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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00497
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00497

Full Text


NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


IC


Forces meet Thursday on bridge fate


By Bonner Presswood
A year-end analysis
Thursday may be the final meeting between two feud-
ing state agencies on whether a 65-foot, fixed-span bridge
will be built to Anna Maria Island. In an effort to recap the
last year's activities, below is a chronology of what has
happened with the Megaa" bridge.
Mayor/DOT meeting
At a meeting of Island mayors, the Island Elected


Bradenton Beach

gives easements

to Florida DOT
By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Bradenton Beach City Council has signed over
to the state two easements to make way for construction
of a roundabout at the intersection of Bridge Street and
Gulf Drive.
The roundabout, a small traffic circle, was proposed
by the Florida Department of Transportation (DOT) to
expedite the flow of traffic through the intersection. It is
being constructed by the DOT in conjunction with the
redevelopment of Bridge Street.
City attorney Alan Prather explained last week, "In
their efforts to move forward with the roundabout, which
| is on a state highway, they need to take some right-of-way
Sin that area to gain title for DOT to be able to do the work."
Prather said the city obtained easements on property
Owned by Helmut Newbauer (Vienna Castle) and Clem
Dryden (Key West Willy's) for construction of the Bridge
Street project. Both then signed easement agreements with
the DOT for construction of the roundabout. Because the
city was a party in the easement agreements from the two,
it must sign similar agreements, said Prather.
S "We'll be adopting resolutions that say it is a proper
public purpose for us to give up our easement over the
property in favor of DOT," Prather said. "Upon adopting
the resolution, council will authorize the mayor to execute
the quit claim deed which will actually pass our easement
Sto them."
The city would maintain access to the easements for
maintenance purposes through a right-of-way use permit
from DOT, said Prather.
The council also executed a similar agreement con-
cerning beach front property at the S-curve on Gulf Drive.
In 1990, the state agreed to purchase four lots north of the
El Bandito Motel through the Save Our Coasts initiative.
The state approved the funds for the purchase in January
of 1993. The lots are to become a neighborhood park.
"One of the attorneys who is handling the sale of three
; lots for the owners found out that there is a street in front
of two lots Avenue E," revealed Mayor Katie Pierola.
"It's a city street, and we have to give it up."
Prather added, "Obviously the street does not exist.
It was washed away at some point in history. With the
renourishment, there is now this desire to be absolutely
certain as to the claim and title to that area."
Prather said the state Department of Environmental
Protection maintains that any renourished beaches are the
property of the state. Their concern is with a portion of
property between the western boundary of the lot line of
the four lots and the erosion control line.
Explained Prather, "They asked those property own-
ers to warranty deed to them and get title insurance to the
state for that portion. The owners say they don't own it,
and if anybody owns it, it's the city, state or county."
The county searched in vain for documents to show
that the street was vacated, so ownership lies either with
the state or the city, said Prather, or if a street vacation ever
occurred, with the property owners. The city and the prop-
erty owners are being asked to quit claim deed any inter-
est it may have in Avenue E in order for the state to pro-
ceed with the land purchase.
In other business, Mayor Pierola appointed John
Kaufmann to the committee to study police services on the
Island. .


Officials, in January 1993, even before the committee
which held public hearings on the merits of a 65-foot
bridge made their recommendation back to regional trans-
portation planners Florida Department of Transporta-
tion District 1 Secretary David May said the department
would proceed with the plans unless the committee found
"substantial flaws" in the engineering report that recom-
mended the high, fixed-span bridge.
At a meeting to resolve differences with environmen-


talists and obtain the necessary permit from the Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection, May and engineers
who developed the plan admitted their proposed construc-
tion method was useless. DOT and the consulting engi-
neer present at that meeting readily admitted they were
unaware that during most hours of the day the depth of
Anna Maria Sound on the south side of the existing bridge
PLEASE SEE BRIDGE FATE, PAGE 24


The hoe-
down
S: 'round-up
SRick Fellows (left), pastor
: *of Episcopal Church of
the Annunciation,
watches as a junior
A3
cowpoke tries his hand at
rounding' up the herd
.'. during Anna Maria
.e. l :s o Elementary School's
-" .Kindergarten/First Grade
S : Hoe-down. Fellows, a
real live cowboy, is a
team roper and heeler
Swho participates in
'. _rodeos in Montana. For
morepictures, see inside.

6 Islander Photo: Joy Courtney


-_.. L-%


-1



Anna Maria Commission okays

remodeling plans for 314 Pine Avenue


The Anna Maria City Commission approved a re-
quest by Paul Horvat for Phase I of the remodeling of 314
Pine Ave., the former Islander newspaper building, at last
week's city meeting.
The request, previously approved by the city's plan-
ning commission, contained the following provisions:
ADA(American Disabilities Act) requirements are met.
Parking requirements are met.
Fire codes are in compliance.
Must be in conformance with all city building codes
and unpermitted work begun or completed prior to stop
work order must be inspected and meet codes.
Building permit is issued.
Stop work order is lifted.
Any other requirements deemed necessary by the
building department are met.
The commission received updates on a street light re-
quest, the city hall addition and angle parking at the IGA.
Public Works Supervisor Don Tarantola said in order
to install a street light at the corer of Palmetto Avenue
and North Shore Drive, FPL must have a letter of request
from the mayor.
On the city hall addition, Tarantola said he conferred
with architect Gene Aubry who suggested that the build-
ing be squared off in the back. Bid specifications on the
remodeling will be available Jan. 17.
Tarantola said the city is waiting for a survey of
boundary lines at the corer of Gulf Drive and Magnolia
Avenue (Anna Maria IGA) before making a decision on


angle parking there.
The commission approved the appointments of
Nancy Ungvarsky, Doug Copeland, Dale Powers, John
Home and Nancy Corcoran to the equity study advisory
committee. The committee is to review the city's occupa-
tional license tax ordinance to insure that it complies with
new state legislation.
The commission agreed to vote on a home occupa-
tional license for Carmen and Frank Pedota, 208 Chilson
Ave., at its Jan. 5 special meeting. The license is for a mail
order doll business.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Molehill of a mountain................. Page 2
Seagrasses ................................ Page 4
Opinion .................................... Page 6
The Way We Were ..................... Page 7
Escape!...................................... Page 8
Stir It Up .................................... Page 14
School Daze ............................ Page 16
Outdoors .....................................Page 20


JANUARY 6, 1994


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND






l[ PAGE 2 I JANUARY 6, 1994 a THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


New Island group to 'go guerrilla'


ByPatCopeland
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach resident Bob VanWagoner said re-
sponse to his call for an Island militia was small, but "the
people and conversations were interesting, with a number
of people offering support from behind the scenes."
In last week's Islander Bystander, VanWagoner an-
nounced the first sign-up for the organization to be called
"Anna Maria Island Irregulars."
"The Island is being attacked by many forces," ex-
plained VanWagoner, "and they're overwhelming our
elected officials and agencies."
VanWagoner noted that each city has something on
its agenda that has the potential to change the destiny of
the Island.


'This will be a tactical arm for the cities
and agencies to see how we're going to
defend the Island in a way that's not tied
Sup with procedure. We have a crisis as
far as the future of the Island goes, and
when you have a crisis, you have to do
something unusuaL'


However, each sees only that one item, not the total
picture, which he characterized as an attack on the Island.
"This will be a tactical arm for the cities and agencies


like Save Anna Maria to see how we're going to defend
the Island in a way that's not tied up with procedure," he
said.
"We have a crisis as far as the future of the Island
goes, and when you have a crisis, you have to do some-
thing unusual."
The voice of the Island is also.being ignored by
county, regional and state officials, and "nobody wants to
pay attention to whatwe think," maintained VanWagoner.
He cited a nationwide trend in which residents are
demanding a voice in shaping their communities and de-
termining their future.
"Alot ofpeoplereally love this Island,"he said "It's one
thing to be concerned, and it's another to be passionate."
Interested residents can call VanWagoner at 778-0342.


SMolehill grows back into mountain::


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The controversy has been renewed over a pile
of sand, rocks and debris at the comer of 25th Street
and Avenue A in Bradenton Beach. The material is
Stockpiled there by the city maintenance department
for use in patching streets and alleys.
After their first attempt at having the pile re-
moved was unsuccessful, Avenue A residents
Dick and Eileen Suhre are returning to council
Thursday with a petition signed by 47 neighbors.
Several weeks ago, the Suhres complained to
Mayor Katie Pierola about neighborhood chil-
dren and teens throwing large rocks and debris
they found in the pile. Dick Suhre collected two
buckets of rocks from the pile and took them to
the mayor to back up his complaint.
The mayor placed the issue on the city coun-
cil agenda for Dec. 2. The Suhres were out of
town on that date.
At that meeting, the mayor said, "' think we
are making a mountain out of a molehill."
Councilman Bill Campbell agreed adding,
"The city can't be parents'to these children."
The council voted to leave the pile as is, with
Councilman Herbi Dolan the lone dissenter.
"I thought common sense and reason would:
prevail," lamented Dick Suhre last week. "We're
askingthem to remove the pile, not be parents to
the children."
"There are rock throwing wars between the
kids," said Eileen Suhre. "You don't put a loaded
gun in front of kids and expect them to ignore it."
The pile is located between a children's park
and an adult park, whichhavebeenrenovatedbythe
city in recent years.
"The city spent thousands of dollars to lure
kids to the park but continues-to ignore the dan-
ger created by the pile," said Dick Suhre. "In at
least one case, an injury from a rock required a
doctor's attention. It's only a matter of time be-
fore someone gets seriously hurt. We've also
seen kids up to their waists in soft sand in the
pile."
The Suhres and their neighbors want the pile
moved to the city maintenance yard or near the
recycling dumpsters at Coquina Bayside.


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Mountain or molehill?


Islander Photos:


Neighborhood residents claim this pile of sand, debris and rocks at the corner of A venue A and 25th Street in
Bradenton Beach is a hazard and want it removed


Sticks and
stones can
break your
bones
This large brickinthe pile
of sand and debris at the
corner ofAvenue A and
25th Street inBradenton
Beach is compared in size
to a pair ofsunglasses.
Residents say neighbor-
hood children are throwing
rocks and bricks found in
the pile and want the city to
relocate it.


Anna Maria City
Thursday, 1/6:7:30 a.m. Bldg. Dept. Meeting
Tuesday, 1/11: 7:30 p.m. Commission
Work Session

Bradenton Beach
Thursday, 1/6:7 p.m. Council Meeting

Holmes Beach
Thursday, 1/6:9 am., Planning Commission Meeting
Thursday, 1/6: 7 p.m. Council Workshop
Wednesday, 1/12:9 a.m. Planning Commission


Anna Maria City
Building permits:
New construction: $130,000.
Additions & alterations: $87,525.
No new business or rental licenses were issued.

