<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00507
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00507

Full Text

NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER
IISLAN91


I A I.'


Island officials request tourist board seat


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island elected officials queried County Commissioner
Joe McClash on the lack of representation for the Island
on the county's Tourist Development Council (TDC) at
last week's meeting of the Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials.
The TDC makes recommendations to the county
commission on how the funds generated by the tourist tax
are spent Two cents of the three-cent tax have been col-
lected since 1981. The third cent, earmarked for beach
related projects, was added in 1987. The tax has generated
$7.7 million since 1981 and is expected to generate $13.2
million by the year 2000.
McClash, the TDC chairman, said representation is
guided by state statute.
According tothe statute, the counciliscomposedofnine


members one county commissioner; two municipal
elected officials, one of which must be from the county's most
populous city; three members of the touristindustry; and three
owners or operators of tourist accommodations.
Islanders have questioned the TDC seat occupied by
a Palmetto elected official. McClash said Island officials
could formally request a change, but Palmetto has re-
quested the seat again this year.
"If you were in that seat and we appointed someone
else, I think there would be some hard feelings," noted
McClash.
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Carol Whitmore said,
"The islands are greatly affected, especially in advertis-
ing. It bothers me to have someone else do the advertise-
ment for our beaches and we have no say."
Larry White, the county's tourism director, said he is
developing a five-year media plan and a series of public


A REAL native-born Islander Islander Photo courtesy CynhiaFinn
Cynthia Finn holds her daughter Mary-Elizabeth, who was born last Friday at home somewhat unexpectedly -
in Holmes Beach. For more about the "little miracler" seepage 5.


Officials agree on 30-day closure

option for 1995 Cortez Bridge repair


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island elected officials agreed on Option 1 a 30-
day complete closing for rehabilitation of the Cortez
Bridge. They further agreed that the work should take
place at a time of the year when danger from a hurricane
is mininal.
Gerald Carrigan, district director of production for the
Florida Department of Transportation (DOT), took feed-
back from officials at last week's meeting of the Coalition
of Barrier Island Elected.Officials.
Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie Pierola said her coun-
cil voted on Option 1 to take place between Oct. 15 and
Nov. 15.
Holmes Beach Mayor Pat Geyer said her council
voted on Option 1 to take place after Labor Day.
Anna Maria Mayor Ray Simches said his commis-
sion did not vote on an optionor time of year but passed
a resolution concerning health, safety and welfare aspects
of any decision.
Longboat Key Commissioner Ray Metz said his
commission voted to support whatever decision the Anna
Maria Island cities make. He said his commission, con-
cerned about hurricane season, asked that the work be
done in spring or late fall.


Holmes Beach Councilwoman Carol Whitmore asked
that the openings of the Longboat Pass bridge be alternated
with those of the Manatee Avenue bridge. Carrigan said he
would relay that suggestion to the Coast Guard.
Pierola asked Carrigan, "Is there any guarantee that
the DOT will start this job and finish it and get out? This
is your big chance."
Carrigan replied, "We recognize that this is our
chance to establish credibility. We've made a particular
effort to accommodate the Island people on this issue. We
put our heart and souls into it and have every intention of
carrying out the plans to the best of our ability."
Whitmore asked about automobile wrecks or break-
downs on the bridge. Metz said dealing with such prob-
lems should be a part of the county's emergency manage-
ment system.
County Commissioner Joe McClash said if just one
vehicle is involved, with no injuries, the situation could be
handled through the county's transportation plan, but if
emergency vehicles are involved, it would be more com-
plex to coordinate.
Fire Chief Andy Price said wreckers are dispatched
throughout the county on a rotation basis, but the rotation
could be circumvented during that 30-day period if offi-
cials desire.


meetings is planned. The first session for local chambers
of commerce and members of the hospitality industry is
set for April 6 or 7 at the Park Inn in Bradenton, he said.
Whitmore protested, "Don't put us off until after the
long-range planning is done."
White replied, "The advertising program is part of the
marketing program. Our marketing effort focuses on the
beaches, because they're the premiere reasonpeople come to
Florida from any place in the world. Whether you have a rep-
resentative on the TDC or not, you will not beleft out of that
process. We would have to be foolish not to orient the bulk
of our marketing effort toward these two islands."
McClash added, "Whatever input this group canprovide
will be taken very seriously by Mr. White and the TDC. I hate
to always get into these confrontations. I hope we can get to
the point where we can work together and notbe so demand-
ing. What you're trying to do is a positive step."


Simches

proposes

Island-long

sidewalk
By Paul Roat
Imagine a wide concrete sidewalk running the length
of Anna Maria Island. The path would be used by stroll-
ers, bicyclists, roller-bladers and others.
Longboat Key has one. So do most of the other
coastal communities in the state. Now, Anna Maria Mayor
Ray Simches wants one here, too.
Simches received the approval ofIsland Transporta-
tion Planning Organization members Monday to begin
pursuit of a grant to initiate planning of an Island-long
sidewalk-bike path.
"We have a recreational problem on the Island,"
Simches said. "I'd like to see us get better recreational use
of our roads.
"I would like to see the three Island cities, through
their own resources, look at this," Simches said. He will
be working with the grant committee in Holmes Beach,
as well as with public works officials in the three cities,
as the first step in the project.
Sidewalks are at a premium on Anna Maria Island.
There is a narrow path through much of southern
Bradenton Beach, and sidewalks through some of Holmes
Beach and Anna Maria City. Much of the Island is lack-
ing a recreational trail, however, forcing bicyclists to ven-
ture onto Gulf Drive.
As a part of the 789 Task Force, sidewalks are being
investigated from the Longboat Pass Bridge north to
Manatee Avenue. Recommendations from the task force
are expected in June.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Opinion ...................................... Page 6
The Way We Were ..................... Page 7
Doing something on Easter? ...... Page 8
Island or Key? .......................... Page 9
Sworn in.................................... Page 11
Dolls ......................................... Page 13
Island house hopping ............. Page 15
Stir-it-up ............................ ..... Page 16
Announcements ................. Page 18-19
Streetlife .................................. Page 20
Outdoors ........................... Page 22-23
School Daze ....................... Page 24


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


MARCH 24, 1994






UI- PAGE 2 1 MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Island workshop will address collection of shells


Taking of live shells will be the topic of discussion at
a special workshop Tuesday on the Island.
Representatives from the Marine Fisheries Commis-
sion of Florida will hold a workshop on Tuesday from 3-
5 p.m. at Roser Memorial Church to inform the public and
give citizens an opportunity to comment regarding the
harvest of shells that contain live organisms.
Scheduled at the request of Anna Maria Commis-
sioner Dorothy McChesney, officials from MFC will dis-
cuss federal, state and local regulations which protect and
conserve Florida's tropical marine life resources during
the workshop.
McChesney contacted the fisheries commission after
she received complaints about the unlimited collection of
sand dollars in the waters of the Gulf and Tampa Bay
around Anna Maria Island.
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection
currently regulate the collection of tropical marine fish and
invertebrate animals which are collected primarily for the


Work underway

for Bridge Street

traffic circle
If it seems like you've been reading about an innova-
tive traffic "roundabout" in Bradenton Beach forever
without seeing any construction, you're partly right.
Plans were'discussed about a year ago for a mini-traf-
fic circle at the intersection of Gulf Drive and Bridge
Street. Work was scheduled to begin last summer.
Now, seven months after the roundabout was to be
completed, work crews are beginning construction. The
project will take 30 to 45 days to complete.
Work crews will mostly work along the side of the
roadway, with construction tie-ups held workers hope
at a minimum. No construction will take place on
weekends..
The roundabout is a new traffic element in the United
States, although the design is common place throughout
Europe. Cars cutting across traffic in the traffic circle have
the right of way, ending long back-ups and congestion.
Traffic planners estimate the roundabout will increase
traffic flow by about 30 percent.
The roundabout is one of the last of the projects sched-
Suled for the Bridge Street rehabilitation project, a $500,000
revitalization effort funded through state grant revenue.
And why the delays in construction?
Blame it on bureaucracy within the Florida Department
of Transportation. Roundabout plans were drafted under the
supervision of the local district office of the DOT. The dis-
trictoffice senttheplans to Tallahasseeforwhatwas expected
to be a cursory examination and approval.
But the Tallahassee DOT officials had problems with
the roundabout design, specifically the size of the traffic
circle the Capital transportation officials wanted it big-
ger. Bradenton Beach officials said it was all they could
do to get easements for the circle sized as it is. To make
it any bigger would be nearly impossible.
Finally, through the urgings of DOT District Secre-
tary Dave May, the smaller roundabout design was ap-
Sproved. And work has begun.

Speedy recovery, Kay
High bridge foes will be pleased to know that
Kay Hoey is making good progress in her recovery
from surgery early this week.
Hoey has been a real fighter right in the front
trenches you could say in SAM's battle to defeat
the proposed 65-foot, fixed-span bridge at Manatee
Avenue. It should come as no surprise to friends she
would fight back so well against cancer.
We wish her and her family the best. Cards are
welcome in care of Manatee Memorial Hospital, 206
2nd St. E, Bradenton, FL 34208. Kay is in room 507.


Easter time change
If you normally need a nap on Easter Sunday because
you rouse yourself to attend sunrise services you'll be
even sleepier this year.
Clocks will need to be set ahead one hour on Saturday
night, April2, because April 3 is Easter Sunday and Daylight
Saving Time officially kicks in.
Remember to spring your clock forward and welcome
the sunrise one hour early.


live tropical aquarium trade.
Shells collected for use in decorative materials (such

B ~!6_F~UIP;U I1~:, ~ i~~gJI ii*El9-6~


Car damages total $17,000 IslanderPhoto: TomaraKafka
It was Friday, March 18, about 1 p.m. The Public Beach was packed the sun was shining and school had early
release. Gene Burr, coach at Anna Maria Elementary, was driving south he had the right of way when he was
struck by Rebecca Schwer, ofPalmetto. Schwer, traveling west to the Public Beach on Manatee Avenue, reported
that another driver had motioned for her to proceed through the stop sign. When she did she hit Burr's car. Schwer
was cited for right-of-way violation. Burr, who is reportedly doing fine but stiff, was taken to Blake Hospital and
released Damage to Burr's car is reported to be'$8,000 and Schwer's car $9,000.


McChesney to represent


islands in EAC review


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island officials selected Anna Maria Commissioner
Dottie McChesney last week to represent the Island on the
evaluation and review committee for the county's Envi-
ronmental Action Commission (EAC).
Karen Collins, EAC director, explained, "The EAC
passed a rule in January that set up a process for a periodic
review. It's on a three-year cycle to review the work of the
EAC in achieving its goals through its mandate. The com-
mittee represents all the interests in the community."
The Island cities were unsuccessful last year in their
bid for representation on the EAC, and were assured a seat
on the review board at that time.
Collins told officials at the Coalition of Barrier Island
Elected Officials meeting that the EAC is revising the re-
gional contingency plan for use in the event of a coastal
disaster such as an oil spill.
Anna Maria Mayor Ray Simches said a rapid re-
sponse system is needed because during last year's oil spill
he "went through a revolving door of referrals from the
Port of Manatee to the Coast Guard to Manatee County to
the fire district."
County Commissioner Joe McClash took Island of-
ficials to task for not being represented at meetings to re-
vise the plan.


"What I'm concerned about'is that you're not in-
volved today. I was at a meeting at McDill (Air Force
Base) a few weeks ago. You should have had represen-
tatives there. The reason why is when the spill happens,
it's too late to try to figure out a plan. Attend these meet-
ings, become involved and help form the plan."
However, officials told him they had not been noti-
fied of any meetings. McClash said he would notify of-
ficials in the future.
Collins reported on the disposal of dredged spoil
material that is to be placed at a Gulf site off the north
point of Anna Maria.
"It is very difficult to find out the status from the agen-
cies doing the environmental impact statement," she said.
"The major concern we all had was limited opportunity for
public comment There will be other opportunities for pub-
lic input, butthey may not be very well advertised There may
not be a regional public hearing when the final report comes
out Once thereport is published there will be a formal review
period and then another 45-day review period when it comes
out in the federal register."
Collins said local officials can give her their com-
ments, and she will forward them to the Florida Environ-
mental Protection Agency as a response from the barrier
islands. She will also keep Island officials informed about
comment periods.


4
.d.'


as sand dollars) are not protected unless special rules are
approved.
In Lee County, a special ruling passed in 1993 prohib-
its the harvesting of more than two live shellfish of any
single species per day. Harvesting exemptions are given
for oysters, hard clams, bay scallops and coquinas. The
ordinance does prohibit the harvest of species such as sand
dollars.
"Live shellfish" is defined as any living mollusk (phy-
lum Mollusca) or echinoderm (phylum Echinodermata).
The Marine Fisheries Commission has received a
request from the City of Sanibel to totally prohibit the
collection of live shells.
The public is invited to attend the Island workshop on
March 29 to discuss the possibility of implementing a
management plan for shell collection similar to the Lee
County rule.
Roser Church is located at 512 Pine Ave., Anna
Maria City.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U MARCH 24, 1994 U PAGE 3 lIE

Don't change setbacks: planning commissioners


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The city's setback regulations should remain as they are,
said Holmes Beach Planning Commissioners last week.
They voted unanimously to make this recommenda-
tion to the city council in April, and present reasons for
their decision at the same time.
The problem, originally with side setbacks, surfaced
in December of last year when a resident applied to add
a second story to a conforming structure. Side setbacks for
new residential structures are 10 feet for a one-story struc-
ture and 15 feet for a two-story structure.
Public Works Supervisor John Fernandez ruled that
if a second story is added to a conforming structure, the
entire building, not just the addition, must have a side
setback of 15 feet.
Council drafted an ordinance making all one-and two-
story setbacks uniform but, after a first reading, members
had second thoughts and sent the issue to the planning
commission for study and a recommendation. The board
has discussed the matter at its last three meetings.
Last week the board heard from Fire Chief Andy


Right-of-way parking problems are persistent in
Bradenton Beach, and officials are wrestling with how
much and where to enforce the no-parking rules.
A parking "hot spot" immediately south of the Beach
House restaurant, 200 block Gulf Drive, has spurred city
officials to look into their codes to see where parking is
permitted and where it is not.
Police Chief Jack Maloney has requested and will
soon receive a number of new "No Parking" signs for the
area. Once the signs are posted, parking citations will be
written for offenders, he said.
Parking in the right-of-way is a common sight along
most of Gulf Drive in the city and, according to city laws,
is not legal.


Price on the safety aspects of setbacks.
"My only concern would be if we needed to ladder
the building from that side. A 10-foot setback, if a person
has a fence there, it would limit our ability," explained
Price. "We would pretty much have to write that side off
for fire fighting."
Price said in order to have working space, fire fighters
need one-third of the ladder height A 34-or 35-foot ladder
would require 12 to 15 feet of space to ladder the building.
He said if the lot has many trees, use of the ladder
would be limited. He also said that a single story elevated
residence would not present a height problem.
Public Works Supervisor John Fernandez said, "My
philosophy is that the closer together your buildings are,
the more danger there is. Whether 20 feetapart constitutes
a major danger or not, I don't think so."
Fernandez said a petitioner can seek a variance of 20
percent of the required setback, which would be three feet
on a 15-foot setback or two feet on a 10-foot setback.
Chairman Gabe Simches asked Fernandez how long
the present setbacks have been in effect. Fernandez said
since 1963.


Following the letter of the law means that patrons of
Smurfs, Dick Wagner Realty, and even the Moose Lodge
are parking illegally when they park in front of the estab-
lishments and could receive parking tickets.
"The city is increasingly plagued with parking on the
rights-of-way," Councilman Jim Kissick said last week as
he raised the issue.
Other council members appeared reluctant to begin a
massive ticketing binge in the city. They appeared to agree to
wait until recommendations from the 789 Task Force were
made later this spring. The task force is studying parking,
drainage, traffic flow, landscaping and other improvements
to Gulf Drive at the urging of the Florida Department of
Transportation. A report is due from the group by June.


Simches reasoned, "The more I read and speak with
people, the more I question doing anything. I don't see any
compelling presentation of data to make me want to
change."
Commissioner Mike Farrup said he had some prob-
lems with the setback variance procedure. Members
agreed to study that as part of the comprehensive plan
review.
In other business, the board recommended changes in
the land development code's language concerning the A-
1 district. These will go to the city attorney for a draft to
be brought to council for consideration.
The board's next task is the state-mandated review of
the city's comprehensive plan and land development code.



Anna Maria City
3/24, 7:30 am., Building Advisory Committee
3/30, 9 am., Planning Commission
Sub-committee
3/30, 7:30 p.m., Planning Commission

Bradenton Beach
3/29, 1 p.m., Council work session on
the city charter
3/31, 7 p.m., Bradenton Beach Civic Association,
Tingley Memorial Library

Holmes Beach
3/25, 9 am., Code Enforcement Board
3/29, 3 p.m., Planning Commission

Of Interest
3/28, 9:30 am., Metropolitan Planning Organi-
zation, Sudakoff Hall, New College, Sarasota
3/29, 3 to 5 p.m., Workshop on protection of live
shells, sponsored by the Marine Fisheries
Commission, Roser Church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria


5 A FULL SERVICE PHOTO LAB
R SINCE 1979
Fine quality photo copies No Negative???
from your PRINTS and
SLIDES, any size Problem
original up to 1 1x14.
COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL
Palma Sola Square, Manatee Ave. at 59th St, Bradenton 792-1009


pr





















BECA USE, IT'HEBST.
qj PI
ON I--,I

151"gIr


Right-of-way parking problems

persist in Bradenton Beach






Im PAGE 4 0 MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A sandy tale of two beaches:



Anna Maria vs. Longboat Key


By Paul Roat
A year ago, Islanders bid a fond farewell to dredge
crews who presented Anna Maria with a new wide, white,
sandy beach.
A lot has transpired in the past 12 months. One con-
stant has remained, though the sand on our beach is still
there.
Our neighbors to the south on Longboat Key also
went through a beach nourishment project. They ridiculed
the beach on Anna Maria as one of the worst nourishment
projects they'd ever seen, pointing out how coarse our
sand was, and how many shells were mixed into the
beach.
"OUR beach," they said, "will be of fine-grained sand
that is easy on the feet." And sure enough, Longboat
Key's beach was made of fine sand. Town officials even
made the dredge crews replace some of the nasty coarse
sand in some spots with the finer powder.
In less than a year, more than two-thirds of Longboat
Key's new beach has eroded. Coastal engineers are call-
ing Longboat's renourishment project one of the worst-
performing projects they've ever seen.
In fact, Longboat's beach renourishment project is so
bad that there are concerns that all beach renourishment
projects may be in jeopardy as a result of the erosion prob-
lems on the Key.
And Anna Maria Island's sand is still on shore, pro-
tecting homes, condos and businesses from the waves and
wind. Just like it was designed to do. Shells and all.

The Anna Maria beach project
The arrival of the dredge Illinois off Bradenton Beach
Dec. 24, 1992, marked the end of a 10-year effort by citi-
zens and elected officials to add to the Island's beach.
Threatened by storms, property and business owners on
the Island were looking at multi-million dollar losses from
winds and waves unless some form of artificial shoreline
enhancement took place.
SLed by Katie Pierola of Bradenton Beach and others,
the Island fought for and eventually received fed-
eral, state and local funds to provide a beach nourishment
effort on the Island. The area of sandy attention would
stretch from 13th Street South in Bradenton Beach north
to 77th Street in Holmes Beach a 4.7 mile stretch.
Residents of Anna Maria City, who through then-
Mayor Ernie Cagnina began the whole process in the mid-
1970s, decided they did not want to participate in the
project.
Pipes were laid. Bulldozers arrived. And the pumps
began to run.
Day and night the sand gushed ashore as the Illinois
slowly "walked" its way north, adding about 150 feet of
width to the Island. The dredge used the tried-and-true
method of auguring a huge drill bit-like device into the
sand and sucking the shell-and-sand mix, called slurry,
through the pipes and onto shore.
Sand for the beach nourishment project came from
just offshore of the Island.
After four months, with the Illinois and crew on their
way to the next project, we were left with a new beach.
And then what we had feared the most happened: the
storm.

March 13
Residents of Southwest Florida awoke Saturday,
March 13, 1993, to the howl of wind and the slap of
waves. A phenomenally powerful low pressure system
brought near-hurricane force steady 60 mph winds to the
state. Coastal flooding was extensive, as was damage -
elsewhere.
When the wind died and the rain and high seas sub-
sided, coastal geologists surveyed the new beach. They
concluded that some erosion took place, but nothing ex-
tensive. The beach did what it was supposed to do in pro-
tecting the Island from storms.
In fact, the storm may have aided the Island's new
beach by flattening the shoreline vertically, doing in a few
hours what otherwise would have taken months to accom-
plish.
Longboat Key did not fare nearly as well in the storm.

The Longboat Key beach project
Longboat Key's beach nourishment project was
plagued with problems from the very beginning. Reluc-


tant to provide public beach access and parking to meet
state requirements, Longboat residents opted to pay for
most of the sand addition themselves through a special
taxing district.
The contract to do the nourishment went to a new, so-
called "state of the art" dredge that used jets of water,
rather than an auger, to produce the slurry that would
eventually be the new beach. The dredge was plagued
with delays and pumping problems and was far behind
schedule when March 13 dawned.
The storm cost Longboat Key several hundred thou-
sand cubic yards of sand. It also cost the dredge company
most of its pipe, as the high waves tore the equipment
apart. Parts of pipe were later recovered from as far away
as Venice.
Longboat used as its sand "borrow sites" areas near
New Pass and Longboat Pass rather than "walking" the
dredge along the shore, as Anna Maria did. The sand from
the sandbars was finer, more powdery, and didn't seem to
"stick" to the beach as well, either.
The following is from the Longboat Observer, dated
March 17, 1994:
"Town consultants and Longboat Key officials were
aware before the renourishment that shell-filled sand is
more resistant to erosion. However, they bowed to the
wishes of Longboat Key residents for fine-grain sand.
"In fact, after renourishment, property owners along


Ours -
and theirs
Pictured above is the extreme north
end of Longboat Key and the
renourished shore ofAnna Maria
Island At left is Longboat Key. As
you can see, the Anna Maria
renourishment project has left the
Island with a wide, sandy beach.
Longboat Key's project has not fared
as well.

Photos courtesy Jack Elka







a 3,000-foot stretch of beach ... demanded that their shell-
filled beach be replaced with powder sand. Bulldozers
subsequently scraped off the 'shelly' sand and replaced it
with finer material stockpiled nearby.
"The area where the beach was replaced is now one
of the Key's hot spots. Seaplace condominium, neighbor-
ing that stretch of beach, decided not to be part of the sand
replacement effort despite its own share of shelly sand.
High winds on March 2 and 3 did not seem to affect
Seaplace's beach as much as other areas."
The final catastrophe on Longboat Key occurred
when one of the dredge work boats struck a swimmer,
killing him.

The final analysis
Probably the best summation of the tale of two
beaches comes from Rick Spadoni, a coastal engineer
with Coastal Planning and Engineering. His comments,
again from the Observer:
"The Longboat Key beach project is the worst-per-
forming project that I've ever seen and, with the two
beaches as comparison, it certainly drives home the point
of the importance of grain size.
"I don't ever see a coastal engineer designing a beach
with fine-grain sand again, and I'm hoping that the state
won't issue permits any more for any project using fine-
grain sand."







