joseph Robert Beaver
Joseph Robert Beaver, 75 of Walhalla, S.C., and
formerly of Anna Maria died May 5 at home.
Born in Greenville, S.C., Mr. Beaver was owner
and operator of Rose Electric Co. in Atlanta. He was
a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, and one of the
Anna Maria Island Pier Regulars.
He is survived by his wife, Mary Elizabeth
(Kelley); a daughter, Sandra of Walhalla; a son, Joseph
L. of Anna Maria; three sisters, Ethel Mae Marritt of
Winter Park, Betty Elizabeth Mapp of Duluth, Ga., and
Katherine Griffith Kellett of Pensacola; five grandsons;
and a great-grandchild.
Sandifer Funeral Home, Westminster, S.C., is in
charge of arrangements. Memorials may be made to
Hospice of the Foothills, P.O. Box 245, Seneca, S.C.
29679.

James E. Devitt
James E. Devitt, 73, of Holmes Beach and Shelter
Island, N.Y., died May 3 in Manatee Memorial Hospital.
Mr. Devitt was born July 23, 1920, in St. Paul,
Minn. A graduate of St. Thomas Academy, St. Paul,
Minn., the University of Minnesota and Harvard Law
School, Mr. Devitt practiced law in St. Paul for two
years before beginning his insurance career with North-
western National Life in 1951. He joined Mutual Life
Insurance Company of New York (MONY) in 1956,
where he was appointed executive vice president in
1972, president in 1976 and chairman of the board and
chief executive officer in 1978. He retired in 1983.
Mr. Devitt was active with the United Way,
Greater New York Council of the Boy Scouts of
America and the Salvation Army. He was a member of
Gardiner's Bay Country Club on Shelter Island, Shel-
ter Island Yacht Club and the Bradenton Country Club.
He was a major in the U.S. Army during World War II,
serving in the European Theater.
He is survived by his wife, Judith M.; two broth-
ers, William L. of Tonka Lake, Minn., and Robert G.
of Austin, Tex.; a sister, Mary Bard of St. Paul, Minn.;
16 nieces and nephews; and a step-daughter.

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vancy, Mashomack Preserve, P.O. Box 850 Shelter
SIsland, N.Y. 11964.

Nils J. Johnson
Nils J. Johnson, 74, of Bradenton, died May 6 at
home.
Born in Providence, R.I., Mr. Johnson came to
Bradenton from New Hampshire in 1965. He was a
letter carrier for the U.S. Postal Service and retired
from the U.S. Air Force. He was a Lutheran. He was a
member of American Legion Kirby Stewart Post 24 in
Bradenton.
He is survived by his wife, Marie E.; a daughter,
Kim Coutcher of Cape Coral; a brother, Alan of Provi-
dence; and three grandchildren.
Catherine B. Sahl
Catherine B. Sahl, 81, of Cortez died May 3.
Ms. Sahl was born Nov. 21, 1912, in Philadelphia
and moved to Cortez 19 years ago from Westville, N.J.
She was a member of St. Bernard Catholic Church.
Survivors include a daughter, Catherine Pannullo
of Cortez; two nephews, Donald Buckley of Bradenton
and George Davis of Woodbury, N.Y.; and a niece,
Patricia Bell, also of Woodbury.
Memorial donations may be made to the American
Cancer Society, P.O. Box 10459, Bradenton, FL
34282-0459.

Robinson Stevens
Robinson Stevens, 76, of Bradenton and Harris-
burg, Pa., died May 2 in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Esmond, R.I., Mr. Stevens owned several
Harrisburg area employment firms. He was a member
of the Lions Club, Chamber of Commerce, Crescent
Lodge Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and Island
Garden Club. He was a World War II U.S. Coast Guard
veteran.
He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two daugh-
ters, Deborah of Lenox, Mass., and Cynthia of Alex-
andria, Va.; a son, Robinson Jr. of Alexandria; a sister,

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Sylvia of Winslow, Maine; a brother, Arthur Lee of
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Memorials may be made to the American Cancer
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Cleo N. Taylor
Cleo N. Taylor, 77, formerly of Bradenton, died
May 8 in Sarasota Memorial Hospital.
Memorials may be made to the American Cancer
Society, 1750 17th St., Sarasota, Fla. 34234.
Born in Bradenton, Ms. Taylor was a resident of
the area for several years. She was a personal secretary.
She was a member of First United Methodist Church
of Bradenton.
She is survived by her brother, Alcee, of Cortez.




Musical inter-

denominational

service to be

held Monday
Sing to God, a praise celebration, will be
held on Monday, May 16,7 p.m., in the sanctu-
ary of Harvey Memorial Church, Bradenton
Beach. The special inter-denominational ser-
vice, held on the third Monday of each month
and sponsored by Harvey Memorial, Roser
Community Memorial Church, St. Bernard
Catholic Church and the Episcopal Church of
the Annunciation, is an open and informal mu-
sical celebration.
For more information or if you need trans-
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 0 PAGE 13 IE


A touch of hope for Teresa Hamilton


By Rick Fleury
Islander Reporter
Like many of us, Charlie Tuppen, a licensed mas-
sage therapist living in Holmes Beach, was captured by
Teresa Hamilton's compelling story of a teen's tragic
lapse into unconsciousness.


'You've got to

take a

chance, and

you can't lose

hope. If you

lose hope,

what've you

got? Miracles

happen.'


Charlie followed the
daily news reports of a 15-
year-old girl's sudden de-
pendence on life support at
Sarasota Memorial, the
doctors' prognosis that she
was "brain dead," and a de-
termined family that
brought the young girl
home against the odds with
hopes that her condition
would one day improve.
Charlie called to of-
fer his help.
He began visiting
Teresa every day, using his
own technique of neuro-
muscular vibration and
reflexology to bring some


relief to Teresa.
From the first day, he says, there was movement.
"Not coordinated motions," Charlie explains, but "sus-
tained motions," like inverting her foot, a pelvic tuck,
shifting on her buttocks "like she was stretching,"
he says.
Since his first visit to her home less than two
months ago, Charlie says her movements are increas-
ing. And, he says, "they seem to be more on cue at
times."
When Charles Tuppen first visited Teresa, the young


Charles Tuppen, licensed massage therapist, is
donating his time to Teresa Hamilton's recovery. "I
can't wait for Charlie and Teresa to meet," says
Teresa's mother, Sharon, ofSarasota.
girl was suffering from severe head and sinus congestion
and other systemic disorders resulting from the respirator.
With several days of treatment, her face became less swol-
len as the congestion moved into her lungs.


Her lungs were cleared with suction. He used vi-
bration in her kidney area to help Teresa release urine.
He traced her abdominal cavity with accupressure and
vibration to produce two bowel movements for Teresa
in one day after many less than successful days.
"It seems I was clearing out system after system,"
Charlie says.
Now, with all systems seemingly functioning well,
Charlie says the focus is on movement.
"She really responds to Charlie," Sharon Hamilton
says of her daughter. She says she seems to get excited
when Charlie comes around, communicating mostly
with her legs. Once, Sharon said, Teresa opened one of
her eyes for a short time while Charlie was massaging
her, then closed it slowly as if to lie back and enjoy the
touch.
"I can't thank him enough for what he's been do-
ing. Her eyes are dilating, she's starting to move her
arms and legs. Every day or every other day there's a
new movement.
"Every day that goes by that Teresa doesn't wake
up is disappointing," Teresa's mother says. "But it's
one day closer to her waking up. I can't wait for Charlie
and her to meet."
Charles D. Tuppen III, L.M.T, is now trying to take
his weekends for himself, to rest for each coming week
as vice president of the new Bayshore Center of
Wellness in Bradenton which he recently opened with
a friend from massage therapy school, David
Barngrover.
He'll also continue to see Teresa most every day,
who, fortunately, lives near his office by the Sarasota
Bradenton Airport.
"I do a lot by intuition," Charlie says. "You've got
to take a chance, and you can't lose hope. If you lose
hope, what've you got? Miracles happen."


Bergquist searches the past for clues to future


By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
Gilbert Bergquist is a man for all
seasons.
The tropical lushness surrounding
his home attests to Bergquist's skill as a
gardener.
His photographs show an eye for
capturing delicate moments.
Gib, as friends call him, enjoys
teaching his Anna Maria Island Little
League team some of the lessons of life
as well as how to hit a baseball or snag
a deep fly to centerfield.
Bergquist recalls his 24 years with
the Federal Bureau of Investigation and
remembers his boss, J. Edgar Hoover, as
"a tough nut who was married to the
FBI."
As vice-president of the Manatee
County Historical Commission, he fills
his Saturday mornings rebuilding the
past at the Manatee County Historical
Village off 15th Street East and Mana-
tee Avenue.
The commission's current project
revolves around renovating the old
Fogarty Boat Works originally built
along the Manatee River in the late
1800s by Bartholomew Fogarty.
Bergquist the philosopher said his
curiosity about the past provides him a
foundation for dealing with the present
and future.
"I think it's important to maintain a
sense of history to maintain stability in
my life," he said. "You have a much
more secure future if you can establish
your roots. For me, I can't go back home
because it isn't there."
The 69-year-old Florida native was
brought up in the small phosphate min-
ing town of Pierce in the central high-
lands. The Charlotte Harbor and North-
ern Railroad, also known as the Cold,
Hungry and Naked line to the poor
people who worked it, ran phosphate
from Polk County to Boca Grande for


For a decade Bergquist would work
bank robberies in Indianapolis, Cincin-


'I'm there to
teach them about
fair play and
respect for au-
thority, to take
responsibility for
your actions and
how to get along
with your team-
mates.'


nati and San
Francisco.
Then he was
assigned to
study the
Serbo-Croatian
language.
At the time
the U.S. was
engaged in the
Americanism
versus Com-
munism Cold


shipment worldwide.
Pierce fell victim to strip mining
draglines. Today it is little more than
deep scais in the countryside around
Mulberry.
But the memories of Pierce are
etched in Bergquist's mind and he re-
calls them as if they were yesterday.
"We were very proud of the town. It
was the closest thing to Utopia that I
have ever seen," Bergquist said. "Pierce
had a great impact on me and what I am
today. It was a model community and a
wonderful place to grow up."
Pierce was self-contained with
stores and a school and each family
owning a garden plot. The phosphate
company even minted its own money,
hexagonal-shaped coins made of bab-
bitt. The light-weight, tin-like money
was accepted at the company store and
later by shop owners in town.
There was no police in Pierce. The


community of 700 or so folks acted as
judge and jury if someone got out of
line.
"We had no crime," he said. "Any-
one who committed a crime was asked
to leave town. Towns like Pierce are all
gone now and I'm not surprised they're
gone. They'd mine out one place and
move on to the next. Just like in the Old
West and the silver and gold mining
towns."
Bergquist left Pierce to study at the
University of Florida. World War II
came along and he did a three-year hitch
in the United States Marine Corps be-
fore returning to college to earn a
master's degree in biology. But it was
the FBI, not science, where he would
make his mark.
"The FBI and the Marine Corps ap-
pealed to me because I like to walk on the
edge," he said. "You get more out of life
if you don't always take the easy path."