Bradenton Beach
Building permits:
New construction: none issued.
Additions & alterations: $21,658.
Business Occupational Licenses:
* Town &'Shore Realty, 105 Bridge St, Real estate


office, Dhimitra LouLoudes, broker.
* Tee-Two Green Golf, 2501 Gulf Dr. N., golf retail,
repair, Sam Allen.
* Doug Nusbaun d/ba/ Transparent Sands, 119
Bridge St., gift shop.

Holmes Beach
Building permits
New construction: $162,000.
Additions & alterations: $36,895.
Home occupancy permit: 2802 Ave. C Javitz.
No new business or rental licenses were issued.


NEWS OF REORD


Matters of record for the month of December 1993


I MEETIN


r-n-
.-~
; '-r
., -I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JANUARY 6, 1994 A PAGE 3 I[j


UP AND AWAY IN BRADENTON BEACH
A fall from a Bradenton Beach roof resulted in a compound fracture of the
left leg for a man Tuesday morning. Details were sketchy at press time, but
Bayflitefrom St. Petersburg was called to transport the man to the Bayfront
Medical Center with possible back complications.


Islander Photo: Paul Roat

IDIITA JIAN & AV
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String Bass...........................Dick Booth Benny Goodman & Les Brown
Call Harriet Or Bud Carew For Tickets And Reservations: 778-1282


REPRINTED FROM ...
Bradenton Herald

DINING OUT
FRIDAY, DECEMBER, 31, 1993


Restaurant critic tells where

she likes to eat
Pat Benson
Herald Restaurant Critic
FAVORITE RESTAURANT
We'll get the most oft-asked query out of the way first.
"What's your favorite restaurant?" is posed almost every time
I'm in a group of people who know what I do.
Over the years, the answer has always been and contin-
ues to be Beach Bistro.
I love the beach view; the caring and careful service; the ex-
citing, impeccably prepared food; the well-chosen wine list; the
wonderful, professional restaurateuring of Sean and J.P.
Since I've publicly revealed my love affair with this restau-
rant, I'll never be able to review it in the future. That's OK; I'll
just continue to eat there for the sheer enjoyment of the Bistro's
culinary seductions.











Award Winning Surfside Dining
778-6444






I'~ PAGE 4 M JANUARY 6, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


SEAGRASSES

Plants growing in those mud

flats can mean environmental

riches for Sarasota Bay


By Paul Roat
It can be one of the more obvious elements of the
Sarasota Bay environment, especially with the extreme
low tides during the winter: seagrass beds poking green-
and-brown leaves out of the tidal muck.
Seagrasses are the most commonly thought of ele-
ment of the bottoms of estuaries like Sarasota Bay. Yet the
entire habitat of the subsurface is a complicated ecosys-
tem called the benthos.
"Benthos is a Greek word that refers to the depths or
bottom of the sea," writes Jim Culter, a benthic scientist
at Mote Marine Laboratory in the technical assessment of
Sarasota Bay titled "Framework For Action."
"The science of benthic ecology is the study of the
plants and animals that inhabit the benthos. Benthic organ-
isms are generally not highly mobile; the majority of in-
dividuals in the benthic community will live their adult
lives within a relatively small area. It is due to this re-
stricted mobility that benthic organisms are considered
excellent indicators of habitat conditions and, in some
cases, environmental quality."
In the Sarasota Bay area, including the near-shore
Gulf of Mexico waters, Culter estimates there are 500-
1,000 different species of tiny benthic creatures.
Culter discovered five different types of bay bottom
in Sarasota Bay. From most- to least-common, Sarasota
Bay is divided into:
unvegetated subtidal sand, muddy/sand
intertidal and subtidal seagrass meadows
artificial hard bottom (reefs, seawalls, bridge pil-
ings)
natural rock outcroppings (including the nearshore
Gulf)
oyster-bar habitat
There are seven different species of seagrasses in Florida.
Sarasota Bay has five of them: Thalassia testudinum (turtle
grass), Syringodium filiforme (manatee grass), Halodule
wrightii (shoal grass), Ruppia maritima (widgeon grass) and

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Halophila engelmannii (star grass).
A total of 8,318 acres (13 square miles) of Sarasota
Bay bottom are covered with seagrasses, Culter found,
about 26 percent. Near Anna Maria Island, 50 percent of
the bottom is covered with 2,011 acres of seagrasses.
From City Island south to Midnight Pass, including
Blackburn Bay, about 23 percent of the Bay is covered
with 2,537 acres of seagrasses.
Culter also found losses of seagrasses and disturbance
of bay bottom have been widespread throughout Saraso-
ta Bay. About 15 percent of the bay bottom has been dis-
turbed mostly through dredging and filling with a
30 percent loss in seagrass beds Baywide.
More insidious is the continued degradation of water
quality. Culter said "losses of seagrass have been docu-
mented throughout the region, and have been attributed to
two principal factors: direct mechanical destruction by
dredge-and-fill and boating operations and indirect losses
due to deteriorating water quality. Changes in water qual-
ity can be attributed to multiple causes associated with
coastal development."
Generally, Culter found that the closer the seagrass
beds are to an inlet with regular exchange of water with
the Gulf of Mexico, the healthier the seagrasses were.
"In Sarasota Bay, barring direct physical impacts,
seagrass meadows decline in diversity and abundance at an
increasing distance from open Gulf waters," Culter said.
So what's so important about seagrasses?
"Through their complex physical structure, seagrass
meadows serve as habitat by providing shelter for both
adult and juvenile crabs, shrimp and fish," Culter said.
"Seagrass blades act as a substrate for an entire com-
munity of marine organisms, including microalgae,
microinvertebrates, protozoa and diatoms. Herbivores that
graze directly on the seagrass blades include fishes, mana-
tees, sea turtles and sea urchins, while the attached epi-
phytes provide a valuable food source for a host of other
marine life. Dead leaves and epiphytic growth falling to

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the Bay bottom make up the majority of the material in the
detrital food web.
"Seagrass leaves slow the water current and promote
the deposit of organic and inorganic particles in the wa-
ter column; their presence also inhibits the resuspension
of sediments. Roots, runners and rhizomes form an inter-
locking grid that tends to lock in the accumulated sedi-
ments and retard erosion of the Bay bottom. The physi-
cal energy of waves and currents tends to be dissipated by
the presence of seagrass leaves, helping to protect adjoin-
ing shorelines from erosion. With their photosynthetic
ability, seagrasses are a major contributor of dissolved
oxygen to the water column.
"Finally, seagrasses play an important role in the nutri-
ent cycle. Seagrass leaves take updissolved nutrients from the
water column, while the roots take up and store nutrients from
the bottom sediments. The removal of excess nutrients im-
proves water quality with respect to light penetration."
:Status of seagrasses is threatened in Sarasota Bay
through the increased levels of contaminants found in
stormwater runoff. Pesticides, excess fertilizer, and petro-
leum products from automobile exhausts run from yards
and streets into the bay, polluting the water and destroy-
ing seagrass beds.
Dr. David Tomasko of the Sarasota Bay National
Estuary Program has said that "... metals contamination,
the product of stormwater runoff and illicit point-source
discharges, is an important issue in Sarasota Bay.
"Many studies have documented the decline of
seagrasses associated with degraded water clarity."
Tomasko is cautiously optimistic when it comes to:
restoring damaged seagrass beds.
'The shallow slopeof the bottom of SarasotaBay would
allow for dramatic increases in area seagrass with minimal
increases in water clarity. According to bathymetric data for
Sarasota Bay, roughly 46 percentofLittle Sarasota Bay is less
than two feet deep at Mean Lower Low Water.Tliis depths
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JANUARY 6, 1994 A PAGE 5 E[


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE
equal to the deep edge of grass beds in the central por-
tion of Little Sarasota Bay.
"If water clarity in Little Sarasota Bay were to im-
prove to values typically found in Roberts Bay,
seagrasses could grow to one more foot of water depth.
In Little Sarasota Bay, that would result in an increase
in potential acreage from 986 acres of Bay bottom to
1,434 acres, apossibleincreaseinseagrass habitat of448
acres (equal to 45 percent of existing habitat).
"Although seagrasses have declined by approxi-
mately 30 percent Baywide compared to historical
coverage, areas such as Longboat Pass and New Pass
show positive trends for coverage. In the Longboat
Pass area, it appears that seagrass increases may be
due to growth on flood-tidal shoals created by pass
dredging. In the New Pass area, better water quality
appears to be allowing seagrasses to grow into deeper
". I ,I 'U- ,,'U :' 1 : 7 1


' Thalassia
testudinum,
commonly
called turtle
grass, is one of
the more
common -
andproductive
-of the
seagrasses
found in the
SSarasota Bay
region.





areas that were previously unvegetated."
More seagrasses means more fish, and more fish
means more potential catch for fishers. Tomasko has
said that "... the primary issue affecting recreational
fishing in Sarasota Bay is that of more people fight-
ing for their slice of a diminishing pie. A tenfold in-
crease in population during the last 40 years has
greatly increased fishing pressure. During the same
period, dramatic declines in fisheries habitat an ap-
proximate 45-percerit decline in mangrove area, and
a 30-percent decline in seagrass area have occurred.
As such, a relationship appears to exist among de-
clines in habitat, increased fishing pressure and the
finding that the average angling experience is less
productive than it used to be.
"It seems thatprotecting remaining fisheries habitats,
although essential, is not sufficient To truly increase the
level of enjoyment of recreational angling, new fisheries
habitat must be created on a continuing basis."


Buy it! o0 u
customers A
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The Islander. Wi0n *hop.
Bystander classified 4G r
section is .ARVI SHOPPE .5 a i
the source. d dresses
See pages 26 & 27 5501 Manatee Ave. W. A
this issue. Brdenton 794-0235

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Island recycles

Xmas trees
Residents of Anna Maria City and Holmes Beach can
help the environment this year just by disposing of Christ-
mas trees on the proper day.
On Jan. 6, 7, 8 and 9, Manatee County and Waste
Management are offering a free curbside pickup program.
Christmas trees will be picked up in special trucks and
transported to the county landfill. Instead of being buried
in the routine fashion, the trees will be mulched in order
to save valuable space in the landfill.
Residents are asked to place the trees by the curb on
the day of normal trash pickup. Officials ask that the trees
not be placed in plastic bags.
For information about tree pickup in Bradenton
Beach, residents may phone city hall at 778-1005.

Save Anna Maria
to meet Jan. 15
Save Anna Maria (SAM) will meet Saturday, Jan. 15,
at 1:30 p.m. in the Walker Swift Meeting Room of the
Island Branch Library in Holmes Beach.
The agenda includes nomination of 1994 officers,
DEP and DOT Jan. 6 meeting results and the upcoming
MPO meeting and a discussion of making an appointment
with Governor Lawton Chiles and chartering a bus to
travel to Tallahassee, all in regards to the bridge.
Nomination of officers will also be held.
All SAM members and guests are encouragedto attend.