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER W MARCH 24, 1994 PAGE 5 IWe


'Little miracle' definitely an Islander


By Jeannie Friedman
Islander Reporter
No one can ever say Mary-Elizabeth Finn isn't an
authentic Anna Maria Islander. Weighing in at three
pounds 15 ounces, she made an unexpected arrival in
Holmes Beach last Friday morning.
Cynthia and Robert Finn had an early morning con-
versation and decided that, although she was nine months
pregnant and had been having intermittent contractions for
three days the tugs, familiar to any woman who has
ever experienced labor weren't getting any closer to-
gether or increasing in severity. That being the case, the
Finns agreed that it would be okay for Bob to go to work
and leave Cynthia alone.
About 30 minutes after he departed, Mary-Elizabeth Finn
made a grand entrance into the wold and onto the Island.
Home alone and having a baby! Cynthia has three
children by a previous marriage Mary-Elizabeth is
Bob's first But the children were visiting with their father
and Cynthia was very much alone when the baby made
her sudden appearance.
Giving birth three times in a hospital surrounded by
professionals is not sufficient preparation for what tran-
spired at the Finn residence at 6:15 a.m. Friday, March,18.
The time between contractions never decreased and
there were no other warning signals. Mary-Elizabeth sim-
ply arrived. She was born with the umbilical cord wrapped
around her neck. Cynthia unwrapped the cord, walked to
the linen closet to get a towel and, less than a minute
after the birth, called the dispatcher at the Holmes Beach
Police Department
"Were you scared to death?" we asked. "Not at the
time," she said. "Later I was very frightened about what
could have happened and I started crying, but at the time,
I just did what I had to do."
Within minutes of her call, help arrived. Capt Den-
nis Dotson of the Anna Maria Fire District, Officer Chuck
Sterns from the Holmes Beach Police Department, two
paramedics and an officer from the Manatee Sheriffs
Office were on the scene almost immediately.
The paramedics cut the umbilical cord, cleaned the
baby, made sure the vital signs of both mother and baby
were stable, provided oxygen and ran routine tests. Bob
was called at work and managed to arrive home in a
state of shock in time for the trip to the hospital.


At first, the doctors were concerned about Mary-
Elizabeth because, even though she was a full-term baby,
her birth weight is considered low. After scores of tests
and screenings the two were released on Saturday to re-
turn to their Holmes Beach home with a clean bill of
health.
On Monday, she met her sisters Kyle, 12, and
Wydham, 8, and her brother Chase, 10, for the first time.


Dad and
daughter
Little Mary-Elizabeth
Finn, pictured here with
Dad Robert, came into the
world at a little less than
four pounds, but is doing
just fine despite her Island
birth.

Photo courtesy Cynthia Finn



















They all agreed she's very special.
"She's a little miracle," Cynthia said. "The doctor's
are amazed at how healthy she is. We're just happy ev-
erything had a happy ending and we're so grateful to the
police and fire department that they got here so fast and
were so helpful. They were wonderful."
Welcome to Anna Maria, Mary-Elizabeth Finn.
There's no doubt about it, you are a true-born Islander.


NOTICE: Please notify The Islander Bystanderspecial Easter Services and Holi-
day Events for publication on March 31. The deadline is noon Friday, March 25.


7 / ka/ -
^ / anCecue^,/
"The name speaks for itself"
* Laundered Shirts Wedding Gowns
* Suedes & Leathers Drapery Cleaning
MIZIrMavI,16m j


Family owned and operated since 1979.
S&S PLAZA BEACHWAY PLAZA
5340 Gulf Drive, 7216 Manatee Ave. W.
Holmes Beach Bradenton
778-3630 792-7466
Daily 8 6 Sat 9-1 Dally 7:30 6, Sat 8 4


fflfm 50th fniuersur


ove... -J anne LO'
Don, Carol, Steve, Kitty, Bob, Lisa, Susan, and Bob
and the Grandchildren Tammy, Tony, Ken, Lindsay, Mat, Sarah, Justin, and Tyler


DRYCENE3





lj PAGE 6 0 MARCH 24, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTAND

e r -9


Don't play the

game of politics

on the Island
Political gamesmanship has augmented statesman-
ship in Holmes Beach of late. The trend isn't new, but
it is disappointing to watch.
Outgoing Mayor Pat Geyer led the political maneuver-
ing with her appointment of Jay Romine as police chief. For
Geyer, it amounted to unfinished business. While we have
no complaints with Romine as chief, we would have pre-
ferred allowing the decision of hiring him be left to the in-
coming mayor as one of the first acts of office, rather than
a departing mayor as a final gesture.
The next political gambit was made by Don
Howard, who is leaving the council. Howard grilled
Betty Hill, applicant for a planning commission seat, on
her stance on issues to the point where Hill eventually
withdrew her application to the commission.
Intensive questioning of applicants for advisory
board seats is a rarity in political circles. Most commu-
nities view advisory boards as a resource to be nurtured,
not an adversarial threat to elected officials' power. In
fact, other Island communities don't even formally quiz
applicants for boards they just ratify the member's
position.
An advance phone call should allow significant in-
troduction to the potential members' abilities and
any political propensities and-avoid the appearance
of the "third degree."
To engage in intensive questioning for a potential
advisory board member is bad enough, but for a lame-.
duck member of the council to lead the attack is unten-
able to us.
Politics is a part of the governing process. Games-
manship is also a part of government. "Playing politics"
is all part of the process whether local, regional, state or
federal in scope,"
Although we frown on the actions, we understand
that it takes place. What disappoints us is the inaction
of the other council members.
Where were the incoming members of the council
during the appointment of Romine? Why didn't another
council member bring to a screeching'halt the interro-
gation of a planning commission member?
Although one can play at politics, it also only takes
one to break up the game.

ISLANDERSM IN


MARCH 24, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 18
V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
Tomara Kafka, Features Editor
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Jack Egan
Rick Fleury
Jeannie Friedman
David Futch
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Darla Becker
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Kristy Hatfield
V Production
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster
R



With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5408 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK


By Egan


I YOUR OINION I


Chill out, dude
RE: letters March 17 issue. Mark Ratliff, Anna Maria.
Hey man, mellow out. This is Island life. You just
have to learn to leave the Island a little earlier otherwise
move to the mainland of hustle and bustle.
Maybe you should try using the Cortez way next time.
Lastly, I agree 100 percent with W.RK Schooler on the
Jet-ski problem.
Plus: Do we actually pay some guy to drive the
"beach rake" which does absolutely nothing but leave tire
tracks in the sand?
CA. Fletcher, Anna Maria Island
Islander works magic again
Thanks for running the photo of the unidentified fish-
erman in the March 17 issue. It worked. The fisherman's
son, John Martens of Holmes Beach, said, "That's my
dad!" Local anglers said they were jealous of his catch.
Carolyne Norwood, president,
Anna Maria Island Historical Society
What a difference a word makes
In the March 17 issue of the Islander Bystander I was
misquoted as saying, "I'm very disgusted because his wife
took ajob at the Sandbar Restaurant," referring to our new
Public Works Director, Don Tarantola's conflict of inter-
est as code enforcement officer for Anna Maria.
What I actually said was, "I'm very disappointed,"
meaning I was let down by his inability to fulfill his re-
sponsibility in the matter.
Thank you for clearing up this mis-quote.
Dorothy McChesney, Commissioner, City ofAnna Maria
McClash credibility like anchor
Some people have a way with 841 words. On March 16,
Joe McClash told Islanders "we must work together," not be
"so demanding" as he spoke of "trust." We recall, however,
recent references to Islanders as "knee-jerk" dissidents.
He compares an above-reproach poll, in which some
2,476 voters took part, to a Longboat bridge referendum
wherein a touted 70 percent who voted "his way" was
only 22.5 percent of the population.
Islander Westwood Fletcher COULDN'T represent
the Island on the MPO we had NO seat then! Those he
claims "endorsed" a 65-foot bridge in 1989 represented
.006 percent of population.


He ignores Florida Department of Transportation
options, and that it WASN'T a mandated planning hear-
ing! He skips the unprecedented 900 citizens who re-
sponded, county-wide, to equally bogus October DOT
hearings, and opposed his goals by a 95 percent to 5 per-
cent margin (7-1 of more than 60 speakers.)
Doing his part, Joe provided false bridge facts to the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection, urged miti-
gating mangroves and seagrass, and suggested fill from Palma
Sola Bay, all on County Commission letterhead.
He is infamous for exhibited contempt and parliamen-
tary repression toward Island leaders, and unilaterally tried to
unseat the current Island Transportation Planning Organiza-
tionrepresentativeto the MetropolitanPlanning Organization.
Representing our district, his record seemed to many
more akin to betrayal. At DOT's hearings, an Islander
suggested his recall but Joe wasn't there.
Three Island cities' and Longboat Key's elected of-
ficials petitioned for staggered half-hour bridge openings,
but Joe's letter to the U.S. Coast Guard in direct opposi-
tion to Island wishes is classic.
His comments on wind are from a 1989 National
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration letter to
a man in Ft. Myers. He ignores the paragraph which states
data was taken on offshore oil rigs and sea buoys; that Dr.
Sheets, in mid-1993, addressed specifically the Anna
Maria Bridge, stating the lower you build it, the longer
you can use it, providing graphs indicating a 300 percent
hazard increase between 27 feet and 80 feet which could
entrap 40-60 percent of the population in an evacuation.
"Meteorologist" McClash wrote that Miami's
Rickenbacher bridge didn't close during Hurricane Andrew;
officials and theMiamiHeral documentitout of service for
37 hours.
He projects span failure during evacuations with full
knowledge all spans are locked down long before hurri-
cane velocity winds; that no ambulance has, in 37 years,
been span-blocked.
Complicit with DOT deceit the Anna Maria Bridge has
only 17.5-foot navigational clearance, he's fully aware it is
actually 25 feet He concludes calling for "maintaining our
quality of life." Tragically, the Commish, pursuing HIS
agenda, has fabricated his own credibility level which, out
here on the Islands, could be used as a boat anchor.
Jim Kissick, Bradenton Beach


uLHO ARE ALLTM'Obe
PEOPLE''...* AND
.-Orr'S WiTH -e4E
"MAWC Mt-S J" Joe, cEI'eIe
urroTTO ?// c&TAt(NL'' tcfr
o/UR Ft CUJI...
IT4r FA CinM A ./
GrlM00P BROOM -rtvE ISLAND.
r, r


KEEP AN
'EYE ON US ?!


I











THOSE WERE THE lAY
By June Alder -----


The Holmes Beach Airport when there was a Holmes Beach airport.

AN AFFAIR

TO REMEMBER


Springfest in Holmes Beach two
weekends ago was an affair to remember.
Happy crowds for each picture-perfect
day. Treasures and treats for one and all.
The arts and crafts show was a complete
success proving that the city did some-
thing right back in 1966 when it purchased
the former airstrip for public use.
If you read last week's column, you
know that the strip was built in a few days
for an Esther Williams moviein 1948. But
it was in use for 25 years, permitting afflu-
ent tourists and flying enthusiasts to make
their arrival on Anna Maria Island in style.
At one time an air taxi made $5tound trips
to St. Petersburg from the field. When the
Island flying club hosted an aviators lun-
cheon at Pete Reynard's their bright air-
craft alighting one after another on the
greensward put one in mind of a convoca-
tion of butterflies.
The field definitely gave the Island a
certain cachet.
But it was really a private conve-
nience for the few. The owners of the land
weren't interested in turning it into a full-
fledged airport with a hangar and the re-
quired safety equipment. So in 1966 the
city bought the area from the families of
the late Jack Holmes and his partners at the
bargain price of $4,000.
Yet the city did nothing more than
keep the grass mowed, and after a while
the town was divided into pro-airport and
anti-airport factions.
In 1970 a small plane nose-dived into


Watson's bayou, within a short distance of a
row of houses on Key Royale Drive. Then
the battle really heated up, leading to a refer-
endum in 1972. The "Save Our Airport"
crowd won by a 4 to 1 vote. Trouble was, no
one knew where the money would come
from to meet modern aviation standards.
What finally did the airport in was
another plane crash, into the boat basin
next to Pete Reynard's. This time two
people were injured. And when it came
out that it would cost a half million dollars
to make the FAA happy, the battle was
over. The strip was officially closed in
June 1973.
In the two decades since'then the
empty land, higgledy-piggledy, has be-
come the site of several tennis courts, a
shuffleboard court, city maintenance
buildings, a library building and a
firehouse. It's even used as a driving
range. Luckily the greensward in front of
city hall has been left as "open space" for
such events as the Springfest.
Isn't it about time this valuable pub-
lic space got an attractive name (City Hall
Park ugh!) and some amenities to go
with it. Like a band shell or outdoor stage
and good restrooms.
How about calling it simply, "The
Green." Like New England towns and
NYC's Central Park have. Then maybe
we would become famous for our "Con-
certs On the Green," "Theatre On the
Green" whatever.
Let's recapture some of that old cachet.


It was America's longest war until
Viet Nam. It brought about the expulsion
of a people from their Florida homeland.
It marked the end of a unique multi-racial
community that had endured for three cen-
turies on Tampa Bay.
It destroyed what was probably Anna
Maria Island's first organized settlement.
The dramatic story of the Second
Seminole War and our Island's role in it
will unfold in the coming weeks leading
up to the Centennial Celebration in May
of the arrival of George Emerson Bean
and other homesteaders in the early 1890s.
The first episode next week will be
about the famous "Dade Massacre" on
Christmas Week of 1835 when a hundred
American soldiers marched away from
Fort Brooke (Tampa) and never came
back. They were ambushed and killed at


the beginning of ~'.
a war that
would ..-
bethe t
Indians'
brave but "
doomed last
stand.
Ihave ".
taken the liberty
to fictionalize minor
details in connection
with the major protag-
onist in the story, William
Bunce sea captain, fishery
operator and signer of Florida's first
Consitution in 1838. But in all other re-
spects I believe this account to be solidly
based on fact.
* June Alder


Anna Maria and the
Seminole War of 1835-42


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 7 EB


RELAX!
W/e can help!







MAT CAT

Carpet Upholstery Cleaning



Dry Foam, Dries Fast!.
We never use steam!

We have happy customers ...

S"Thank you, Jon. You did a
very nice job on my carpet. I'll call
you next year for sure."
Marie Buchheit, Holmes Beach

Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer


For fast, thorough, friendly service call
me Jon Kent, Island resident and owner
of Fat Cat. Call 778-2882,8 AM to 5 PM.
CALL TODAY!



MEMBER: ANNA MARIA & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE









THE NEWS!

We mail the Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $26 per year. It's
the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community hap-
penings, people features and special events ... even the latest real estate trans-
S actions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you need to stay
S in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only newspaper that
gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is a free, community newspaper. If you don't live
here and you would like to subscribe, or if you want to mail the paper to a friend
or relative, please fill out the form below and mail or.drop off at our office with
a check in the proper amount.
BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS
0 One Year: $26 O 6 Months: $18 [ 3 Months: $10

U.S. FIRST CLASS AND CANADIAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
0 One Year: $125 0 6 Months: $75
MAIL TO:
ADDRESS

CITY STATE ZIP
START DATE:_


ISLANDERSS "I "

THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Island Shopping Center 5408.Marina Drive
T Holmes Beach FL 34217
(Between D. Coy Ducks and Chez Andre)
. 778-7978
lii lli liillii llllii'llllliiliillillililli







[] PAGE 8 0 MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


I YOUR OPINION I


Garst-McClash point/counterpoint


J & J Graphics
5304 Holmes Blvd. H.B.
778-6541

JUST IN: T-shirts Sweat Shirts *
Sport Shirts Beach Towels Caps *
Longsleeve T's & Visors
All Imprinted with Anna Maria Island Designs!

Featuring
Dolls & Bears
EASTER BUNNIES & CHICKS
Also, New 1994 Madame
Alexander Dolls
(Other Gift Items Available)
We've Moved to a New Location!
9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza Anna Maria
Hours: Mon-Sat 10-5 778-4456
After Hours by Appointment FAX: 778-1906


S 778-4655


Editors Note: Islander Bunny Garst has taken umbrage
with Manatee County Commissioner Joe McClash's
comments on Island issues. Below are McClash's com-
ments (in italic) and Garst's response.

McClash: The county did support the trolley effort
and set aside over $30,000 for the trolley project. This
was 50percent of what was needed The other half was
to come from the islands. The islands did not budget any
money toward the trolley, and some island cities opposed
the trolley.
Garst: A paltry $30,000 from the county commis-
sion for the island trolley is a farce. It would have been
far more beneficial to the mainlanders than to the island-
ers. We don't have to worry about where we are going
to park once we get here. As usual, it was Longboat Key
that opposed it, perhaps because a trolley is not capable
of hauling their garbage over our bridges to the Mana-
tee County dump.
McClash: The straw poll taken by the Save Anna
Maria group was in fact a poll, which is a sampling of
opinion carried on outside the privacy of the ballot box
The SAM group was outside the voting precinct asking
people as they went to vote if they would give their opin-
ion on the bridge. Ofcourse, SAM would give their rea-
soning to be against the bridge and there was no secret
to how someone voted This method is in no way simi-
lar to the Longboat Key referendum.
Garst: Because the City of Anna Maria voted
against a referendum, the straw poll was our only re-
course. It was conducted under rigid guidelines. Voters
were not influenced by SAM at the polls. It was strictly
against the rules. Locked boxes were supplied for the
ballots by Bob Sweat's office and were kept locked, at
the Bradenton Beach Police Department, after election
day until they were delivered to Roser Church for count-
ing. The only words on the ballot were:
"Do you want a65-foot clearance fixed-span bridge
on Manatee Avenue connecting the mainland with Anna
Maria Island? Yes, No, Signature, Print your name."
That was it. Out of 2,476 islanders who voted in the poll,
79 percent voted against this bridge. I would hardly call
that many voters a "sampling."
McClash: You state the islandwas not representedprior
to having an appointed seat on the MPO. The late County
Commissioner Westwood Fletcherfrom Holmes Beach
servedon the MPO. All county commissioners prior to 1990
were electedcounty-wide and infact represented the islands.
Citizens and elected officials from the islands were aware
of the MPO plans for a 65-foot fixed bridge to replace the
1957 drawbridge. They even endorsed these plans. The is-
lands did not lack representation. The fact is that the repre-
sentation today has even swayed back and forth on their
support of the bridge issues.
Garst: The local newspapers are correct The island
is not now, nor has it been, properly represented on the
county commission. Islanders have not "swayed back
and forth" on their position against the bridge. Only you,
Judas Joe, have done that in order to get our vote. Once
you were elected, the islanders were betrayed.
McClash: My position is guided by what Ifeel rep-
resents the view of over 200,000 residents of Manatee
County. It is my responsibility to research the facts and
make a decision. Replacing a drawbridge which mal-
functions and stops cars for an average offive minutes
three times an hour with a safe fixed bridge is a good de-
cision which will benefit our county. A fixed bridge will
not draw more people to the islands. It will, however,
provide a safer transportation network for those who
travel over the existing bridge.
Garst: A. "It is my responsibility to research the facts
and make a decision." Nice words, J.J., but they mean
nothing. If you HAD done your homework, you would
have known that only a handful of the several hundred
people that attended the October 1993 bridge hearing
supported your bridge.
B. Where do you get the idea that a 65-foot-high bridge
is safe? Certainly not from the "facts." Unfortunately, your
"position" is guided solely by your own pursuits.
McClash: In reference to how the new fixed bridge
will be affected by wind during evacuations, the facts are
clear in both letters from Bob Sheets of the National Hur-
ricane Center. He says there is little difference in wind
velocity at the different elevations of the current bridge
and the proposed fixed bridge. His letters state, "If(hur-
ricane) winds arrived with a heavy shower or a rain
band moving over the area where winds might increase


from 30 knots to 50 knots, there would essentially be no
time difference for the arrival of 45-knot winds at the two
elevations." He also states that "with unstable atmo-
spheric conditions associated with the hurricane, there
would be little difference between the wind speed at the
70-foot elevation versus that at the 25-foot level" and
"winds in an open environment near the surface can be
nearly as strong as those at the top of the boundary
layer. This reflects the 65-footfixed bridge would be as
safe as the existing bridge, if not safer when you don't
have to worry about mechanical failure of the drawbridge
mechanism during an evacuation.
Garst A. You conveniently omitted, in your out-of-con-
text quotes from Bob Sheets, his most important words, "in-
deed, the lower you can build your bridges where they still
clear all other hazards such as storm surge or shipping, the
more likely they are to stay open [to traffic] during high wind
events with the exception of extreme events."
B. You forgot to mention the young man in his truck
that was killed when he blew off of the Merritt Island 65-
foot-high bridge during 1993's March No-name storm.
C. You neglected to tell us that a 65-foot-highbridge will
have to be closed to high-profile vans and trucks, including
emergency vehicles. If winds are in excess of 40 to 45 mph,
which is a common occurrence on this barrier island.
D. You also left out the fact that drawbridges are kept
in a "down" position during hurricane evacuations. If you
don't know all of the above, shame on you.
McClash: [You] should highlight the good things the
county has worked.with the islands on over the years.
Manatee County led the beach renourishment project for
Anna Maria Island. One-third of the countywide tourist
tax helped to pay the cost for this project and for future
maintenance. The county commissioners serving on the
MPO along with the DOT have worked with the cities of
Holmes Beach and Anna Maria Island to find the money
needed for bridge replacements. The county operates the
library on Anna Maria Island It also provides bulldozers
and dump trucks to help clean the roads when storms
wash up boulders andsand on roads. The islanddoes not
have to worry about water, sewer or garbage. The county
takes care of all that as well. The county Emergency
Medical Service comes to the aid of islanders when emer-
gencies arise. The list can go on and on, but even a rea-
sonable person can see there are many issues where the
county and island cities work together without differences.
Garst: A. It was Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie
Pierola, not Manatee County, that led the beach
renourishment program. Come on, Joe, give credit where
credit is due!
B. Most of the tourist tax that paid for this
renourishment came from tourists that use the beach, not
Manatee County residents.
C. Both MPO and DOT refuse to listen to ANY op-
position to a 65-foot-high bridge. You connived the have
Kent Chetlain, who was next in line for the chairmanship,
removed from the MPO so that you could take his place.
As soon as you became chairman, you tried to illegally
throw our island representative off of the MPO because
he disagreed with your posture on the bridge.
D. We do not want you to find bridge replacement
money, we want you to rehab the bridges we have at a
fraction of the cost to the taxpayer.
E. The three island cities are entitled to the same ser-
vices as the rest of the cities in Manatee County. We cer-
tainly pay enough for them.
Finally, J.J., you touchingly wrote "Our county is a
great place to live, and I will continue to strive to make
decisions that maintain our quality of life." When you say
"our," you must be referring to your family, because you
continually demonstrate over and over again your total
lack of respect for anyone else's quality of life. Your ac-
tions as a commissioner have been exclusively in your
own best interest Get off your soapbox, Joe. We don't
believe a word you say.