War and it was Bergquist's job to read
ethnic newspapers from mill towns
around the country in an effort "to see
what their line was."
Bergquist spent the rest of his 24-
year career breaking foreign messages
and deciphering intricate codes used by
bookies. Later he would act as FBI chief
Hoover's aide in translating his foreign
mail.
"The cryptanalysis division was like
a little United Nations," he said. "People
from all nationalities worked on code
breaking."
Now in retirement, Bergquist
spends his hours molding young minds
and recreating the past.
As a Little League coach, Bergquist
believes there are more important things
to the game than just the game.
"I'm not there to just teach them
baseball," he says. "I'm also there to
teach them about fair play and respect
for authority, to take responsibility for
your actions and how to get along with
your teammates.
"Life's a game but you have to play
by the rules. And baseball's a simple
game but a lot of things you learn in
baseball, you can use the rest of your
life. Somewhere along the line you have
to answer to somebody right up to God,
your father and your top sergeant."






i~ PAGE 14 M MAY 12, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


ZA i 111I= ( Z i


Volunteers wanted for
AMICC newsletter
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce is
looking for people with experience in publishing, com-
position, layout and computers to volunteer a few hours
a month to produce the Chamber's monthly newsletter.
Any individuals and/or businesses interested contact
Darcy at the Chamber, 778-1541.
More horseshoe winners
The team of Bubba Stewart of Anna Maria City
and Jack Krueger of Perico Bay were the winners of
last Saturday's horseshoe match.
Ruth Foehrkalb of Bradenton Beach and Don Bur-
ton of Cortez were runners-up.
The April 30 matches were won by Don Burton
and Chuck Hussey, both of Cortez.
Runners-up were George Landraitis and Jim
Spenser, both Anna Maria City residents.
Cruise to benefit bird
sanctuary, center
A two-hour benefit cruise on the "Bay Star" will
tour nesting pelicans and other seabirds on Monday,
May 23, 11 a.m., departing from Venice. Tour guide
will be Pelican Man Dale Shields. Venice-area restau-
rants will provide the food service.
Tickets cost $20 and are tax deductible. All pro-
ceeds go toward construction projects of the Pelican
Man's Bird Sanctuary and the Venice Nature Center in
Brohard Park, Venice.
ITPO seeks input on
'charrette'
The Citizens Advisory Committee of the Island
Transportation Planning Organization will meet on
Thursday, May 12,7 p.m., at the Bradenton Beach City
Hall. Public input on the Metropolitan Planning
Organization's planned "charrette" for a proposed third
mainland/Island bridge will be discussed.




S U FUNERAL HOMES
KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager
BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459


Don't miss out on
Centennial fun!
Look for a complete list
of events in this issue of
The Islander Bystander.


KOHLER.
Lavatories


Colorful and exciting, a Kohler
lavatory adds beauty and practicali-
ty to any bath or powder room.
Crafted from brilliant vitreous china.
or enameled cast iron in a full range
of Kohler colors. Accent with the
elegance of a Kohler faucet fbr a dis-
tinctive look for your home. A true
design statement by KOHLER
THE BOLD LOOK
OF KOHLER.
LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc.

778-5622 1.
5348 B Gulf Dr.
Holmes Beach
LIC. #RF0049191


we'll




o,




Fleas In your t
dog's hair? On
your Cat? On
your chair?
If these pesky
critters give you the jitters, we
can eliminate
them and their
future litters.
Our methods
are safe, our
rates are great
too.., so call
us and tell us
what's bugging.





Island t
PEST CONTROL, INC.
State Certified/Licened & Inmred. Emy
Keller, bland Refdcnt ii Owner Operator.
3010 Avunu C, Suite A.
Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Volunteers needed to
help find WWII vets
The Wall of Liberty National Grass Roots Cam-
paign, an organization dedicated to honoring
America's veterans of World War II, is celebrating the
50th anniversary of the liberation of Europe.
In an effort to place the names of ETO veterans on
the Wall of Liberty, the National Grass Roots Cam-
paign is offering a "How-to Kit" to anyone interested
in volunteering to help with the project.
For more information write to the Battle of
Normandy Foundation, P.O. Box 96491, Washington,
D.C., 20077-7152.


Prepare your business
for disaster
"Disaster Preparedness for Businesses" is a semi-
nar, sponsored by the Longboat Key Chamber of
Commerce's Small Business Council, to be presented
Tuesday, May 24, 8 to 9:30 a.m., at the Holiday Inn,
Longboat Key.
Specifically intended to address the needs of business
during a disaster, the Longboat Chamber seminar is free
for members of Chambers in Manatee and Sarasota.
Speakers are Jim Jackson, weatherman at WWSB-
TV Channel 40; Rod Macon, regional manager of
Florida Power & Light; and Pete Woodham, Florida
Chamber of Commerce Disaster Preparedness Task
Force chair.
Pre-registration is required. For more information
or to register call 383-2466.


Chamber meets May 18
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will hold a board of directors and officers meeting on
Wednesday, May 18, at 5:30 p.m. in the Holmes Beach
Chamber office. The meeting is open to members and
the public.

OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKEEPING 0
AND YEAR AROUND TAX SERVICE -
Individuals, Corporations, Partnerships & Estates
Our NEW office is located at: "
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
&&y o &morffld49, 778-6118
Ucensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.






RESIDENTIAL / COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CONDOS
REPAIRS SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
REMODELING WATER HEATERS
NEW CONSTRUCTION GARBAGE DISPOSALS
EMERGENCY SERVICE BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
FREE ESTIMATES LP TANKS FILLED
Visit Our Do-It-Yourself Plumbing Supply Store.
*We are DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce






BUY DIRECT FROM THE MANUFACTURER AND SAVE






Bahama Storm
Shutters Panels
.s 0,,I Factory
-- VTew -o 580315th St. E.
_-a ag. Accordion Shutters
SO Bradenton
STR ANELs AWNNs Island Resident 751-2929


ALS to present sea
turtle program
As part of an environmental lecture series, the Ameri-
can Littoral Society is presenting a free program on sea
turtles, Wednesday, May 25, 7 p.m., in the environmen-
tal library of the Gulf Gate Library, Curtiss Avenue,
Sarasota. The program will begin with a video on sea
turtles and follow with a discussion led by John McCarthy
of the Sarasota Department of Natural Resources.
For more information call 951-0884.
High Twelve to hold
programs
All Masons are invited to meet for luncheon pro-
grams on Thursdays, May 12 and May 19, noon, at Pete
Reynard's restaurant.
The luncheon on May 12 will feature Donna Har-
ris, from the Brain Gym book store, Holmes Beach,
speaking about her experiences teaching deaf students
in Indianapolis.
Masons and their wives are invited to the May
19th Ladies Day luncheon. The guest speaker is a
Panama Canal pilot.
Longboat Chamber to
hold reception
The Longboat Key Chamber of Commerce will
hold it's May Membership Reception on Wednesday,
May 18, at the Sarasota Convention and Visitor's Bu-
reau, 655 N. Tamiami Tr., Sarasota.
The reception is the chamber's monthly business
card exchange. Complimentary hors d'oeuvres, wine
and beer will be served. Cost is $5 for members and
$10 for non-members.
For reservations or information call 383-2466.

Libraries closed on
Memorial Day
The Manatee County Public Library System will be
closed Monday, May 30, in observance of Memorial Day.


Don't miss out on the Centennial fun!
Look for a complete list of events in this
issue of The Islander Bystander.


Your Local Agent
Serves You Best...
Progressive offers, preferred
rates for safe drivers. Stop in
or call us today.


778-2206


John P. Huth Insurance, INC.
"Your One Stop Insurance Agent"
5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL.


(yWm
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MAY 12, 1994 M PAGE 15 IB



Beach fishing for Silver Kings


By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
Casting bait to tarpon as they roll down the beach
foraging for food is a peaceful way to spend a morn-
ing.
It's peaceful, that is until a tarpon actually takes a
pin fish, crab or artificial fly at the end of your line.
If you're fortunate enough to hook into a silver
king, hold on and get out the camera because tarpon in
shallow water off the beach go crazy and often make
a half dozen or more acrobatic leaps.
"The first 20 minutes is fun when they are jump-
ing," said area guide Capt. Rick Gross of the Fishy
Business. "With tarpon it's not how many fish you
catch, it's how many you jump. The fun is in the jump-
ing."
Tarpon (Megalops atlanticus), silver king or sabalo
in Spanish whatever he's called, the tarpon is re-
garded as one of the great game fishes.
The tarpon is found on both sides of the tropical
and sub-tropical Atlantic Ocean in brackish water bay-
ous, estuaries, coastal lagoons and even in freshwater.
Because tarpon have an air bladder allowing it to ab-
sorb extra oxygen, they have the ability to move from
saltwater tofresh and back again with no mortality rate
quite a feat for any aquatic organism.
A large, herring-like fish, the tarpon can reach a
weight of 300 pounds. Most of those caught along the
Gulf Coast weigh from 50 to 150 pounds. The Florida
record is 243 pounds caught near Key West by Gus
Bell on 20-pound test line.
The world record for more than three decades was
a 283-pound monster taken in Lake Maracaibo, Ven-
ezuela. However, a 303-pound tarpon caught off
Gabon, Africa last year is being considered by the In-
ternational Game Fish Association as the new record.
Tarpon are considered a prehistoric animal esti-
mated to have been around for 60 million years.
Comparatively little is known of the life history,
but spawning is presumed to take place from May
through September near Boca Grande Pass where up-
wards of a 100,000 of the animals congregate each
summer. A large female can carry as many as 10 mil-
lion eggs.
Although Boca Grande is famous for numbers -
sometimes as many as 200 boats congregate in the half-
mile wide pass the sandbars off Anna Maria Island
have a long history of beach tarpon fishing as well.
In the 1940s, fishing guides broke from traditional
pass fishing techniques and began stalking tarpon off
Passage Key and the sandbar off Bean Point.
King of the beach fishermen was a guide named
Bobby Buswell, according to Capt. Scott Moore.
Buswell still guides his boat Lil' Tiger but now fishes
from Manasota Key to Sanibel Island.
"I've seen him throw five baits at a time to a roll-
ing school and have five fish on at one time," Moore


... and a Rod and Reel fish, too
The late Frank Cavendish, at left, is pictured with a
185-pound tarpon caught in 1975.


Bean Point tarpon
Capt. Bobby Buswell, Jean McClanathan and Nancy Huss show off a 50-pound tarpon, caught off Bean Point
in 1963.


said. "But I'll tell you, when things are right, you can
throw any bait at them and they'll bite. If they're hun-
gry enough, you can even throw dead cut bait I like to
top-water fish for them because they come out of the
water immediately."
One of Anna Maria's greatest tarpon anglers is


Nancy Huss. She has landed hundreds
of silver kings in her life, the biggest
a 155-pound monster. No longer ac-
tive, Huss recalls fishing with
Buswell and other captains such as
Buster Herzog, Joe Dvorcak and
Sonny Aylesworth.
Despite living in St. Petersburg at
the time, Huss said she and Buswell
and the other guides preferred fishing
off Bean Point
"Bobby and I used to watch them
come across that bar at Bean Point
because the water was so clear. I re-


ally loved tarpon fishing. I was addicted to it. It took
me a long time to get over that addiction.
"There's an art to it. It's really hard work and you
can't expect to just go out and catch one. You need to
hire a guide."
Gross on the Fishy Business starts beach fishing for
tarpon June 1. But the tarpon run typically begins in
May with the fish thinning out in mid-July.
"I try to go after whatever is doing it at the time I
don't try to force it," he said. "What I usually do is go
out at 6 or 7 a.m. and try to catch a couple of tarpon but
if they aren't around I come back inside and look for
reds."
Tarpon aren't picky eaters, going after just about
anything pinfish, shiners, crabs large shrimp.
According to Gross, here's how beach fishing
works
Look for the schools and get ahead of them in po-
sition to cast. Be as quiet as possible, tarpon are easily
spooked.
If you see another boat stalking a school, proper
etiquette demands you find another school to work.
Never go between a boat on the hunt and the school
being hunted. You most certainly will scare them off
and likely will get some unkind words of advice about
your heritage.
Gross said when he uses pinfish, he also uses a