How do I get a back
issue of the paper?
Issues up to 30 days old ate available from The Is-
lander Bystander office at no charge. Older issues are
available for $1 each.
To order by mail, send $2 for each copy of each is-
sue requested along with the specific date of the newspa-
per desired to The Islander Bystander, 5400A Marina Dr.,
Holmes Beach 34217.


L77:C:67777 1.1
C rriei






1[] PAGE 6 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

U. 9


A voice too faint
to be heard?
Amazing how things have changed in just a few years.
Just 20 years ago, mosquitoes on the Island were so
thick you couldn't go out in the evening without a cover-
ing of oily bug repellent or an even thicker coat of
black, furry skeeterss.
Today, a mosquito bite is a rarity, and there are no fears
of venturing out in the warm summer evenings on the Island.
Just 40 years ago the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
decided a waterway an Intracoastal waterway should
be created to link us with the rest of Florida's shores. Huge
dredges came to the area and created a channel 100 feet
wide and 12 feet deep through the bays.
Baybottom, oysters and seagrasses-it was alljustcalled
muck back then- were sucked out and piled up. New islands
were created or dredge was simply dumped into swamps.
Today, we have learned the value of seagrasses and
bay bottom "muck" and mangroves, and how important
the surrounding environment is to a clean, healthy Bay.
At least, some of us have learned.
Studies conducted on behalf of the Sarasota Bay
National Estuary Program have revealed that 26 percent
of Sarasota Bay is covered with seagrass beds. We've lost
about 30 percent of the seagrasses historically found in the
:region because of dredge and fill activity and residential
waterfront construction.
In Anna Maria Sound, about 50 percent of the bay
'bottom is covered with seagrasses something we
should all be proud of. It's one of the reasons the fishing
is so good and the water so clear here.
But wait! The Florida Department of Transportation
wants to build a new bridge right through some of the
most pristine and luxurious seagrass meadows in the en-
tire Bay area, destroying three acres nearly impossible to
mitigate turtle grass.
SSo what's the difference? What's three lousy acres of
muck in the bottom of the Bay?
John D. MacDonald says it best in his book, The
Empty Copper Sea:
S''orida can never reallycome to grips with saving the
environment because a very large percentage of the popula-
tion at any given time just got here. So why should they fight
to turn the dock back? It looks greattothem the way it is. Two
years later, as they are beginning to feel uneasy, a few thou-
sand more people are just discovering it all for the first time
and wouldn't change a thing. And meanwhile the people who
knew what it was like. 20 years ago are an ever-dwindling
minority, a voice too faint to be heard."


ISLAND RI eRN
JANUARY 6, 1994 VOLUME TWO, NUMBER 7
'V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Paul Roat, News Editor
June Alder
-Bob Ardren
Pat Copeland
Joy Courtney
Jack Egan
Jeannie Friedman
Tomara.Kafka
'V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Dennis Friedel
Mike Heistand
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Darla Becker
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Susan Runfola
V Production
Darla Becker
Dennis Friedel
V Distribution
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster


wI


With a lot of help from our friends. 1994
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5400A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978


SLICK BYEgan


NEE l l


Check facts before it's in print
I'd like to ask your writers -did you verify the story
.Pierola told you about the dangerousbridge?
Did it have concrete walls on both sides as the bridge
going into St. Pete? How fast was the car traveling? Was
it a small or large car? There are a lot of factors to con-
sider in this report.
I'm 110 percent in favor of a 65-foot bridge and as
far as I'm concerned I speak for only me and Queen Katie
speaks only for herself.
John Bacich, Anna Maria City
Editor's note: Yes. The police crash report is on file at The
Islander Bystander office.

Football winner lucks out
What a nice surprise to find your $50 check in
Saturday's mail.
I didn't knoW I had won the football contest since I
usually pick up The Islander Bystander at Island Foods
when I go to the beach, but the weather's been so cool I
haven't been over to the Island in days.
An ironic note I don't know anything about foot-
ball. I don't even like it but I can't resist contests and just
randomly picked familiar names;
I'm sharing the prize with mykids, so you see, you've
spread around some extra Christmas cheer.
Elizabeth Van Loan, Bradenton


Trust in FDOT misplaced
I am moved by Bill Saunders' trust in FDOT, that fine
government agency that gave us 1-75 which crumbled soon
after opening (and had to be repairedat additional taxpayers'
expense), that gave us synchronized timedlightson Manatee
Avenue (well, they WILL give us timed lights on Manatee
sometime, whenever they can get them working, again late,
at taxpayers' expense), and of course that gave us the side-
walks in downtown Bradenton that have to be ripped out at
$49,000 expense to the taxpayers.
If we cannot trust FDOT on any of the above projects,
why should we trust them with our lives when they have
continually ignored Island concerns while at the same
time falsifying bridge data?
As the Islander Bystander reports, a young man died
on a high bridge during the March storm "airborne over
bothlanes of traffic." What might happen tousduring the
-;; g i,


14 hours necessary to evacuate (FDOT's figure) during a
hurricane?
The accident information was not provided by those
"eminently qualified people" atFDOT, althoughit almost
certainly was known to them. A "stridently vocal Is-
lander" (and SAM member) traveled to the eastcoast to
report on the accident site.
Island elected officials have asked that a wind study
be conducted (in co-operation with the National Hurricane
Center in Miami) before bridge discussion goes any fur-
ther. Instead FDOT is pressing ahead to use state taxes
because the bridge on Manatee Avenue is in such good
shape that it does hot qualify for federal funds..
Why this assault onthe state's very limited funds? Who
stands to profit rom the rush job? Certainly not Islanders.
Kay Hoey, Bradenton Beach

Journalist-in-training says thanks
I wanted to express my gratitude and thanks for al-
lowing meto have such a great experience at The Islander
Bystander.
The three weeks thatI worked with all of you taught me
morethan you canever know. Notonlydidithelpme become
a better writer, but it showed me how to have confidence in
myself and my work and how to relate better to people.
I am very lucky that you allowed me to come aboard
for this short time I did. Most newspapers would not have
been so flexible or generous with their time and energy.
I am so grateful to-all of you.
I also want to thank the readers of The Islander By-
stander. They did not complain about a "rookie" report-
ing the news of their Island to them, and for that I am very
grateful. I was able to learn a great deal through this in-iii
ternship and I thank everyone for helping me.
My thanks and appreciation again for letting melearn
about the newspaper business and what it entails. I may
become a journalist after all. Who knows?
Laura Dart, Holmes Beach

... and the final football
winners are:
Bob Johnson and
Robert Crorey, both with -3.











THOSE WERE THE lAYS
Part 5, Bridges Over Troubled Waters,
by June Alder


NWm I
Three circus elephants with bathing beauties perched on their heads were the first to
cross the new Cortez bridge when it was dedicated on Sunday, March 3, 1957 U.S.
Sen. Spessard Holland cut the ribbon, and the day of celebrating was climaxed by
fireworks at the Anna Maria City Pier.


VARLEY'S CRUSADE


When Harry Varley burst on the scene
with his newspaper, The Islander, in late
1951, Manatee County and Anna Maria
Island were just beginning to come out of
the Depression and World War II dol-
drums. Holmes Beach was eight months
-old and eager to take on the world.
Bradenton Beach was in its birth pangs
(Dec. 12, 1951). Even old Anna Maria
City (1923) was showing signs of life.
The Island's future depended on re-
placement of the 1920's-era Cortez bridge.
It was literally falling down (nailing down
loose boards was a daily task for the ten-
der). But the politicians and state bureau-
crats were maddeningly slow to act.
Varley, a born crusader and
wordmaster if there ever was one, quickly
became the Voice of the Island. In every
issue he bedeviled the establishment about
the bridge. "One good bridge to the Island
NOW!" was his slogan, repeated over
and over.
Before 1952 was out, the announce-
ment came: Anna Maria was slated to get
not just one but three bridges! It would
be a package deal to be financed by $6
million worth of bonds to be paid off with
tolls over a 30-year period.
It seemed like overkill to Varley. But
he went along with the scheme.
There were those who didn't: Bridge
Street merchants disappointed that the new
Cortez bridge terminus would be 200 yards
to the north; owners of empty land where the
mid-Island bridge would touchdown, protec-
tive of"riparianrights"; old-timers and fish-
ermen who hated the idea of a causeway
across upper Palma Sola Bay; and certain
Palma SolaParkproperty owners who feared
lowered property values.
But with the backing of the county
commission, the three Island cities and top
state officials, the plans went ahead. The
bonds were ready to go on sale in early
1953, and Varley predicted, "This
reporter's guess is that one new bridge to
the Island will be ready in the forepart of
1955 but maybe he's too optimistic."
Varley's second statement was cor-
rect. The bridge bonds did not go on the
market in 1953, nor in 1954. A lawsuit
blocked their sale for two years. Eight
Palma Sola property owners charged the
county commission with depriving them
of their property rights under the U.S.


Constitution.
The suit slowly worked its way
through the courts while everyone fret-
ted. The multi-million-dollar Sunshine
Skyway over Tampa Bay opened in Sep-
tember 1954, bringing thousands of tour-
ists into Manatee County. But few of
them were willing to endure the traffic
jams to,.get on and off Anna Maria's
beaches.,
Finally the case reached the state
Supreme Court. And there it ended in
February 1955 when the court found it
without merit.
Letting all his frustration out, Varley
unleashed this diatribe against the ring-
leader in the suit:
"When a man holds up a people's
project of six million dollars for many
weary months; challenges the expressed
will of the people; sues in the Circuit and
then in the Supreme Court; threatens to
go to the U.S. Supreme Court; annoys
and upsets thousands of people; keeps
hundreds of workers off the job, compels
the County and State to waste money
fighting him; takes the time of engineers,
executives, attorneys and officials; leaves
Islanders depending on one rattling
bridge and all this on the flimsiest kind
of excuse there should be some pen-
alty exacted. While the law does not pun-
ish him, Pirman has already gone before
the highest tribunal that of public
opinion. He has been found guilty. His
sentence is the richly-deserved contempt
and scorn of his neighbors and fellow
citizens."
And a few weeks later when the
county commissioners voted to go ahead
with the sale of the bridge bonds, Varley
crowed: "The bridges will be built! And
Pirman and his lawyer can go fly a kite in
Washington, D.C., or Brooklyn or wher-
ever Pirman comes from. One good
bridge to the Island SOON is as-
sured. The others will come as, when, but
no longer if."


Next:
Yet another
bridge flap


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 6, 1994 1 PAGE 7 I-E


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* U
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MAILING!

We mail the Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $26 per year. It's
Sthe perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
S need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only
S newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is a free, community newspaper, and if you
U live here, you'll never have to pay to get the Island news. But if you don't.
live here and you would like to subscribe, please fill out the form below .
and mail or drop off at our office with a check in the proper amount.

BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS START DATE:


Q One Year: $26 Q 6 Months: $18 0 3 Months: $10
: 1st Class Mail and Canadian Subscriptions:
SEl One Year: $125 l 6 Months: $75
NAME
U U
ADDRESS U
* U
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CITY STATE ZIP__
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ISLANDER .""MIJ
MAIL OR DROP IN PERSON TO:
. THE ISLANDER/BYSTANDER.
* THE FREE VOICE OF ANNA MARIA ISLAND
: 5400A Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 -
. We're located right between D. Coy Ducks and
* the Holmes Beach laundromat in the Island Shopping Center.
WWmWE EE Ui UEUUEgUngmUEUE Em EUUU g ag


For fast, thorough, friendly service call
me Jon Kent, Island resident and owner
of Fat Cat. Call 778-2882, 8 AM to 5 PM.
CALL TODAY!


C~ 5"'1
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~~ .-
"~~:I






liD PAGE 8 K JANUARY 6, 1994 T THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

THE BROWN PELICAN


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Thomas (left) and
Andreas Nierade visited
Anna Maria Island
recently, recanting a tale
about a daring escape
from communist-
controlled East Ger-
many.







Editors Note: Today, the
Nierades live in their
native Pirna; in the
Unified German Repub-
lic. There, the brothers
own and manage a travel
agency which has five
offices throughout
Germany. Visiting here
over the holidays, they
said they wish to pur-
chase property on Anna
Maria Island and
"arrange for vacations
on this beautiful island
paradise."

Many thanks to Sabine
Musil whose excellent
translation skills allowed
this story to take form.





By Dennis Friedel
Islander Correspondent
PIRNA, German Democratic Republic, Nov. 1984
-It was the worst of times and Andreas Nierade could
stand it no longer. After conferring with his family, he
marched down to the government office and applied for
a permit to leave the country.
"You realize the consequences of this?" the GDR
official asked. "You will never see your family again."
Nierade simply nodded, recalling something his
father had told him several years earlier. "Some day, you
will be free."
But the cost of freedom was high in those days for
the few who were fortunate enough to be granted permits
to leave the communist-controlled nation. If allowed, the
government would see to it that all family connections
were severed. No longer would Andreas' family be
allowed to visit friends and relatives in West Germany.
And it was certain the government would keep a watch-
ful eye on those he was leaving behind his mother,
father and a younger brother, Thomas. Leaving was a
decision not to be taken lightly.
"They made it very hard for anyone to leave,"
Andreas recalled, "but I hated the system and I just
wanted to get out." He recalled his excursions to Hun-
gary where he would met new friends from western
Europe telling about the freedom they enjoyed. "They
had things simple things by your standards but
things we could not get in East Germany. Fruit, candy,
clothes you name it we just didn't have access.
Those in the West were so far ahead of us," he said.
In East Germany, everything was under government
control. Most essentials were rationed. People stood in
long lines just to garner enough staples to feed and clothe
their families. Autos were expensive and took a long


Islander photo courtesy Dennis Friedel


time to get Most rode trains or bicycled to work. By
western standards, it was a mediocre existence with little
chance for improvement "There was no hope that any-
thing would get better. The only hope," Nierade said,
"was to go west."
Soon after Andreas made application to leave, his
brother Thomas followed suit Four years younger than
Andreas, Thomas also decided he'd had enough of the
communist regime.
"Our mother and father told us to go if we could.
They hated the system and knew we could do better else-
where," Andreas said. He was an electrician and Thomas
was an auto mechanic. "We went to school to study these
things and that's what you did for the rest of your life,"
Thomas said.
In 1988, Andreas received notification that he would
have to serve in the military. It was a requirement that all
East German men had to eventually fulfill.
"But I refused," he said. "I told them I would not
defend their system." It was this decision, Andreas noted,
that probably led East German officials to grant him per-
mission to leave the country.
"I was an embarrassment to them. They could not
tolerate this kind of disobedience. I consulted an attorney
and he told me I had two options either leave the coun-
try or go to jail."
A permit was granted and Andreas had 10 days to
settle matters, say good-bye to his family and friends and
make arrangements to be received in West Germany
where other friends and relatives waited. Thomas was not
as fortunate. His permit was denied. Nonetheless,
Andreas said, there were other options.
"All my family and friends in East Germany gathered
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 A PAGE 9 Ij


'I didn't think I would ever see them again.'


at the train station to say good-bye. I didn't think I would
ever see them again," Andreas said. He boarded the train,
waved farewell and a few hours later, arrived in Stuttgart,
West Germany. He was 23, had $100 in his pocket and
a suitcase full of clothes. Immediately, he began to plan
his brother's escape.

GYOER, Hungary,
March 1989 Thomas and
Andreas Nierade laid flat be- 'At the time
hind some bushes in the Hun- e i e 1
garian countryside, peering escape we h
across the Austrian border.
Nestled in the woods, they knowing the
prayed the helicopter overhead
would pass them by, unno- fall. We had
ticed. They could barely make
out the signs tacked to the trees to believe any
on the Austrian side.
"Welcome to Austria," about to char
the placards read. To many,
the signs paved the way to a they were cla
new life, offering a level of down on visit
freedom and opportunity unat-
tainable in the Eastern Bloc and there wa:
countries.
Others, though, were not even greater
as fortunate. To them, the lure
of freedom had brought only restrictions.'
prison and more suffering. To
many, it brought death.
If caught trying to escape,
Thomas would be shot on the
spot No questions. No expla-
nations. No time for apologies.
The soldiers were under strict orders. If they dis-
obeyed, they faced charges of treason and a long prison
term. They were trained to kill.
S Thomas examined the map in his hand, peered at the
chain link fence across the clearing and noticed a section
at the top where the barbed wire was cut away.
"This is it! This is the spot!" he told his brother.
Others had crossed here, finding their way to freedom.
Fortunately, the Hungarian border patrol had not yet re-
paired the fence.
A few days earlier, the two brothers met in Gyoer and
secured the map from an Austrian soldier. The maps were
plentiful and the Austrian government encouraged their
distribution. This map was recent and highlighted sec-
tions along the border where little activity had been no-
ticed on the Hungarian side. Apparently, the Hungarian
border patrols were elsewhere, the Austrian told them.
Hopefully, Thomas thought, this area was still safe.
The brothers examined the clearing Thomas had to
cross before scaling the fence. "See the wood be care-
ful!" Andreas told him. He pointed to the strip of
branches, rotten logs and other debris which the army had
piled in front of the fence.
It stretched for miles in either direction and would no
doubt break under foot. Simplistic in design, any loud
cracking would alert nearby patrols. Many had met their'
fate because of the crude alarm system.
It would be easy to slip and break a leg, Thomas
thought There would be trip wires too, which, if broken,
would sound an alarm in the guard tower.
Thomas planned his break, thinking how he would
carefully step over the trip lines, one at a time, being ex-
tremely careful to maintain his balance. Then he would
negotiate the debris as best as possible. Finally, he'd scale
the 12-foot-high fence.
That was the easy part, he thought Hopefully, the
area was free of land mines. He looked at his brother,
smiled, took a deep breath, focused on the path he had
chosen and started to his feet.
"Runter! Ruhig!" Andreas said, grabbing Thomas'
arm and slamming him to the earth. He touched his fin-
ger to his lips and pointed ahead, to the right.
Both melted to the ground as a jeep approached and
stopped 250 feet from their position. The men covered
their heads, silencing their breath as a soldier stepped from
the vehicle. They closed their eyes, expecting their worst
nightmare to suddenly unfold.
Ka-plunk! Ka-plunk! Ka-plunka!
"It was a miracle!" Thomas thought as he peered
ahead, watching the soldier gather hazelnuts. He filled his
helmet, returned to the jeep and sped away.
"We were so thankful we busted out laughing af-
ter he left," Thomas said.


n




Irm

to

s


The brothers hugged and Thomas walked into the
clearing, looking one way, then the other. He found the
trip lines, caught a pant cuff on one but managed to free
himself without breaking it He looked back where
Andreas laid and wiped his brow.
Carefully, he walked towards the border, planning
each step, looking for more booby traps. He clambered
across the wood, feeling it give
slightly under foot Some of
made the the pieces cracked loudly but
there was nothing to do now
no way of but go on.
He was past the point of no
Vail would return Hewasin therestricted
zone and, if found, would be
to reason shot. He scaled the fence and
dropped to the other side. Tho-
hing was mas turned, and waved franti-
cally in the direction of his
e. In fact, brother, "Imadeit! Imade it!"
he shouted, pointing to one of
tpl g the welcome signs someone
permits ,had thoughtfully tacked to a
Permit nearby tree.
talk of Andreas returned a "Thumbs
up", hiked back through the
woods and found his car where
he left it, nestled behind some
bushes on an abandoned log-
ging road.
The worst was over, he
thought. He reached in his coat
pocket and found his West
German driver's license. No
one would question him. The license allowed him free
passage across the border.
He drove to Austria and picked up his brother. It
was time to celebrate.

STUTTGART, West Germany, Nov. 9, 1989'-
Thomas and Andreas Nierade stared at the television in
disbelief as they watched the Berlin Wall crumble. East
German guards stood nearby, apparently unconcerned
with those crossing into West Berlin.
They looked at each other, wondering if this was
real. Could it be a trick? Some cruel joke the East Ger-
mans had concocted to flush out more disidents?
After all, wasn't this the same government that
erected "fake" borders near the actual boundary to fool
those unfamiliar with the terrain?
That's why the Austrians had tacked plenty of
"Welcome to Austria" signs along the 250 kilometer
stretch that separated their country from Hungary. They
didn't want anyone getting confused. That's why Tho-
mas decided to make his freedom break in broad day-
light, eight months earlier.
"I didn't want to be fooled," he said. "I had a friend
that tried to escape at night, became confused and
crossed one of the 'fake' borders thinking he was in
Austria. The Hungarian border patrol picked him up and
sent him to prison."
Now, the newscaster was saying the border between,
East and West Germany was open. There was talk of
unification. The news spread like wildfire.
It was true. The borders were open. It was unimag-
inable, Thomas said. "At the time I made the escape, we
had no way of knowing the Wall would fall. We had no
reason to believe anything was about to change. In fact,"
he said, "they were clamping down on visitor permits
and there was talk of even greater restrictions."
The following day, the brothers joined the family
and friends they had left behind in Pirna It was time to
go home.

HOLMES BEACH, Fl., Jan. 1, 1994 The
Nierades and their friends, Antje Feddermann and Jana
Waltofen, gathered at the home of Harmony Feldman
and Sabine Musil to celebrate the New Year. They were
joined by Brenda Almeda, Kingsley Veltin and a local
journalist. Each held a candle, waiting their turn to light
it and make a New Year's wish.
"I wish for peace and freedom on earth, good health
and prosperity for all," Andreas canted in English.
Thomas chimed the German equivalent, "Ich
wiinsche Frieden und Freigeit fiir alle Menschen, Ge-
sundheit und ein erfuillltes Leben fir Alle."
One by one, those gathered offered their best wishes
for the coming year. It was a time for gratitude.