Letters welcomed by
Islander Bystander
Letters should have the writer's signature, a printed
or typed name, a full address and a daytime telephone
number. Brief and timely letters on a single topic have the
best chance of being printed fully. Letters should be no
longer than 400 words. We reserve the right to condense
any letter. Send letters to: Editor, Islander Bystander,
5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217.


iea table's

SWIMSUITS
"The Island's Best Selection"
...arriving daily!

r -
BRING THIS AD FOR
S5.00 OFF YOUR SWIMSUIT
I PURCHASE OFFER EXPIRES
MARCH 31, 1994
----------- F J
Mon.-Sat. 9 to 6 S e
Sunday 10 to 5 Stable ,s .
Buttonwood i ES
Plaza
3170 Gulf of Mexico Dr. -
Longboat Key, Florida 1 '
383-2288
SERVING THE ISLANDS SINCE 1966






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I MARCH 24, 1994 E PAGE 9 [Ii

Holmes Beach planning commission

appointment process questioned oar cus mers san -
S(4r~rrh YirCP ,; 1Is neorl P"


Discussion surrounding an appointment to the
Holmes Beach Planning Commission by the city council
at last week's meeting was opened after Mayor Pat Geyer
read the following statement:
'Irespectanyone who makes awell-thought-out decision
and stands by it I would hope that all citizens of Holmes
Beach feel that way. Atourlast meeting Betty Hill, who vol-
unteered to serve ontheplanning commission, was grilled on
her beliefs and her opinions. It was like a mini senate confir-
mation hearing. It was totally uncalled for.
"She has been a loyal and faithful citizen of Holmes
Beach for many years, working as city clerk, as council
person and as a volunteer. We have truly lost a friend. The
people, especially a lady in the audience, made me feel
ashamed for the City of Holmes Beach. I hope you will
accept my apology, Betty,"
At the council's March 1 meeting, candidate Betty
Hill was questioned at length by Councilman Don
Howard. Following that, she was confronted by a mem-
ber of the audience, and withdrew her application.
Planning Commission Chairman Gabe Simches ad-
dressed the council, "Volunteers who wish to give some-
thing back to the town they live in are not running for
political office," he stressed. "I think public sessions are
wrong because there's no way you can control the nature
and style of questions. It politicizes the process, and tends
to discourage volunteers from coming forth."
Simches suggested the council improve the application
form to gain more detailed information or question candidates
individually. He also asked council to delay a decision on an
appointment until a full council is in session.
Councilwoman Mary Ellen Reichard defended the
process and said the council needs to question candidates
to get to know them and their qualifications in order to
make an intelligent decision. She agreed that guidelines
on questions could be formulated.
Bohnenberger said the application form and process


can be improved upon when the council adopts its new
legislative procedures code.
Holmes Beach resident John Kreidler agreed with
Simches.
"I don't see why someone who is trying to give
back to the city should have to go through a public in-
terrogation if there are other ways this can be handled,"
he said. "Gabe has suggested several ways."
The newest applicants, architect Gene Aubry and
real estate agent Dolly Young responded to the querie
as to their vision for the Holmes Beach of the future.
Aubry said, "I envision Holmes Beach to be a beau-
tiful place. That's why I came here. I envision it to stay
that way..I envision it to be a more beautiful place."
'My vision for Holmes Beach is exactly what it was
when I came here in 1973 and took up full time residence
in 1984 and that is to recognize the economy of Holmes
Beach is, and always will be, tourism. To remember that
those of us who live here were once tourists and it's been
made a comfortable place for us because of the revenues that
come in from tourism," said Young.
Council had only three members present: Howard,
Reichard and Carol Whitmore. Councilwoman Billie Mar-
tini was out of town. Rich Bohnenberger had resigned his
council seat to run for mayor effective on election day,
March 8, and was not yet sworn in as mayor.
Reichard noted that if two members of council were
split between the two applicants, the third member of the
three-member council would make the decision. She asked
that the matter be tabled until the new council meets.
Young protested and said she would remove her
name from consideration if the council would proceed
immediately to appoint Aubry.
Council agreed to allow Young to withdraw and
voted for Aubry's appointment. Whitmore dissented,
stating that she felt the decision was political and a full
council should make the decision.


I hate Mondays Photo courtesy Stephen Bell
Kieth Rogers was headed east on the Manatee Avenue bridge Monday morning, March 7, between 6:15 and 6:45
am. when he lost control of his Ford pick-up truck The truckjumped the curb, striking the guard rail of the
bridge's sidewalk Kieth was not hurt, but his truck did not fare as well.
I I


'Horsey' hooray for
Can you top this? One of the runners-up in last
week's Island horseshoe competition is 92 years old
and, as if that's not enough she's a her.
Holmes Beach resident Gladys Graham who
obviously is not intimidated by the male species and
has no intention of growing old was a member of
the team which placed second in the increasingly
popular Saturday morning matches. Off-Islander Bob
Crorey was Graham's teammate.


womanhood, age
First place winners were Clyde Crosslin of
Bradenton and Al Frattare of Holmes Beach.
Horseshoe organizers and the Islander Bystander
are ready to sponsor a city versus city competition, com-
plete with a traveling trophy, as soon as all three cities
are ready for the challenge. The only thing lacking is a
larger number of Bradenton Beach participants.
Next match: Saturday, March 26, 10 a.m. at
Anna Maria City Hall.


Doing anything special for Easter?
If your church or organization has made Easter plans, March 25, at noon.
please let the Islander Bystander know about it. Easter Drop your notice to the Islander Bystander office
Sunday is April 3, and in order to publish advanced no- at 5408 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, or FAX to 778-
tice of your events the deadline for press releases Friday, 9392.


BOOKS MUSIC TOYS GAMES GIFTS
Whole Brain Goodness!
5340-F Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-5990
S&S Plaza next to the Sweet Spon


SPRING FLING
Save 30% on
these famous brands
March 1 thru March 31
Gorham Oneida
Lenox Royal Doulton
Noritake RoyalWorcester/
., 4 Towle Spode
Villeroy & Boch
Yamazaki Reed & Barton
Wedgwood Johnson Bros.
Fitz & Floyd China
Sale applies to in-stock and special orders
Holiday patterns excluded from this sale
SSome patterns excluded
Take advantage now of these
SPECIAL SAVINGS on
China, Crystal Flatware.

Lively Gifts & KEtchen
Beachway Plaza 75th St. & Manatee Ave.
792-0487


Mix and Match

SWIMWEAR

SEPARATES


-
























available at:





9801 GULF DRIVE* ANNAMARA, FLORIDA
778-6877





[] PAGE 10 a MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Is it an island or a key?


By David Futch
Islander Correspondent
People gravitate to islands like lemmings marching
to the sea.
Witness Sunday's migration to Anna Maria by what
seemed like most everyone living east of 75th Street and
north of the Green Bridge from Palmetto.
And why not. The draw of sun, sea, sand and young
tan bodies on the beaches during spring break is irresist-
ible.
My family has lived on islands from Gulfport to the
Florida Keys for a couple of centuries, not for fun and
sun, but primarily out of necessity and survival.
Fishing allows us to bring home the bacon and grou-
per. Tarpon fishing Boca Grande Pass puts money in the
bank to be used to fend off the dog days of summer when
the tourists are as difficult to find as a cool breeze.
The Roberts' side of my family sailed from Green
Turtle Cay, Bahamas, around 1850, settling in Key West.
My great-grandfather, Samuel Leonidas Roberts, was
born on a schooner near Caxambas in the Ten Thousand
Islands in 1882. Sam's father, Thomas Roberts, made his
fortunes as a Key West shipwrecker.
My grandfather, Daniel Webster Futch, was the
youngest of 12 children born to Frank Futch and Sarah
Melissa Slaughter of Gulfport. During prohibition, Dan
would ease his 28-foot open boat across the turbulent
Straits of Florida and into Havana picking up 100 or so
cases of rum bound for Chicago via Key West and Boca
Grande.
In 1916, the Futches moved from Punta Gorda to
Gasparilla Village on the north tip of Gasparilla Island.
According to Grandpa, "We moved because times were
better at Gasparilla and we got more money for our fish.
There wasn't many people there. Maybe six."
So it is with myself. Another Futch finding a new
home this time on your Island.
Now that we've met informally in print, here's a
puzzling question about islands that surfaced a couple of
weeks ago at a local watering hole when a patron posed
this to the bartender: "What's the difference between an
island and a key? If Egmont Key is an island, why do
they call it a key? Why don't they call Longboat Key
Longboat Island?"
The bartender was glad to answer promptly that he
did not know.
Someone said the difference is one of size and eleva-
tion. An island is a land mass smaller than a continent
surrounded by water while a key is more akin to a reef
or low island.
That answer failed to satisfy, which led me to search
out the answer in the definitive source for word mean-
ing and derivation, The Oxford English Dictionary (sec-
ond edition, 1988).
OED contains 21,728 pages in 20 volumes. Every
A relative newcomer to


rurcn


our Island David Futch
is a fifth generation
Floridian, former Boca
Grande fishing guide
and the former editor of
the Gasparilla Gazette, a
community weekly
newspaper he helped
found in Boca Grande,
Fla. Look for his byline
in upcoming issues on
everything from little
league baseball to big
league sport fishing.


J Island


Key I


word in the English language is included as well as slang
terms in common usage.
Definitions for island take up more than a page and
the word has its roots in Old English (ealand) and Middle
English (iland), pertaining to water, watery, watered and
hence "watered place, meadow, island." King Aelfred first
used it in 888 A.D.
That still doesn't help much in terms of the "key"
versus "island" debate.
This from the OED on island. "La. A piece of land
completely surrounded by water." Other OED definitions
state an island is "an elevated piece of land surrounded by
a marsh," "an insulated portion of a group of cells ... such
as the island or islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, a
group of insulin secreting cells, "a small isolated ridge or
structure between the lines in fingerprints."
Nope. None of those fit.
Another meaning pointed out by OED scholars is "in-
sular." Now we're getting closer, but the condition of
being insular applies to both island and key.
Back to square one.
Turning to the word "key," the OED states it is a low
island, sand bank or reef, such as those common in the
West Indies or off the coast of Florida."
Therefore, the words "key" and "island" have strik-
ing similarities. Now on to the a derivative of "key" as it
pertains to the word "cay."
"Cay" originates with the Spanish word "cayo,"
which means "shoal, rock, barrier reef." Old French de-
scribes it as "cay, caye" for "sandbank or bar."
Now we're getting somewhere. But how do you ex-
plain Anna Maria Island sitting smack dab between
Egmont Key and Longboat Key with the general makeup
and appearance of the sisters they are- but with differ-
ent last names? Go figure.
The venerable OED, with its desire for preciseness,
continues to throw the gas of confusion into the fire of
uncertainty.
Let's do what they do in government We'll call an
expert. She is Joann Mossa, assistant professor of geog-
raphy and geology at the University of Florida.
Here is what Mossa had to say on the difference be-
tween island and key, or cay.
"Let me put it to you this way. There are dictionary
definitions and there are people definitions and there are
classification definitions. In general, most keys are made
of coral or limestone base, while an island can be of rock,
coral, or volcanic material.
"In this part of the country, key is used to describe a
lot of things. Here is one thing that may or may not con-
fuse you. Key is coral, island is anything.
"But really the difference between key and island
isn't clear. It's like the difference between a stream, a
brook and a river. It's a problem of classification and each
.person's classification and definition is different."
Glad we got that cleared up.
Now that you know where you live or at least what
you live on I'll start bringing you stories about who
lives here and why.
Wonder what the difference is between lizard and
chameleon?



A sure sign of
spring
These white orchid trees
helped usher in first day
of spring last Sunday.
They were planted in
1960 by the Safos family
on Gulf Drive, in Holmes
Beach. Alexandra Safos
says people comment on
their beauty every spring
when they bloom.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kajka


Watch for a complete list of holiday
events and Easter Services in the next
issue of your community newspaper ...

IISAN)DERMEIE8D7 m
778-7978


_
L 7
*-r~u I






THE









Steel
Magnolias
The women at Truvy's
beauty shop gather
around Tracey
MacLeod (Shelby) are
(left to right) Jan
Docking (Truvy), Marge
McKeever (Ouiser),
Georgette Thomas
(Clairee), Janice Craft
(M'Lynn) and Jennifer
Lukas (Annelle).
Islander Photo:
Tomara Kajka


ISLANDER BYSTANDER MARCH 24, 1994 PAGE 11 jI
A ,C -" S. .

Style Artst
A ULAI. SAL-ONA
.,_ 5A .. *o Style/Image Consulting
00ooo 00 ooc Photography Make-Up/Hair
0000ooooJ > c Private Studio Atmosphere
0ooo '00 c "A Drive Worthwhile"
000
00000
Doooo \ oc

0000c
00 32' 0000000eWs
0000c
0000 BaetnFoid 40


Women's beauty, strength


provide humor, pathos


By Tomara Kafka
S .. .. Features Editor
Steel Magnolias, with a cast of six women, is worth
a six-star rating. This theatrical treat, directed by Sara
Marshall, is showing at Island Players Theatre through
April 2,
The setting of Steel Magnolias is inside the walls of
Truvy's beauty shop; it's the mid-'80s and somewhere in
Louisiana. The two beauty-stall chairs sit on opposite
sides of the stage, across from each other excellent for
tension building between characters. The overhang in
front of the stage is a magnolia tree, perfect symbol of the
South, flowing with leaves and full of flowers.
Truvy (played by Jan Docking) states her philosophy
clearly in the beginning of the play, and there it hangs on
a plaque gracing the wall of the beauty shop: "There is no
such thing as natural beauty." And her addendum: "Re-
member that or we're all out of a job."
The theme of Steel Magnolias deals with the spiritual
development of six women. Their seemingly "natural
beauty" is groomed and nurtured within the boundaries of
Truvy's converted garage/beauty shop.
And because it's about women, the play is about
emotional issues. Steel Magnolias has wonderfully funny
moments and the play effectively builds to crescendoing
pathos. The audience laughs out loud at the pointed hu-
mor and, in the end, cries along with these strong women.


If you've seen the movie (and I have many times -
it's one of my favorites) the first thing you'll notice is
the lack of men in the stage cast. Steel Magnolias con-
cerns six women, and their relationships with the men
in their lives are peripheral fare.
And you'll recognize some of the great lines such
as Annelle's (played by Jennifer Lukas) Southern-
twanged pledge: "I swear to you my personal tragedy
will not interfere with my ability to do hair."
Or when Shelby (played by Tracey MacLeod) explains
her coping with her own physical limitations to her
mother M'Lynn (played by Janice Craft): "I'd rather
have 30 minutes of wonderful than a lifetime of noth-
ing special."
While all the performances are strong and charac-
ters are individualized and recognizable, Georgette Tho-
mas is a great Clairee and Marge McKeever is hysteri-
cally funny as Ouiser. Janice Craft (playing M'Lynn)
does a stunning job in the pivotal closing scene, and we
all cry for the shared grief she invokes within our hearts.
The two younger actresses, Tracey MacLeod and Jen-
nifer Lukas, stand strong amid their more experienced
counterparts.
If you're a community theater fan, this is a must-see
show. Island Players Theatre is located at the corer of
Gulf Drive and Pine Avenue, in Anna Maria. Tickets are
$9 for all performances.


k". ." ^'^ ',:.:-K^. -


Holmes Beach officials sworn in slander Photoim: Pat c It,.,,
Left to right, Holmes Beach Council niitnber: Luke Co, rint"v. Pat Geyer and Carol Whitmore and Mayor Rich
Bohnenberger were sworn into office by Manatee County Supervisor of Elections Bob Sweat, Monday at city hall.


Easter
Is Just
Around The
Corner...
We have a
great selection
of dresses in
Missies and
Petites ...
* Carol Anderson
* Willi
* Schrader
* Peter
Popovitch


Open Mn-Sat. 9-5 RESORT WEAR
Island Shopping Center. Holmes Beach 778-1161


/ ur tran

%) %\ iiMarh tt




FINE IMPORTED EUROPEAN GIFTS
Russian Lacquer Boxes
German Angels Wooden Carvings
Unique & Rare Collector Items
from the Old World
Tucked Above The Columbia Restaurant
on St. Armands Circle
88-5024
Hard to find'... But Worth the Effort
2 North Blvd. of the Presidents, St. Armands Circle





iJm PAGE 12 0 MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

'Island Poet' Bud Atteridge knows it


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
He signs his poems "Bud Atteridge, The Island Poet"
And if Anna Maria Island were to appoint a poet lau-
reate, it would certainly be Bud Atteridge.
Although that's not what he started out to accomplish.
"I always used to write poems for friends, for birth-
days and anniversaries" says Atteridge, a bright and lively
man. "But they were always risque. Your newspaper
couldn't publish them."
Hedidn'tthink about ever publishing his poetry until, one
day in 1980, Betty Kissick at the now-defunct Beachcomber
newspaper, asked him to write a poem for Christmas.
That was the beginning of a new pastime for Atteridge.
Now, he says, "I write at least two poems every
week." And you can read his handiworks, for he publishes
regularly in the Islander Bystander, as well as self-pub-
lishing three books of his own poetry.
He will soon have a fourth as the recent result of an
ocean cruise he took._
"On the last cruise, it was a Russian ship," he says, "I
was sitting by the pool working hard on a poem." A man
came over to him, he says, and asked what he was doing
- he thought Atteridge was writing long letters home.
Atteridge read him the poem and the gentleman in-
sisted he bring his poems to the cruise ship's amateur hour
that evening.
"I read the poems," says Atteridge. "There were about
600 people in the audience. A fellow came over to me and
he said, 'I want to buy the material you read tonight' I said
I thought I might make a book out of them myself."
But, says Atteridge, the man was insistent.
"What do you charge for something like that?"
Atteridge asks philosophically. He didn't know. But he
thought about it and when he returned from the cruise, he
wrote to the man selling the 13'poems for $500.
Atteridge said he was told he could not resell the po-
ems but, he says, "I told him I wanted to be able to use
them around the Island and he said that was okay."
As far as the three books he has self-published, they
may be a little difficult to find these days.
"I had saturated the Island with about 800 of them,"
he says. "I wasn't making any money on them I gave


" v '' i"*a s 1 r
S3S t. .... WJ
'a-
,.7a,
~JlliLI


most of them away anyway."
Then, Atteridge explains, about three or four years
ago, he had a stroke.
"Every one thought I was dying," he laughs heartily,
"and they bought them all."
But he didn't publish again. He finds it humorous that
he was able to get rid of the ones he had.
"I didn't see any reason to print any more because no
one was buying them up to that point, anyway."
Atteridge first came to the Island in the 1940s when
he and his wife Laura visited a friend of hers. They would
stop over for a night on their way back from their vaca-
tions in Miami.
On retirement, the Atteridges moved to Holmes
Beach in the early 1960s. Their two sons Bob, who
lives in Texas, and Bill, in Louisiana worry about their
father since Laura passed away in 1986. They want him
to move closer to them.
But Atteridge says he's all right he stays busy and
active. He works at the St. Bernard Bingo game on
Wednesday nights, he attends the Sunday Pancake break-
fasts and he's an usher at the Sunday services and
"that's not counting the parties and all the stuff going on
around here," he says.
Atteridge is happy with his life.
"I'm satisfied with the way things are," he says. "As


long as I'm able to go by myself. I'm happy and I have
so many friends down here."
People, he says, comment on his poetry all the time.
'They tell me, 'I enjoyed your poem yesterday.' I tell
them, 'I'm glad you found one you like,' he laughs.
Atteridge; who admits to a Scotch/Irish heritage, feels
he didn't have much.choice as to becoming a poet it
must have been fate.
"They say the Irish are poets or kings," he says. "And
I'm no king, so for heaven's sake ...."
The following poem is one from the soon-to-be pub-
lished book of poems by Bud Atteridge:
A wealthy young bride asked her husband to let her
bathe in champagne
And he felt that wasting all that money surely was a
shame.
But he said he might do it andfilled her heart with hope,
For he'd fill the tub with champagne ifshedidn 't use
the soap.
'Cause after the bath was over he'd pull fast one on
his honey
And refill all those bottles and save himself some
money.
So he refilled all those bottles and much to his sur-
prise
He had a pint left over, right there before his eyes.


i't leave ptfadise -itholut s!

























Stay in touch with Island news, people and community events, fishing action, and the real estate market...
S with a subscription to Anna Maria Island's community newspaper. It's the best news on the Island.


IISLANDE


R VUPll^


For information about subscriptions, call (813) 778-7978 or use the handy form on page 7.
You won'twant to be without us.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 13 IJ


Dolls, bears worth more than mere childhood memory


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
"There is a lot of psychology around dolls and bears,"
says Carmen Pedota, "and why people collect them."
Take for example one of the most common of today's
(and yesterday's) little girl dolls Barbie, who celebrates
her 35th birthday this year.
"The psychology with Barbie," says Pedota, "was to
show little girls they could be anything they wanted to be:
doctor, business woman, teacher" along with the many
other professions Barbie has portrayed over her long and
illustrious doll career.
Pedota was brought up to appreciate the intrinsic
valie of dolls and toys. Jean Bach, Pedota's mother, wrote
books on dolls and bears and had the Raggedy Ann An-
tique Doll and Toy Museum in Flemington, N.J. Her
mother's and her professional experience with dolls and
bears adds up to 37 years.
Anything Goes is the antique and collectible doll and
bear shop in-Anna Maria that Pedota and her husband
have co-owned for nine years, as long as they have been
living in Anna Maria.
The shop is a trip into a sentimental place: the dolls,
bears and collectible toys of Anything Goes are hand-
made, unique and lovely.
"Many people come in here looking for that dollar
bear they had as a child," says Pedota. "Those first toys
bring back pleasant memories."
But Pedota, professional toy expert, is more than sim-
ply interested in memories.
She is sponsoring, along with another local toy dealer,
the Fourth Annual Doll, Bear and Miniature Show and
Sale, at the Manatee Civic Center, Saturday, March 26, 10
a.m to 5 p.m., and Sunday March 27, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Marl Davidson, of Marl & Barbie in Bradenton, is the
other sponsor of the show. Davidson, says Pedota, is the
largest Barbie dealer in the world.
Besides the 160 booths of local and out-of-state deal-
ers, special guests will be on hand to meet with fans, give
expert advice, offer special limited editions and to hand-
sign collectors' dolls.
Patricia Rose of Anna Maria is a nationally recog-


Patricia Rose (right), of
Anna Maria, poses with
current Miss America and
the Miss America doll she
was commissioned to
make. Rose will take
orders for the doll at the
show this weekend.
Islander Photo: Tomara Kafka


nized doll maker who created the current Miss America
doll. She will be taking orders for this doll; and she will
have other hand-made dolls for sale. Rose will be avail-
able to sign those dolls or already-purchased dolls that are
brought in by collectors.
Donna Hodges from Bearons of LaJolla, California,
will be offering special limited editions of her "Crystal"
bear. This year's crystal insignia is couched into a little
half shell.
A. Genn Mandeville, a nationally known author and
past president of Madame Alexander, the only American-
made collectors' doll, will fly in from Pennsylvania to
advise on doll and bear appraisals.


Carmen Pedota holds collectors' toys whose
makers, Patricia Rose and Donna Hodges, will be
special guests at the Fourth Annual Doll and Bear
Show and Sale this weekend.


Ni


ISLANDER SflnsueB
"vi SALE


The Islander
Bystander wants your
social and club news.
Call to find out how your
story can become news!
778-7978.


The Hair
Cottage, etc...