Mustad 4/0 short shank hook. Mustad hooks are excel-
lent for catch and release because the hook rusts out of
the fish's mouth.
"I file down the point where it's a razor," Gross
said. "I use 100-pound test monofilament for a leader
about 6 or 8 feet long. It's necessary to make it long


because a tail can cut through your
line. I generally go for 20 or 25-
pound test line. You use a cork to
keep the bait floating. I tie an over-
hand knot about 18 inches below the
swivel and that keeps the float from
dropping to the hook."
A tower is a big plus because
you can spot the tarpon from a dis-
tance and it allows the captain to cast
the bait to the fish.
"Tarpon fishing is not for
amateurs," Gross said. "I had a fish-
erman last year who would rest when


the tarpon rested and I had to keep telling him to pump
the fish."
Resting when the tarpon rests could lead to a fight
of an hour or more and a sore back in the morning,
Gross said.
Because tarpon have bloody flesh and absolutely
no food value, there is no reason to kill one.
"I don't kill any tarpon caught on my boat whether
someone wants to mount it or not," Gross said. "You
don't need to kill them. All yoi have to do is tell the
taxidermist how big it is and they can reproduce it"



The Island Poet
I've fished a lot, both man and boy,
It somehow seemed my greatest joy.
With a pole in my hand and waves lapping
the boat,
What a joy it was to be out there afloat.
And I caught them all, it was such a lark,
From the tiny pin fish to the great big shark.
But as I've grown older, I have only one
wish,
To let the waitress just bring me the fish.
Bud Atteridge


'You don't need to
kill them. All you
have to do is tell the

taxidermist how big

it is and they can

reproduce it.'






iM PAGE 16 0 MAY 12, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
In case you haven't noticed the flyers posted in just
about every storefront on the Island or read this news-
paper lately, the Island is gearing up for three days of
Anna Maria Island Centennial Celebration, May 20,
21 and 22.
On Friday, May 20, a street dance is "happening" in
the parking lot of the Island Shopping Center in Holmes
Beach. Entertainment, sponsored by this newspaper, in-
cludes The Hammerheads and opening the show, former
member of the DTs, Dean Cruse on acoustic guitar. The
official grand opening for the centennial is scheduled for
8 p.m., and other fun events will be interspersed through-
out the evening, including an auction and prize raffle, the
beard contest and lots more. An open house at The Is-
lander Bystander will be held throughout the event.
"Please do drop in. We'd love to meet you."
The Grand Parade, Saturday, May 21, is spon-
sored by the Anna Maria Privateers. It leaves Coquina
Beach at 10 a.m. and ends at Anna Maria Bayfront Park
where a huge family picnic begins at.11 a.m.
Flavors of the Island, held at the Community
Center on Saturday, May 21, 6 to 10 p.m., is a tasting
feast of Island restaurants including the Anchorage,
Chez Andre, Gulf Drive Cafe, Rotten Ralph's, Sand-
bar, Beach House, Ato's, Shells, BridgeTender Inn,
Vienna Castle, Rod and Reel Pier, Sign of the Mer-
maid, the Crown & Thistle British Pub, Joe's Eats and
Sweets and Domino's Pizza.
"Educating Rita" starts Thursday and continues
through May 22 (with one 2 p.m. matinee May 15) at
Island Players, Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue, Anna
Maria. Tickets are $9. Call 778-5755.



joe's Eats & Sweet

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays
219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge


Tia Lena's is making some changes in their wine
list. In order to make room for new vintages, they are
clearing out some of their inventory of wines and
champagnes. This is a good opportunity to enjoy some
good wine at great prices. They are closing Mondays
through the summer.
The Mutiny Inn has entertainer Berni Roy on elec-
tric piano, singing quiet background dining-type mu-
sic. She occasionally takes requests.
Cafe on the Beach, the restaurant at the Manatee
Public Beach, offers daily specials for lunch and dinner.
And they recently finished remodeling their beach shop.
With about twice as much space as before and lots more
items to choose from, they are getting rave reviews from
shoppers as well as diners. You might want to check it out
It's way more than a souvenir shop.
At Turtles Bar & Grill the Hammerheads play
Thursday through Saturday. Wednesday are Reggae
nights: May 18 is Jam-iya. Turtles will also close on
Monday nights through the summer.
AMIArt? (the new gorilla Island art anti-group)
will have their second showing on Saturday, 10 am. to
2 p.m, in the parking lot at the First Union Bank. The
cluster of artists, some 25 strong, will be doing a rather
large painting project. Live music by Colgie.
Have your heard about Ray's gourmet pizzas at
Euphemia Haye, on Longboat Key? These are hand-
rolled eight-inch pizzas for about $7, with gourmet
toppings such as gorgonzola, walnuts and rosemary or
pesto and pine nuts. In the Haye Loft, the upstairs
lounge and dessert room, they offer is jazzy entertain-
ment nightly.
The Longboat Key Small Business people of the
year were named last week by the Longboat Key
Chamber of Commerce. Ethna and Christine Lynch of
Lynches Landing were honored for longevity and
civic activity.
Rumor has it that the recently closed Shenkel's has
already attracted an interested Sarasota restaurant



FINE MEXICAN CUISINE
Q C Now until May 31 Celebrate Cinco De Mayo!
SoCo EVERY NIGHT 6-9 PM
with Poco Loco Dinner Entree
Mon. & Wed. Tu. Thurs. Fri. & Sat.
] Local Beer All Wine Sangrias Mexican Beer
S $1.00 $1.00 $1.50 $1.50
Deck Overlooking Bayou
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY11-9
387-0161 CLOSED SUNDAYS
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owner, Coasters, who will lease the Longboat Key res-
taurant and give it a new name.
The Mar Vista Dockside Restaurant & Pub has
a popular Caribbean barbecue on Sundays. Now they
do Italian specialties on Wednesday nights. Any night
they do a mean char-grilled grouper sandwich.
The Old Salty Dog on City Island (over the bridge
at the south end of Longboat, sharp left) just started
having live entertainment. Dem Tings is a Reggae band
with new member Greg Poulous (guitarist from the
Poulous Ramsey Band) playing for the "Dog's After
the Beach Barbecue Party" on Sunday afternoons.
* *
"I would like the recipe from the Anchorage on the
Anna Maria City Pier for breaded shrimp and clam
chowder. "
(No signature, but the letter is from Flint, Mich.)
John Home, manager of both the Anchorage res-
taurant and the Anchorage Oyster Bar on the Anna
Maria City Pier, was happy to share Chef Mike Dallis'
recipe for battered shrimp. The clam chowder, how-
ever, is one of those secrets that they just don't share.

'Battered Shrimp'
For approximately 5 doz shrimp
Batter:
2 doz. eggs
1 qt. milk
1/2 cup beer

Seasoned Flour:
flour
salt
white pep er
garlic, granulated

Roll the shrimp in the seasoned flour. Dip into the
batter. Shake in sieve or colander. Roll the shrimp in
flour a second time and deep fry in 375-degree oil.


1/2 mile
* North of City Pier *
"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida "TM
ISLAND
COOKING
REASONABLE
PRICES
778-1885
875 NORTH SHORE DR.
ANNA MARIA


StO ,ID4EL


"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
k Open Daily *
8 am. to Closing
Same Menu and
Prices as Below
but with
Restaurant Seating
Full Breakfast *
r Lunch & Dinner *
Draft Beer Wine
Car Parking
ALSO
50 Guarded Bike Holders!
r Please come by bike r
i


ISLAND

SEAFOODl 0)

SPEC LIAU IEIS

Fresh Live Maine Lobster & New England Fish
directly from Kittery Pt., Maine to you!
Stop In to See Us for the Freshest Fish Available i
Special Prices on Whole Fish ,.
Also Available Smoked Fish -y_
Open 10 to 6 Monday thru Saturday
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333








Good work
These are the "Students of
the Week" at Anna Maria
Elementary School for the
week ending April 29.
Kneeling, left to right, are
Doug Swanson, David
Branning, Bryan Greene
and Peter Fellows.
Middle row, left to right,
are Ginny Mazza, Sarah
McLaughlin and Crystal
Michael Back row, left to
right, are Kyle Bachman,
Michael Pocino, Jesse
Ferguson, Michael Knott,
Carly Castoro and Nicole
Murray.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER W MAY 12, 1994 A PAGE 17 IMG

I: Anna Maria School


Book war
Toni Lashway's
third-grade class
recently fought the
"Battle of the
Books." "Bdttle of
the Books" is a
reading incentive
program used in
Alaska thatfound its
way to Anna Maria
Elementary through
parent and volunteer
Sandy Lyndahl. The
children read five
assigned books,
divided into five
teams, and answered
questions about the
stories, finishing
each answer with the
name of the book and
its author. This is one
war which every-
body won.


menu
Monday, 5/16/94
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit
S Lunch: Ham Patty w/Cheese on Bun or
C Chicken Nuggets, Potato Rounds, Lettuce &
Tomato, Fruit Juice
Tuesday, 5/17/94
S Breakfast: French Toast w/Syrup or Cereal,
Juice
Lunch: Beef-A-Roni or Cheese Pizza, Carrot
S& Celery Sticks w/Low Fat Dip, Pears, Cake
Wednesday, 5/18/94
S Breakfast: Hot Cheese Pocket or Cereal,
C Juice
Lunch: Hot Dog on Bun, Chicken Wings,
S Strawberries & Bananas, Pudding, Cookies
Thursday, 5/19/94
SBreakfast: Hot Sausage Roll or Cereal, Juice
SLunch: Hamburger Gravy, Mashed Potatoes
. or Mini-Chef Salad, Mixed Vegetables, Hot
Roll, Fruit Cup
Friday, 5/20/94
. Breakfast: Bagel & Jelly or Cereal, Juice
S Lunch: Pizza or Nachos & Cheese, Corn,
Pineapple, Jello
All meals served with milk
0 0 0 0 0 a 0 a a 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0o 0 o0oa a 0aaa


Joy Courtney
Joy Courtney


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Before 6 P.M. After 6 P.M. REG. PRICE
These entries and 6 other delicious entries
available at BUY ONE GET 2nd AT 1/2 Price
You don't even need a coupon...
WE MUST BE NUTS


ANCHORAGE
OYSTER BAR
on Historic City Pier
Join us for lunch,
watch the porpoises
play while enjoying
the Island's best,
freshest grouper
sandwich.
Dine
inside
or
outside.


LIVE ENTERTAINMENT JOIN USI
Tuesday SWING BAND Fridays & Saturdays Dance Band
Monday & Thursdays Dixieland "Sons of the Beach"
Sunday & Wednesdays Brian Beebe
Happy Hour Daily 4 to 6 p.m. $1.25 House Brands $1 Draft Beer
101 S. BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA 778-9611 *.* Oyster Bar on Anna Maria Pier 778-0475


"If you haven't tried it yet, you're
in for a very pleasant surprise."

CAFE ON THE BEACH


"Put your toes in the
sand and then enjoy dining
.'. ~, on our casual outside patio."
....S"; b P.S. We have the very best sunsets.


Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Great Lunches & Dinner Specials Nightly
OPEN 6 AM 7 DAYS A WEEK 778-0784
Casual Inside Dining Room or Outside Patio Dining Plenty of Parking
Live Entertainment (Weather Permitting)
On Beautiful Manatee Beach where Manatee Ave. ends and the Gulf begins!