BOOKS MUSIC TOYS GAMES GIFTS
Whole Brain Goodness!
5340-F Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-5990
S&S Plaza next to the Sweet Spoon


St. Bernard Guild 24th Annual


Antique Show
and Sale
Friday Jan. 14 10 AM to 5 PM
Saturday Jan. 15 10 AM to 5 PM
Sunday Jan. 16 10 AM to 5 PM
Admission: You and each member
of your party $2 each with this ad.
Snacks & Food Available


r"~~


Bring damaged crystal or glass Bill West will be
available to grind & restore thruout the show.
ST. BERNARD CENTER
South Harbor Drive Holmes Beach *north of Manatee Beach


inthe swim


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ANNA MARIA. ISLAND, FLORIDA
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new 1994 swimwear...with this ad.





I-E PAGE 10 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


A walk through the Island's newest park


As you approach the Anna Maria Historical
Park, you will notice the dune area created
along Pine Avenue. The dune features beach
dune sunflower, rail vine, beach morning glory,
sea purslane, sea oxeye daisy, seashore elder
and sea oats, pictured at right and below.







Pat Copeland


At the main
entrance at the
park is a sign
.providing a
.plant guide
corresponding
to numbered
plants through-
out the park To
the right you
will see the back
dune area with
yaupon holly,
cinnecort pitch
aple, bay
cedar, gallardia,
partidge pea
and cocoplum


The main path leads through an area of slash pine, sabal palm, saw palmetto, Boston
fern, coontie, necklace pod, wild coffee, golden dew drop, fire bush and rain lily,
pictured above and below.


As you turn toward the water, you willfind live oak, red cedar and sabal palm draped
with Virginia creeper, purple cone flower and fire bush. At the water's edge is a
bench under a canopy of mangrove and sea grape.


.i : .


i -,





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U JANUARY 6, 1994 I PAGE 11 I
-------------------- in BTT- ~r - 1


As you return from the water to the parking lot, you will notice live oak, mahogany,
wax myrtle and native grasses, pictured above and below.


At the end of the path, silver buttonwood isfeatured. The park is located at 402 Pine
Avenue in Anna Maria, and is open from dawn to dusk daily.


"Happy 1994!"
May the New Year bring
Peace and Goodwill to
all. Thank you
for the opportunity
^ to serve you.
West Coast Coast Refrigeration
5347 GULF DR. 778"962
HOLMES BEACH -9


Anna Maria Laundromat
/ fI Open 24 Hours
7 Days a Week
9906 GULF DRIVE
ANNA MARIA
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BI3 PAGE 12 M JANUARY 6, 1994 K THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

FIE-j i f-!T~lL M


Janet Simon Scharff
Janet Simon Scharff, 71, of Longboat Key,
died Dec. 29 in Sarasota Memorial Hospital.
Born in St. Louis, Ms. Scharff was a resident
of Longboat Key. She was a homemaker.
No visitation or services were held. Burial
was in Mt Sinai Cemetery, Affton, Mo. Kicliter
Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.


Donald Shepherd
Donald Shepherd, 85, of Bradenton, died Jan.
1.
Service and burial will be in Scituate, Mass.
Memorials may be made to a favorite charity. Lo-
cally, a memorial service was held at Freedom
Village.
Born in Glouceter, Mass., Mr. Shepherd came
to the area from Scituate in 1993. He was a win-
ter resident since 1965. His career was in life in-
surance and estate planning.
He is survived by his wife, Catherine Louise;
a daughter, Jean Lee Sears of Holmes Beach; a
sister, Margaret Fish ofBradenton; four grandchil-
dren; and seven great grandchildren.


Linnie B. Springer
Linnie B. Springer, 84, of Cortez, died Dec. 30
at home.
Born in Atwood, Tenn., Mrs. Springer came to
the area from Ohio in 1957. She was a homemaker.
She was a member of Oneco First Baptist.
She is survived by two daughters, Betty
Fulford of Cortez, and Dean Holsapple of Peking,
Ind.; two sons, Gene, of Conroe, Texas, and Larry,
of Shrewsbury, Mass.; two sisters, Lucille Ortman
of Delaware, Ohio, and Lila Payne, of Franklin,
Tenn.; two brothers, R. L. Walker of Oakridge,
Tenn., and J. L.. Walker of Murfreesboro, Tenn.;
nine grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
Visitation was held at Brown and Sons Funeral
Home in Bradenton. Services will be at a later late
in Milan, Tenn. Burial was held in Atwood, Tenn.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING SERVICES
--------~ '-----------
READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday *10 a.m. to 1 p.m.



Gy Yatros, D.M.D.

FAMILY DENTISTRY


2j,1 17AI/4


Art League to hold
photography exhibit
The Anna Maria Island Art League will hold an in-
vitational show "Island Photographers" beginning
Wednesday, Jan. 12, through Feb. 8, at the League, 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach.
Photographs by Jay Canterbury, Karley Carlson,
John DeFazio, Jack Elka, Juan Fruedenthal, Melody
Kramer, Jon Thornburg and Mary Worobec will be on
display to the public.
A reception for the artists will be held Friday, Jan.
21, from 5 to 7 p.m. The public is invited.
For more information, call the League at 778-2099.

Hi-12 to meet
The Anna Maria High 12 Club will meet Thursday,
Jan. 6, at 11 a.m. at Shucker's restaurant in Holmes Beach.
James Huffstutter from the Manatee County Sheriff s
Department will speak about boot camp. All Masons are
welcome to attend.
For more information, call 778-1260.

Writing class at center
Helen Nettleton, journalist and free-lance writer, will
conduct a Writing to Publish course at the Island Commu-
nity Center starting Tuesday, Jan. 11.
The course will run for eight weeks and will include
the study of techniques for writing articles, interviews,
feature stories and fiction.
The feels $45. To register call the center at 778-1908
for call 751-6940. Enrollment is limited.

Centennial committee to meet
The Centennial Celebration Committee will meet at
Anna Maria City Hall on Monday, Jan.'10, at 7 p.m.
The meetings is for all committee members and any-
one wishing to help work on the celebration.

Homemade bread at
Island Museum
The popular Early Settlers Bread is now available on
Wednesday at the Island Historical Museum.
Homemade by members of the Anna Maria Island His-
torical Society, the loaves resemble English muffins. Special
orders may be placed with Jeanne Blassingame at 778-2421.
With 21 old and rare photos to offer, Anna Maria Is-
land historic calendars for 1994 are also on sale for $5 at


aRoser Ftemonarial (monunumnit QThurch
The Rev. An Interdenominational Christian Church
Frank W. Serving the Community Since 1913
Hutchison,
Pastor Saturday 5 PM Seaside Worship
located at Magnolia St. & the Gulf
Sunday 9a.m. Sunday School
9 a.m. 1st Worship
10:30 a.m. 2nd Worship
10:30 a.m. Children's Church
S 512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
Transportation & Nursery Available
Come, Celebrate Christ 778-0414


Cherie A Deen LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments
Qift CertiFicates Available
House Calls


792-3758


MM0003995
MA0012461


Guild sponsors Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
Antique Show and Sale
The Ladies of St. Bernard Guild will hold its 24th
annual Antique Show and Sale at St. Bernard Catholic
Church, 248 S. Harbor Dr., Holmes Beach, on Friday
through Sunday, Jan. 14, 15, and 16. Sale hours are 10
a.m. to 5p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Bill West will be available to
restore crystal and fine glassware. Booth rental
inquires should be directed to 792-3631 or 778-4769.
Seepage 9 in this issue of The Islander Bystanderfor a
discount admission ticket. Guild members Virginia
Downing (left) and Marie Uttendorfer admire a 100-
year-old porcelain vase. Antiques such as this will be
available to dealers and collectors at the show.

the museum.
The museum, at402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria, is open
Tuesday, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.




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3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459


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The Island's new
MEDICAL CENTER
New Patients Welcome
Family Practice
Walk-Ins Welcome or call
for appointment 778-0711
503 Manatee Ave.. Holmes Beach

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(Suite 205) Holmes Beach
778-2204
OPEN: MONDAY thru THURSDAY 8:30 to 5:30
FRIDAYS BY APPOINTMENT


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Family Practice.
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 6, 1994 A PAGE 13 JIM


Civic Association will meet
The Anna Maria Civic Association will meet on
Wednesday, Jan. 12, at7:30p.m atthe AnnaMaria City Hall.
Nominations for new officers will be held.
Island Chapel holds rummage sale
Longboat Key's Island Chapel will hold a rummage
sale on Saturday, Feb. 19 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The sale will feature appliances, clothing, baked
goods, collectibles, housewares, jewelry and linens.
A carry-out barbecue chicken dinner will be available
Island Chapel is located at 6200 Gulf of Mexico
Drive, Longboat Key.
Off Island
The Manatee County Chapter of the American Red
Cross will host a special benefit preview performance of
the upcoming Asolo Theater production of "Okiboji" on
Family Owned and Millwork &
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years 1 4, i' ... To Size


We specialize in custom cabinet making *
formica tops entertainment centers
Svanities kitchens
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We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center


]TIISLANDRI EAR
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Problem with

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Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
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Tuesday, Feb. 15. Ticket are on sale now at $15 each, with
50% of the purchase price tax-deductible. Tickets may be
reserved by calling the Chapter at 792-8686.
The Art League of Manatee County will present an
Artists' Studio Tour on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 14 and
15, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m..Advance tickets are $8 or can
be purchased on the day of the event for $10. Call 746-
2862 for tour details.
The Gallery at The Education Center will present
"The State of the Figure" from Jan. 17 to Feb. 4. The pro-
gram is a contemporary interpretation of the figure by
local artists. A free reception will be held Monday, Jan.
17, from 5 to 7 p.m. The gallery is located in The Centre
Shops of Longboat Key, 5370 Gulf of Mexico Dr. For
more information call Susan Goldfarb at 383-8811.
Julie McClure, Florida State Representative from
Bradenton, will speak on "National Defense" before the


First ever 'Island Home Tour'
Tickets are on sale now for the Anna Maria Island
Community Center's "Island Home Tour" to be held
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, March 19. All
proceeds will benefit the center. The tour willfeature
stops at six spotlighted residences on the Island.
Architectural details and histories of each stop on the
Island Home Tour will be provided. Advance tickets
are $8 per person and $10 on the day of the tour.
Preparing for the first-ever benefit home tour are
committee members Ellen Abely (left), Anne Abgott and
Zita Gavin, committee chairperson. For more informa-
tion, call the center at 778-1908.