Susan
Van Ostenbridge
is now certified
educational consultant
for JOICO
products and an active
member of
Team Joico of Florida
OPEN: Tues. thru Sat.
Facials by Appointment
Gift Certificates
Available
5500 Marina Dr.
Holmes Beach

778-6868


ON MAY 25TH WE ARE OFFERING A EURO-
PEAN CRUISE WITH UNMATCHED VALUE.
11 nights from Venice, and includes Bari, Katakolon &
Lemnos; Greece, Varna, Bulgaria; Odessa, Yalta
9 Ukraine; Instanbul, Turkey; Mykonos, Piraeus, Greece.
Includes air from New York. Second person 50% OFF.

1 15 DAY CRUISE, SAN JUAN TO SAN FRAN-
CISCO includes St. Thomas, Curacao &
Acapulco & complete passage of the Panama
Canal. $1,620.


CorolaisTM Faucets
by KOHLER


Visit our showroom -
LaPensee Plumbing can
help you achieve your
kitchen or bath design.
We are a full service
company, specializing in
repairs, remodeling and
new construction.
THE BOLD LOOK
OFKOHLER.

LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc.
5348 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach
778-5622
State Cert. #RF0049191
State Backflow Tech A09-89-1399


SPECIAL
OFFER:
Fly from Orlando
to Aruba then
enjoy a magnifi-
cent 7 night cruise
to Martinique,
Barbados,
Curacro,
including air

$69500


Going north? Who will look after your home?


Relax!
We can help
0> (:D---n-gl


FAT CAT


H MEWATCH


Is there storm damage? Is the air conditioning working?

Winter residents here's the answer to
peace of mind while you're up north. Fat
Cat Homewatch will check your house or
I condo, making certain all is well.
For peace of mind while you're away,
call me Jon Kent, Island resident
and owner of Fat Cat.

Call todayfor details. 778-2882 or 387-0607
MEMBER ANNA MARIA AND LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE


Palma Sola Square
5501 Manatee Ave. W.

M. KESTEN
APPAREL FOR MEN

792-5334


-7- o i -TY T % r


rRaVEL91





Mfl PAGE 14 I MARCH 24, 1994 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

I l-j~bdLlA Z


Forrest Ardell Rowell
Forrest Ardell Rowell, 81, of Holmes Beach,
died March 12 in Freedom Village.
Born in Boston, Mr. Rowell came to the area from
Hastings-on-Hudsonin 1992. He retired after 47 years
as a physician in Hastings-on-Hudson. He was a 1934
graduate of Brown University and a 1938 graduate of
Tufts Medical School. He was a U.S. Army veteran of
World War II, serving in the Medical Corps as a 35th
Division major. He was a member of the First Reformed
Church of Hastings-on-Hudson.
He is survived by his wife, Ruth W.; four daugh-
ters, Nancy Lewit of Cornwall, N.Y.; Betsy Buckner
of Cardiff by the Sea, Calif.; Susan Mellegard of
Tucson, Ariz.. and Debra Bushey of New Windsor,
N.Y.; six sons, Forrest R., of Carlsbad, N.M.; Chris-
topher, of Alexandria, Va., Bruce of Milan, Italy,
John, of Hastings-on-Hudson, David and Douglas,
both of Stamford, Conn.; and 23 grandchildren.
Memorial services will be at a later date in
Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. National Cremation Society,
Sarasota chapter, was in charge of the arrangements.


The Island Poet
I'm sure everyone in this country thought we were
very smart,
When we were first to take an atom and pull it all
apart.
And how our atomic bomb put an end to our great
war,
And gave our enemies the idea that they better not
start anymore.
But we have invented so many things the third world
couldn't guess,
That has given us the idea that somehow we are the
very best.
And everyone of us thinks we know a lot more than
our bosses,
Then why are we suddenly eating bran and oats, a
food we only gave to horses.
Bud Atteridge

Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist

r Now Accepting Appointments


MM0003995
MA0012461


SGQift Certificates Available
T House Calls

792-3758


By Katharine Wight
Islander School Correspondent
Islander Gib Bergquist has done some statistical re-
search on this year's Science Fair. He personally knows
every high schooler who won, and found that out of 31
high school winners, seven are, or were at one time, from
the Island. As he puts it, "A whopping 22.58 percent!"
Gib doesn't want to take anything away from other
schools and teachers that have helped develop these stu-
dents, but has traced all the students back to who he be-
lieves was the "key" to their success.
Ted Swank, who recently died of a heart attack, was
a teacher at Anna Maria Elementary School. He was one
of the first people to start nurturing the scientific instinct
in his fourth grade students, and fourth and fifth graders
could always go to him for help on their projects. These
former students have gone on winning and carrying the
torch.
As Gib puts it, they are Ted Swank's "living legacy."
Do any of these Island kids' names sound familiar?
And what do Jimmy Brackman and Melissa Eddington
have in common?
They were the first-place winners (elementary school
division) in the County Science Fair. Twenty-five kids (or
young adults, whichever you prefer) from Anna Maria
Island took awards at the GTE-sponsored Science Fair.
An exhibit of the finalists was held recently at DeSoto
Square Mall, where the final winners were selected.
Other (Island) elementary school winners are Lucina
Courtney, Jesse Ferguson, Kaelan Richards, Natalie
VanWormer and Suzanne Wight all second place win-
ners. Janae Haupt, Alan Jenkins, Shawna Rigney and
Kristopher Smith all received third place and Jason
Loomis, Vaughn James, Misty Kinney, Beatrice Pohl-
Wilmott and Travis Wicklund received honorable men-
tion.
A first place winner in the middle school category
was Katie Jenkins, who won the Kodak award. Islander
Dixie Ferguson received second, Paul Esformes walked
off with a third, and Nate Bergbom took honorable men-
tion.
In the high school category Mike Fara, Mark


^ffiexr 49m3 al e r rmmtmU t U [tn rurd1
The Rev.FrankW. An Interdenominational Christian Church
Hutchison, Pastor Serving the Community Since 1913
Come, Celebrate Christ
March 27 Messiah Concerts
2 and 7:30 PM in Sanctuary
Saturday 5 PM Seaside Worship Resumes
Magnolia St. at the Gulf
Sunday 9 am. Sunday School
9 am. 1st Worship '
10:30 a.m. 2nd Worship
10:30 a.m. Children's Church
Transportation & Nursery Available
512 Pine Ave, Anna Maria 778-0414

MASSAGE THERAPY

c:-4nna ::,Ma ia
Specializing in Corrective Muscle Therapy V
Rachel Barber, LMT #MA0015167. MM0004539 778-8575
By Appointment Most Insurance Accepted




MASSAGE CAN HELP:
Arthritis (non-inflammatory) Joint Immobility
Back, Neck & Shoulder Pain Poor Circulation
Chronic Headache & Migraine Sciatica & Tendinitis
Hip, Knee, Leg & Foot Pain Sport Injuries
SFibromyalgia Stress Related Problems
Insomnia And More
Gift Certificates 9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza


Islander Brett Pettigrew
First-place, High School category
Second-place, Best of Show


Esformes, Sarah Pettit and Brett Pettigrew won first-place
medals, while Brett also captured the award for Second
Best of Show. Angie Jenkins placed second. Angie, Mike,
Mark, Sarah and Brett will all advance to state and
maybe national competitions.

* Special Thanks to Robin Esformes, Marlene Fletcher,
Dave Ferguson, Gib Bergquist, and Joy Courtney for
their time and help in compiling the winners.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING SERVICES

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.





FUNERAL HOMES

KEITH L GRUENDL
General Manager
BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459


Island Pobiatrq

CLARE H. STARRETT,
D.P.M.


PODIATRIC MEDICINE

SURGERY
A convenient Island location
104 Crescent Dr., Anna Maria ,
Accepting Medicare Assignments
Office Hours Daily Home Visits by Appointment
.99


Alls fair in love and science


ISIANDERI I I I
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING


*\W' A | |1 I
STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


Easter

Services
The Islander
Bystanderwill feature
a complete listing of
Island services and
holiday events in the
March 31 edition.
Deadline to submit
information is
March 25 at Noon.





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 15 Ij

Trolley bus concept officially dead this year


Manatee County Commissioners have formally run
into the ground the idea of a multi-Island trolley bus sys-
tem for this year.
'The commission by motion agreed to reject the grant
for this year," Florida Department of Transportation Dis-
trict Public Transportation Manager Ron Lasseter told the
Islander Bystander.
The grant would have provided about $2 million in
funds to pay for much of the cost of the buses and main-
tenance for three years. The grant would have been jointly
administered by Manatee and Sarasota Counties.
The proposal, as outlined last fall, was to have six
buses operate between the north end of Anna Maria Island
south to Lido Key in Sarasota. The buses originally would
have operated at no charge to passengers; later proposals
had a $1 fee.


Lasseter said the counties could apply for another
grant next year. Deadline for application submission is
June 1. If.approved by local and state transportation offi-
cials, funds would be available July 1995.
The trolley bus idea for the islands was modeled af-
ter a highly successful project on Ft. Myers Beach in Lee
County.
The local project was met with great controversy
since it was presented last fall. Originally suggested by
Longboat Key officials, that island community later
passed a number of resolutions objecting to the trolley
busses. Residents and officials there feared the busses
would add to traffic congestion on the Key.
Manatee County Commissioners then said they had no
funds for the project. They later offered $30,000 in county
money to pay for the project, with the Island communities to


pay another $30,000. Islandleaders balked at the suggestion,
complaining that no other communities in Manatee County
were asked to subsidize a mass transit system.
One positive end-product of the trolley bus debate did
occur, though. Manatee County Area Transit buses have
closed a four-mile gap in coverage, and have linked the
MCAT system with Sarasota County transit buses.
Manatee officials, citing a lack ofridership, halted the
bus network at Coquina Beachin the late 1980s.
Residents wishing to travel from Bradenton Beach to
Sarasota therefore had to go into Bradenton, then south to
Sarasota.
Last November, the gap was closed and a mini-trans-
fer station created at the Holiday Inn on Longboat Key.
The number of riders was sufficient to have the system
continued, officials determined earlier this year.


House hopping proves to be great success for AMICC


By Tomara Kafka
Features Editor
If it was fantasy living that tour goers were looking
for, the Anna Maria Island Community Center (AMICC)
will now be day dreaming about how to spend $11,500
raised last Saturday.
Six Island homes were showcased for the tour -- a
new event to raise funds for the Community Center
which offers more than 40 programs and services year
round for Island residents.
"At the Loken home," says Deana Hartman, assis-
tant director of AMICC, "they counted 967 people." The
North Point Harbor homeowner reported 1,300 "guests."
Pierrette Kelly, AMICC executive director, said tour
takers came from as far away as St. Petersburg and
Tampa..
Winners of the raffle are Sue Miller, who won a
watercolor by Anne Abgott; Florence Gelderman, who
won a wooden and shell wreath made by Barbara
Kruger; and Helen Hagen, who won a ceramic fish bowl
made by Betty Grant.
Jeanette Cashman, on the AMICC board of directors
and the Tour of Homes committee, couldn't have been
more pleased. "This was far more successful than we
ever anticipated," she says. "And we will definitely do
this again next year."
But while the tour is considered to be wildly success-
ful, AMICC workers prepare for the next fund raiser -
a '90s Country Affaire Auction on May 7.
"The Auction is our biggest fund raiser of the year,"
says Hartman, who explains that this year's auction has
a country western theme in dress as well as catered foods.


PRESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL / MOBILE HOMES / CODOS


REPAIRS
REMODELING
NEW CONSTRUCTION
EMERGENCY SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES


SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING
WATER HEATERS
GARBAGE DISPOSALS
BACK FLOW PREVENTORS
LP TANKS FILLED


SWe are DRUG FREE WORKPLACE
* Member of the Island Chamber of Commerce
ww"M RIM- r r -'MW


Islander photo by Tomara Kafka
Irene Murphy (left), volunteer with the Anna Maria Island Community Center's Tour of Homes, checked tickets for
tour goers and sold raffle tickets at last Saturday's event.


LET US DO '
YOUR TAXES
COMPUTERIZED
Individuals, Corporations,
Partnerships & Estates WA:
'We're Here Year-Round."
AT OUR NEW LOCATION
Otey & Associates
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110) Holmes Beach
Shirley Otey, E.A.
Ucensed by the U.S. Government to
represent taxpayers before the IRS. 778-61 18



Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon
Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center '~''
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253...


KEY INCOME TAX
& Business Services, Inc.
Individual, Partnership, Corporate,
Federal and State,
Tangible and Intangible
TAX PREPARATION
5500 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
FOR APPOINTMENT 778-5710
"Same Island Location Since 1971"

Back by popular demand
... We're having our
PRE-SEASON SPECIAL
Don't let the heat get you down
Call West Coast Refrigeration to schedule
your pre-season air-conditioning check-up

*34.00
Up to 2 disposable filters included in price,
any additional parts required extra.
You'll have to call us or we'll never meet.
Celebrating our 22nd Year


WEST COAST
REFRIGERATION
AOR CONDITIT
& HEATING G3
CACO44365

778-9622* Holmes Beach
WE SERVICE ALL FPL
MAKES MODEPARTICIPATING
MAKES & MODELS CONTRACTOR






Ei PAGE 16 N MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Features Editor
The Anchorage in Anna Maria has lots of entertain-
ment going. Monday and Thursdays a Dixieland band
plays. Tuesday is the Swing Band. Friday and Saturdays
they have a dance band with a dance floor big enough to
accommodate lots of stepping out.
Cafe Robar is offering lots of lunch specials and lots
of combinations, daily specials and a "working stiff' type
lunch special including soup or salad, lunch entree and
coffee all for mighty modest prices.
Steel Magnolias is currently running at the Island
Players Theatre through April 2. Tickets are $9 but
scarce. See the review in this week's issue of The Islander.
You might want to ride your bike to the Rod & Reel
Pier. They have 50 new bike holders for the environmen-
tally conscious never mind the demand for auto-type
parking space at this popular spot for dining and fishing.
They are now serving their "Menu #3 by Mona Lisa"Ts
it dining or is it art?
In Holmes Beach, for some great delicatessen sand-
wiches you might want to stop by Peaches Ice Cream
and Deli. Their Sub-All sandwich is a specialty (and talk
about huge). Their double Dutch chocolate Columbo yo-
gurt is to die for. They have the Island's only soup and
salad bar and very fresh, real bagels, too.
Anna Maria Island Dayis Wednesday as part of aweek-
long countywide celebration of Manatee Heritage Days. His-


torical photographs and living history exhibits can be seen at
the Island Branch Library, 11 am. to 8 p.m.
Last week we stopped by Pete Reynard's for dinner.
I'm happy to say it was delightful. The food was great and
the service was wonderful. We stayed awhile to chat with
old friends (and it was a school night). The kids enjoyed
it too, and you know how they can be.
Shells is offering a new menu this week called the
"Florida Lobster League." It features Florida char-grilled
lobster combinations such as lobster with steak, shrimp,
or fish, just to name a few.
In Bradenton Beach Norah Henzell at the Crown &
Thistle proudly announced the birth of granddaughter
Taylor Marie on March 8. The healthy baby girl weighed
in at 7 pounds, 8 ounces. Mother Maxine Henzell, Norah's
daughter and co-owner of the pub, is also doing fine.
In a special performance, Leon Merian and a 14-piece
band will present a Tribute to Harry James and the Big Band
sound next Thursday, March 31, at the Beach House.
The Bridge Tender Inn is getting ready to add more
seats inside and out If you haven't been by to sit at
their outside patio with tables and umbrellas overlooking
the bay, you need to. It's a lovely, quite respite.
On Longboat Key the Plaza recently received kudos
from restaurant critic Pat Benson. The Plaza re-opened in
December with Kim Strazis-Grant as executive chef. For-
merly with the Heritage Grille in St. Petersburg and Cool
Beans in Tampa, Strazis-Grant is "making magic" at the
dinner restaurant, according to Benson.
And across the bridges in Bradenton as part of the
week-long Manatee Heritage Days celebration, Thursday
is DeSoto National Memorial Day, where guided tours
and exhibits will be held at DeSoto National Park.
And in Cortez, Friday is Historic Cortez Fishing


Village Day with tours of the 1890 store, boat works and
a "vanishing-culture" exhibit
Saturday is the Cortez natives picnic to be held 1 to
5 p.m., at the Fulford Fishing Co.
If you haven't been to Gamble Mansion in Ellenton
to see the historic Confederate troop re-enactments, they
are cool and will be there on Sunday along with craft ex-
hibits, tours of the antebellum mansion, music; ceremony
at 2 p.m.
In St. Armand's Circle there's a free jazz concert
Friday at noon sponsored by the Jazz Club of Sarasota
featuring saxophonist Jerry Jerome and his All Stars with
Gene DiStasio on trombone, Joe Bruno, Sr. on trumpet,
Bob Haggart on bass, Johnny Varo on piano and Tom
Glaister on drums. Fans are encouraged to bring chairs
and picnic lunches.

Cafe Robar's Salmon Wellington
I've enjoyed your "Stir-It-Up" column in the Islander
Bystander.
I have two recipes I'd like to find out about from
Leverock's. Both were delicious. One is their "Onion
Crusted Salmon" and the other is "Salmon Wellington."
Thanks and good luck.
Betty Schaefer, Anna Maria

We are in the process of trying several recipes from
Leverock's (it seems to be a very popular place). But we
have to deal with "corporate office" and it's taking some
time. However, someone dropped in the office this week
and requested Cafe Robar's Salmon Wellington, which
we heard is delicious, so I thought you might like this one
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


SEFOD.TEK


MIDA'S #1 WATERFRONT LOCATION...
p1 l #Caught daily from
our boats ...... ...... 495
LUNCH SPECIALS _SBECBB5LAWS
& EARLY BIRDS ...... FROM *495 IE3S IER


DINNER
SPECIALS ............. FROM $695


OR TRY OUR_
WHLESUFE


LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ... JOIN US!
Sunday Afternoon & Tuesday SWING BAND
Friday & Saturdays Dance Band
Monday & Thursdays "Sons of the Beach" Dixie Land
101 S. BAY BLVD. -ANNA MARIA 778-9611
= Eg Oyster Bar on Anna Maria Pier 778-0475 iES (




Make Easter Special ..

for the entire family.





CAFE ON THE BEACH

Patio and Casual Inside Dining Directly on the Gulf
at Beautiful Manatee Beach Playground too.
Open 6A.M. 7 Days a Week
Good Old Fashioned Breakfasts, Lunch & Dinner Specials
Some Breakfast Specials
All You Can Eat Pancakes Including Sausage & Coffee ........................ $3.25
Eggs Benedict................................................................................... $4.50
Omelettes ............................................................................. $2.95 to $4.95
French Toast...................................................................................... $2.75
Biscuits and Sausage Gravy .............................................................. $3.25
Lunch & Dinner Specialties
Burgers, Dogs, Grilled Sandwiches & Hoagies..................... $1.75 to $4.25
Grouper Sandwhich Platter ................................................................ $6.95
Rib-Eye Steak.................................................................................... $8.25
M ahi-M ahi ........................................................................................ $7.95
Easter Baked Ham with.all the "Trimmings"................................ $7.95
Plus Chalkboard Special*Take-OutAvailable.Prices Do Not Include Tax
"Try dining with the Sunset ...it's Great!
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-5442
The Public Beach is more than sun & sand-it's a great place to dine!


I


* Authentic British Atmosphere
8 British Draft Beers on Tap
Uve British Soccer via Satelite TV
Saturdays- 10 AM
Coronation Street
Mon thru Wed 3 PM
Fish & Chips Mixed Grill Shepherds Pie
Steak & Kidney Pie Bubble & Squeak


BRITISH PUB
&
RESTAURANT


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173 .


ROD 4,REEL



1/2 mile
* North of City Pier *
"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida"TM
ISLAND
COOKING
REASONABLE
PRICES
778-1885
875 NORTH SHORE DR.
ANNA MARIA


RESTAURANT

SLbadhtra wge R

778-2233
5325 Marina Drive
. Holmes Beach


Make your Easter reservations now!
[Our gift certificates make great Easter gifts


LUNCH SERVED
daily 11:30AM
Lunch entrees
start at $5.95
All day specials
from $6.95
(our version of the early bird)


DINNER SPECIALS
$9.95 6 oz Sirloin & Shrimp Scampi
$12.95 Veal (choice of Marsala,
Sorrentino, Francoise or Siciliana)
$10.95 Fresh Clams over Linguini
All include Pete's World Famous
Revolving Salad Bar
and choice ofpotato


Chuck Senrick at the Piano Bar Daily
Sons of the Beaches Dixieland Band
Wed. & Sunday 5:30 to 8:30 PM
Coming on April Fools Day ... "Smokin" Stevie & the Backbreakers

Sunday Brunch is Back (Lunch & Breakfast items) $7.95

BANQUEr SPACE AVAILABLE FOR MEETINGS CELEBRATIONS RECEPTIONS


OPEN DAILY
BREAKFAST
SERVED SAT. & SUN.
FROM 8 AM
LUNCH & DINNER
NOON to 10P


.;z
"
't.

?

';
i.
i.
i,
z
,
..
~
~
..
i.
~
..
=
;,:
~



\,


- ,,


u '
vQ





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDEIt MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 17 JrI

Island student selected as presidential scholar semifinalist


Michelle Lynn
Johnson, a resident of
Holmes Beach and a
graduating senior at Mana-
tee High School, has been
selected as a semifinalist in
the 1994 Presidential
Scholars Program. She is
the daughter of Gene and
Terry Johnson.
Approximately 2,600
semifinalists were selected
from more than 2.5 million
students expected to
graduate from U. S. high Michelle Lynn Johnson
schools in 1994. A total of
141 students will be selected as finalists. Johnson is now
competing to be one of 20 who will be chosen from the


field of creative and performing arts. She was
selected through the ARTS program of the
National Foundation for the Advancement of
the Arts.
Johnson recently won an award from the
arts foundation for a trilogy of essays. One of
the winning pieces was published in the
March 3 issue of the Islander Bystander.
Now in its 30th year, the Presidential
Scholars program is the highest federal honor
bestowed upon graduating high school se-
niors. Scholars are selected on the basis of su-
perior academic achievements, leadership
qualities, strong character, community in-
volvement and school activities.
The 2,600 semifinalists were selected
for their exceptional performance on either the SAT or the
ACT testing programs. Further consideration is based on


students' essays, self-assessments, description of activi-
ties, school recommendations and school transcripts. A
distinguished panel of educators will review these submis-
sions and select 500 finalists in April
Final selection of 141 scholars will be made by the
White House Commission on Presidential Scholars, a
group of some 30 eminent citizens appointed by the Presi-
dent. They will select one young man and woman from
each state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and U.S.
students living abroad; up to 20 students from the creative
and performing arts; and 15 students at-large.
Scholars will be invited to Washington, D.C., for sev-
eral days in late June to receive the Presidential Scholar
medallion at a recognition ceremony and to participate in
activities with their elected representatives, educators and
others in public life.
Finalists will be announced in late April and Schol-
ars in mid-May.