RESTAURANT
SCocktail [otuz e
778-9566
5325 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach


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Served 10 to featuring 25 breakfast and lunch items to choose from
FULL MENU STILL AVAILABLE NIGHTLY -
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Chuck Senrick at the Piano Bar Daily
Sons of the Beaches Dixieland Band
Sunday, Wednesday & Friday 5:30 to 8:30 PM
BANQUET SPACE AVAILABLE'FOR MEETINGS CELEBRATIONS RECEPTIONS


7 Z


~r. tP~






OIM PAGE 18 E MAY 12, 1994 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
May 1, trespass, 100 block of Beach Avenue.
Four subjects were issued trespass warnings.
May 3, civil dispute, 200 block of Coconut. The
complainant reported that the subject trespassed on his
property.
Bradenton Beach
April 28, grand theft, 2601 Gulf Dr. N., Sandpiper
Mobile Home park. The complainant reported that a
person unknown removed a trolling motor valued at
$130, an outboard motor valued at $750, a tackle box
valued at $350 and an anchor and line valued at $150.
April 30, warrant arrest, Cortez Beach.
May 2, information, 2300 block of Avenue B.
The complainant reported that a person unknown used
a tennis ball to prop open her bathroom window.
May 3, information, 30 block of Gulf Drive
North. The officer responded to a report of a large
amount of personal belongings sitting by the road and
found a subject loading the items into a vehicle. Ac-
cording to the report, the subject said the items were not
his and the officer had him return them. A neighbor
said the items belonged to a tenant who had been
evicted.
May 3, burglary to an automobile, 200 block of


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Bay Drive South. The complainant reported that a
friend told her someone was in her vehicle and she
looked outside and saw the subject going through her
vehicle. She yelled at the subject, who walked to the
end of the driveway and stood there as police arrived.
The subject was placed in custody.
May 4, trespass warning, 200 Bridge St,Pier res-
taurant. The complainant reported that her boyfriend
came to her place of employment and became verbally
abusive. He was issued a trespass warning.
May 5, information, 200 block of SR 789. The
officer reported that after stopping the subject for a traf-
fic violation, the subject put his vehicle in reverse in-
stead of park and hit the patrol vehicle. Holmes Beach
responded to take the report. The officer noted that the
subject had been drinking, spoke very little English and
had a driver's license from Liechtenstein, which was
difficult to read. The officer parked the vehicle and
called a cab to take the subject to his motel.
Holmes Beach
April 29, burglary to an automobile, 6006 Gulf
Dr., Playa Encantada. A person unknown cut a rear
window and removed a golf bag valued at $300.
April 30, lost and found property, 5400 block of
Marina Drive. The complainant reported that he drove
off with a large, blue, zippered pouch on top of his car.
The pouch fell off the car between Pete Reynard's res-
taurant and the Rod and Reel Pier. On May 2, the pouch
was returned to the complainant by an employee of

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April 30, DUI, 3400 block of East Bay Drive. The
officer stopped Sharon Speicher, 33, of Holmes Beach
for unlawful speed and asked her to perform field so-
briety tests.
May 1, trespass, 3800 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported that subjects were playing volley-
ball on the beach and trespassed on her property to re-
trieve the ball. The subjects were gone upon the
officer's arrival.
May 1, animal, 300 block of 61st Street. The of-
.ficer responding to a report of a found dog took custody
of a male basset hound with a red scarf collar and out-
of-state tags. An animal control officer took the dog to
the animal shelter.
May 2, burglary, 3705 East Bay Dr., Sunbow
Bay. The officer on patrol observed a work truck and
a red pick-up truck with a hose sticking out of both gas
tanks and a subject hunched down in the passenger seat
of the pick-up truck. The subject gave the officer sev-
eral stories concerning the situation. The officer asked
the subject if he had siphoned diesel fuel and he Said
he didn't but his friend might have done so.
The officer located an Igloo cooler on the ground
in front of the pick-up truck half full of diesel fuel and
observed that the fuel tank on the work truck was
empty and the furl tank of the pick-up truck was full.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 M PAGE 19 Irm


I STREETLIU


The subject was placed in custody and charged with
prowling.
The officer contacted the owner of the work truck
who advised him that the fuel tank had been full. The
owner also advised the officer that there was a tool belt
and tools in the cab of the work truck. The officer lo-
cated these items on the floorboard of the subject's
pick-up truck.
The next day, the officer spoke to the subject who
advised him that the owner of the pick-up truck had
fled as the officer approached the truck the night be-
fore. The subject was charged with burglary.
Also the next day, the owner of the pick-up truck
was summoned to the police department. The owner
said that he took the fuel but the other subject removed
the tools, according to the report. He was also placed
in custody.
May 2, grand larceny, 501 Marina Dr., Captain's
Marina. The complainant reported that a person un-
known removed the lower drive unit from her boat. It
was valued at $7,000.
May 3, DUI, 5300 block of Marina Drive. The
officer responded in reference to a vehicle accident.
The driver of the vehicle at fault, Richard Hennessey,
73, of Holmes Beach, was placed in custody, said the
report.
May 3, drunk, 3900 block of East Bay Drive. The
officer found the subject passed out by the side of the
road. The subject was intoxicated, did not know where
he was or where he was staying. He was taken into
custody under the Marchman Act.
May 3, DWLS, 3900 East Bay Drive.
May 3, suspicious persons, 6300 Marina Dr.,
Christ the Scientist Church. The complainant reported
two juveniles climbing on the roof of the church. The


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officer told the juveniles not to do so and reported the
incident to their parents.
May 4, grand larceny of a mountain bike, 100
block of 74th Street
May 4, suspicious persons, 105 White Avenue,
Lay By. The complainant reported minor problems
with young adults hanging around the resort, doing
minor larcenies and trespassing.
May 4, domestic, 100 block of 4th Avenue. The
complainant reported that her brother was intoxicated
and causing a disturbance. The officer advised the
brother to stay at motel for the night.
May 5, burglary to an automobile, 5325 Marina
Dr., Pete Reynard's restaurant. The complainant re-
ported that a person unknown broke into. her vehicle
and removed a pair of Oakley sunglasses valued at
$100.
May 5, drugs, 3600 block of East Bay Drive. The
officer on patrol observed a parked pick-up truck with
a female subject in the passenger seat and a strong odor
of marijuana coming from the area. According to the
report, he approached and observed the female subject,
Marcia Dresser, 21, of Bradenton, place an object in the
glove box. The officer asked Dresser to exit the vehicle,
opened the glove box., and located a plastic bag of
marijuana. As the officer placed Dresser in the patrol
car, a male subject ran out and asked what he was do-
ing. After learning the male subject, Michael Dille, 23,
of Bradenton, was the vehicle's owner, the officer ad-
vised him of his rights.
The officer reported that Dille told him the mari-
juana was his and as the officer was placing him in
custody, he said, "You might as well have this." Dille
then reached into his pants pocket and handed the of-
ficer a partially rolled marijuana cigarette from a ciga-
rette box.
May 5, vandalism, 5300 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported that a person unknown threw a beer
bottle at her back porch window causing $60 damage.


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Convenient Docking come by land or by sea (Marker 49)
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WW II medics to hold

reunion May 12-14
The 347th Station Hospital, stationed in England
during World War II, will hold their 14th Annual
Reunion at the Holiday Inn, Lido Beach, May 12-14.
Mike and Betty Finelli of Bradenton Beach will host
the 50th Anniversary
for these veterans of
D-Day, June 6, 1944.
A special reunion
guest will be Chief
Nurse Margaret
Kritemeyer.
The emergency
medical team of 42
doctors, 75 nurses
and 260 enlisted
men cared for as
many as 700 to 800
casualties a day.
"I was the regis-
tered pharmacist," Finelli
says Mike Finelli,
"and I had three other technicians to assist me in
preparing medication. Shortly after D-Day, we
were at our peak in receiving casualties by air. We
were the first hospital to receive patients which
were then evacuated by trains to other hospitals in
the United Kingdom.
"During these busy days and hours," Finelli says,
"It was not uncommon to see as many as 30 or more
ambulances lined up in front of the receiving office."
In 11 months, between June 6, 1944 D-Day
and VE-Day, May 8, 1945, the 347th Station Hos-
pital staff had received more than 74,000 battle
casualties.



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Ml PAGE 20 n MAY 12, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

All Longboat's fault except for maybe the Skyway


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
SEAWORTHY, the BOAT/U.S. Marine Insurance
and Damage Avoidance Report, blames the Longboat
Key beach renourishment program last summer for "a
hazardous condition at Big Sarasota Pass.
"Much of the dredged sand has been eroded by
winter storms and is believed to be the source of sand
filling the passes to the south," the magazine reports in
last month's issue.
Citing severe damage to a 33-foot sailboat well
within the markers but hitting bottom hard in a follow-
ing sea, the magazine said it was also alerting "readers
of the possibility of serious injury if a power boat hits
at high speed."
I called Aids to Navigation Officer Bill Andres at
U.S. Coast Guard/St. Petersburg and was told two Big
Pass markers were moved south within the past month
and two temporary buoys were installed to help outline
the existing channel.
If you have problems with the newly marked chan-
nel, or any local pass for that matter, just remember to
bear south (that's almost always where the water is in
local passes.) Coast Guard/Cortez would like to hear
about it, too. They can be reached at 794-1607.
Speaking of BOAT/U.S., it has a new 900 num-
ber now called "Weather Watch" providing NOAA
marine weather reports for any U.S. boating area. If
you've got a touchtone phone cellulars work fine, too),
Weather Watch can connect you with your choice of 70
different area National Weather Service stations offer-
ing marine weather.
The cost is 98-cents a minute when charges are
billed directly to a home or office touchtone phone, 85-
cents if a prepaid access account is used. An access
account is needed if you're using a cell phone. Calls
average three minutes, according to BOAT/U.S.
To use Weather Watch and have it billed to your
home or office, call 1-900-933-2628. For information
or to open a prepaid account, call 1-703-461-2864.

Play co-ed volleyball at AMICC
Recreational co-ed volleyball is held every Tues-
day, 8 to 10 p.m., at the Anna Maria Island Community
Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Men and
women are. welcome. Cost is $1 for members, $2 for
non-members.
For more information call 778-1908.


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ALL BAIT, TACKLE & EQUIPMENT INCLUDED
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Anna Maria Island


Gov. Lawton Chiles used an appearance at the
Sarasota Bay Program offices last week to sign a
law establishing a uniform statewide definition of
wetlands. As you might expect, the law has plenty of
detractors, including the Florida Wildlife Federation
which is concerned about 126 large project exemptions.
Standing in front of the Bay Program's BayWalk
reclaimed wetlands project, Chiles made law a measure
the Federation also says "probably" deserved a veto.
But all in all, finally achieving a clear working defini-
tion of a wetland has to be a positive thing.
Remember that stormy Friday morning 14 years
ago this week? Remember what you were doing when
somebody said, "The Skyway's fallen and a Grey-
hound bus is in the water."
It was May 9, 1980.
By the time it was over, more than 30 people were
dead, and there were tales of incredible horror, courage,
and wonder. Remember the pickup truck driving off the
end of the bridge and landing on the deck of the ship
below and the driver surviving?
I was standing in the New Wing Gallery at the
Ringling Museum waiting for a camera crew from a
Tampa television station to arrive when I heard the
news. They never showed up. Crossing the bridge just
minutes before the crash, they heard a bulletin on the
radio and promptly turned around to cover the story.
Here's a reminder.
On May 18, "The Image and Voice of Cortez Fish-
ing Folk," a slide/lecture program of the folk traditions
of Cortez, will be presented at the South Florida Mu-
seum in Bradenton. Developed by Michael Jepson, the
project is sponsored in part by the Vanishing Cultures
project of the Florida Humanities Council.
Jepson is a doctoral candidate at the University of
Florida who has spent years poking around Cortez and
a fascinating guy I've been lucky enough to talk with
a few times.
I promise you this will not be like too many of
those boring humanities programs. First off, if you get
there well before the starting time of 7:30 p.m., light
refreshments will be served. That means you'll have a
chance to sample Mrs. Fulford's famous mullet spread
simply the very best there is.
There's no charge for the program through the help
of the Florida Institute of Saltwater Heritage, and the
Museum is located at 201 10th St. W. in Bradenton.
For more information, just call 746-4132.

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Just visiting our Island paradise? Don't forget a subscription to the "best news on Anna
Maria Island, The Islander Bystander."A subscription form appears on page 7, this issue.