Manatee Chapter DAR on Thursday, Jan. 13. The meeting
will begin at 9:30 am. atthe Christ United Methodist Church,
5512 26th St. W., Bradenton. The public is welcome.
The Longboat Key Art Center, 6860 Longboat Dr. S.,
will feature a lecture by Dr. Chris Hassold, professor of
Art History, New College of USF, on Thursday, Jan. 20,
at 7:30 p.m. in the Main Gallery. The lecture is titled,
"Surrealism: A State of Mind." Tickets are $5 for mem-
bers and $7 for non-members. Attendance is limited so
sign up early. For more information call 383-2345.
The American Littoral Society will offer three programs
in the month of January. On Wednesday, Jan 12, it will hold
a Carefree Learner Picnic and Cruise followed by aLearning
and Families Home Schooling BayWalk on Friday, Jan. 14.
On Wednesday, Jan. 19, it will sponsor an environmental li-
brary program titled "Sarasota Bay: An Update." Call the
society at 951-0884 for costs and details:


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i[ PAGE 14 A JANUARY 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
7-7-""-


Holmes Beach hot-spots
By Tomara Kafka
Holmes Beach is the largest of the three cities of Anna
Maria Island and, naturally enough, houses the most eat-
ing and entertainment spots. From elegant dining to a few
local hang-outs, Holmes Beach caters to a diverse crowd.
There are a few real Island-type stops for those who
wish to take in some of the ambiance particular to Anna
Maria's unique beach lifestyle. If you want elegant din-
Sing, don't miss out on the fabulous food and superlative
service at Beach Bistro. It has won numerous awards and
is considered one of Florida's 100 and 300 categories of
top-quality restaurants. The owners recently established
a non-smoking policy and, with it, acclaim from the
American Heart Association.
In the less formal, and much more bare-foot beachy
style of dining, Duffy's Tavern has been around since
1955. Burgers and beer are the typical order from the
menu and Holmes Beach Mayor Pat Geyer has owned and
run Duffy's since 1971.
You can meet a small group of Island icon-related
restaurateurs at D. Coy Ducks Bar & Grill. Says new
owner Steve Lardas, the guys were talking the other day
and realized that the old Trader Jack's crew are all work-
ing together again at Duck's. That brings back a lot of
memories. Trader Jack's burned down years ago, and its
only relic is that ugly fenced-in hunk of concrete next to
Gulf Drive Cafe in Bradenton Beach. Duck's has enter-
tainment seven days a week and serves a full menu: ap-
petizers, steak and seafood.
For casual diners, you might try Shells, which has
been in Holmes Beach since 1989. It's a chain restaurant
but says manager Bill Hard, Shells has been the recipient
of the number one readers' choice award from both the
Tampa Tribune and the Sarasota Herald Tribune for
"seven years running." Starting this week, Shells opens its
doors at 4 instead of 5 p.m.
Ches's Pasta Plus is another casual local spot with
lots of atmosphere. Ches's serves Italian, Spanish and
American dishes and the specialty is stromboli. The place
serves a good breakfast, too.
Two newer restaurants serving unique cuisine seem to be
doing well in Holmes Beach. The Mutiny Inn, says veteran
restaurateur and Mutiny waiter Dan Lord, is also called
"Pitcaim's Island" because diners are invited "to a piece of
paradise." The eight-table bistro opened this summer where
O'Keefe's Wine Cellar was for more than 10 years. The at-
mosphere is that of a nautical library and the menu is served
in the middle of a 1959 Funk and Wagnell's encyclopedia.
While Mr. Bones BBQ (like the name says) may


Coasting along Islander Photo: Paul Roat
The advancing low pressure system that spiraled through the area earlier this week brought out both big waves and
sellers. This Bradenton Beach beachwalker braved the cold and high winds to try to find that perfect shell.


Homemade bread at Island Museum


The popular Early Settlers Bread is now available
on Wednesday at the Island Historical Museum.
Homemade by members of the Anna Maria Island
Historical Society, the loaves resemble English muf-
fins. Special orders may be placed with Jeanne
Blassingame at 778-2421.


specialize in barbecue, says owner and manager, Eric
Connors, "We are, by no means, limited in our menu,
which includes Indian dishes, curried rice, dinner salads
and fancy boneless chicken." But the real kick is the cof-
fin full of ice and about 35 imported and seven domestic
types of beer when you walk in the door. Mr. Bones BBQ
began to accept plastic about three weeks ago. They used
to take only cash.
Another new restaurant is the Old Hamburg Tavern
which serves authentic German Bavarian cuisine, and, if
you speak German, all the better. Owner Helmut
Hedegger says everything is fresh. "We have no freezer,"
Hedegger says. The Old Hamburg has daily specials and
is now open for lunch.
There are a few great breakfast spots in Holmes
Beach that need to be mentioned.
Linda's Sunny Side Cafe serves up plate-fulls of
good home cooking and cheery smiles (as well as lunch).
Chez Andre's has wonderful French cuisine for break-
fast, lunch and dinner, but their breakfasts are my favor-


With 21 old and rare photos to offer, Anna Maria
Island historic calendars for 1994 are also on sale for
$5 at the museum.
The museum, at 402 Pine Ave., Anna Maria, is
open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Satur-
days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.


ite which is served through the lunch hour. Cafe on the
Beach serves old-fashioned breakfasts, lunch and sunset
dinner specials seven days a week.
Several night spots in Holmes Beach offer live en-
tertainment every week. The Anchor Inn will have
music by the D T 's, Thursday through Saturday, from
9:30 p.m. to 1:30 am. Turtles Bar & Grill offers live
entertainment five nights a week. This Friday and Satur-
day night, and at a Beach Bash on Sunday from 4 to 8
p.m., there will be entertainment by the Hammerheads;
Jan. 12 is Raggae music by Democracy. The Dry Dock
Inn will have classic rock 'n' roll by the Craigger White
Band, beginning 9:30 p.m., Thursday through Sunday.
Shucker's Dockside Grill, another Island landmark
that most remember as Pete Reynard's since the 1950s,
still had its doors open on Sunday (last week's rumors
had Jan. 2 as closing day). But the fate of the restaurant
may now be up to the court. On Jan. 14 the restaurant, its
contents and alcohol license will be auctioned from the
steps of the Manatee County Courthouse.


ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
FINE WINE SPIRITS BEER ICE
Free Delivery Full Service Low Prices
5904 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-2507


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you're in for a very pleasant surprise."

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On Beautiful Manatee Beach
Casual Inside & Outside Patio Dining

Open 6AM 7 Days a Week
Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Specials

Live Entertainment Tuesday thru Sunday pre-sunset until ? (Weather Permitting)
Plenty of Parking 8 0 4
At the Gulf end of Manatee Ave.! 778-0784


Formerly Pete Reynard
Formerly Pete Reynard's


Karaoke Contest

Finals
Jan. 8th 9 p.m. til?
Someone will win
a Trip to the Bahamas!
Will it be you?
Come Join the Fun.


1A'kV I A1N I IQ1
Hot & Cold Food 'til Midnight Always Banquet Facilities Available
Anna Maria Island, Florida Open Daily Entertainment Nightly
5325 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-2233


ISIANDI

SEAFOOD )

SPECALUI TIES

Fresh Live Maine Lobster & New England Fish l-
directly from Kittery PL, Maine to you!
Stop In to See Us for the Freshest Fish Available
Special Prices on Whole Fish
Also Available Smoked Fish
Open 10 to 6 Monday thru Saturday
5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333


I





THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U JANUARY 6, 1994 A PAGE 15 liI

Businesses aid foreign tourists visiting area


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
With an increasing number of foreign tourists visit-
ing the area, local businesses are responding to the.need
to make their stay easier and more enjoyable. Signs offer-
ing help in various languages are sprouting up in front of
many businesses, while others have translators on call.
Two businesses featured here have found unique ways to
aid both foreign and American tourists.

Tourist Information Center
Marty Stahl, a friendly and exuberant young man,
recently opened the Tourist Information Center which
offers a host of services to tourists.
Stahl's primary focus
is on European tourists .
who not only have the nor-
mal tourist queries of
where to go and what to
do, but are also faced with
language and cultural dif-
ficulties.
"I do translating in
German, Swiss, Austrian,
Dutch, Italian and French,"
explained Stahl, "and have
resources to translate other
languages. If their plane is Stl
late, I will find them a
place to stay. If they are looking for a rental car, a barber,
a doctor, or a dentist or need help with local laws or the
police, I can help them. Most foreign tourists don't know
where to go and are afraid to ask."
Stahl has recently published a three-page safety bro-
chure in German. It is available for hotels and motels to
give to their German guests.
Stahl, who has been traveling for the past 15 years,
came to the United States from Germany and hitchhiked
his way across the country. He settled here in 1982 and
resides on Longboat Key with his wife, Martina, and chil-
dren Cosima, three, and Saskia, nine months.
.: Many Europeans are discovering the West coast of
Florida said Stahl. The area is attractive to older tourists
and families, he said, but younger tourists like a bit more
night life than they find here.
Stahl also offers mini trips to local and area attrac-


PRICES GOOD
THRU TUESDAY
JAN. 11, 1994
I


THE



~"3i"q


tions, complete with a translator for European visitors.
Destinations, many with discounted rates, include Busch
Gardens, Silver Springs, Weekie Wachie, Sea World,
Universal Studios and Disney World.
"I am not a tour guide," stressed Stahl, "and I cannot
book trips, but I provide transportation and information to
make it easier for people to visit places of interest. I can
also tell them about alternatives to the big attractions, and
interesting places for people with children to visit that
won't cost them a fortune."
Stahl is planning a series of seminars to be held at
Manatee VoTec to introduce Americans to Europe and
provide information on different countries.
"I can tell them how to travel economically, how and
where to find bed and breakfasts, alternatives to major attrac-.
tions, how to go on bike tours," said Stahl. "If you go some-
where you haven't been before, the language is different and
all you have is a travel book, you may miss a lot"
The Tourist Information Center is located at 503
Manatee Ave. W. Stahl is available by phone seven days
a week, 24 hours a day. The number is 778-8378. The toll
free number is 1-800-698-5741.