Stir it up, from preceding page


for now. Meanwhile, I'll be working on
Leverock's.
Chef Marcus Vega was happy to
accommodate with this recipe of Salmon
Wellington. It's not on the menu anymore
but is served as an occasional special:
Cafe Robar's "Salmon Wellington"
4 to 5 oz. pieces of Salmon
2 puff pastry sheets
12 oz. cream cheese (softened)
1 tbs. chablis wine
1 tsp. chopped garlic
1/2 tsp. Worchestershire sauce
1 tsp. chopped dill weed
salt and pepper to taste
Combine the cream cheese with the
wine and seasonings.Cutthe puffpastry irto


four circles. Place a salmon fillet on one half
of each circle allowing a 1/2-inch margin
around the edge. Place 1/4 of the cream
cheese mixture on each fillet Moisten the
edge of the puff pastry and fold over the fil-
let. Seal the edges completely.
Bake in a 350 degree oven.for 15 to
20 minutes until golden brown. Serve with
a cream sauce.

Stir-it-up is a weekly column cover-
ing events, newsy items and fun things to
do for Islanders, most on the Island, some
off-island. We encourage those who pro-
vide food, drink and entertainment to send
us information of your upcoming event or
tell us what's new.


ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
FINE WINE SPRITS BEER ICE
Free Delivery Full Service Low Prices
5904 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-2507




ID- 0 .

3r 778-4949

The finest Italian/Spanish/American
Restaurant
2 for 1 Early Bird
Specials
4:30 6 PM

LIVE
BREAKFAST MUSIC
Featuring:
GLEN BAUER
SUNDAY MORNINGS

CHES'S NIGHTLY SPECIALS
MONDAY PASTA PRIMAVERA ............................................... $8.95
TUESDAY SPANISH PICADILLO .............................................. $7.50
WEDNESDAY ALL YOU CAN EAT SPAGHETTI.......................... $4.95'
THURSDAY ROTINI BOLOGNESE .............................................. $7.50
FRIDAY PRIME RIB ........................................................ .... $9.95
GROUPER FILET...................................................... $8.25
SATURDAY PRIME RIB ............................................................... $9.95
VEAL MARSALA .......................................... $10.95
SUNDAY CHICKEN MARSALA ........................................ $8.50
"OPEN SEVEN DAYS"
Hours: Breakfast, 8am noon; Lunch, 11 am 2 pm; Dinner, 4:30 10 pm
S&S PLAZA *5348 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH


"Upstairs"
"Dramatic View"
Open Daily *
8 a.m. to Closing
Same Menu and
Prices as Below
but with
Restaurant- Seating
SFull Breakfast *
Island Cooking
Draft Beer Wine
New -
50 Guarded
Bike Holders!
Come by Bike! -


ROD 4a6E


PLEASE COME BY BIKE...
Ua ^


... IF YOU CAN. THANK YOU!


"iklly Thez IMt
Breakfast
in town
From 7 am.: by Lisa O'Connell"


BREAKFAST
If not on Menu, talk to cook.
If not too busy, tries to please


2 Eggs A ny Style ................................................................. ............ 2.35
1 Egg Any Style........................................ .......................... ........ 2.05
2 Eggs with Bacon or Sausage ......................................................... 3.85
2 Eggs with Ham or Corned Beef Hash ........................ ............ 4.50
Cheese O m elette ..... .......... ............................ ..................... .....3.85
Ham and Cheese Omelette ........................................................... 4.75
Bacon or Sausage & Cheese Omelette.............................................. 4.50
Spanish Omelette with Onions, Green Pepper, Tomato, Mushrooms
and Cheese, with Jalapeno Pepper (upon request) .....:.................. 4.95
Western Omelette with Ham, Green Pepper, Mushrooms,
Onions & Cheese ..................................................................... 4.95
Egg Beater Available..................................................................... add .50
All the above orders with
homefries or grits and toast

SPECIAL FEATURES
Eggs Benedict ........................................ ....................................... 5.25
French Toast ....................................................... ........................ 2.65
2 Pancakes ............................................................................ ......... 2.65
3 Pancakes .................................................................................... 3.60
Sausage, G ravy & Biscuits ...;..................:............................ ............. 3.50
Sausage, Gravy & Homefries............................................................ 3.50
Egg & Cheese Sandwich .................................................................. 2.35
with Bacon or Sausage ................................................................ 2.95
w ith H am ................................................................................ 3.50


Single Egg............................... .65
Bacon .................................. 1.85
Toast ................................ .75
Biscuits .......................... (1) .50
Homefries ........................... 1.00
English Muffin................. .85


SIDES
Ham ............................... 1.85
Sausage ........................... 1.85
G rits .................... ........... .95
(2) ....................... ...... ..... 95
Corned Beef Hash .......... 1.95
Danish ........................... 1.00


MMMMMEMM%





IE PAGE 18 0 MARCH 24, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


W2 l9IZll1Z[ I=Z


Arts & Crafts festival at
library in Holmes Beach
The Island Branch Library invites the public to attend
an Arts & Crafts Festival to be held in the Walker-Swift
Meeting Room from Monday, March 28 to April 1.
The five-day event will include clay sculpture and
basketry and weaving on Monday, March 28; shellcraft
and woodworking on Tuesday, March 29; quilting on
Wednesday, March 30; dried flower arranging and art-
work on slate on Thursday, March 31; and earring design-
ing and artwork on slate on Friday, April 1.
Callthe branch at 778-6341 for a schedule of the pro-
grams or pick one up at the front desk, 5701 Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach,

Manatee Heritage Days
Festival schedule
Following is the calendar of events for the remainder of
the 1994 Manatee Heritage Days festivities. Events are free
unless otherwise noted. For information, call 741-4070.
Wednesday, March 23 Anna Maria Island Day,
11 a.m.-8 p.m. Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Video interviews of early Island residents
will be shown at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Braden Castle Historic District, 1:30 p.m., State
Road 64 and 27th Street East. Musical program by
Suncoast Mummers String Band. Old fashioned ice cream
social at 3 p.m.
South Florida Museum/Bishop Planetarium, 10 am.-
5 p.m., 201 10thiSt.W. Tickets $2 for planetarium show. -
Thursday, March 24 De Soto National Memo-
rial Day, 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m., De Soto National Memorial at

5702 MARINA DR.
HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
OPEN DAILY AT 4 PM
HAPPY HOUR: 4 to 8 PM
ENTERTAINMENT 5.NIGHTS A WEEK
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY
6 PM TIL MIDNIGHT
1/3 Lb. Hamburger, Large Fries and
a Draft Beer $3.95 (6 til Midnight)
Tuesday: NICKEL BEER NIGHT, 7 to 9 PM
Wednesday: ISLAND NIGHT- REGGAE
Thursday: LADIES NIGHT $5 All You Can Drink, 9 to Midnight
THE BAND LINE-UP
Wednesday, March 23 Reggae "Jam-iya"
Thur. Sat.; March 24, 25 & 26 Fatcat
Sunday, March 27, DTs Beach Bash 5 to 9
Wednesday, March 30 Reggae "Democracy"
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, March 31
April 1 & 2 Lifeguard



"The ambiance is romantic, the decor has a well
presented theme, service is relaxed... while the
cuisine compares favorably to the area's best
Bill Bailey Longboat Observer





ielMutiny Inn
'Pitcaimrn $ lnd""
A&Restaurant

Intimate faxed !iz i
Piano & Vocal by Bemi Roy, Thurs. Sat
Chef Chosen Fresh Catches Dailyl
Unique Black Angus Beef Selections
Imaginative Pastas & Salads
ServingoDinnerS:00 10:00 Tuesday thlru Tursday
'til 1:OO Friday^ &Saturday, 'til9:00 Sunday
*Early Dinner S-6p.m. nightly
Sunday Champagne Brunch 10-2
Pcsrvationssuglud *, Avaia6tb for~iPvatPartis
6059Manatee .venue at East Bay Dr.
(1olm) s7each
(813) 778-5440


the north end of 75th Street Northwest.
Annual Author Luncheon with David Kaufelt, noon,
Bradenton Municipal Auditorium, 100 10th St.W. $15 for
lunch; $5 for lecture only.
Friday, March 25 Historic Cortez Fishing Village
Day, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Activities begin at the Volunteer Fire
Department, 4415 123rd St. Court W., Cortez, and include
tour of village.
Saturday, March 26 Palmetto Heritage Day, 9
a.m.-2 p.m., Heritage Park and surrounding area at 10th
Avenue West and Sixth Street.
Cortez Natives Picnic, 1-5 p.m., Fulford Fish Com-
pany, 4531 123rd St. W., Cortez.
Sunday, March 27 Gamble Plantation Spring
Open House, 1-5 p.m., 3708 Patten Ave., off U.S. 301 in
Ellenton. Ceremonies at 2 p.m.
Artists Guild to hold free
program April 4
The Artists Guild of Anna Maria Island will present
readings by "Marilyn Hawkins and Friends" on Monday
April 4, at the Guild Gallery, in the Island Shopping Cen-
ter, 5414 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach.
Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. The pro-
gram begins at 7 p.m. with a general meeting will follow.
The public is invited to this free event. For more in-
formation call 778-6694.
Hi-1 2 Club to meet
All Masons are invited to lunch at Pete Reynard's
Restaurant at 12 noon on Thursday, March 24.
The speaker will be Bradenton attorney Bill Garland
who will explain how Manatee County was the swing
vote for the presidential election.


Free HIV/AIDS testing
offered
Testing, along with medical treatment and education, is
the first stepto fighting HIV/AIDS, according to Dr. Michael
C. Bach, medical director of StratoGen Health of West
Florida, who encourages everyone to be tested.
StratoGen Health offers free confidential testing for
HIV/AIDS every Friday from 1-3 p.m.
"In less than ten months the number of patients that
we see who have HIV/AIDS has tripled. This is just the
beginning of what we expect to see," he said.
Individuals wishing to be tested are asked to call (813)
753-2949 or (800) 528-5488 for an appointment
Free testing is just one of many programs and services
offered by StratoGen Health which operates a private/
public partnership with the AIDS Council of Manatee.

AIDS-Manasota car raffle

on April 2
Take a chance. For just $100, you could be the win-
ner of a 1994 Lexus ES 300, valued at over $33,000.
The auto will be raffled April 2 in the third annual
event benefitting AIDS-Manasota. Only 900 tickets will
be sold at $100 each. The drawing will be held at 1 p.m.,
Saturday, April 2, at Lexus of Sarasota.
Tickets can be purchased through Friday, April 1 be-
tween 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. at the AIDS-Manasota office,
2080 Ringling Blvd., Suite 302 (at East Avenue),
Sarasota. They will also be available through Saturday
morning, April 2, at Lexus of Sarasota, 7641 South
Tamiami Trail -if they are not sold out.
AIDS-Manasota is a non-profit service organization.


ANCHOR) INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
7AM to2:30AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085

LIFEGUARD
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
March 24, 25 & 26 9:30 PM 1:30 AM
* *
Sunday March 27
PARTY PARTY PARTY
Softball 12:00 2:00 PM
(Behind Police Station)
Willy Steele 2-6 PM.
Hanulmer Heads 8-12 PM



Bridge Tender Inn


It's Coming...

Watch For It..!


BIGGER -
Outdoor Bar

MORE
Outdoor 9
Indoor ;-
Dining

Inside or
Deckside a--


'unh * fnjn'v cSfiLi.
CASUAL OLD FLORIDA STYLE
BAYFRONT DINING
778-4849
135 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach Docking Available


I


Mar Vista
Caribbean
BBQ
S5-10 p.m.
Every Sunday
Caribbean Combo -
Half a rack of BBQ ribs
and a quarter of jerk
chlcken...$12.95
BBQ Baby Back Ribs
Negril Basted with spicy citrus
BBQ sauce... $11.95
Jerk Chicken Marinated with
Jamaican herbs and spices then char-
grilled... $9.95
Port Antonio Seafood Kabobs -
Basted with rum butter... $10.95
Grouper Port Royal Char-grtlled and
basted with mango chutney sauce... $9.95
Specials served with Caribbean peas &
rice, sweet and spicy cabbage, slaw & rolls.
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39
383-2391





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 19 I'E


A~ iljM^l^iS


Pierette Kelly to speak
to Episcopal women
Pierette Kelly, director of the Anna Maria Commu-
nity Center, will speak at a meeting of the Episcopal
Church Women of the Church of the Annunciation on
Thursday, April 7, at 10:15 am.

Use time change as
safety reminder
Fire Chief Andy Price encourages everyone to change
- not check the batteries in all battery operated smoke
detectors at the same time you turn your clock ahead for
daylight saving time.
The time change occurs this year on Easter Sunday,
April 3, and it's a good reminder of the necessity to
change batteries in all battery-operated smoke detectors
and check all electric detectors.
Price also said personnel from the fire department are
available to check smoke detectors for residents who need
help. Phone 778-6621 for assistance.

Chamber Island guide
to hit the streets
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce will
present its new Island vacation guide to its members at the
Chamber's monthly membership reception on Wednes-
day, March 30.


Volunteers needed with
Palmer Point project
The American Littoral Society is looking for volunteers
to help plant certain native plants and to remove exotic plants
on Palmer Point; in Little Sarasota Bay at the north end of
Casey Key on Saturday April 2, from 8 to 11 am. The project
goal is to restore the barrier island to its pristine state.
If you wish to participate or would like more infor-
mation call 951-0884 or 966-7308.
Holmes Beach resident
wins Thomas print
Allen Bobo, a Sarasota attorney living in Holmes Beach,
is the winner of a watercolor print featuring the Egmont Key
pilot house by Island artist Richard Thomas raffled at the re-
cent Springfest by the Anna Maria Island Historical Society.
Bobo, a board member of the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, said he had previously admired the
print and was excited about winning it.
Women's Association to
meet March 28
The Women's Association of the Key Royale Club
will meet on Monday, March 28, in the clubhouse.
Tea will be served at 1:30 p.m. with the meeting to fol-
low at 2 p.m. Officers for the coming year will be elected.
The program to follow will feature a fashion show pre-
sentedby Lori Hutchinson of Beach-Style Boutique of Anna
Maria. Styles will be modeled by members of the club.


Off Island happenings
Durward Kirby, star of radio, TV and stage, will
speak to fellow members of the Florida Chapter of Broad-
cast Pioneers at an informal noon luncheon at Fairways
of Forest Lake Restaurant, 2401 Beneva Rd., Sarasota, on
Friday, March 25. Longtime radio or television broadcast-
ers or associates are welcome to attend as are others who
are interested. For information and reservations, call 747-
3212 or 795-0961.
The Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat Dr. S.,
will have the opening reception for the "Student Show" on
Sunday, March 27, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The show runs
through April 13. For more information, call 383-2345.
Three exciting events will take place at the Van
Wezel Performing Arts Hall, Sarasota, in March. On
Tuesday, March 29, Canada's acclaimed Royal Winnipeg
Ballet will perform followed by a performance by Judy
Collins, one of folk music's most enduring artists on
Wednesday, March 30, and comedian Bill Cosby will do
two shows on Thursday, March 31. Call 1-800-826-9303
for show times and ticket information.
The Manatee Players is sponsoring a two-day, three-
band Dixieland Jazz Festival on Friday, March 25, and
Saturday, March 26.
The bands featured are Yellow Dog Jazz, the Black
Cat Jazz and Roy Lang's Traditional Jazz Band. Call the
box office at 748-5875 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., Mon-
days through Fridays, for jam times and ticket informa-
tion.


Cafe Robar
Large Groups
Welcome
Separate Checks
Available
Reservations Accepted
MAKE YOUR
EASTER
RESERVATIONS
NOW!
204 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria
778-6969


We're Open for Lunch!
Q9 9* Baked Chicken
^93 Beef Stroganoff
SSpaghetti with Meat Sauce

01"3 s LUNCHES
c \FROM $395
\ seA~C s soups salads
o\ so,3 mee \ seafood specials
\ etve. Daily Specials
\ etsTl All Reasonably
Priced

Don't Forget Sunday Buffet!
Served 10 am-1 pm $595


THE BEST
// STRAWBERRIES
AT THE BEST PRICE

Ask For BANANAS 4
Your COUNTRY PRODUCE & SEAFOOD Always
Neighborhood 5016 MANATEE AVE. W.
Diount (Corner of 51st & Manatee) OPEN DAILY FRESH LOUISIANA
Card. 749-1785 8 AM to 7 PM BAYOU OYSTERS
ME aIPENED 2.99 DoZ.
VINE RIPENED SILVER STONE CRAB LARGE .
TOMATOES QUEEN -A GULF -~LITTLE NECK
CORN CLAWS SHRIMP CLAMS
DAIL 7.99 bM 5.99 LB. j3.99 DOZ.

Make Easter reservations early... choose one of the area's
finest restaurants from the advertisers in The Islander.

ISLAND)

SIALl (NII) "
SPECIALTIES

Fresh Live Maine Lobster & New England Fish
directly from Kittery Pt, Maine to you! -
Stop In to See Usfor the Freshest Fish Available
Special Prices on Whole Fish
Also Available ~ Smoked Fish
Open 10 to 6 Monday thru Saturday
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
Specializing in
British Style
Fish & Chips
Our Key Lime Pie
is made with real
Key Lime Juice
and is rated one of the
BEST ANYWHERE
We Dare You to Compare!
Open 7 Days
901 S. Bay Blvd; Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch Specials on the Island!

'Fresh Baked Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL EGGS BENEDICT
Pies & Biscuits Full cut, potato, $6.95 All Day...7 Days a Week
vegetable, salad, rolls $.

| EYE OPENER ... 2 eggs, toast, home fries and coffee-..Only $1.75

TfvIslmd~Inn ^taurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM f 9^ 41
l 1701 Gulf Dr. N., Bradeiton Beach 778-3031
I I 71Gl'r raetnBah7833


THE HUNT CLUB
RESTAURANT
Lunch & Dinner Daily
Early Birds
from $5.95
4:30 to 6p.m.
Sunday Brunch
11 an. 3 p.m.
Afternoon Tea
Wed & Sat 2-4 p.m.
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.'
Longboat Key
383-0543


I RED SEEDLESS $ O FF
I GRAPEFRUIT $ 00 II00 OFFR I
I Reg. $2.99 ANY GIFT FRUIT i
Reg. $2.99 5 Lb I SHIPPING ORDER '
Limit 2 Exp. 3/29/94B Bag Limit 2 Please Exp. 3/29/94 IB
- - --- r n -- --- - --- ----- -
j11 ,I .V'_ Vkc1 ;TVdi :.. ~ll-W]J1 I I1X]& icl19 ;{A*Whlk '1 k IIl, :] =,iIJ 71] VF
I VALENCIA or TEMPLE I Fresh Squeezed ORANGE or I
I ORANGES $ 00 I GAPEFRUIT JUICE 8
14 Lb. Bag Reg. $1.99 L I 1/2 Gal. Reg. $2.59 B
imit2 Exp. 3/29/94= B _I Limit2 Exp. 3/29/94 I -


'





I10 PAGE 20 N MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
No reports this week
Bradenton Beach
March 13, warrant arrest, Coquina Beach
March 13, criminal mischief and theft, 210 Gulf Dr.
S., Capri Sun Resort. The manager complained that the
subject rented a room and checked out, apparently taking
a fire extinguisher and causing minor damage to the room.
March 14, burglary, 125 Bridge St., Blue Gown. A
person unknown forced open the back door, entered the
business and removed $25.
March 14, DUI, SR 789 and SR 684. The officer
was traveling north on Gulf Drive, approaching the inter-
section at Cortez Road, when he observed Scott A. Mar-
tens, 28, of Wisconsin, traveling south on Gulf Drive,
approaching the intersection. According to the report,
Martens turned east on Cortez Road from the turn lane and
almost struck the officer's vehicle. The officer pulled
Martens over and noted that he smelled the strong odor of
an alcoholic beverage. The officer administered field so-
briety tests and placed Martens in custody.
March 15, Marchman Act, 116 Bridge St., Sports
Lounge. The officer was contacted by the subject who said
he was the victim of ahit and run accident. The officer saw
abrasions on the subject's arms and legs and noted that the
subject was visibly intoxicated. When the officer asked
the subject routine questions, he refused to give all but the
most basic information. He refused to give details of the
accident or cooperate with the officer. While being
checked by EMS personnel, he gave them a hard time,
refused to sign a medical release form and left the scene,
noted the officer.
Later that night, the officer was flagged down by an
employee of the Drift Inn, and she advised him that the
subject was intoxicated and refused to leave the business.
The officer escorted him out of the bar and told him he
was too intoxicated to be on the street. The officer advised
the subject to sleep in his vehicle and observed him enter
the vehicle.
Later that night, the officer was sent to the Sports Lounge
for a911 hang up call and was advised that a man was report-
ing ahii and run accident The officer located the subject in-
side drinking beer and noted that he was unsteady on his feet.
The subject again refused to give any information on the hit
and run suspect According to the report, the officer felt the
subject was too intoxicated to safely be on the street and
placed him in protective custody.