Having grown up in a time and place where
poaching deer was a locally accepted way to feed the
family (the 1940s on a Winnebago reservation in
Wisconsin), I'm even more shocked by what's hap-
pening in Florida today. Poaching, of just about ev-
erything it seems.
Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission
officers recently caught four guys in an airboat on the
Peace River gigging snook. They had 44 filets in the
boat, and I hope they hang 'em high.
As an amateur orchid grower and sometimes
Everglades hiker, I wasn't very surprised to finally
hear one of my worst fears confirmed. Creeps posing
as honest orchid dealers are hiring Seminoles to hike
back into Fakahatchee Strand and other areas of south
Florida to poach orchids.
Not the most sophisticated folks in the world, these
Seminoles see no harm in collecting plants for money,
and now they're getting nailed by rangers such as those
at Fakahatchee, 30 miles east of Naples. In the latest
case, the poachers were caught with 136 rare native
orchids, some worth up to $100 apiece retail.
Here's hoping they catch the guy who hired the
Seminoles.
Poaching is an old story in Sarasota County too,
both out on the water and inland, where poaching deer
goes on all the time but nobody is feeding their family
anymore, and there's no excuse anymore, either.
Don Smith and Jayne Fenner, both with strong
Sarasota ties, have been named members of the 1994 U.S.
Sailing Team as Mistral sailors. Based on their standings
in a series of five Olympic regattas this past year, the two
are America's standing Mistral class representatives.
The lightweight Mistal sailboards are the desig-
nated designs for the 1996 Olympics and Smith, for
example, has won five of his seven championships at
The Nationals in San Francisco on that board.
Fenner, on the other hand, recently left Sarasota-
partially in hopes of finding financial support for her
campaign to represent U.S. on the '96 team.
Ron the Baitman at the New Pass Bait Shop
called me over last week to say "There's this five-foot
barracuda under my dock, and its been there all week."
"Got any ideas about what to do with it?"
"Hey, sell tickets to the tourists for a look at it," I
suggested, and Ron, he just smiled. Then he went over
and strung a line across the foot of the dock.
See you next week.

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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 M PAGE 21 IB

Snook still plentiful, as are catch-and-release reds


By Capt Mike Heistand
With just a few more weeks of snook fishing, most
of the backwater action is centering around linesiders.
The snook season is in full bloom, and snook are both
plentiful and big. Offshore, kingfish catches are wan-
ing, but the fast fish are still to be found for the dedi-
cated stalkers about seven miles from shore.
Brian at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the
four-hour trip is averaging 80 to 100 head of Key West
grunts, sand perch, porgies, trigger fish and a few lane
snapper. The six-hour trip is averaging 100 to 150 head
of vermillion snapper, Key West grunts, lane snapper,
porgies and trigger fish. The nine-hour trip is averag-
ing 40 to 60 head of mangrove snapper, yellowtail
snapper, lane snapper, red and black grouper. And once
a month they do a really long 12-hour trip. This time,
fishers came back with 40 head of big red and black
grouper, red snapper and mangrove snapper.
Arkee at the Bradenton Beach Pier said Tony
Kimon caught a 17-inch flounder and a big 15-inch
whiting while fishing there last week. Bob Dare caught
a rare 20-inch grouper in the bay and a four-foot nurse
shark. Arkee advises the fishing is great in the eve-
nings, with 32-inch catch-and-release reds.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said his
customers are still doing well with snook in the Bay.
Carl said cobia are still around, with one fisher land-
ing a 36-pounder.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said fishers have
been catching mackerel, pompano, blue runners, a
couple of reds and some snook caught at night.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishing has
been great, with a lot of glass minnows circling the pier
and serving as natural chum. Fishermen are catching a
lot of catch-and-release redfish, as well as mackerel
and a few snook.
Chris at the Galati Yacht Basin said black grou-
per are thick in about 120 feet of water in the Gulf,
about 32 miles from Anna Maria Island. He said there
are still a few kings out in the seven-mile zone, and in
the backwater his best bet for the week is snook.
On my boat Magic, charters have been doing well
with catch-and-release reds, with as many as 30 caught
on some trips. We've also caught a few keeper snook
'-,. and lots of good-sized mangrove snapper.
'--Capt. Rick Gross said his clients have come back
to the dock-with a lot of snook, one stretching to 38
inches in length..
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's been doing a lot of
snook fishing before the season closes at the end of the
month.
Capt. Phil Shields said his customers are still

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GALATI
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catching black fin tuna and a few kingfish. Bottom fish-
ing offshore is still coming on strong with grouper.
Rick at Island Discount Tackle said he's heard
lots of reports of kingfish at the seven-mile range off-
shore. Backwater fishermen are doing will with snook
and reds, and Rick reminds us all that redfish are still
out of season until June 1.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he's been doing well
with kings offshore. He's also caught some huge red-
fish some up to 15 pounds which were great fun



When we owned Haley's Motel 20 years ago,
a retired couple from St. Petersburg stayed over
night so that the husband could go deep sea fish-
ing early the next morning.
The gentleman got up early the next day and
left on the fishing trip. Later that day, his wife
came into the office saying she was certain her
husband would be so tired when he returned that
they would just stay another night and return to St.
Pete the following day.
When her husband returned, he had had excep-
tionally good luck, catching several fish in the six-
to eight-pound variety. One was about four feet
long and probably weighed around 25 pounds. The
man was exhausted and said he wished they could
stay and go home the next morning, but he had to
get home and clean the fish and get them on ice.
We came up with a quick solution. We had an
empty unit, so we took all of the shelves out of the
refrigerator, turned it up on high and put the fish
in there where they would keep overnight.
Of course, the big one, we had to stand on end.
Luckily, we went back into that unit about an
hour later to check on the refrigerator.
The big fish had fallen over, knocked the door
open and was lying out in the middle of the floor. We
picked it up, put it back in the refrigerator, closed the
door and propped a chair against the door.
I have always said, "Whenever you have to
prop a chair against the refrigerator door to keep
the fish in Man, that is some big fish."
Bob Armstrong, Holmes Beach

Got a good Fish Tale to tell?,
Drop us a note explaining your biggest or best
fish story!
The Islander Bystander, 5408 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.


SUN GLASSESr
SUN GLASSES


OPEN AND COVERED BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE!
... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN DAYS AWEEK8 TO5
( 7 -90 S. AYB LVDANNA MAR


to play on a fly rod.
Capt. Todd Romine has been successfully target-
ing snook and will continue to do so for the rest of the
month. He's said he's gotten some fantastic catches of
linesiders.
Capt. Don Kyser said he's been able to get his
clients onto some whopper black fin tuna, some up to
30 pounds. While offshore, he's been able to land some
excellent snapper and grouper.
Good luck and good fishing.


AMICC Little

League

League standings
(second half of season)
for the week ending May 6


"Major League"
AMFD
Haley's Motel
D.Coy Ducks
Westbay AC
Kiwanis


"Minor League"
Betsy Hills
'Uncle Dan's Place
Island Discount Tackle
Quality Builders
Bali Hai
Tip of the Island


Major League player stats
top 6 players
Name (Team) G AB H RBI
Greg LaPensee (WAC) 15 43 23 30
Robbie Douglas (Ducks) -13 36 18 16
Scot Atkinson (Haley's) 15 34 17 30
Jacob Becker (AMFD) 16 35 17 22
Rickie Buckelew (Haleys) 15 43 20 17
Paul Feeney (AMFD) 16 51 23 28


BA
.535
.500
.500
.485
.465
.450


Last week's highlights
Jacob Becker of AMFD hit his third home run of
the year, a grand slam, against Kiwanis.
Westbay broke Haley's long winning streak with
an 8 to 7 victory.


SALES & SE1KVIEU 2
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'



BOAT GROUP QUALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD
-OA GROU
/ ( t


Starting at $6439.


Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'

Starting at $325.


Five O'Clock Marine
5 "Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577

ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES I


DAY
Thu 5/12
Fr 5/13
Sat 5/14
Sun 5/15
Mon 5/16
Tue 5/17
Wed 5/18


AMHIGH
2:49 1.3ft
3:34 1.3ft
4:26 1.3ft
5:26 1.3ft
6:34 1.4ft
7:17 1.5ft
7:58 1.6ft


AMLOW
5:44 1.1ft
6:09 1.1ft
6:44 1.2ft
7:38 1.2ft
8:44 1.3ft
10:33 1.3ft
12:17 0.2ft


PMHIGH
12:50 2.4ft
1:24 2.5ft
2:06 2.4ft
2:52 2.3ft
3:47 2.2ft
4:56 2.0ft
6:22 1.8ft


PMLOW
8:13 -0.2ft
8:56 -0.1ft
9:42 -0.1ft
10:31 -0.1ft
11:24 0.0ft

12:28 1.2ft


* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later Low Tides 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
" Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


*



Fish Tales
Welcome!
Got a great catch?
We'd love to hear
your fish stories,
and pictures are
welcome! Just give
us a call at
778-7978 or stop
by our office in
the Island
Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach.


I







1I[f PAGE 22 0 MAY 12, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


CITY

Anna Maria




Bradenton Beach




Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot

309 Pine Av
52x145-ROR

514 South Dr
57x101x80x110-canal
1407 Gulf Dr S
105 Coquina Moorings
2305 Gulf Dr
50x100
607 Dundee
90x155-canal
6200 Flotilla
265 Westbay P & M
6500 Flotilla
122 Westbay P & M
8017 Marina Dr
irregular-canal


STYLE/rooms

ground home
2/1/lcar/loffice

residential lot

elevated condo
3bed/2bath-bay
ground duplex
2bed/2bath
ground home
2bed/2bath/2car
down condo
2bed/2bath-bayou
down condo
2bed/2bath-bay
residential lot


AGE/size

1915
828 sfla



1982
1267 sfla
1952
816 sfla
1968
1400 sfla
1980
1250 sfla
1978
1512 sfla


SELLER/BUYER/when

Grasberger/Ward
3/21/94

Finnis/Ferald
3/21/94
Finkbiner/Vaness
3/21/94
Martin/LBK Const.
3/21/94
Muncy/Kreisel
3/21/94
Woodcock/Ritchie
3/21/94
Naumann/Box
3/21/94
Sutherland/Polli
3/21/94


SALE$/LIST$

$110,000
list uk

$115,000
list $125,000
$155,000
list uk
$75,000
list uk
$210,000
list $235,999
$131,000
list uk
$143,000
list uk
$180,000
list uk


Sale of Week
Arnie and Kathleen Colon are the new owners of the Anna Maria Motel at
806-12 N. Bay Blvd. in the City of Anna Maria. The 8-unit Gulf side
motel plus owner's home was listed by Dolly Young of The Prudential
Florida Realty in Holmes Beach in November, 1993, and sold by Young
on April 1, 1994 for $525,000.

Real estate transactions and sale of the week are compiled by Doug Dowling,
Licensed Real Estate Broker, exclusivelyfor The Islander Bystander, 0 May 12, 1994


Mail subscriptions top over 700
We mail The Islander Bystander every week to
OVER 700 paid out-of-town subscribers.
Everyone on Anna Maria Island gets the paper free,
either delivered to their driveway, or from a newspaper
rack or shop. If you would like to request free home de-
livery, please call 778-7978. And although we can not
deliver to single units at condos and mobile home parks,
we do deliver bulk copies there. You may also call if you
need to stop home delivery for any reason.


NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION
North end of Anna Maria Island, 1,560 sq. ft.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. $172,000.


QUALITY
BUILDERS
l[l 1",Eel ,11


* OTHER HOMESITES
AVAILABLE

778-7127
Fax 779-2602
#CRC047915


ISLANDER



DRAG OUT
YOUR OLD
"BEACH"
HAT AND
CANE ...
FOR THE ISLAND'S
FIRST CENTENNIAL
CELEBRATION!
Volunteers are needed -
along with parade
and craft show entries.
Call 778-1514 and tell
Carolyne Norwood
The Islander said to
call for more
information on the
Centennial.


.. ..I -I .