Vacation guide printed
in four languages
A vacation guide, published by GSM Productions,
offers foreign visitors a host of information in four lan-
guages English, Spanish, French and German.
The free publication is available at restaurants, mo-
tels, shops, tourist information centers and tourist attrac-
.tions from Manatee County to the Venice area. It offers
a map, travel information, descriptions of Anna Maria
Island and Longboat and Siesta Keys and information on
accommodations, restaurants, shops, fishing and boating
and emergency services.
The publication is the brainchild of Mike Andre,
Steve Smith and Graham Cox, who formed GSM Publi-
cations in the fall of 1992. The first issue was published
in February of 1993 and the second in October of 1993.
"The catalyst for the publication was Graham," ex-
plained Andre. "He called me about publishing a multi-
lingual vacation guide. We talked with Larry White, of the
county tourism office, and he said he had done a survey
with the Longboat Key Holiday Inn which showed that 20
percent of the summer visitors were foreign. It confirmed
our feelings that foreign visitors are becoming a recogniz-


OPEN MON THRU SAT 8 to 6


5907 Manatee Ave. W. Bradenton 794-MEAT

London Broil ......... ................. ................. LB. $2.99
Tender Cube Steaks ..................................... LB. $2.99
BONELESS, SKINLESS
Chicken Breasts .......................................... LB. $2.79
Fresh Ground Chuck............................. 5 LB. PKG. $8.95
HOMEMADE
Crab Cakes Buy 3 Get 1 Free! .................... LB. $1.99

RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
0lR 778-9611
iA --AND-
OYSTER BAR ON
A ANNA MARIA CITY PIER
778-0475

lRIPA'S # 1 WATERFRONT LOCATION...
Lunch Specials From $5.95
Early Birds From $6.95
Dinner Specials From $8.95

CAUGHT DAILY FROM OUR BOATS
STONE CRAB CLAWS 1 LB. DINNER
OR TRY OUR
WHOLE STUFFED FLORIDA
LOBSTER DINNER
SWING BAND TUESDAYS DANCE BAND FRI & SAT
DIXIELAND with SONS OF THE BEACH THURSDAYS
= i 101 S. BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA 778-9611 Riii =


Mike Andre, Graham Cox and Steve Smith.


able percentage of our marketplace, and'we decided to do
the publication."
Numerous changes were made to the second issue
said Andre including a more pleasing layout, the addition
of introduction and travel information pages, groupings of
information according to location and the addition of in-
formation on Bradenton and Sarasota.
"We are constantly looking to improve," he said.
"We'll be adding more information in the future such as
a calendar of local events. Our thoughts are to always be
expanding the publication."
Andre said the second issue of the publication was
brought to the attention of Sachkle Cook of the Florida
Department of International Tourism. She requested a box
of the booklets which she sentto her department's offices
in Spain, France, England, Germany, Canada and South
America.
"They will let us know if they would like to have the
publication sent to them on a regular basis," explained
Andre. "We're excited, because it gives foreign visitors
an opportunity to find out about the Manatee/Sarasota area
before they leave their country to go to Disney World. It
introduces them to the west coast and also opens up the
lines of distribution overseas."
Andre said business owners in the area are beginning
to acknowledge the increase in foreign visitors.
"Our philosophy is to provide this publication as a
courtesy to our foreign visitors," said Andre. "We wanted
to put something in the marketplace that wasn't there and
is useful."


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch Specials on the Island!

Fresh Baked Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL EGGS BENEDICT
Pies & Biscuits Full cut, potato, ($ Q All Day...7 Days a Week
vegetable, salad, rolls $ .5JJ

SEYE OPENER...2 eggs, toast, home fries and coffee...Only $1.75

Isfandilnn Aestaurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM-2PM 77 01
1701 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-3031 77-303


AUTHENTIC GERMAN SPECIALTIES
Serving Lunch and Dinner
OPEN .... 11:30 am to 11:00 pm


HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY
4:30 6:30 Draft & Wine 2 for 1
Bitburger on draft

Located in the Anna Maria Shopping Center (We're right next to Walgreens)
5246 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach Anna Maria Island
778-1320


I


,1


-JF


Awt






IB PAGE 16 W JANUARY 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

S- Anna Maria I


: School menu
Monday, 1/10/94
. Breakfast: Toast or Cereal, Fruit Cup
* Lunch: Grilled Chicken Nuggets w/Sauce, Oven
. Potato Rounds, Fruit Cup, Ice Cream Cup
Tuesday, 1/11/94
* Breakfast: Waffle w/Syrup or Cereal, Juice
Lunch: Sloppy Joe on Bun, Carrot and Celery Sticks
* w/Low Fat Dip, Fruit Cobbler
* Wednesday, 1/12/94
SBreakfast: Peanut Butter Toast or Cereal, Juice
* Lunch: Macaroni and Cheese, Sausage Link,
* Broccoli, Hot Roll, Fruit
* Thursday, 1/13/94
* Breakfast: Toast, Eggs or Cereal, Juice
* Lunch: Chicken and Gravy over Mashed Potatoes,
" Soup, Roll, Pear Fruit Crisp
Friday, 1/14/94
* Breakfast: Cereal or Toast, Fruit
: Lunch: Fiestado, Fruit Cup, Tossed Salad, Almond
Butter Bar
* All meals served with milk.
06.6666666606666666666 6


Got the gold
After they were taught how to pan for gold, these students show off their luck- bags full of golden dreams.


Line'em up and dance
No "swing your partner and do-see-do" during the Kindergarten/First Grade Hoe-
down at Anna Maria Elementary. Here they learn the modern Country and Western
way to trip the lights fantastic line dancing.
IU. -- ----------- IU



Ss 792-5300 1 *
I DINNER... I
SPIZZABUFFET E Cupo4
: Buy One Buffet :--q I
at $4.49 and get 0
Second Buffet for 'o *"
LUNCH... 3 B I
PIZZA BUFFET "Thembesthamburgersand
Mon-Sat 11 AM-3 PM Sun 12-3 PM 0 the coldest mugs of beer
3I PM ,0. this side of Heaven."e, ie
Buy One Buffet frf. o uffy, Pat Geyer, Owner.
at $3.99 and get Across from Manatee Pub
L Second Buffet for OUPON I Sun 12-7pm Closed T
------ m COUPON W--- ----


A rich chance
These kindergarten students at Anna Maria Elementary School digfor gold nuggets
just like the gold-hungry planners did in 1840 at James Marshall's mill. Reports have
it that there are still a few nuggets left to be found in the playground's sandbox.


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


CfiezAndre

Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Breakfast
Daily Special Luncheon
Intimate Dinner
Entertainment by:
Tony's Soft Guitar
every Friday night!
Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France
Tues thru Sat Thu, Fri &Sat
SAM-2*30PM 6- IPM
Sun 8AM-1:30PM :Sun 5:30-9PM
Reservations Suggested for Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


/ -


blic Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
uesday Takeout 778-2501


UPPER DECK
DANCE CLUB

RESIAURANf

Night Wing
Wed Sat Jan 5-8 9:30 p.m. 1:30 a.m.
in dance club

OUTSIDE DECK ENTERTAINMENT

Bob Comeau
Sat *Jan 8* 1 -5 p.m.


Steel Pan Dan
Sun Jan 9 1 5 p.m.

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 2AM
792-5523
9915 Manatee Ave W Bradenton


The Finest Italian/Spanish/American
restaurant that does breakfast too!
A SAMPLING OF OUR MENU









THE BEST PIZZA ON OR OFF THE ISLAND
INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS STROMBOLI
2 for 1 Early Bird Specials
4:30-6:00pm Daily
Ches's Delicious Nightly Specials
OPEN 7 DAYS
Hours: Breakfast, am-Noo; Lunch, 11am-2pm; Dinner, 4:30pm-10pm
S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach
TH ETPZZ NO FFTEILN


Authentic British Atmosphere
8 British Draft Beers on Tap
SLive British Soccer via Satelite TV
Saturday 10 AM
Coronation Street
Mon thru Wed 3 PM
S Fish & Chips Mixed Grill Shepherds Pie
Steak & Kidney Pie Bubble & Squeak
OPEN DAILY
BRITISH PUB BREAKFAST
SERVED SAT. & SI
& FROM 8 AM
RESTAURANT hiS LUNCH & DINNER
Si NOON to 10 P
S-


-1-


.


UN.

R






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M JANUARY 6, 1994 :PAGE 17 lI


Basket full of learning
Island basket weaver Betsy Smith shows a kindergarten student how the pioneers
wove baskets of all kinds using needles from southern pine trees.




JoyCourney
Joy Courtney


Ridin' high
Kindergarten student Jerard Lee gets ready to ride the range during a Hoe-down day
at Anna Maria Elementary.


Joe's Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we 'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes.
Closed Tuesdays
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge.

Something very special is happening
on Anna Maria Island.

qe MutinyInn
'VPtcaimr'sIsand"
.Rgstaumnt







Somet m wgInno vatweij,9VwI
In Tradition
"The Secret's Out: Mutiny Inn is Superb'
Pat Benson, The Bradenton Herald
Serving Dinner 5:00-10:00
Tuesday thru Saturday eservationsSugg.
Sunday Brunch 10:00 2:00
605ManateeAve.at East Bay Dr, Hdmes Beach
S(13)778-5440
Fomrny s 'O~'9('fe's MWi Cedar'


By Popular --- ,
Demand
We're adding an .
extra hour to
Mar Vista
Caribbean BBQ
New hours 4-10PM
Every Sunday
Caribbean Combo -
Half a rack of BBQ ribs
and a quarter of Jerk
chicken...$12.95
BBQ Baby Back Ribs
Negril Basted with spicy citrus
BBQ sauce... $11.95
Jerk Chicken Marinated with
Jamaican herbs and spices then char-
grilled... $9.95
Port Antonio Seafood Kabobs -
Basted with rum butter... $10.95
Grouper Port Royal Char-grilled and
basted with mango chutney sauce... $9.95
Specials served with Caribbean peas &
rice, sweet and spicy cabbage, slaw & rolls.
Tucked away in the village of Longboat Key
By the Bay... 760 Broadway Street
Channel Marker 39
383-2391


ITropical
Lunch & Dinner
i Special
SBuy 1 Entree, Get 2nd FREE!
(Fre Enire of equal or leser value. 15% gmraluily added before
SdiscounNot valid with any other offeror lakeoul.) Exp. 1/12/9.
I Open Daily for Lunch 11:30 to 3 and Dinne
L 4304 14th St. West Bradenton 758
Take out & Catering Available. (Behind Roc


er4to 10
-6390
oms to Go)
- ----~


FINE MEXICAN CUISINE
@ Q Q(( *Brunch *
SLunch
-Dinner ( z


Bridge Tender Inn-
I _tlw l


I





BI' PAGE 18 M JANUARY 6, 1994 M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Island grandson weds
Joseph Francis Kinnan IV and Robin Leslie Douglas,
both of Bradenton, were married Dec. 19 at Faith United
Methodist Church in Bradenton with the Rev. Larry
Kilbourne officiating.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert L.
Douglas and the bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Joseph F. Kinnan, all of Bradenton. Mr. and Mrs. George
Norwood of Anna Maria City are the maternal grandpar-
ents of the bridegroom.
Chris Kinnan, the bridegroom's cousin, was best
man. Ushers were Chuck Brown, Matt Hessalbart,
Dwayne Jefferson and Nat Norwood, the bridegroom's
cousin from Coconut Grove. Ring bearer was Logan
Rheinhardt, the bride's nephew.
Michelle Vella was maid of honor. Alicia Hooper was
matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Lisa Richardson and
Lindsay Douglas, the bride's sisters, and Nicole Alvarino.
Flower Girl was Lottie Kilbourne.
A reception was held at Bradenton Woman's Club.
The newlyweds took a wedding trip to the North Carolina
mountains, staying in Brevard. They are living in Orlando
where they both attend college.