Holmes Beach
March 11, disturbance, 200 block of 56th Street The
complainant reported that his girlfriend was intoxicated
and trying to get into the apartment they shared. The girl-
friend had broken a window while banging on it trying to
get inside. The complainant wanted her to leave and she
agreed, then changed her mind after the cab was called.
She paid the cab driver and sent him away. The officer
warned the pair that they would be placed in custody if he
had to return. The girlfriend later called another cab and
left.
March 11, lost property, 5900 block of Marina
Drive. The complainant was riding a bicycle and lost a
small, black, credit card case containing credit cards and
a driver's license.
March 12, suspicious person, 400 block of 62nd
Street The complainant reported that he was awakened by
someone trying to open his front door, then his back door.
He looked out the window and observed a white, juvenile
male walking from the area. The juvenile had long, dark
hair, was about six foot tall and 160 pounds and was wear-
ing long pants and a black T-shirt with writing on it.
March 12, suspicious person, 5600 block of Gulf
Drive. The complainant reported a person unknown
loudly pounding on another apartment door. The subject
was gone upon the officer's arrival.
March 12, noise, 4400 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant twice reported a loud party. The officer spoke
to the subject twice and the second time told him to end
the party. The officer warned the subject about this be-
coming a constant problem and told the subject he could
receive a noise summons.
March 12, petty larceny, 5325 Marina Dr., Pete
Reynard's restaurant. The complainant stated that two
males and a female had dinner, then asked if they could
go to the bar and have their check sent there. A waiter
observed them split up and leave the business. The waiter
followed and obtained a tag number which belonged to a
man living in St. Petersburg.
March 12, petty larceny of $13 in gasoline, 3015
Gulf Dr., Citgo.
March 12, petty larceny, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee
Public Beach. The complainant was at the beach and left
his skim board in the sand while he went for a walk. It was
gone when he returned.
March 13, animal, 5626 Gulf Dr., Harrington
House. A large dog chased the complainant in the park-
ing lot.
March 14, suspicious person, 3248 East Bay Dr.,
Walgreen's. The officer responded in reference to a sus-


,,- -- - *.COUPON ,,. ,= ,
Better than Ever... Eats & Sweets
MARCO POLO'S I

PIZ A STYLE
501 VILLAGE GREEN PARKWAY The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
BEHIND THE VIDEO 4A Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
I LIBRARY ON MANATEE AVE. I79 1 01 Ifyou can dream it,
WITH THIS AD Thru March 31,'94 we'll make it!
$1.00 OFF Any Size Pizza Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes
Closed Tuesdays
NEW YORK FRESH VEG. WHITE WE DELIVER ANNA 219 Gulf Drive South, Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
LSICILIAN MEATSA 12" AND 18" MARIA & BRADENTON 6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge
Im I -COUPON .


picious person and found a subject asleep on the bench in
front of the store. The subject said he was a transient and
was on his way to the Salvation Army in Sarasota when
he somehow ended up in Holmes Beach. The officer told
him he was not permitted to sleep outdoors as a transient
in the city.
March 14, petty larceny of $14 in gasoline, 3015
Gulf Dr., Citgo.
March 14, assist, 5900 block of Marina Drive. While
in the police building, the officer observed a male juve-
nile riding a bicycle on the dirt mounds behind the pub-
lic works department. The juvenile fell and the officer
went out to check on him. The juvenile had a bloody nose
and the officer took him into the building to clean him up
and stop the bleeding. The officer then took the juvenile
to his parents.
March 14, animal, 6700 block of Gulf Drive. The
complainant reported three raccoons that crossed the street
in the area. The officer located the raccoons and followed
them. He noted that they appeared healthy, and no action
was taken.
March 15, suspicious person, 100 block of 46th
Street. The officer responded to a complaint of a male in
a G-string swim suit The officer advised the subject of the
complaint, and he said he would wear shorts to the beach
in the future.
March 15, disabled vehicle, East Bay Drive and
Manatee Avenue. The officer responded to a disabled
vehicle and jump started the vehicle. The driver's father
responded and removed the vehicle.
March 15, suspicious person, 2900 block of Avenue
C. The officer responded to a report of a person in the
road, found the subject passed out and took him home.
March 15, burglary to an automobile, 3208 East Bay
Dr., Shell's restaurant. The complainant parked his car
behind the restaurant to go to work. When he returned, he
found the driver's side window broken and a CD player,
25 CDs, $26 in cash, clothes and shoes missing.
March 16, suspicious person, 500 block of 70th
Street. A friend called for the complainant who is blind
and heard a loud noise outside her house. The officer
searched the area and found evidence of a raccoon.
March 16, found property a bicycle, 100 block
of 30th Street.
March 16, service, 200 block of 67th Street. The
officer assisted a woman who was locked out of her house.
March 16, suspicious person, 3300 block of 6th
Avenue. The complainant reported two juveniles loiter-
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE



FINE MEXICAN CUISINE


387-0161


Direct From Mexico City
Real Taquitos Enchiladas *
Fajitas Chimichangas Burritos
STamalas Tortas and More...
Always Fresh & Soft Tortillas
Deck Overlooking Bayou
OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY1 1-10
AND SUNDAY 11-3


r BEACH LOVER'S DELITE
103A Gulf Dr. N. Bradenton Beach
NEXT TO OPEN DAILY
CITY HALL 778-8366 o10TO 10
WE SERVE:
Ice Cream and Feature
Colombo Frozen Yogurt
SANDWICHES:
Subs Cheese Steak Hot Dogs
Hamburgers Salads & Side Dishes


C 3, APPrHI'Y HOUIR |
Mon-Fri* 4-7PM
Nightly Entertainment

795-8083
Tuesday:
Restaurant Appreciation



RICH
KENDALL
WED. SAT.
MARCH 23 26
9 PM-1 AM




The Best Burgers and
The Best Phillie Cheese Steaks
in Manatee County
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA *10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


tBO'SP/
(j0 10519 Cortez Road
792-5300
BUFFET HOURS: 11AM 9PM SUN. 12:00 Noon 8 PM
LUNCH
PIZZA BUFFET

$3.99 0

DINNER
PIZZA BUFFET

$4.49




THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 21 11i


I STREET


ing at the rear of the property.
March 16, noise, 5702 Marina Dr., Turtles Club and
Cafe. A complainant reported that the bass was too loud,
and it was turned down.
March 17, suspicious person, 28th Street and Av-
enue E on the beach. While checking the area, the officer
noticed two subjects under a blanket. As he approached,
the subjects made furtive movements in putting on their
pants. When the male subject exited from the blanket, his
pants were unzipped and his belt undone.
The officer asked what was going on and the subjects
said they were just fooling around. The female subject had
no identification and admitted she was a juvenile. The
officer warned the male subject about laws regarding sex
with minors and told him to go home. The officer took the
female subject home to her mother.
March 17,4300 block of Second Avenue. The of-
ficer responded to a complaint of juveniles letting air out
of tires. They were gone upon the officer's arrival.
March 17, suspicious person, 3300 block of 6th
Avenue. The complainant reported two juveniles throw-
ing debris in the roadway, trespassing on neighbors' prop-
erties, damaging plants and creating a general nuisance.
The officer found the juveniles and noted that they had
thrown large pieces of trash from the side of the road into
the roadway. The officer gave the juveniles a trespass
warning and warned them they would be arrested if they
were found on the property again. He took the juveniles
home to their parents and told the parents what they were
doing.
March 17, assist EMS, 3200 block of Gulf Drive.
The officer assisted EMS with a subject who had fallen
due to excessive St. Patrick's Day celebrating and cut the
top of his head.
March 18, suspicious person, 400 block of Bay Palm
Drive. The complainant reported an alarm sounding in the
area. The officer found a vehicle with a short in the horn.
The owner was contacted and the power disconnected.
March 18, assist EMS, 2900 block of Gulf Drive.
The officer responded to assist in a childbirth. Upon his
arrival, the baby had been delivered. The officer assisted
in'post natal care until EMS arrived.


What's
the
best 4
news 4
anywhere
on


Maria
Island?,















HOMEMADE PIZZA,
778-7978 ___


Q UNCLE DANS PLACE
OI N WHITNEY BEACH
383-0880/383"881
Sunday-Thursday- 4PM-11 PM
Friday & Saturday 4PM-1AM
Featuring
CHICAGO STYLE THIN CRUST
HOMEMADE PIZZA
BBQ BABY BACK RIBS
In Our Own Special Sauce
FISH & CHIPS 0 21 SHRIMP
HOTSANDWICHES:
ITALIAN BEEF
ITALIAN SAUSAGE
ITALIAN GRINDER
MEAT BALL
Salads e Garlic Bread & Cheese Bread
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
to the furthest reaches of Anna Maria Island and
Longboat Key (Delivery charge: $1.50)
^ ,--y


r "'^- ". .:--* .- . .

.':" 9 '- -.. ', "" '- " :
'.,.,'. t"

-*~ *


1~. ?


ii x~


Islander Photo: Pat Copeland


Simply ... the soul of Europe

in the heart of Longboat Key.






FINE DINING


383-8898


Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2065 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


Is it a bird?
Is it a plane?
No, it's
Bradenton
Beach Air One!
Bradenton Beach Police
Chief Jack Maloney took
advantage of the beautiful
weather Friday to take a
parasail ride along the
beach.


Ivo Scafa, Proprietor


IZZY BREAKFAST SPECIALTIES
FRITTATA ALA VEOGIE Fresh seasonal veggies,
fluffy scrambled egg and assorted cheeses served atop
a bed of steamy homefries. Served with salsa 4.95
MEXI FRITTATA Homemade chili, fluffy scrambled
egg, melted cheddar cheese and green onion atop a
bed of steamy homefries ............................... 4+95
HuEVEROS RANCHEROS IZZY'S VERSION 2
Warm flour tortillas topped with chili, eggs your way,
cheddar cheese, diced tomato and green onion.
Served with sour cream and salsa ................ 4.95
COUNTRY BENEDICT An open faced biscuit topped
with 2 sausage patties, farm fresh eggs, and country
gravy. Served with homefries ......................450
BIscUITS AND GRAVY ................................ 9S
-' 2 JSunrise Special
$1.99
2I Farm Fresh Eggs,
Homefries or Grits, Toast & Fruit
Preserves and Coffee.
I ( ''6:30 a.m.- 10:00 a.m. Mon.-Fri.
383-0689 HRS.: MON.-SAT.
383-0689 6:30AM-2:30PM* SUN. 8AM-1PM
6836 Gulf of Mexico Dr. *Whitney Beach Plaza


I






i PAGE 2f'ili'ARCH 24 1 994' THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Want t see avana? Here's g t stop along the way


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor perspectives
Keep your head down. Anna Maria just might be right
in the middle of a naval war.
Remember last March when the St Pete Yacht club
was going to re-institute their St. Pete-Havana sailboat
race? First run in 1930- and a legendary event to say the
least the race was suspended in the late 1950s.
Fidel Castro had taken over Cuba, swore his everlast-
ing friendship with the Russians, and in the process nearly
brought the world to nuclear war.
Then, last year, the good sailors in St. Petersburg an-
nounced the race was on again but, bowing under the po-
litical pressure of anti-Castro folks from around the state,
they canceled it again. Now a brash bunch of Sarasota
sailors have taken the event over, and plans for it are solid.
The legendary race has become "The Sarasota Sail-
ing Squadron Sarasota/Havana Classic." Maybejust "The
Classic," for short.
High noon June 10, the Sarasota Sailing Squadron
will flag off the Cruising Class boats and, eight hours later,
the racers (both spinnaker and non-spinnaker) will storm
past the Sarasota seabuoy andhead directly for Cuba. The
route will take them westward of Fort Jefferson. The race
ends at the outer marker of Marina Hemingway.
I hope you understand there probably will be a little
party later in the marina.
Of course there are some legal entanglements, what
withthe Still-in-place embargo against Cuba by our gov-
ernment (and our government alone), but these are fairly
easily dealt with. Keep in mind there is no law against any
American visiting Cuba. You'll stay perfectly legal if you
do two things:
First of all, you have to check in with U.S. Customs
upon your return as you have to do any time you visit
any foreign country.
Secondly, it's important you not show any evidence
of having spent U.S. currency in Cuba. That's what's
against present regulations. Of course, all kinds of Ameri-
cans do spend U.S. dollars in Cuba all the time (Havana's
economy seems to run on U.S. dollars, and they're ac-
cepted everywhere) but don't tell that to Customs. They
Don't want to hear it.
Remember, the Customs folks don't make the rules,
they just get stuck with enforcing them.
So even if somebody gives.you some primo Cuban
cigars, you'd better have smoked them upbefore you get
back. Only Washington politicians are permitted to smoke
those things and they get them in diplomatic pouches.
That Washington habit started back with JFK and, even
today, President Clinton is known to enjoy a good cigar.
But of course he doesn't inhale.
Unlike the St. Pete Yacht Club racewhich was by invi-
tation only, the Sarasota Sailing Squadron will accept entries
from anyoneinterestedin going. Obviously they don't accept
any liability for your safety, but how bad can it get if you're
part of a 40-boat squadron? And they're looking for a field
of at least 40 boats to inaugurate the event.
Organizer Bob Winters says he's getting three to four
phone calls a day asking for more information on the race,


STz to Gr7en Golf
SCustom Clubs Club Repair New & Used Clubs
CONTINUING SPECIALS
7 r 500 OFF REGRIP (per club)
7 Wood Special Trident Wide
Bodies $85.00
778-5184
Open Mon thru Sat- 9 to 5 (Sunday by appointment only)
2501 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach


SA





ISLAND
iscouir TACKLE

V
3240 East Bay Drive
Anna Maria Island Center
Holmes Beach


LE

PENN
REELS

PENN 320 G.T.I.
GRAPHITE REELS
OUR REG. 10 ONLY AT
LOW PRICE 50
$6495s

778-7688


and he's preparing an entry form to be mailed shortly.
Winters can be reached at The Sailing Company Sail-
boats Ltd., 6025 15th Street East, Bradenton, FL. 34203.
His phone is 753-1533 or 755-6303.
And now for something entirely different.
There's a fascinating new state park, opened just
last weekend, down in the Florida Keys. So far there's
no running water, no restrooms and, for the most part, no
visitors.
This is the time to go.
Called the Windley Key Fossil Reef State Geological
Site, the 32-acre park is the site of several coral quarries first
opened decades ago, exposing thousands of feet of petrified
coral reef filled with fossils. When the actual quarrying
stopped in the 1960s, the site became a center of study for
geologists and reef scientists. It still is that today.
Located at mile marker 85.5 bayside on the northern
end of Islamorada, the land was once inhabited by Ameri-
can Indians and, later, early white settlers. Once called ,
Umbrella Key when owned and farmed by the pioneer
Russell family, the Florida East Coast Railway bought it
' in 1908. That's when the quarrying began.
Coral rock was just the thing for building those abut-


By Rick Fleury
Islander Reporter
Island anglers are talking lately of muchh"
sheepshead, "whoppers" of snook, "cornucopias" of
snapper and "gluts" in white
bait. But, holy mackerel, there -
are more fish stories going
around lately about fishing li-
censes, than anyone's daily
catch!
The story is, since 1989,
everyone in Florida who
wants to "take, attempt to take
or possess" marine (saltwater)
fish must have a valid fishing
license. But, according to the
Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection, there are
some exceptions to the rule.
You do not need a Florida
saltwater fishing license if:
you are under the age of 16
you are fishing from land-- or from a structure
fixed to the land
you are fishing from aboat that has a valid "ves-
sel saltwater fishing license" (most charter fishing
boats)
you hold a valid saltwater products license
you are 65 years of age or older
you are a member of the Armed Forces with
proof you are in Florida "on leave" for 30 days or less
you have been accepted by the Florida Depart-
ment of Health and Rehabilitative Services


IC .778-2761
A Sightseeing
44 &
:i 4Water Taxi

CRUISE SPECIAL
On our Covered 28 ft. Pontoon Boat
(with bathroom)
1 1/2 Hours $10 per person





OFFSHORE FISHING
ALL BAIT, TACKLE & EQUIPMENT INCLUDED
NO LICENSE REQUIRED
Fishing. Diving *Island Excursions
Aetna Mw'ia sle l(13) 778-5489
Anna Maria Island


ments on the Overseas Railway, and there was even a
ready market back north in Miami and beyond. The St
Louis post office is built of the Key Largo limestone called
keystone, as is Vizcaya and the Miami post office, too.
If you spend much time down around Homestead,
you'll see some wonderful old houses built of keystone
there, as are the entrance buildings to the attraction Mon-
key Jungle northeast of Homestead. A friend of mine in-
herited that roadside attraction and, after Hurricane An-
drew, she found only the keystone buildings laid up by her
grandfather were left intact. She rebuilt from there.
A group of students from Vanderbilt University have
laid out a series of trails with markers showing different
coral fossils at Windley Key as part of an "alternative
spring break" program, and so the park was dedicated last
Saturday.
Should you decide to visit Windley Key Fossil Reef,
you'll have to pick up the keys (I told you it was new and
undiscovered) at Long Key State Park at mile marker 68.
Arrangements to do so although the Rangers down that
way are a great bunch of folks and generally there's no
problem can be made by calling (305) 664-4815.
See you next week.


you have a Florida freshwater license and are
only fishing for mullet
you are fishing for saltwater fish in fresh
water.


Now, let's define land.
. "Land" in the State of Florida
extends to a water depth of
four feet. If, however,' you
have broken the surface of the
water in less than four feet of
depth but are wearing a face
mask, you'll need a license.
As far as a "structure
fixed to land," this includes
any pier, bridge, dock, float-
ing dock or jetty permanently
S fixed to land.
Licenses are available to
nonresidents at costs of $5 for
S three days, $15 for seven days
and $30 for one year, plus a small fee. Residents
can purchase licenses at a cost of $10 for 10 days,
$12 for a year and $60 for five years, plus a small
fee. They can be purchased at any county tax,
collector's office or at most bait and tackle shops.
Some locations on or close to the Island in-
clude Annie's Bait and Tackle in Cortez; Cannons
Marina on Longboat Key; Island Discount Tackle
in Holmes Beach, Perico Harbor Bait and Tackle
and K-Mart and Wal-Mart in Bradenton.
If you have further questions, you can call the
Tampa office of the Florida Marine Patrol at 813/
272-2516.


SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises- $20 per person
Swim Picnic *Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
"- ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Uc. Capt.

Snook Trout Redfish Flounder *

LIGHT TACKLE .
| SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
1/2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
S Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308
* Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


Saltwater fishing licenses:

not just another fish story


XGN






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER a MARCH 24, 1994 N PAGE 23 IEG


White bait arrival brings good fishing to area


By Capt. Mike Heistand
Good news for all fishermen: white bait are starting to
show up near shore as the water warms. I saw a big school
of thelittle guys just off thebeach last week. Besides being a
great source of bait, the little fish tend to draw bigger fish to
the schools. Consider it an early sign of spring.
Snook season continues and, by most accounts, seems
to be shaping up to be a good one. And the winter peren-
nial favorite catch sheepshead should start to fade
just after Easter. Catch the convict fish while you can!
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said they've been
catching a lot of sheepshead during the day, and some
snook at night. One of the linesiders stretch out to 33-
inches long.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said that mackerel
should start to show up any day as the water continues to
warm. Anglers at the pier have been doing well with sheeps-
head, with shrimp being the best bet as a bait source.
Capt. Zack with the Dee Jay II said with the arrival
of white bait, so too came a host of fish: cobia, mackerel,


AMICC Little

League
League standings for the week
ending March 19
"Major League"
Haley's Motel 5-0
AMFD 3-2
Westbay AC 3-2
D.Coy Ducks 1-4
Kiwanis 1-5

"Minor League"
Tip of the Island 5-1
Betsy Hills 4-1
Quality Builders 4-2
Uncle's Dans Place 1-3
Bali Hai 1-4
Island Discount Tackle 1-5

Major League player stats top 7 players


Name (Team) G
A.J. VanSlyke (Ducks) 3
Scot Atkinson (Haley's) 5
Greg LaPensee (WAC) 5
Paul Feeney (AMFD) 5
Dusty Wagner (Haley's) 5
Ricky Buckelew (Haley's) 5
Robbie Douglas (Ducks) 4


RBI
4
14
11
12
10
6
6


BA
.700
.643
.636
.556
.545
.533
.461


trout, flounder and sheepshead. Capt. Zack said the week
started slow, but the Chamber of Commerce-like week-
end weather really turned on the snook action. One of his
charters brought in a 15-pounder.
Capt. Dave with the Neva-Miss said his half-day
charters are doing well with mangrove snapper, sheepies
and a few mackerel. On the longer trips, anglers are catch-
ing amberjack and grouper.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said mackerel action is
picking up offshore. He suggested using #2 planners and
#2 spoons, and troll in and out of the passes and near the
artificial reefs. Moving a little farther south should pro-
duce some good pompano action, with sand fleas or jigs
as bait. Offshore, grouper are still relatively close to shore,
in about 60 feet of water.
Capt. Rick Gross said snook are really starting to hit
the lines. One day last week he got as many as 18 in one
day as long as he can get white bait to tip the hook.
There are still plenty of sheepshead around as well.
Capt. Tom Chaya said he's managed to get his cli-
ents onto a few good-sized snook, as well as alot of catch-
and-release redfish.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle saidhehas been hearing
more and more reports of really hot snook action in the bays.


Offshore, snapper and amberjack seem to be the best bets.
On my boat Magic, I've been limiting to no more
than 25 sheepshead per trip. We've also caught and re-
leased reds up to 10 pounds.
Capt. Tom Romine said that with the better weather
he's scoring will on snook, with some trips producing
upwards of 20 of the big-jawed fish. Capt. Todd is also
finding more white bait.
Capt. Mark Bradow said snook, reds, trout and sheep-
shead were the catches of the week for his charters, with some
of the convict fis tipping the scales at six pounds.
Carl at Perico Harbor Bait and Tackle said mack-
erel are the best bet wherever the water is moving fast -
passes and channels. Snook are in hiding, but you can see
them roll in the sun. Carl said white bait is starting to
show, but shrimp are easier to find and his suggestion for
the bait of choice.
Ralph at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the four-
hour trip is averaging 75-100 head of Key West grunts,
vermillion snapper and black sea bass. The six-hour trip av-
eraged 250 head of vermillion and mangrove snapper, por-
gies and Key West grunts. Their nine-hour trip averaged 40
to 50 head of red and black grouper and mangrove snapper.
Good luck and good fishing.


I/


42 -~ 3


"