NEWLY REFURBISHED DIRECT GULF FRONT
UNITI 2Bed/2Bath, tiled foyer & hall, elevator, un-
der unit parking. Lighted tennis courts, pool, sau-
nas. $150,000. MLS#57139. Call Bill Bowman, 778-
2261 or 778-4619 eves.
ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE BEACH!!
$49,900 Each 2 lots build 2 units (duplex) on
each lot! Lowest cost per unit on the Island! Great
location & investment. MLS#53287. Call Tom
Nelson. 778-2261 or 778-1382 eves.


TIDY ISLAND DIRECT WATERFRONT -
SARASOTA BAY. 150 yds. from new lighted ten-
nis courts. 2900 total area, 20' vaulted ceilings,
gourmet kitchen 24 Hr. security. $229,000.
MLS#56010. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-2261 or 778-
7780 eves.
WATCH SAILBOATS GO BYII Lovely condo just
reduced to $125,000. Downstairs corner, Westbay
Cove So., pool, tennis, award winning landscape.
Turnkey furnished MLS#56000. Call Bobve


GRAND CAYMAN AT PERICO BAY CLUB 3/2 + Chasey, 778-2261 or 778-1532.
den, $159,900. Lovely lake front villa climate con- WALK TO THE BEACH! Remodeled 2Bed/2Bath
trolled glassed lanai, awning & sun deck, vaulted home with large caged pool area. Separate 2 car
ceilings, new tile, 2 car garage. MLS#56690. Call garage with workshop. MUST SEE! $169,900.
Marilyn Trevethan, 778-2261 or 792-8477. MLS#99985. Call Mary Ann Schmidt, 778-2261 or
HOLMES BEACH WITH IN-LAW APT. NEAR 778-4931 eves.
BEACHI 3Bed/2Bath completely remodeled. New ELEVATED TOWNHOUSE 3Bed/3Bath, 2 blocks
carpet & tile. Looks Good! $121,900. MLS#56432. to beach, amenities galore. Dick Maher, 778-2261
Call Harold Small, 778-2261 or 792-8628. or 778-6791. $239,900.


:T *
0 M 1914 9:1


AN NA .MARIA IS LAN D

A


DUPLEX THE ISLAND
Great location in HolinoBeach to own and have an in-
come to help with the i lgage. 2BR/IB features cat-in
kitchen, deck off den, a fireplace. IBRiIB has lanai.
There is a 2-car garage sg itrus trees. Allkig $189,900.
WALK TO BEAC from this d 2B1/2B
home in prime Hol h localdi..Sures ln t de
a large opdh living ge,wh b .iob, sltoi~ f-
place and bitd. 145,0.( 'W '
FOR FURTHER ATIO HER OF
THESE ULI PLEA Il1L -
S 6654



Anna Maria Island Centre / 81 8-6654
3224 East Bay Drive/ Holmes Beach, FL 34217






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 A PAGE 23 l[


I ANOUNCMEIIN


Chapel Players
announce summer
workshop
The Chapel Players of Roser Memorial Community
Church, Anna Maria, will sponsor the 4th Summer The-
atre Workshop for children and youth, ages eight to 14.
The two-week workshop will be held June 13 to
24, from 1 to 3 p.m. The program developed during the
workshop will be presented for family and friends in
the Roser Chapel on Friday, June 24 at 7:30 p.m.
Led by Cheryl Carty and Lisa Gallo, the workshop
will emphasize training for musical theater produc-
tions. Transportation from Roser to the Carty Academy
of Theatre Dance will be provided.
Early registration is required. The cost is $15 and
includes a Chapel Players T-shirt. Scholarships are
available. Space and registration are limited.
Interested students should call Roy McChesney,
program coordinator, at Roser Church 778-0414.
Off Island happenings
The Manatee County Libertarian Party will meet
on Wednesday, .May 11, at 7 p.m., at the Manatee
County Central Library. Guest speaker is Charles
Champion, who will speak on "How to Make a Politi-

ANNUAL RENTALS
BAYFRONT CONDO 2 BR, 2BA, unfurnished.
$625 plus utilities.
SANDY POINTE CONDO 2BR, 2BA, unfurnished.
$725 plus utilities.
CANAL FRONT HOME 3BR, 2BA, unfurnished.
$800 plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX -2 BR, 1BA, $575 plus
utilities.
DUPLEX WITH BAY VIEWS Bradenton Beach
2 BR, 1.5 BA, $595 plus utilities.
(813)7778-2246
1FAX 778-4978


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


U


cal Interest Group Successful Work Smart and
Hard." For more information call 778-3318.
Celebrate the 2nd Annual Top of the Town Sunset
Social sponsored by the AIDS Council of Manatee,
Inc., on Friday, May 13, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on the roof
top of the Bradenton Financial Center, 1401 Manatee
Ave. W., Bradenton. Donation is $25 per person. Cash
bar and hors d'oeuvres.
The American Association of University Women,
Manatee Country Branch, will meet Saturday, May 14,
9 a.m., at the Bradenton County Club. The program
includes the installation of officers and scholarship
winners for the year ahead. A cookie sale will also be
held. Brunch is $7.50. Please make reservations by
May 11. Information, call 722-2055 or 722-2225.
The Health and Safety Safari Children's Health
Fair, sponsored by HCA L.W. Blake Hospital, is Sat-
urday, May 14, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the hospital, 2020
59th St. W., Bradenton. The fair, for preschoolers
through teens, is free. It will include immunizations;
hearing and ear fluid checks; heart monitoring; height,
weight and temperature checks; pulse oxygen satura-
tion and peak flow meter readings; flexibility and
strength testing; educational programs and games.
The "Spiritual Renaissance Singers" of Tampa will
perform the final program in the fine arts music series
on Sunday, May 15, 4 p.m. at First United Methodist

Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner
Links
Buyers and Sellers
Together and Provides
Personal Caring Attention-
Professional Knowledge
Exceptional Service
Serving Manatee County & The Beaches
FREE Market Analysis No Obligation



ze. s :-: *


Church, 603 11th St. W., downtown Bradenton. The
concert is free and open to the public. For more infor-
mation call 747-4406.
Psychotherapist Mary B. Lembright will speak on
"Psychological Isolation" at a dinner program for the
American Association of University Women,
Bradenton Branch, on Tuesday, May 17, 6 p.m., at the
Bradenton Yacht Club. Dinner is $14.50. To make res-
ervations call 955-1519 evenings.
The Open Campus of Manatee Community Col-
lege will offer "Designing Women ... and Men," a
class for the amateur decorator, beginning May 31
through June 23. Instructor Joan Williams, I.S.D., will
cover decorating a home or just one room. Cost is $95
for residents. For more information or to register call
755-1511, ext. 4669.
Volunteers are needed for the South Florida Mu-
seum of Bradenton to greet visitors, guide tours, work
with children's groups and staff the museum store.
Shifts are three or four hours a week, hours are flexible
and training is provided by Museum staff. For more
information call Bea Cotellis at 746-4132.
Applications for the 1994-95 Leadership Manatee
class are available at the Manatee Chamber of Com-
merce, 222 10th St. W., Bradenton, or by calling 748-
3411. Sponsored by the Chamber and the Kiwanis Club
of Bradenton.




.BEST PRICED ISLAND DUPLEX !
$108,900
Near the beach, elevated, 2 bedrooms
each side, under-cover parking,
great rental investment!


Call Tom Nelson
Office: 778-2261
Evenings: 778-1382
501 Manatee Av. W. Holmes Beach
r Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 LS
1i Mis ~~M


I. E II


I


Jtj


I


L.







I' PAGE 24 a MAY 12, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



F o d RelWALK TO THE BEACH!
Remodeled 2BR/2BA home with large caged pool
area. Separate 2-car garage with workshop. Must
see! #99985.

MARVELOUS MARTINIQUE ... New listing, GULFFRONT
priced right! Great Gulf front views! 2 bedroom, Ocean Park Terrace Condo 3BR/2BA fully fur-
2 bath, tennis, elevator, secured lobby, swim- nished. Two screened porches & roof-top sun deck
ming pool. Call Carol Heinze, 792-5721. overlooking entire Gulf, Intracoastal Waterway and
#57185 ......................................... $159,900. Island. $t894, Q. REDUCED to $175,000.
ISLAND HOME ... Gated entrance, 3 bedroom, ISLAND 6-PLEX
2 bath, eat-in-kitchen, formal dining room, garage. 2/2 each unit. Close to beach, restaurants and
Located on natural canal. To see, call Robert St shopping. Pool and laundry facilities. $450,000.
Jean, 778-6467. #53686.................. $159,900. RUNAWAY BAY
CORTEZ VILLAS!! ... Price just reduced! 2 BD/2BA Unit, Turnkey Furnished, Completely
Great location close to pool, clubhouse & en- updated, custom ceramic tile throughout.
trance. Newer carpeting & window treatment. 2 Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
or 3 bedrooms, 1 bath. Call Sally Schrader,
792-3176. #51626 ..................... $48,500. or Janis Van Steenburgh 778-4796
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
Imperial House! or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 MIS .a
$89.900


SUMMER RENTALS! We have Gulffront con-
dos! Canal homes w/pool and houses. Please
stop by or call for our free brochure. Call
Debbie Thrasher, 778-0766 or 778-3395 eves.


PRICES REDUCED AT PERICO BAY!!
SPECTACULAR VIEWS over Bay, lake &
bridge! 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Minutes to beach,
shops, dining. Heated pool, tennis putting
green. Excellent investment potential: $94,900.
SPECIAL GROUND LEVEL CONDO. Westerly
view for beautiful sunsets. Overlooks nature
preserve. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, large kitchen,
screened lanai. Tastefully furnished. $92,900.


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory. IU
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


IISLANDER


V.sIi j I


SNews about social events is
always welcome at The Islander
Bystander. Call 778-7978 to find
South how you can be included.

THE BAYOU: Two bedroom, 1 bath condo-
minium with a water view completely refur- WHEN IN PARADISE SEE...
bished in 1991. Just steps to bay, beach and
Anna Maria fishing pier. Turnkey furnished.
$86,500. Call Mimi Wilde, 755-7752.
CATCH A BARGAIN! Now it's your turn to own l ,
yourown home. Two bedroom, 1.5 bath villa
close to everything in central Holmes Beach -
the gulf, bay, shopping, churches, school (easy
walk for the kids). $74,500. Call Mimi Wilde for
an appointment, 755-7752 eves. 5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME: A rare opportu- (813) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522
nity to fulfill the American dream can become a
reality on this corner lot, cleared and ready to be
built on. One block to new beach & cldse to i.
shopping. $66,900. Call for building require- t
ments & financing information. Marion Ragni, ,1 !1 i ,
778-1504 eves. mow n;g !
PERICO BAY CLUB ...
TASTEFULLY DECORATED: Spacious two .
bedroom, two bath condo directly on Palma
Sola Bay. Great southerly view from large
screened porch. Community pool, tennis. DIRECT GULF FRONT 2BR2BA tkey fur-
$141,500. Call Dick Rowse, 778-2003 eves. nished, including new Berber carpeting. You canprac-
Stically feel the spray from the waves as you sit on the
PERICO BAY CLUB: Expansive lake view from porch. Call Stan Williams, 795-4537. $165,000.
this model perfect three bedroom, two bath porch. Cl Sn W 7 .
condo located close to pool. Tiled entrance PICTURE PERFECT 3BR/2BA canal home at
foyer decorated window treatments & wallpa- prime Anna Maria location. Fruit trees, hot tub, boat
per. Heated pool, tennis, nature boardwalk, lift and more. $229,000. MUST SEE! Call Ken at 778-
close to beach. $110,500. Call Zee Catanese, 3026.
794-8991 eves. JUST LISTED On top floor- turnkey furnished, all
PERICO BAY CLUB: Delightful 1st floor two upgraded appliances. Heated pool, lighted tennis
bedroom, two bath condo with a great view of court, sauna, elevator, covered parking. $144,900. Call
two lakes, 24hr. security community, tennis Stan Williams, 795-4537.
courts, clubhouse, swimming pools, minutes, to WATERFRONT BARGAIN! Luxury at bargain
beach. $95,900. Please call Zee Catanese, price describes this spacious 2BR/2BA condo. Enjoy
794-8991 eves. canal front living with boating, tennis, pool, hot tub &