r,,,
~s~6pt~-.s
~~~~YS; ~f
:".

h
a~a~~
t.

-~RL~I'
,,


No hitter pitcher
Mike Armstrong,D.Coy Ducks, pitched a no hitter
against Kiwanis on Tuesday, March 15. The final score
was 12 to 3. Great game- and great team support.


To the moon, baby Islander Photo: BonnerPresswood
If you cruise a big boat, the Jet-skiers swarm and ride along side, motioning you to kick up a wake big enough to get
some "air." They shoot across, criss-crossing and jumping. They fly high and drop as if they would go on their
backs but miraculously don't. Looks like fun, but we'll stick with the 50-footer guys.


HOBIE
GALATI SUN
YACHT BASIN GLASSES


OPEN AND COVERED BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE!
... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN 7DAYSAWEEK*8TO 5 *
(377 92 .A L N A


SALEcS & 1nKV
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


Five O'Clock Marine
"Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices"
P. 0. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES I


DAY
Thu 3/24
Fri 3/25
Sat 3/26
Sun 3/27
Mon 3/28
Tue 3/29
Wed 3/30


AMHIGH
10:30
10:48
11:07
11:32
12:31
1:28
2:35


AMLOW
3:32 -0.1ft
4:06 0.0ft
4:36 0.2ft
5:00 0.4ft
5:25 0.5ft
5:47 0.7ff
6:05 0.8ft


PMHIGH
9:47 1.9ft
10:43 1.8ff
11:36 1.7ff

11:58a* 2.1ft
12:30 2.3ft
1:05 2.3ft


PMLOW
3:20 0.6ft
4:09 0.4ft
4:58 0.1ft
5:47 0.2ff
6:36 -0.3ft
7:31 -0.4ff
8:31 -0.4ft


5


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later Low Tides 1:06 later. I I


0 o
o 0
0 o




FISH TALES WELCOME
Got a great catch? Rare catch? The biggest catch of your life?
Your fish stories, and pictures are always welcome at
The Islander Bystander. Just give us a call at 778-7978
or stop by our office in the Island Shopping Center.






Ij PAGE 24 M MARCH 24, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
_ F ORV EF MIIIIIrW M


Great job
These are the "Students of the Week" at Anna
Maria Elementary School for the week ending
March 11. Front row, left to right, are Ayla
Strickroth, Megan Nelson, Kaitlyn Moore, Zachary
Schield and Donte Marone. Second row, left to
right are, Scott MacGregor, Ryan Headrick,
Kirsten Faasse, Sara Kafka, and Akela Collins.
Back row, left to right, are Ian Frederickson and
Jessica Sweetnich.


Curious minds win
county awards
Out of the 32 county-wide elementary school
students who qualified to participate in the Manatee
County Science Fair, 16 were fourth and fifth-grade
students at Anna Maria Elementary. First row, left
to right, are Jimmy Brackman and Melissa
Eddington, who walked away with first place
awards. Second row, left to right, are Janae Haupt,
Misty Kinney, Shawna Rigney, Kristopher Smith,
Jesse Ferguson, Travis Wicklund and Jason Loomis.
Back row, left to right, are Lucina Courtney,
Beatrice Pohl-Willmott, Natalie Van Wormer,
Kaelan Richards, Alan Jenkins and Suzanne Wight.



Spring Break starts
Anna MariaElementary School will be closed for
spring break from Monday, March 28, through Friday,
April 1. Classes will resume Monday, April 4.
Reminder classes will be dismissed early,
approximately 12:30 p.m., on Friday, March 25.


(D Joy Courtney


Cookie time ends
Brooke Trovato-Brown, left, honors
the end of Girl Scout cookie time
dressed as "Betty Bee," the Girl Scout
Cookie Mascot, with her fellow Girl
Scout Pamela Tuit. Trovato-Brown
was Brownie Troop #40's top pro-
ducer selling 250 boxes. To all the
Islanders who supported the Island's
Girl Scouts, each and every girl says
thank you.


Celebrating the green on the green Islander Photo: TomaraKafka
On St. Patrick's Day, Charlene Anderson (left to right), Amanda Sebastion and
Lindsey Wickershom, in Mrs. Whitfeld's first grade class, celebrated with green
shamrock cookies, green punch and got to sit in the green, green grass.


- ,
,,


Ready to soar
Clare Hapner, left, with her friends Rachel Soloman, Coleen Rydal and Sara
Loveland prepare their kites for Kite Day at Anna Maria Elementary School As high
winds blew off of the bay, the students' spirits flew as high as their colorful kites.


. G -% a






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N MARCH 24, 1994 ., PAGE 25 J1 .
I


CITY
Anna Maria


Bradenton Beach



Bradenton Beach



Holmes Beach


Anna Maria


Anna Maria


Bradenton Beach


Bradenton Beach


Holmes Beach


Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot
103 Pelican
75x100-canal

102 4th St S
50x94


2600 Gulf Dr
35 Anna Maria Island
Club

2703 Gulf Dr
50x100

239 Willow
75x148

801 N Shore Dr
50x1 25-Gulf

104 Gulf Dr S
104 Gulf View Condo

105 8th St S
50x100

209 69th St
70xl11

503 58th St
82x105-canal


STYLE/rooms
residential lot


AGE/size


ground duplex 1930
Bldg 1 -1 bed/1bath
Bldg 2 2bed/1bath/2car

elevated condo 1984
2bed/2bath-Gulf 1200 sfla


ground home
2bed/1.5bath


1920/1993
994 efla


ground home 1965
2bed/2bath/1car 1100 sfla

elevated home 1985
2bed/2.5bath/2cp 2,004 sfla

elevated condo 1980
2bed/2bath-Gulf 1200 sfla


2 story duplex
4bed/2bath


1957
1339 sfla


elevated duplex 1980
4bed/4bath/2car/pool

residential lot


SELLER/BUYER/when
Cannon/Albert
2/7/94 list

Sebastiano/Harring
424 sfla
649 sfla

Heffron/Meehan
2/7/94


Chisolm/Eaglin
2/7/94

Cataletto/Ward
2/14/94

Edenfield/Bostick
2/14/94

Geist/Gongaware
2/14/94

Allen/Larson
2/14/94

Lecroy/Pasuit
1950 sfla

Wimpy/Norman
.2/14/94


SALE$/LIST$
$95,000
$99,000

$113,000
2/7/94 list uk


$175,000
list uk


$108,000
list $113,900

$166,000
list $175,000

$590,000
list $625,000

$135,000
list $139,900

$66,300
list uk

$212,000
2/14/94 list $224,900

$62,500
list $69,900


Compiled by Doug Dowling, Licensed Real Estate Broker, 778-1222


Florida saltwater fishing laws include
limits on some of these species
commonly found in our area :
AMBERJACK: 28-Inch minimum fork length; 3
fsh daily possession limit.
BLUEFISH: 10-inch minimum fork length.
COBIA: 33-inch minimum fork length; 2 fsh limit.
FLOUNDER; 11-Inch minimum length.
GROUPER: (black, gag, red, yellowfin,
yellowmlouth,scamp): 20-inch minimum length; 5 fish
limit; no harvest of Nassau grouper allowed.


KINGFISH: 12-inch minimum fork length in state
waters; 20-Inch minimum federal waters: 2 fish limit in
state and federal waters.
MANGROVE SNAPPER: 10-inch minimum; 5 fish


limit
REDFISH: 18- to 27 inch slot; closed in March,
April, May. I fish limit.
SNAPPER: 20-inch minimum on red snapper; 12-
inch minimum on cubera, dog, silk, queen, mahogany,
blackfin and yellowtail; 10-inch minimum on gray or
mangrove snapper; 8-inch minimum on vermilion snap-


per, lane snapper,. Bag limit 10 daily (no limit on lane
or vermilion). Limit may not include more than 5 man-
grove daily or 2 red snapper daily.
SNOOK: 24-inch minimum length; closed Jan.,
Feb., June, July, Aug.; 2 fish limit; cannot possess more
than one fish or more than 34 inches.
SPECKLED TROUT: 14- to 24- inch minimum
length; 10 fish limit.; cannot possess more than one of
more than 24 inches.
TARPON: no size limit; 2 fish limit; requires $50
tarpon tag to possess or kill.


I FEE!!


9- -i







iE PAGE 26 1 MARCH 24, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


a4l sas~:4: 1P- -* ***- -as
CONDOS FOR SALE! ISLAND PARADISE -
luxury Gulffront! 3/2 $279,000 to $289,000.
GULF BEACH PLACE 2/2 $179,000. GULF
VIEW TOWNHOUSE 2/2.5 -$129,000. SHELL
POINT 2/2 $112,500. Also, Duplexes &
;Homes from $79,900. CALL DEBBIE
THRASHER, 778-2259.



Since 4
MARE 1957 UC. REAL ESTATE
REALTY oR
'We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813)778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250

Social notes welcome!
News about social events, clubs, anniversaries
and special gatherings are always welcome at
The Islander Bystander. Call 778-7978 to find
out how to include your news.





.. .




REDUCED -4 BEDROOM KEY ROYALE: Qual-
ity custom home shows like a dream. Split bed-
room desigh with private guest wing, separate din-
ing room, moving room, parlour, Florida room with
hand loomed carpet. Other amenities include all
appliances, heated pool and spa, sprinkler system,
well central vacuum, intercom, circle drive. Now
$249,000. Call Carol Williams for showing, 778-
0777 office, 778-1718 after hours.
I --_ I.


SOUTHERN COMFORT: Enjoy the quality and
formality of yesterday with today's convenience.
Picture 10 ft ceilings, decorative moldings and col-
umns, shining oak floors, fireplace, butler's pantry,
and 'ole-fashioned wraparound porch for catching
the breeze. High hip metal roof and 70ft. dock.
Reduced to $304,900. Call Judy Duncan, $304,900.
778-1589 eves.
CONDOS:
$58,900 ... FLAMINGO BY THE BAY 1BR/1BA
waterfront unit. Furnished turnkey. Boat dock, close
to beach. Call Debbie Walther, 794-6295 eves.
$89,900 ... BRIDGEPORT CONDO 2BR/2BA
bright corner unit with great view of Bay & Gulf. Just
steps to beach. Call Zee Catanese, 794-8991 eves.
$69,900 ... MT. VERNON 2BR/2BA condo with
great view of Sarasota Bay. Shows like a model.
Call Zee Catanese, 794-8991 eves.
$85,000 ... SEASIDE GARDENS 2BR/2BAvilla
with fenced back yard. Large laundry/workshop,
85,000. Call Sandy Greiner, 778-2864 eves.
$94,500 ... GULF FRONT COMPLEX 1BRI/BA
condo sleeps 6. Excellent rental for absentee owner
small complex. Call Carol Williams, 778-1718 eves.
$105,000 ... SHELL POINT 2BR/2BA waterfront
condo on Bayou heated pool, tennis. Call Carol
Williams, 778-1718 eves.
$109,900 ... 2BR/2BA BAYFRONT CONDO with
a direct bay view. Small complex just steps to the
beach. Call Zee Catanese, 794-8991 eves.
$158,900 ... MARTINIQUE outstanding view of
Gulf & Beach from this 2BR/2BA direct Gulf front
corner unit. Glass enclosed porch, 1 car garage.
Call Zee Catanese, 794-8991 eves.
$185,000 ... PLAYA ENCANTADA 2BR/2BA
condo with direct Gulf view from most rooms. Cov-
ered parking. Call Carol Williams, 778-1718.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS W5
III_


1 ANNA MARIA


ISLAND


WALK TO BEACH
from this elevated 2Br/2B home in prime Holmes Beach lo-
cation. Features include garage, whirlpool tub, stone fire-
place and more $145,00. Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
LOCATION & MORE spacious living/dining room features
fireplace, wetbar & soaring ceilings. Spectacular views, boat
docks, tennis & 2 pools. $212,500. Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
SMUGGLER'S LANDING turnkey furnished 2BR/2B
condo with extra storage. Corner unit with view of canal.
Includes 26 ft. beachcat $167,500. Jean Sears, 778-5045 or
Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
CANAL LOT IN WEST BRADENTON one of the last
waterfront lots. House does not need to be elevated. No
bridges to ICW or Bay. Nice neighborhood close to new im-
proved Cortez Rd. $89,900. Terry Robertson, 778-6654.
GULF-FRONT CONDO contemporary 1 BR/1.5B with
den/guest room is partially furnished and sits on prime walk-
ing beach. Sunsets galore! 778-6654.


Anna Maria Island Centre / 813-778-6654
3224 East Bay Drive / Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Screen
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA


Exclusive
Waterfront 419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
Estates REALTOR (813) 778-2291 P O Box 2150
Video Collection MLS EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


778-0455
9906 Gulf Drive
Next to the
Anna Maria Post Office


Watchforour
- listings on
U Classivision,
channel 19.


KEY ROYALE GEM
A Golfer's Dream and Boater's Delight!
This immaculate, tastefully appointed 3 bedroom, 3
bath canalfront home has it all, including a boat dock
and davits on deep, seawalled channel, plus execu-
tive golf course located directly across street Ameni-
ties include gorgeous window and wall coverings, a
preferred split bedroom design with spacious living
room, gracious, ceramic-tiled dining room, expan-
sive family room with vaulted ceiling, and sunny
screened lanai with built in Jennaire range and wet
bar. Also offers a central vac, security, intercom, and
sprinkler systems! First-rate tropical retreat for only
$395,000. Don't miss it!

CANALFRONT
POOLHOUSE
This inviting 3 bedroom, 1 bath waterfront home
wraps around a sunny, caged swimming pool
area with sliding glass doors opening onto most
major rooms. The deep seawalled canal offers
direct bay and Gulf access, plus boat dock and
electric davits. High and dry lot with coconut palm
and orchid tree in fine Bay Palms neighborhood of
Homes Beach. Only $175,000. What a super deal!

PREMIER
ISLAND HIDEAWAY
Custom built 3 bedroom, 2 bath Island residence with
views of Tampa Bay. Boat dock minutes from the
Intracoastal and the Gulf of Mexico. Fireplace of white
Alaskan rock, gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets,
Jennaire range, large center island. Enormous garage
area with workshop and recreation area, tropical land-
scaping. $345,000. Steps to sandy beach.


Jss i dtler cH /earda a alSa.. caflona, eT ialarzbi la I rletL. o f ic f is
' Aeoolatos Alter Hours: Barbara A. Sato...77B-3500 Christine T. Shaw..,778*2847 Marcella Comett...778-5919 Nancy Gulford...778-2158


ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


mum... ml


ANNUAL RENTALS
BRADENTON BEACH 2 BR, 2BA, unfurnished.
$525 plus utilities.
BRADENTON BEACH-2BR, 2BA, unfurnished. $500
plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH 2BR, 2BA, unfurn. $500 plus utilities.
SANDY POINTE CONDO 2BR, 2BA, unfurnished.
$725 plus utilities.
CANAL FRONT HOME -3BR, 2BA, unfurnished. $800
plus utilities.
CANAL FRONT HOME 2 BR, 2BA unfurnished.
$1200 plus utilities.


(813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
Florida 34217


El


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
I L 9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307










BEACH COTTAGE
Fantastic cottage near Bean Point and beautiful GULF
beaches. Enjoy the sunsets from this 2 bedroom, 1 bath
home. Call today. Only $124,500. Call eves. Pat Jack-
son 778-3301 or Ken Jackson 778-6986.
Great lot near beach. Must see to appreciate. Drive by
308 Spring Street, Anna Maria. $74,900. Call Kathy
Granstad778-4136 or Agnes Tooker 778-5287
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson, ;.
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
and Kay Kay Hardy
WEEKDAYS 9A.M. to 4:30P.M. UE-
SATURDAYS 9A.M. to NOON .0


One of Anna Maria's most popular neigh-
borhoods rarely available!
Gorgeous home completely renovated throughout
with new kitchen, family room, new carpet and de-
cor. SEPARATE GUEST HOUSE for mother, hob-
bies, studio or? Tile roof, garage, huge 100 x 100
lot. Drive by this quality home at 112 Peppertree
Lane (beach side near Baptist Church) and call ...


DICK
WAGNER
REALTY INC,


EXCEPTIONAL

PROPERTIES .1


I


I


[Snu~tn






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 MARCH 24, 1994 0 PAGE 27 l3


1290 PALM AVE., SARASOTA, FL 34236 SINCE 1988
Attention Realtors ...
Do you get more "lip service" than
action from your mortgage lender?
Communication = Results
"The cheapest price isn't worth
anything if the loan doesn't close."
CALL RANDY SMITH (813) 957-3616


-- .


AFFORDABLE KEY ROYALE HOME on Sailboat Water -
3BR/2BA Split bedroom plan. Great home for entertaining with
open floor plan. Eat in kitchen, boat dock no bridges to Tampa
Bay or Gulf. Priced appropriately at appraisal of $220,000.
[ Hal Gillihan Office 778-2261
_.. MLS a Evenings 778-2194


NEW HOME UNDER CONSTRUCTION
North end of Anna Maria Island, 1,560 sq. ft.,
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. $172,000.


QUALITY
BUILDERS
-.M. 3l


778-7127
Fax 779-2602
#CRC047915


Bruce L. Skorupa
REALTOR Award Winner
Links
SBuyers and Sellers
Together and Provides
Personal Caring Attention
Professional Knowledge
.h Exceptional Service

Experience Plus! Call Bruce Now!

The Prudentia Fr' ida Realty
5340-1Gulf r., Hlmes eachFL34 17
(813)78-076 1-80-778-448 Ees: 75-030


*tl~r .


- ~ E


I WW^--^^-. ,--,.. ll" _, l. l, ..



BEACH BARGAIN
Just steps to the BAY, this 2 bedroom home is in
great shape. Lovely lot in an upscale neighbor-
hood. Seller is very motivated. See it today. Call
Rosemary Schulte eves. 794-6615. Only $138,000.


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Drive P O Box 717 Anna Maria, FL 34216
FAX# 778-7035
(813) 778-1450 or778-2307


DRAG OUT YOUR OD "BEACH" HAT AND CANE...
FOR THE ISLAND'S FIRST CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION! Volunteers are needed along with parade
and craft show entries. Call 778-5405 and tell them The Islandersaid to call for more information on the Centennial.

Serving Anna Maria Since 1*939 CAiL(1377-246FAX778-497
DICKA J^ ^^^MnBradnon Beahi^^^^ lB ill~llll~lM ^
W AGNERZ~i Dav Monia ................... 778-7976^^^^WU^

REALT INC. Real state jES Bll Wgner Broer ......... 778591
Broker Ed Olieira ........................ 778-175


I-1


---I


In
GULFFRONTI Magn
this great house. Pop
beach in all direction!
anxious. Call Stan W
I


FOUR UNITS, GREAT
center of Holmes Bea
rented on an annual b
Stan Williams.


LAKEFRONT Beautil
lake views all it takes
pools, tennis, 24 hoi
ambiance. $109,900.
I s.-, n


RUNAWAY BAY 2BF
floor unit in complex
sauna and on site mr
access and excelled
$98,500. Call Dave M


lificent views from all rooms of BAYFRONT LOT Central Holmes Beach location
)ular rental. Expansive, sandy with deep water dockage and fabulous view. Lot is
s. Priced at $299,000. Owner cleared and measures 85' x 130'. Offered at
'illiams for details. $189,500. Call Dave Moynihan.









WT INCOME Located near the LA PLAYITA 2BR-2BA townhouse, close to beach
ach. Just remodeled. All units and shopping, large pool and recreation area, ga-
)asis. Priced at $165,000. Call rage and storage for $79,900. Call Dave Moynihan.










fully furnished, new carpeting, SUNBOW BAY 2BR-2BA well-maintained unit with
s to make a home! 3BR 2BA wonderful view of lagoon, two pools, tennis, bayfront
ur security compliments the pier and dock and walking distance to beach. Of-
Call Stan Williams. feared at $92,500. Call Dave Moynihan.






- o '- .

U&I
-2BA fully furnished, second GULF VIEW TOWNHOUSE Spacious Gulf view
with pool, tennis, clubhouse, townhouse with 3BR-2BA, private 2 car garage and
management. Deeded beach over 3100 sq.ft. under roof. Complex offers two pools,
it rental program. Priced at tennis, lush grounds and short walk to prime beach, Of-
loynihan. fered at $159,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
STOP IN FOR A FREE 1994 RENTAL BROCHURE AND CALENDAR


ANNUAL RENTAL* 2 Bedroom -.2 Bath Nice,
single family home on canal, Anna Maria.
Washer/Dryer, one car garage. Will consider
less than 12 month lease. $800 per mo.


(813) 778-0426
HORIZON REALTY
ofAnna Maria, Inc.
420 PINE AVENUE BOX 155
ANNA MARIA, FL 34216


*


-m-


iis *a AB


NEW LISTING! Spacious 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home which is
designed to include an open living area & kitchen plus Florida
room with wet bar for entertaining. Also ideal as mother-in-law
suite. Lush landscaping surrounds this lovely home. Dock &
davits included. $289,000. Call Debbie Thrasher.



Since
MARIE 1957 LIC. REAL ESTATE
FRANKLIN REALTY BROKER
"We ARE the Island.'
9805 Gulf Drive PO Box 835 Anna Maria, Florida 34216
1-800-845-9573 (813) 778-2259 Fax (813) 778-2250

FEE V- ki


202 LAKEVIEW
2 bedroom, 3 bath home with 2 car garage. Heavy duty
boat davits. Seawall and dock, fireplace, central vacuum.
Renovations done ready for offer. Asking $18 8;0,0
$175,000, $171,0 00, $16,000. $165,000.


DOUG
DOWUNG
REALTY
409 Pine Av.
Anna Maria
778-1222


Doug
Dowling
Realty
778-1222


,1~


I


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
The ONLY Island Real Estate Group AND we offer you ALL REAL ES-
TATE SERVICESI Anna Maria Island Real Estate Specialists extend-
Ing both Personal AND Professional Services In New Construction &
Design, Existing Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis,
Home Warranty, Free Network to Other Areas, Best Property Manage-
ment and Annual & Vacation Rentals. Over 75 Yrs. Combined Expe-
rience AND Smilesl
S .1 l l . ; lj|. ;. '


- -- L --- ---


-M






IJ PAGE 28 0 MARCH 24, 1994 E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


JENNIFER
AND


Jennifer Jones ... year round Island resident hails from North
Central Penn. Police officer for 15 years and former Assistant Chief
of Police at Mansfield University. Jennifer holds a degree in busi-
ness administration and marketing. Member of Manatee County
Board of Realtors and Island Co-Listing Service ... water sports
enthusiast... reading and professionally a Realtor-Associate.
Jennifer along with the entire SMITH TEAM, wants to serve you better than anyone on the is-
land. If what you need has anything to do with selling, buying, renting or managing real estate.
Call Jennifer 778-6947 eves.
S5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-0777
Rentals 778-0770
REALTORS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK


SINCE 1939'
Island Relocation
Specialist
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR
When Buying or Selling, Ed can make your
SIsland Dream come true!


778-1751
Evenings


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


Business and social news are always wel-
come at The Islander... call us at 778-7978
to find out how you can be included.


The Prudential


The house is light & bright. High ceilings, tile
floors, very open rooms & screened lanai make
this home the example of What Island Living is
All About! 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Call T. Dolly
Young, 778-5427 to see #56442 ....... $169,000
OLD CRACKER-STYLE HOME just listed!
Large oak trees, quiet street. bedrooms, 1 bath.
Needs TLC or could remodel & build 2 new
homes! Call Don Pampuch, 778-3111 for appt.
#56478 ............................................... $62,900
WILD OAK BAY at EL CONQUISTADOR! Ul-
timate in vacation & luxury. 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths,
spacious & light w/spectacular views of Sarasota
Bay! Golf memberships avail. Call T. Dolly Young,
778-5427, #56392 ............................. $229,000


North Beach
Village! $139,900
and
4-PLEX in Holmes
Beach! $289,000
Call me today!
Carol Heinze
CRS REALTOR0
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


Karin Stephan
REALTOR
LEADING EDGE
SOCIETY
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
Mobile:
813-350-5844


DUPLEX 106 31st ST. One lot from gulf with
beautiful sunset views. 2 car garage. Excellent,
rental history. $209,000.
2708 AVE C. 3Bd/2Ba with Mother-in-law
apartment 1 block from Gulf & Bay. $121,900.

Harold Small
Realtori/Associate
Million Dollar Club Member i
Ofc. 778-2261 Evenings 792-8628


SMLS


Toll Free
.1-800-732-6325


WESTBAY COVE
CONDOMINIUM
Direct Bayfront- 2nd floor view, 2BR/2BA, white
tile and white carpet. See the shimmering waters
of the Bay and Intracoastal. $4-5-700'T Reduced
to $155,000. Owner financing available.
Call Rose for details.
778-2261 or after hours 778-7780.
Toll-free 1-800-422-6325.
ROSE
SCHNOERR
S Realtor
GRI, LTG, RRC
4 Premier Circle
Member
0 Experience
E Commitment
-. M Service
; E Results
o~ m-i--- M- s


^T. A-


KEY ROYALE
624 Foxworth Lane
100 feet on deep water canal. 3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, eat-in kitchen and formal dining room.
1,880 sq. ft. New sea wall and dock.
778-7837




Vacation


Rentals

Anna Maria Island
Great Selection of
Seasonal Properties

Beachfront Bayview Gardenview -
Weekly rates from $500.00
Monthly rates from $1,200.00
Contact: Debbie Dial
800/881-2276
813/778-2275
Michael Saunders & Company
Licensed Real EstateBroker
3222 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217 (813) 778-2275










Bmm Adaman mm


GULFFRONT
Ocean Park Terrace Condo 3BR/2BA fully fur-
nished. Two screened porches & roof-top sun deck
overlooking entire Gulf, Intracoastal Waterway and
Island. $t89-,Q0 REDUCED to $175,000.
ISLAND 6-PLEX
2/2 each unit. Close to beach, restaurants and shop-
ping. Pool and laundry facilities. $450,000.
RUNAWAY BAY
2 BD/2BA Unit, Turnkey Furnished, Completely up-
dated, custom ceramic tile throughout.
GULFFRONT COMPLEX
DESIRABLE TIFFANY PLACE-2BR/2BA, all
the amenities, elevator and turnkey furnished.
$169,900.
Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
or Janis Van Steenburgh 778-4796
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 T MiS


NO BROKER CHARGES
1 .. IP


SMALL DUPLEX OR LARGE HOUSE
308 68th St., Holmes Beach 2 bedroom, 1.5
bath and 1 bedroom, 1 bath OR combine! 3
sundecks overlooking lake, 2 blks to Gulf. El-
evated, newer building with 2 car garage & huge
enclosed storage areas. $139,000 with possible
owner financing. 778-4877.


It's the best
news on the
island, and
it's free!
For information
on free home
delivery, call...


S778-79L

778-7978.


OWNER SELLING


620 Hampshire Lane
Key Royale Main Canal Golf Course frontage.
3 bedroom, 2 bath, Florida room, office, large liv-
ing room, fruit trees, 80' custom dock, 2 car garage,
metered sprinkler system. $289,000. Call 778-4252.


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


bR~4~t~~m ~ I IIa I --


I







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E MARCH 24, 1994 A PAGE 29 ilG

, A A A4 Ar IS S I I E S

ITMSFO SLEITMSFO SLEGAAG SLE


PHOTO EQUIPMENT: Complete professional camera
system NIKON EM body with 50 mm lens, motordrive,
strobe, plus 28 mm and 70-300 zoom lenses, bag, misc.
filters. Complete $450. 778-9392. WANNA SKATE?
Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A relentless rush! For
skating information and sales call 778-3880.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels... and everything else
in THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
CAR CLEAN SPECIAL Wash and vacuum every week
all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. We come to you
with fully mobile service. Call mobile phone # 356-4649.
BE THE BEAUTIFUL woman you know you are. Call
me for a free facial. Left home and forgot some of your
Mary Kay cosmetics. Call me. Free delivery. Donna
Jean 383-3202.

WANTED OLD ORIENTAL RUGS All sizes, any con-
dition. Call Robert Adamsky 383-9211.

WANTED Your unwanted stuffed fish. Get rid of it here.
Call The Islander Bystander. 778-7978.






,:. Marilyn Trevethan
REALTORSWASSOCIATE
is BRINGING
S4 BUYERS &
SELLERS
TOGETHER!
Beach/Gulffront
3 Bedroom Condo
$220,000



,,tlq4 VV'l E .mr r





Call for Details & Showing
Anytime (813) 792-8477
S Office (813) 778-2261
SBI[ MiLS Toll Free 800-422-6325


WHEN IN PARADISE SEE...







5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522









Sandy Pointe Condo Panoramic views of lower Tampa
bay from this 2 bedroom, 2 bath turnkey furnished unit.
Small quiet complex and priced to sell at $99,500. Call
Dennis McClung at 7784800.
Picture Perfect 3 bedroom, 2 bath canal home at prime
Anna Maria location. Near the beach. Home features fruit
trees, hot tub, boat lift and much more. MUST SEE!
$229,000. Ken Rickett. 778-3026.
Top Quality Gulffront Complex is where you'll find
this 2 bedroom, 2 bath turnkey furnished unit with a view.
Complex features pool, tennis and elevator. $175,000!
Ask for Brian Bishop at 778-4800.
Waterfront Bargain! Luxury at bargain price describes
this spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo. Enjoy canal front
living with boating, tennis, pool, hot tub and much more
all at a great location. Live like a king for just $79,900.
Ken Rickett. 778-3026.
Anna Maria Island Club has it all! Can't get a better
Gulf view! 2 bedroom, 2 bath with top of the line furnish-
ings, heated pool, elevator, Jacuzzi, sauna. Call Lynn
Hostetler at 778-4800.

-- ~. :.... .


ITEMS FOR SALE Custom slip-covers, draperies, pil- .
lows & cushions. Wide selection of decorator fabrics to
choose from. Call Joann Van Ostenbridge 792-9529.
NAUTICAL ANTIQUES Solid brass ships wheel &
stand off of liberty ship or lake freighter. 1918 US Navy
compensating binnacle on solid brass base. Both
$3500 OBO. 778-0019.
MURIEL SMITH buys old toys, dolls, dollhouses, teddy
bears, miniatures, folk art, children's books. 778-7544.
TWO DOHON foldup travel bikes. Like new. $400
OBO. 778-9557.


GARAGE SALE Sat., Mar. 26.8 am to 3 pm. Fumiture,
books, clothes, misc. 601 S. Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach.
MOVING SALE 522 75th St., Holmes Beach. Sat., Mar.
26. Lamps, furniture, golf clubs, some clothes, many
misc. 8 am to 12 pm.
ANNA MARIA 202 Iris St. Sat., Mar. 26.8 am to 3 pm.
Furniture, wicker, silver, drum set, antique trunk, 72
Plymouth, archery, misc.
GARAGE SALE Sun., Mar. 20. 8 am to Noon. 710
Gladiolus St., Anna Maria. 778-9612. Good day/trundle
bed, weight set, large microwave, m/f dress clothes.


DICKI i


ISLAND BAYFRONT Panoramic views from the 4BR-
2.5BA Bayfront residence with Bay and deep water ca-
nal frontage. Natural cedar construction with cathedral
ceilings throughout. Tropical setting with pool, gazebo
and lush landscaping. Short walk to Gulf beaches. Of-
fered at $379,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
778-2246 Office or 778-7976 Evenings
Serving Anna Maria Since 1939
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach


neaL=~neaL


ANNA MARIA
ISLAND
TOP PRODUCER
DICK MAHER
Office 778-2261
Evenings 778-6791
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325


DICK MAHER
REALTOR0 ASSOCIATE


BEACH HOUSE
* 3BR/3/BA with garage, lowest price available,
directly on the beach 278,000.
WESTBAY POINT MOORINGS
* #76 2BR/2BA Turnkey, on Tampa Bay
$149.000
* #225 3BR/2BA recently redecorated, with
private dock and carport. $145,000.
* #164 Turnkey furnished, lower level, end
unit. $135,500.
KEY ROYAL, SAILBOAT WATER
* 607 Baronet Lane. 2BR/2BA in excellent con-
dition, and well landscaped.
* 602 Hampshire Lane. 3BR/2B, great comer lot
BRADENTON BEACH
* 2500 Gulf Dr. 2BR/2BA Gulf front home, re-
cently renovated. $338,000. Reduced to
$299,000.
HOLMES BEACH
* Tiffany Place, Island's finest location. Just re-
decorated 2BR/2BA. $184,900.

8 m-s Ms [
REALTOR


MOVING SALE Come one, come all to 2204 Ave C.,
Bradenton Beach. Fri., Mar. 25 & Sat., Mar. 26. 9 am
to 1 pm. Home fumishing, plants, wicker, children toys,
clothes, some furniture, boat accessories and more.

FAMILY SALE Sat., Mar. 26. 636 Dundee Lane, Key
Royale, Holmes Beach. Walker, commode, spreaders,
household items, clothing, toy train, misc.


REWARD Diamond necklace and diamond ring lost at
Holmes Beach Art Fest. 792-8339.
LOST Swim goggles. Prescription. Lost on beach by
City pier. Reward. 778-9112.


BEN AND IRENE'S Dog Babysitting Service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls (Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


66 CHRYSLER New Yorker. Great looking. No rust.
Runs great. $2700. 794-0298 after 6:00 pm.
CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every
week all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Call
mobile phone # 356-4649.






li] PAGE 30 0 MARCH 24, 1994 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Co Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Lawn Hauling By the cut orby the month.
Service 12 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
778.1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
1 AND SATISFACTION




MV0359 l


|ISLA]h


JDER l AIW I


CALL 778-7978 FOR INFORMATION ABOUT
OUR GREAT RESULTS FROM
CLASSIFIED AND SERVICE ADVERTISING.


Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcom ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468

CHRISTIE'S
J PLUMBING
so COMPANY
V Commercial & Residential
Open Saturday
S 24-Hour Service
S No Overtime Charges!
778-3924 or 778-4461
"Remember, it pays and saves to get a second estimate."
5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach (RF0038118)



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
S-* ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
9 LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
i* MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


AMERIOAN CAR WASH

Q &DETAIING

Self service or personal service
Pick up & delivery service available
Enclosed facility for added protection
of your vehicle
778-1617 5804 Marina Drive Holmes Beach


.WHY
^ WORRY???
About Your Home
When You're
Gone


Check-A-Home
19 Years Serving Longboat,
Lido and Bird Keys ...
Now Available on Anna Maria Island.
Weekly Visits Monthly Reports
TED and JANET FRIEDRICKS
383-4413


BOAT DOCK Marina Drive. $100 for 3 months or $40
week. Call 778-5522 leave message.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. 1/2 & full day. Reservations please. Book now
for next season. Call 778-1990.


VOLUNTEERS NOW ACCEPTED. For Tingley Memo-
rial Library. Part-time or full-time. 778-9413 or 778-
6247.
Calling ALL VOLUNTEERS! Would you like to meet
interesting people from around the world? Are you in-
terested in learning the history of Anna Maria Island?
Get involved with the Anna Maria Island Historical Mu-
seum, 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. WE NEED YOU!
Call Martha Stewart, 778-4362 or Carolyne Norwood,
778-1514 if you can give a few hours of community
service.
LIVE-IN NANNY/Housekeeper needed. Must drive.
778-1863 for details.
AD PRODUCTION Desktop Publishing Program. Ex-
perienced in Pagemaker and computer ad layout. Part-
time. Call or stop in the Islander Bystander.
RETAIL SALES Part or full time. Beach-Style Boutique,
Mature adult with retail experience. Anna Maria. 778-
4323.
HOUSEKEEPER needed for beachfront motel. Part-
time, some weekends, start immediately. Apply in per-
son at Sand & Sea Motel, 2412 Gulf Drive, Bradenton
Beach.
HOUSEKEEPER Harrington House Bed & Breakfast.
778-5444.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light clean-
ing, spring cleaning, WINDOWS, moving help, organiz-
ing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island! (20% dis-
count to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.
HOME REPAIR-Kitchen & Bath, handyman and home
repairs. Island resident, 23 years experience, local ref-
erences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office, or
dock-at your convenience. Complete detailing includes
wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon on
mobile number 356-4649.
PROFESSIONAL YACHT & Boat cleaning by Carleen.
15 years experience. No job to small. For free estimates
call voice pager 813-252-0080. Island resident.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!
MARY KAY COSMETICS-Free facials. Free delivery,
Call Donna Jean. 383-3202.

TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all types of
trees including palms. Insured, reasonable, Island resi-
dent. Local references. Call Brewers 778-7790.


ISLANDER



HOW TO
ADVERTISE
DEADLINE: MONDAY at
NOON for WEDNESDAY
publication. Up to 3 line
minimum includes ap-
proximately 21 words -
$4.50. Additional lines
$1.50 each. Classified
ads for businesses are
6.50 for 21 words. $2.00
per additional line. Place
and pay in person in
advance. Stop by 5400A
Marina Drive, between D.
Coy Ducks and Chez
Andre in the Island Shop-
ping Center. More infor-
mation: 778-7978.


HOLMES
BEACH
BUSINESS
CENTER

C3 ZONING
RENTAL
SPACES
AVAILABLE

Office Suites
Mini Storage
Retail or Service
CALL NOW
778-2924
5347 Gulf Drive
Holmes Beach


TAX PREPARATION and small business accounting.
25 years experience. Certified. Your neighborhood rep-
resentative in Holmes Beach, Pat Kenney. Kenney Tax
Service. 778-6024.

INCOME TAX PREPARATION. Individual, corporate
and special situation. All states. 28 years experience.
Free pickup and delivery. Island resident. Jay Parker
778-6179.
9 to 3 ADULT DAYCARE Service, Inc. Daycare for
older adults with memory loss or are slightly confused.
794-6864.
HOUSE CLEANING Reasonable rates. Dependable
Island resident. Local references. 778-9678.
ISLAND PAINTER Fast, neat, reasonable. 27 years
experience. Call Big Jim 778-5587.
HATE TO IRON Call the Ironing Lady. Experienced
with great references. Island pick-up and delivery. 778-
1767.


HOME REPAIR SERVICE Professional tile installa-
tion, marble work, plaster & stucco. Interior/exterior. All
repairs. Excellent Island references, 23 years experi-
ence. Call Mark at 778-5354.
VAN-GO PAINTING ResidentialCommercial, Interior/
Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wallpaper. Island resident
references. Dan or Bill 778-5455.
JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional instal-
lation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee County resident
25 years. Call today for a free estimate. Ken 792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the Island for
17 years. 778-0181. Lic. # RF0038400.

Interior/Exterior Painting. Call Jim Bickal 778-1730.
Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
LIC #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free esti-
mates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repairs. 778-
4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
HOME REPAIR Seniors discount. Special rate for
mobile homes. 24 hour service. Island resident for 22
years. Call Pete 778-2812.


ONE LARGE commercial studio. Gulf view. Gulf Drive.
Ideal for small business, office, crafts, etc. Neg. Call
Frank at 778-6126 Eves. 778-6127.

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Yes, if you lost your pet or found
someone elses pet The Islander Bystanderwill run the
ad absolutely free for up to two weeks. Just write it up
and drop it off at our office in the Island Shopping
Center, 5408 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


SEASONAL Gulffront/canal homes and condos.
Weekly and monthly. Call Debbie Thrasher, Anna
Maria Realty, Inc. 778-2259.






etailW
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
WASH WAX SHAMPOO
Engine & Underbody too.
Every detail is cleaned and protected. Your
car and boat can look like new again ...
and maintain the value! By appointment,
at your home or office. Most cars $85.
Call the mobile service number. 356-4649
or leave a message: 778-9392.


IS ANDER -ASSFID
BOT 9'SEVCE


/


I E.






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER MARCH 24, 1994 U PAGE 31 Iri


QUIET 1/1 fumished. 1.5 blocks to beach. Cable TV
and microwave. Available beginning March 16. Wk/Sn/
An. No pets/children. 778-9413.
FOR RENT 2/2 duplex apartment. West of Gulf Drive.
Three houses from Gulf. Completely fumished. Central
A/C & heat. Florida room. Yearly furnished $1000
month plus utilities. Seasonal $1520 month plus tax and
utilities. Call Betty-Cole 813-778-2422.
COTTAGES ON the beach in Anna Maria City. Wk/Mo/
Sn. 813-735-1488.
LOVELY DUPLEX 3/2, 210 81st St., Holmes Beach.
Available for 1995. 813-962-0817.
BRADENTON BEACH 1 bedroom home fully furnished
March/April or semi fumished annually. 1/2 block from
beach, pier; eating, and shops. 114 3rd St. S. 778-2896.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2 BR house in
Holmes Beach. Prefer someone working nights. $300
plus 1/2 utilities. 778-8375 days/778-2899 nights.
BOXBOXBOX
ANNUAL $550 month, 2/2, excellent location. $400
month, 1/1, S Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach. Gulf Bay
Realty of Anna Maria, Inc. 778-7244.
KEY ROYALE Canalfront. 2/2,1560 sq. ft., living area
plus garage, shop and laundry. Unfumished. $1000
month. Call owner 778-5045.
ROOMMATE WANTED Female wanted to rent large
bedroom in nice NW Bradenton home w/2 females, mid
20's & mid 30's. House privileges. 10 minutes from Is-
land. $300 month includes utilities. References re-
quired. 778-6541 days. 794-6553 eves.
SUMMER RENTAL Adirondack Mountains lakefront.
May 1 to Oct. 1, 1994. $3000 season. Ideal for adults.
778-9555.
GULFFRONT RESIDENCE Turnkey 2/2 with fabulous
views. Located north Holmes Beach. Available April
1994. Call Dave Moynihan, Assoc., Dick Wagner Re-
alty, Inc. 778-2246/778-7976.
LOVELY 2/2 Holmes Beach duplex available for annual
rental on April 1. Almond carpeting & verticals, ceiling
fans, washer/dryer inc. First/last/security deposit re-
quired. $625 month. 795-3838.
WANTED TO RENT May 1st, annual, unfumished. 2BR
house/dup, quiet area. Holmes Beach/Anna Maria.
Responsible, excellent references with small well be-
haved dog. 795-7852.

BAYFRONT Arina Maria, North Shore. 2/2, A/C, cable,
microwave, washer/dryer, large porch. Wk/April or May
$1500 month includes utilities. 778-0340.

APRIL 1ST Comfortably furnished duplex apartment, 2/
1, screened porch overlooking Gulf. 100' from beach.
Washer/dryer, dishwasher, phone, cable, microwave,
covered garage, off season, reasonable. 778-0727 or
924-7260.
UNFURNISHED Island rentals. Bayfront 2/2 with loft,
boat dock, sm. pet ok, must see, $750 month. Island in
the Sun 2/2 townhouse, pool, $600 month. Neal & Neal
Rentals, Inc. 778-9477.
AVAILABLE NOW: Quaint beach cottage. 3/2 across
from beach. No annual rental. Reserve now for next
season. 778-1180.
GULF CABINS 2716 Gulf Dr. Oceanfront, top floor, 2/
2 with laundry. Newly decorated. All the goodies. Due
to lease cancellation. Will discount $400. 778-0015.
LOVELY ANNA MARIA Gulffront apartment. 2/1, porch,
sundeck. Wk/Mo/Sn. No pets. 778-3143.
BAYFRONT COTTAGE Anna Maria. View of Sunshine
Skyway Bridge. 2/2, seasonal. Small pet ok. 778-0488
Leave message.


BEACH RENTAL Best on beach. Steps to gulf. Im-
maculate 3/2 on N. Shore Dr. Available after May 5.
$800 week. 778-3171.
SEASONAL OR ANNUAL 3/1 house. Cable, large
kitchen, covered parking, sundecks, bayview, 2
blocks to beach. Available April 15th. 778-0192.
BRADENTON BEACH duplex. 2/1 with boat space
available. Unfurnished. Available April 2. $775 month
includes electric, water, garbage, cable, washer/dryer.
750-8715 evenings.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2/2 in Holmes
Beach. 1/2 block to beach. $300 includes utilities.
778-1276.


KEY ROYALE 624 Foxworth. 100 ft. canalfront. 3/2.5
living room, dining room, kitchen with eating area. 2
car garage. 778-7837.

PERICO BAY Open House. Saturday & Sunday. 3/
2, glassed lanai, ceramic tile, floors in great room,
custom closets, plantation shutters, custom made
entertainment center. Over looks Bay. Gated commu-
nity. Tennis, pools, etc. Garage with storage.
$199,500. 813-794-6472.


OPEN HOUSE Sat., Mar. 19 & Sun., Mar. 20. 1 pm
to 4 pm. 3/2, glassed lanai, ceramic tile, floors in great
room, custom closets, plantation shutters, custom
made entertainment center. Over looks Bay. Gated
community. Tennis, pools, etc. Garage with storage.
$199,500. 813-794-6472.


DIRECTLY ON THE INTRACOASTAL. Key West
style duplex. Seawall. Deep water. Anna Maria Island.
Owner financing or trade. $165,000. 778-7980.


LOVELY 4BR/2.5BA, two story brick home. Com-
pletely renovated. Separate studio. 7704 20th Ave.
NW., Bradenton. 795-8169.

65' X 1OY LOT overlooking Tampa Bay on S. Bay Blvd,
Anna Maria. Excellent building site. Cleared with palm
trees. $119,500. Phone 778-4363 leave message.
ISLAND CONDO 2BR/2BA. 2 lanais, eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer, pool, walk to beach, low maintenance
fee and owner may finance! $99,900. Call Yvonne
Higgins at Island Real Estate 778-6066 or 795-0105
after hours. SEE IT TODAY! HISTORIC CORTEZ
VILLAGE Charming 2BR/1.5BA cottage. Nice oaks,
quiet street. 1 blk from Bay. Great seasonal rental or
second home. For sale by owner, 794-1103. $62,500.
LARGE 2/2 VILLA. Pool, clubhouse. Nice area min-
utes to Gulf beaches. $49,900. 794-6293.
BY OWNER Two story brick. 4/2.5 with family room.
Oak floors. Completely renovated. Two car attached
garage. Separate brick studio. Northwest Bradenton.
Best schools. Must see. $169,000. 794-0145.
ABSOLUTE AUCTION Oceanview 3/2 condo. Anna
Maria Island. Sat., Mar. 26th at 2 pm. Preview at 1
pm. 2700 Gulf Dr. (Ocean Park Terrace), Unit 201,
Anna Maria. Call for brochure 813-488-1500. Neal
Van De Ree auctioneers. Lic. RE Broker.
HOLMES BEACH LOT Deep water canal, view of
Skyway. Approx. 66 sq. ft. Excellent seawall. 66' on
water. $149,000. 778-0019.
WATERFRONT 2/1 in Holmes Beach. Deep water
canal, view of Skyway. Excellent seawall. Dock.
$149,000. 778-0019.
Happy Easter Holiday from all of us at The Islander.


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
DEADLINE: MONDAY at NOON for Wed. publication. Up to 3 lines includes ap-
proximately 21 words $4.50 minimum. Additional lines $1.50 each. Classified ads
for businesses are 6.50 for 21 words. $2.00 per additional line. Place and pay in per-
son in advance. Stop by 5400A Marina Drive, between D. Coy Ducks and the
Laundromat in the Island Shopping Center. More information: 778-7978.

/ e_


JS ANDER-C ASSFID
I ENAS ENASI


Island Typing Service
S--Computer Operated
SFAX Service: Send & Receive
FAX #778-8390
310 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-8390


Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630 Lic. No.4467

778-2586 M MARV KA Eve: 778-6771


S25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY- EXP. 3/30/94






SABAL PALM ,
CARPENTRY PM g
AFLORIDACOMPANY Interior/Exterior
SMALL HOME REPAIRS 20 Years
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDINGExperience
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS Husband/Wife
*ODD JOBS Team
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603 Free Estimates
RickLease 778-2139
32-Year Island Resident

Free Estimates Donnie Rivera




O OWNERS
ISLAND LAWN SERVICE

(813) 778-7508
P O Box 352 Anna Maria FL 34216

SSISLAND CLEANING
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
NOW OFFERS...

VACUUM SALES & SERVICE
We carry all makes & models
Small Appliance Repair Licensed & Bonded
Same Dependable, Prompt, Quality Service
5600 Marina Dr Holmes Beach
Mon-Fri 10-4, Sat 9-2 778-4988
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! All in The
Islander Bystander Classified Ads.

S HOMERS
DRAPERY CLEANERS
QUALITY & SERVICE GUARANTEED
Take Down and Rehanging


RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL
Same Day Drapery Service In-Home Carpet Cleaning
Upholstery Spreads Comforters Blinds *
Free Estimates 779-1410
SMember of Manatee Chamber of Commerce *


I jl||f |II I|

COMMUNITY ELECTRIC
NEW DO-IT-YOURSELF
CONSTRUCTION SUPPUES
Call FREE EXPERT ADVICE
David Parrish Call
792-5207 798-3095
7800 Cortez Rd. W. (Behind Wings & Things)
"Serving the Islands for over 15 years"
'- .j




\ jl PAGE 32 0 MARCH 24, 1994 i THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcpme Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1994


RIGHT HEREON THE ISLAND!


, rII)


WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU MARCH 29
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE


U.S.D.A. CHOICE
Top Sirloin


I %~I


COUNTRY STYLE
SPARE $429
RIBS I LB


I %~3


FAMILY PACK 80% LEAN
GROUND BEEF


3 LBS. OR MORE


GARDEN
FRESH


oagus


$1


NUTRITIOUS
Cauliflower


39
HEAD


Join Our 3rd Annual
Easter Egg
Hunt...
Saturday
March 26, 8 a.m. r


Bring a Bask
Lots of Free
Prizes and
Meet the
Easter Bunn'


DELI-DELICIOUS
Potato Salad


-'*1'*^


na


59
LB.


BAKERY FRESH
Banana Nut


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


No purchase n cssly.


Q|PWdMMMOWE


==NJ