Don't leave paradise without a subscription to the 5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
best news on the island. Visit our office in the Island
SShopping Center before heading north. We're Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
right between Chez Andre and D.Coy Ducks. See MLS
you soon! (Mail order form on page 7.) 1-800-741-3772 OPENSEVENDAYSAWEEK MLS -


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive PO Box 717 Anna Mara, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307

--







FISHERMAN'S PARADISE
Deepwater canal home. Three bedroom, two
bath home on lovely Anna Maria Street. Large,
architect designed home with many extras. Sail-
boat waters. See it today. Call Fran Maxon Real
Estate, 778-2307 or 778-1450. Priced right at
$289,000.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
Kay Kay Hardy and Darlene Hughes
.f SATU WEEKDAYS 9A.M. to 4:30P.M.
SATURDAYS 9A.M. to NOON


REALTORS


much more all at a great location. Live like a king for
just $79,900. Call Ken, 778-3026.
LAKE VIEWS from this sparkling Blue Heron
model. Beautifully furnished with 3BR/2BA, large
screened porch on the lake. Entire building now being
upgraded. $109,900. Call Stan Williams, 795-4537.


r~~n Iv


snuothj


r


1-
ec,







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MAY 12, 1994 A PAGE 25 IIl


Exclusive
Waterfront
Estates
Video Collection


MESO
MALS


Oi NERs


FOR SALE BY OWNER

205 57th St. Holmes Beach
2BR/1BA Home Large Lot
Close to Beach Duplex Zoning
Central Air/Heat Laundry Room
Screened Porch Carport
$112,000. Please Call For Appointment
778-4642
Owner is Lic. Real Estate Broker


S you
O the time
property
4 Saunder
can earn
A on your
O sl\e serv
mI quests ol
Guests.
Contact
Maria Is
Sattentioi
SMid
& Cc
Ucened RetI
3222 East
Holmes Be
(813) 77&


The Islander Bystander... it's the'best
news on the Island and it's FREE.


419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
(813) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


..---4


MAGNIFICENT BAYFRONT ESTATE
This ultra spacious and light 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath
bayfront residence located in exclusive Key
Royale has it all! Enjoy year round swimming in
the 33.5'X16' heated caged pool and spa, or drop
" 'hor at the 50' boat dock with electric lift. Other
ameriftieinclude a private shuffleboard court,
double seawall with new cap, 3 sets of manual
davits, and manicured landscaping with several
imposing Canary Island Palms and 4-zone


sprinkler system on
flowing floor plan offf
design with two bays
built in dresser draw
eled kitchen offers a 1
2 pantries, and built
enormous Florida ro<
Tampa Bay. This ra
being offered at $65
arid call today for a I


Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...8-350 Christine T.Shaw...-2847 Marcella Corne...77 Na
Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847 Marcella Cornett...778-5919 Na


Watch for our
S listings on
Classivision,
channel 19.











ers a preferred split bedroom
side master suites and many
ers. The beautifully remod-
tile top center island, skylight,
in desk plus pass thru to the
om with spellbinding views of
ire and captivating home is
0,000. Finalize your dreams
private showing.


ncy Gullford...778-2158 WARRAN


RUNAWAY BAY 2BR 2BA fully furnished, sec- BEACH DUPLEXES Two units with a total of four,
ond floor unit in complex with pool, tennis, club- furnished 1BR 1 BA units. Well-maintained and
house, sauna and on site management. Deeded located in a quiet neighborhood. Only two blocks
beach access and excellent rental program. to great beach. Priced at $175,000.
Priced at $98,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


JUST REDUCED BAY WINDS Direct Bayfront GULF VIEW TOWNHOUSE Spacious Gulf view
apartment with great views of Bay and townhouse with 3BR 3BA, private 2 car garage
Intraeoastal waterway. Short walk to beach and and over 3,100 sq. ft. under roof. Complex offers
shopping. Excellent Island second home with two pools, tennis, lush grounds and short walk to
strong rental opportunity. 2BR 2BA with under prime beach. Offered at $139,000. Call Dave
cover parking. Now $84,500. Call Dave Moynihan. Moynihan for details.


MAGNIFICENT GULF FRONTI Direct Gulf front home unlike
any other Island location. Enjoy your private compound in this
three bedroom, 2.5 bath PLUS master bedroom suite set apart
from the home directly on the Gulfl Custom built and includes
shower room, workshop & utility downstairs plus undercover
parking for three cars. Qualified buyers, please call Marie
Franklin, 778-2259. Asking $950,000.


SHOP AND COMPARE THIS GULFFRONT
HOME ... 849 N. Shore Drive in the city of Anna
Maria is a 4 bedroom 2.5 bath Gulffront home.
$275,000.

SDoug
DOUG
D Dowling
REALTY
409 Pin A. a
Anna Ml Realty
778-1222
.778-1222

SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Ma iIsland Real Estate Specialists extend-
Ing both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction &
Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis,
Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Manage-
ment and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Expe-
rience AND Smllesl
P1 i==.6 ifi:In r.T4,


have property to lease, now is
to contact the professional
management team at Michael
s & Company. Learn how you
Sthe highest possible income
property, in addition to exten-
'ices provided to meet the re-
four sophisticated owners and


Debbie Dial at our Anna
land office for personal
n to your special residence.
iael Saunders
company
Etate Broker
Bay Drive
each, Florida 34217
-2275 or 800-881-2276 mmM


Location is key here. Comer of 65th and Holmes Blvd. is where
you will find this 2 bedroom ranch style home. Amenities include
2.5 baths, Franklin stove, family room, mother-in-law quarters,
carport, and if need be duplex zoning. All this at a very realistic
$129,500. If you price and compare, you can't beat this.
Dolores M. Baker
Licensed Real Estate Broker 778-7500


II : t:lI: LC
SringAn aiaSne139 C L 83)7824 FX7847






lE PAGE 26 0 MAY 12, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
WyS \ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service 12 YEARS EXPERIENCE -INSURED
778 345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
I 7,L43.4,. AND SATISFACTION








Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630 Lo.No. 4467

1M MANATEE
SHOWERS
_-. ISLAND LAWN SERVICE
Donnie Rivera (813) 778-7508


I L1,= II
STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
S^ *n MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558




HOW TO


PLACE A


CLASSIFIED


AD

THE DEADLINE IS NOON
MONDAY FOR
WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in person and
paid in advance at our office we do not in-
voice or handle credit card charges. Our office
is located at 5400A Marina Drive, in the Island
Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. We're on
the corner between D. Coy Ducks and the
laundromat. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday thu Fri-
day, Saturday 9 to 2.
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21
WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One
or two line headlines 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21
WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or
two line headlines 250 per word.
Call 778-7978 for information
and assistance.

ISLANDER
I


ISANDERCASSFID
ITM -FO ALE______ BOATING__________


WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A
relentless rush! For skating information and sales call
778-3880.
2 SWIVEL ROCKERS $50 ea., king size sleeper
sofa $150, dinette set $100, carpet $100. Call 778-
4036 or 813-644-2951.
LA-Z-BOY recliner/swivel chair $50. 778-2916.
WASHER/DRYER, Frig with ice-maker, gas range
with micro, 3 yrs new. Moving must sell. 779-2003.
RATTAN FLORIDA PRINT living room suite, 1 year
old, green & peach, very nice. Rattan & glass table,
sleeper couch, love seat and queen size bedroom
suite. 778-4073.
2 MATCHING SOFAS, 1 Simons sleeper leather
sofa & 1 recliner. 778-3921.
3 CUSHION SOFA, cream/beige/blue in good con-
dition $100 OBO. White rattan desk & chair $100.
Light entertainment center, 4 months old $100. Oak
table lamp $10. 778-5352.
SOFABED FULL SIZE excellent condition $50. Small
frig excellent condition for shop or garage $20.
High chair $5. 778-2742.
A LIFETIME of security for home, vehicle or person.
High quality, hi tech, inexpensive security systems
available. Demonstrations upon request. 778-1353.
WANTED Your unwanted mounted stuffed fish. Get
rid of it here. Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.


SAT., MAY 14TH. 9am to 3pm. 626 Dundee Ln.,
Holmes Bch. Furniture, pictures, bed linens, house-
hold items & misc.
FRI., MAY 13TH. 9am to noon. 207 78th St., Holmes
Bch. A plethora of junque (some rather unusual).
SAT. & SUN. MAY 14th & 15th. 119 52nd St.,
Holmes Bch. Super single waterbed, A/C window
unit-7000BTU, household items, etc.


WANTED single large driftwood. Decorative, inter-
esting, prefer 10-12 ft. Will pay $10 ft. if acceptable.
778-3304.
ATT: Magic Closet Consignees! All consignment
clothing is located at Roser Church for information or
to pick up call 778-0414.
LOSTAND F I U

BIKE FOUND abandoned at The Islander Bystander
office. Call 778-7978 or come by the office.


IRENE'S Dog baby-sitting service. At our home with
constant supervision. No cages/kennels. House calls
(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Call
mobile phone # 356-4649.
CHRYSLER LA BARON 1992 convert. Low mileage,
excellent condition, new white top & boot. Best offer
over $11,500. 778-0751.
1990 COACHMAN MOTORHOME loaded, 48,000
miles. New $36,000 asking $18,000. 778-0751.
UTILITY TRAILER new 5 x 10 steel bed, wood &
steel beam sides. Cost $875, asking $700 OBO. 778-
0751.


40' HOUSEBOAT Drift-R-Cruise. Classic design,
comfortable, accommodating live aboard. Slip in
quiet marina. Good condition, no motor. $10,500
OBO. 778-8322.
CHRIS CRAFT 1992, 27', OMC, cuddy. Co-rent for
$200/mo plus 1/2 expenses. Holmes Bch. If inter-
ested call 778-4426.
Find the home of your dreams in the pages of The
Islander Bystander. Just look over the ads!


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand
aboard Magic. 1/2 & full day. Reservations please.
Call 778-1990.


BOAT SALESMAN for new & used boat dealer, high
income potential. Call Ken at 778-5577.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for Tingley Memorial Library.
Three and six hour shifts. 778-9413 or 778-6247.
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED for immediate employ-
ment at Rod & Reel Motel. 778-2780.
HAIR STYLIST. Booth rental possible. Business on
Island over 20 yrs, exp. only. Please call Royal Palm
Beauty Salon 778-7767.
WAITSTAFF NEEDED part-time or on call. Knowl-
edge of wines preferred. Call the Mutiny Inn 778-
5440 and ask for Ken or Tina.
SEEKING INDIVIDUALS interested in selling high
quality, hi-tech, inexpensive security systems. Part-
time, full-time or spare-time. All legal ages welcome.
Call 778-1353.
PART-TIME WORK. No nights or weekends perfect
hrs. for parents with school children or retirees. $6
per hr. Call 761-0092 between 8am & 3pm.
FULL-TIME dishwasher needed Mon. to Fri. at Rot-
ten Ralph's, 902 S. Bay Blvd., 778-3953.
PART-TIME 20hrs per wk. Cleaning and light yard
work, includes weekends and holidays. Haley's
Motel, 778-5405.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Get in-
volved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU!
Call Martha Stewart, 778-4362 or Carolyne
Norwood, 77-8-1514.


AD PRODUCTION help wanted. Experienced in
Pagemaker and ad layout. Part-time. Call or stop in
The Islander Bystander.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, windows, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.
HOME REPAIR Kitchen & bath, handyman and
home repairs. Island resident, 23 years experience,
local references. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office, or
dock-at your convenience, complete detailing in-
cludes wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly
cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and much more. Protect your investment.
Call Damon on Mobile number 356-4649.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!

CPD LANDSCAPING, INC. "Natural by Design".
Design Installation Renovations. Full-Service
Landscape Maintenance. Longboat Key 383-9212.

ISLAND PAINTER clean, fast & reasonable. Call
Big Jim 778-5587.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all
types of trees, including palms. Insured, reasonable,
Island resident. Local ref. Call Brewers 778-7790.

HOUSE CLEANING. Two openings: soon available
not a "cold" service, but "have it your way" friend.
Ironing, too! Call Jackie, $10 hr. 383-0755.



HOME REPAIR SERVICE Professional tile instal-
lation, marble work, plaster & stucco. Interior/exte-
rior. All repairs. Excellent Island references, 23 years
experience. Call Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentialCommercial, Inte-
rior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper, Island
resident references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.


7'






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MAY 12, 1994 U PAGE 27 ID


JISW'DE CLASSIFIEDSIJ
I E M R V M E TIR N A LI


JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee Co. resident
25 years. Call today for a free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. #RF0038400.

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING. Call Jim Bickal
778-1730. Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation andrepairs. Insured and references.
LIC #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free es-,
timates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repair. 778-
4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
REPAIRS, CARPENTRY, ceiling fans, painting int.,
ext., roof coating and repairs. Screen repairs, low
prices guaranteed. Call 778-0410 leave message.
BILL THE HANDYMAN is accepting jobs. For de-
pendable, quality work call 778-7675. A permanent
Island resident!
BRICK, GLASS, BLOCK, stucco, tile, pavers & con-
crete. In business since 1978. Dave Elliott, 778-5183.
CARPET, TILE, VINYL, or wood. Mobile showroom
brings 1,200 samples to you. Guaranteed installation.
Our hours are your hours. Carpet Network, 778-7311.

PAINTING OLD FASHIONED quality brush job, no
blow and go spray. Inside or out. Call "Mr. Finishing
Touch Fisher" Skip,383-0755.

HOME REPAIR, 24 hour service. Island resident for
22 years. Call Pete, 778-2812.
WHY GET SOAKED? Dry foam, dries fast! We never
'us%< team. Fat Cat also cleans tile, wood & terrazzo
floors. Fal-ct Carpet Cleaning. 778-2882.


1LG/1SM commercial studios. Gulf view. Gulf Drive
ideal for small business, office, crafts, ect. Neg. Call
Frank at 778-6126 Eves. 778-6127.
SBUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! ISLANDER CLASSIFIED
COTTAGES on the beach in Anna Maria City. Wk/
Mo/Sn. 813-735-1488.

NOV. THRU APRIL Furnished 2/2 home in Holmes
Beach, steps from Gulf. J. Pollock & Assoc., Inc. 748-
8718 or 792-8340 eves. No pets.

KEY ROYALE 3/2 unfurnished, 2 car garage, end of
deep water canal, newly decorated, $1,200/mo.
Agent 383-0023
ANNA MARIA, Gulf/Bay views. 1 bedroom, patio,
pool. Furnished or unfurnished. $550 incl. utilities.
211 S. Bay Blvd. 778-2896.
KEY ROYALE, CANALFRONT w/dock, 2/2,1560 sq.
ft. w/fam. rm., plus garage, shop & laundry. Unfur-
nished, annual $1000. mo. Call owner 778-5045.
KASTLE KEEPERS: Mature responsible couple will
house or condo sit, while you're away for the sum-
mer. Maintenance, plant care or whatever. Please
call 778-0601, evenings.
BEACH RENTAL. 1 Bedroom, completely remolded,
carpeted. 100' to Coquina Beach. $115. weekly -
annual, includes utilities. 778-2036.
LOCATION: One lot from Gulf! 2BR/2BA comfortably
furnished doll house. Available June 6th. Call now to
reserve your vacation. Seabreeze, 778-4372.
HOLMES BEACH, very nice 1 bedroom apt., 100 yds
to Gulf, furnished or unfurnished. No pets, 778-5246.
NEED RENTAL for Jan., Feb., March. Write Anna
May Peet, 6665 Stillwater Blvd., Oakdale, MN 55128
or call Jack 778-6153.


ANNUAL RENTAL, Anna Maria City. Lovely 2/2 du-
plex, completely furnished. Cable, microwave, dish-
washer. 1 block to best Gulf Beach and shopping.
Sorry, no pets. $630, plus utilities. 778-2190.

DUPLEX APARTMENT, 2/2, west of Gulf Dr. 3
houses from Gulf. Completely furnished, central a/c
& heat, Florida room. Yearly furnished $1,000/mo +
util.- Season $1520/mo + tax & util. Call 778-2422.

ANNUAL RENTAL Holmes Beach. 2/2 Duplex re-
cently renovated. New tile, carpet & appliances. 1
blk. from beach & shopping. Available June 1st.
$575/mo + util. 813-689-8101.

DUPLEX SEASONAL or annual, 2/1. Boat space
available. See Pat at 104 7th St. S. or 750-8715.
WE HAVE GREAT RENTALS! Seasonal & annual
rentals. Gulffront condo, canal homes, duplexes. Call
Debbie Thrasher for all your rental needs, now at
Prudential Florida Realty, 778-0766 or 778-3395.
BEACH FRONT large 1/1 unfurnished duplex. An-
nual, no pets, references $550. Call collect 813-988-
1344 or 985-5763.
ANNA MARIA DUPLEX in quiet neighborhood.
Clean, newly redecorated 2/1, annual. $490/mo plus
util. 778-1626 or 778-4497.
ANNUAL Holmes Bch. clean 1/1, across from beach.
$425. garbage, water & sewer included. 794-3196.
ANNA MARIA quiet, secluded on canal, boat dock,
1 bick to Gulf. 2 bedroom, 1 car garage $675/mo.
778-4073.
ANNUAL 2/1 and 1/1. Furnished or unfurnished,
close to beach. 778-1392.
WANTED RELIABLE Male or Female roommate,
short or long term for quiet place on canal w/dock and
boat ramp. 753-5397.
BAY HOLLOW, 2/2, den, 8728 54 Ave. W., pool,
deep water dockage, $800. Perico Bay Club, 2/2,
waterside, $825. West bay Point & Moorings, 3/2,
dock, $950. Island In The Sun, 2/2 townhouse, pool,
$600. 2/1 house, 12007 45 Ave, $525. Neal & Neal
Rentals, 813-778-9477 or 800-422-6325.


ISLAND CONDO 2/2. 2 lanais, eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer, pool, walk to beach, low maintenance
fee and owner may finance! 99,900. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate 778-6066 or 795-0105
after hours.
SEE IT TODAY! Historic Cortez Village Charming 2/
1.5 cottage. Nice oaks, quiet. 1 blk from Bay. Great
seasonal rental or second home. For sale by owner,
794-1103. $62,500.

NEW HOUSE, Holmes Bch. 3/2, quiet street, private
boat launch, 2 blocks to beach. $184,500. 778-1966.

LUXURY LOT on Ivanhoe Lane, Key Royale. Du-
plex, 208 Peacock. Reach Richard at 778-6066. Is-
land and Key Specialist.
THE SEARCH is over. Charming 2/2 on wide canal.
Split bedroom plan. Five minutes to beach and
Intracoastal. Move-in condition. $149,900. M56059.
Call Jim Layfield, Neal & Neal Realtors. 383-3708.
JUST LISTED! 3BR/2BA home. Holmes Beach.
$89,900. Reach Richard at 778-6066. Island Key
Specialist.
BY OWNER at Perico Bay Club. $89,500. Must see
to appreciate! Gorgeous lake view. 2/2 with many up-
grades. Security, covered parking, pool, spa and ten-
nis. 794-5085.
JUST REDUCED $99,800. 301 23rd. St. N. Drive by,
take a look. Reach Richard Freeman at 778-6066.
OWNER FINANCE. 1Bedroom duplex, lot 1/2 near
bch. Fixer up. $89,000. 795-0873.
FREE HOT LIST "By Owner Homes" 100's comput-
erized & analyzed. Free mortgage card. Help-U-Sell
- Realty Counselors. 795-0616.


Computer Operated
774 --,1 FAX Service: Send & Receive
FAX #778-8390
ANNA MARIA 778-8390

778-2586 ~-MARV KAy Eve:778-6771
778 8 Ry_ KAY
2 OFF7YY


H THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 5/18/94
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 5/18/94


= ViSA


Cavanagi Marine Repair
MOBILE ENGINE REPAIRS DOCKSIDE
COMPLETE MARINE REPAIR
Cortez Rd. & 124th St. 795-7264

A



SABAL PALM J. B
CARPENTRY Painting
AF LRIDACOMPANY Interior/Exterior
SMALL HOME REPAIRS 20 Years
CUSTOM FENCES
*DECKS SIDING Experience
FASCIA SOFFITSand/Wife
DOORS WINDOWS Husband/Wife
SODD JOBS Team
Fully Insured Rasonable Rates Estimates
778-7603 Free Estimates
Rick Leas 778-2139
32-Year Island Resident


lAtl, SUPPORT
-- E
I ISLAND
^%'*/ EIrENNIALAL
Events are May 20, 21 & 22.
Volunteer now! Call 778-5405.


AMERICAN CAR WASH

& DEFILING

Self service or personal service
Pick up & delivery service available
Enclosed facility for added protection
of your vehicle
778-1617 5804 Marina Drive Holmes Beach


MOST CARS $85

and we come to you!






details


ISLAND CLEANING
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
VACUUM SALES & SERVICE
Mon-Fri 10-3, Sat 9-2 778-4988
5600 Marina Dr Holmes Beach


"=-:..I


AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
Hand wash & Vacuum, Buff Seal & Polish,
Armorall, Dress Rims & Tires, Shampoo
Carpets & Seats, Dress Interior, Satin-Black
Under Carraige, Engine Cleaned & Silicone
Protected. Everything included for $85 -
on a normal size car. By appointment,
at your home or office.
Call the mobile service number: 356-4649
or leave a message: 778-9392.


.-





I~l PAGE 28 0 MAY 12, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island Foods
0 FREE BLOOD
3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach PRESSURE LHECK
W OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100 Every Friday
We Welcome Food Stamps 11 A.M. to NOON
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, MAY 17, 1994


--;" -" -*I M .. -
SCOUPON GOOD WEDNESDAY
MAY 11 ONLY
CELERY
I 29
d290 EACH


LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
1---- ---
I W mu .me m I f
COUPON GOOD SATURDAY
MAY 14 ONLY
PEPSI
Diet Pepsi
P or Mountain Dew

690 .
[,~f
V^r


ti!


W2 LITER BTLS.
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE


I ~ ,


L~3 rn1 rn C rn rn rn rn rn r rn


GREEN
CABBAGE


EACH DAY A COUPON SPECIAL


I COUPON GOOD THURSDAY
| MAY 12 ONLY
CHAMPION
SHamburger or
SHot Dog Buns
I EACH
I 8 COUNT I
I PACKAGE
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE .
Q-------*-----S


I III)


CANTALOUPE


COUPON GOOD TUESDAY
I MAY 17 ONLY
Celeste Plush Fluffy
BATHROOM
TISSUE

4902 U
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
---- "-""~ rn --r n-
SWEET GEORGIA
PEACHES


LB.


Li


85% LEAN
Ground


This Saturday and


Sunday


Deli Picnic Special
8 pc. Fried Chicken (Our Choice)
1 lb. Potato Salad $599
1 lb. Baked Beans
BAKERY DEPARTMENT
Dinner Rolls 990
Or 1 o
Potato Rolls Package


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


Homemade Hot or Sweet
Italian Sausage


49
LB.


IN OUR
' MEAT
DEPARTMENTT


J


i