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kinnan IV



The Island Poet
The flowers are blooming around the
door,
And the poinsettias are blooming as
never before.
And all those trees of purple and
gold,
Are beautiful visions for you to be-
hold.
The old folks are sunning themselves
in the sand,
The kids are swimming and surfing
to beat the band.
And all these sights and sounds are
something extraordinary,
'Cause once again it's Florida in
January.
BudAtteridge


Island artist fares

well in national

arts search
Writer Michelle Lynn Johnson from Holmes Beach,
is among 110 finalists nationwide invited to participate in
"ARTS Week '94," Jan. 12 --16 in Miami.
A total of 110 young artists were selected from
among 6,550 talented 17- and 18-year-old applicants from
across the country. During ARTS Week, the ARTS award
candidates will be evaluated through a series of auditions,
master classes, seminars and workshops conducted by
well-known artists and arts educators.
As a result of the competition, winners will receive cash
awards and will be eligible for scholarship opportunities.

How to prepare your
announcements
Information must be submitted in writing. Clearly
print or type news items. Include first and last names of
all persons mentioned. Include the preparer's name and
telephone number. Mail or bring to: The Islander By-
stander, Island Shopping Center, 5400A Marine Dr.,
Holmes Beach, FL 34217.






ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
7AM to 2:30AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085


THE DTs
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Jan. 6-8 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.


Cs ICE C Freshly Cut &
Sr Made to Order
Take Ou cliches Deli Sandwiches,
For tl ach Soup &
Salad Bar
C-ES 9 Served for

Fresh Bagels Ice Cream Cakes
EVERYTHING HOMEMADE!
Mon-Sat 10 AM 9 PM Sunday 12 9 PM
Eat-In or Take-Out
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
(813) 778-7386


Holiday candle

poses burn danger
"Nutcracker" candles sold under the brand names
Colonial Candle of Cape Cod and Carolina Designs, Ltd.
have been the subject of two recent consumer reports of
abnormal and potentially dangerous burning.
These candles, which are in the shape and colors of
"Nutcracker" soldiers, may generate a significantly larger
than normal flame which may produce excessive dripping
or "flaring" and flaming of the surface finish.
Consumers should not burn these candles. The spe-
cific lot information is Colonial Candle of Cape Cod,
"Nutcracker" Candle ~nm #N1100 and Carolina Designs,
Ltd., "Nutcracker Candle Item #8986.
Retail stores have been asked to remove these candles
from sale, and have been requested to offer full refunds
or credit for unburned candles. Consumers should return
these candles to the store where they were purchased for
a refund or credit.
Consumers or retailers can call the following Candle
Corporation of America toll-free number for assistance or
additional information: 1-800-552-2635.

Sarasota Bay Program
director feted
Mark Alderson has been presented with the Outstand-
ing Public Relations Service Award by the Tampa Bay
Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America.
Alderson, executive director of the Sarasota Bay Na-
tional Estuary Program, received the award in recognition
of his use of public relations principles and practices lead-
ing to successful accomplishments. The award is pre-
sented to non-public relations specialists.
Past winners of the award include U.S. Sen. Bob Graham
and Florida Commissioner of Education Betty Castor.
The Society noted that Alderson "champions the cause
of citizen involvement in critical issues related to bay manage-
ment and continually stressed the value of positive public
image, good market research, excellent media relations and
effective public communications at all levels, from grass roots
to elected officials to community leaders."
Island doll expert to judge
Carmen Pedota of Anything Goes, Inc. Dolls and Bears
in Anna Maria has been chosen as a judge for DollsMaga-
zine atthe New York International Toy Fair, Feb; 10 -21.
Pedota will be responsible for evaluating entries sub-
mitted from internationally-known doll artists and com-
piling categorical nominations for Dolls Magazine's read-
ership to vote for final selections.
She will also be attending the International Doll Expo in
Arlington, Texas, Jan. 14-16, where she will select Limited
Edition Artists Dolls for display in her and her husband's new
shop in the Alexis Plaza in Anna Maria City.


ROD REEL





"Likely The Best
Fishing Spot in
Florida "TM
ISLAND
COOKING
BEER FUN
WINE
875 NORTH SHORE DR
ANNA MARIA


IU
I




EAT AT BON


307 PINE GENERAL STORE

Deli Delights
Boiled Ham ...................................... $1.89 lb.
2% M ilk .................................................. $2.79 gal.
W shipping Cream ............................................ 890
S OVER 50 SANDWICH SELECTIONS
r- - - - - -


BEER .
SPECIALS
DAILY I.
OPEN 7 DAYS For Fast Service ...
7AM-9:30PM Call 778-4656
Dell Closes at9PMine A 778-46
307 Pine Avenue Anna Maria


Dine


out

often!
And when you do,
please mention
The Islander
Bystander.


I


I


t.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 M PAGE 19 li]


Island police reports
City of Anna Maria
Dec. 30, burglary, 875 N. Shore Dr., Rod and Reel
Pier. Three teenage boys, seen by witnesses, forced entry
to the upstairs.
Dec. 30, aggravated assault, 400 block of Spring
Avenue. The victim was threatened with a knife.
Dec. 31, lewd and lascivious, 10 block of Pine Av-
enue on the beach. A couple flagged down a patrol car and
reported that the defendant had masturbated in the pres-
ence of their children, ages six and nine. The couple said
the defendant came up behind them on the beach, made
a remark, sat down in the sand, covered himself with a
towel and masturbated. Based on the description given by
the couple, police placed Kenneth Emmott, 43, of York,
England, in custody.
Bradenton Beach
Dec. 20, theft of a bicycle, 200 block of Church
Avenue.
Dec. 20, attempted burglary, 105 Highland, fire sta-
tion. A person unknown attempted to gain entry to the fire
station by using a pry tool.
Dec. 22, expired license plate tag,200 block of Bay
Boulevard North.
Dec. 23, defrauding an innkeeper, 2200 Gulf Dr. N.,
El Bandito Motel. The subject checked out leaving an
unpaid balance of $83.50.
Dec.24, aggravated assault, 100 block of 5th Street
South. The victim was visiting friends and went out to
chop wood for the fireplace. According to the report,
Bernard Heffernan, 46, of Bradenton Beach, came down
the stairs from his apartment, yelled at the victim to put
his tools down and swung a double-bladed ax almost strik-
ing the victim. The ax stuck in a door above the victim's
head. The victim ran into his friends' apartment and
Heffernan followed, yelling at the occupants.
While passing a counter, Heffeman stuck it with the
ax, then walked into the kitchen and ordered the occupants
to leave. He brought the ax up over his head, then brought
it down on the kitchen counter. The three occupants at-
tempted to flee the apartment, and Heffeman recovered
the ax and went back upstairs. The investigating officer
confiscated the ax and placed Heffernan in custody.
Dec. 26, criminal mischief; Pines Trailer Park. A
van tire was cut


Simply ... the soul of Europe

in the heart of Longboat Key.







Award winning Italian Continental Cuisine


383-8898



4


Ivo Scafa, Proprietor

Adjoining Four Winds Beach Resort
An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
2065 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key


I^J STREETLB*^J ^ ^


Dec. 27, theft of license plates from two vehicles,
1800 Gulf Dr. N., La Costa.
Dec. 27, theft of license plates from five vehicles,
2300 block of Gulf Drive.
Dec. 28, theftof a license plate from a vehicle, 1300
block of Gulf Drive North.
Dec. 29, theft of license plate from a vehicle, 1800
Gulf Dr. N., La Costa.
Dec. 29, burglary, Coquina Bayside. A person un-
known smashed out the passenger side window of a ve-
hicle and removed a camera and a fanny pack.
Dec. 29, burglary, Coquina Bayside. A person un-
known entered vehicle and removed a purse containing
$200 in cash and credit cards.
Holmes Beach
Dec. 22, warrant.arrest, 700 block of Manatee Avenue.
Dec. 22, vandalism, 400 block of Clark Lane. The
victim reported that a person unknown threw an unknown
liquid on his vehicle.
Dec. 22, petty larceny, 5347 Gulf Dr., Broken Glass.
A person unknown removed a screw gun valued at $145
and $35 in cash.
Dec. 23, service, 3900 block of Gulf Drive. A woman
locked her keys in her vehicle and the officer opened it.
Dec. 23, DUI, 700 block of Manatee Avenue. The
officer observed the defendant, Edward Edmond, 28, of
Anna Maria, traveling at a high rate of speed and failing
to drive in a single lane. According to the report, when the
officer attempted to stop Edmond, he attempted to flee and
elude and reached a speed of 91 mph during the pursuit.
Edmond stopped at the entrance to the Perico Bay Club,
was given performance tests and placed in custody.
Dec. 25, noise, 400 block of Clark Drive. An un-
known person was setting fireworks. Debris was found by
the investigating officer.
Dec. 25, automobile theft, 6900 Gulf Dr., Bali Hai. An
unknown person entered the vehicle and attempted to steal it
The ignition was broken and the vents on the front dashboard*
were removed in an attempt to remove the stereo.
Dec. 26, disturbance, 2900 block of Avenue C. The
officer investigating a complaint of a large party found
approximately 200 people inthe residence and in the street
outside. Many were intoxicated and several were arguing.
The officer told all persons to leave the area.'
SDec. 26, disturbance, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Pub-
lic Beach. A couple was arguing.
*Dec. 26, suspicious person, 300 block of 57th Street
The complainant caught a man on his porch collecting


C0 -l HAPPY HOUR
SMon-Fdri o4-7PM
~Nightly Entertainment

795-8083

Tim Bamboo
Wed Sat Jan 5-8 9 p.m. 1 a.m.
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ-RD.


I FIRE CAL


Summary of call
December, 1993
Dollar loss


s

Pro


Structure fires-1 $100.00
Brush fires-0
Misc. fire calls-1 628,400
Investigations-6
False calls-0
Fire alarm/alarm calls-12
Power line calls-1
Emergency medical calls-40
Rescue calls-1
Service calls-2
Motor vehicle accidents-14
Hazardous material calls-0
Mutual aid calls-1
Total calls-79 628,500
Year to date-976 702,310
8,599,800
Average number ofpersonnelper call: 4.87
Average response time: 5.17


Dperty value
$60,000

6,388,400










66,388,400


I I


THE HUNT CLUB
RESTAURANT

Lunch & Dinner Daily
Early Birds
from $595
4:30 to 6 p.m.

Sunday Brunch
11 am. 3 p.m.

Afternoon Tea
Wed & Sat 2-4 pm.
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key
383-0543


ROTTEN
.,ALPH'S

WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR

CRIBBAGE
Every Sunday
Noon
FREE WINGS &
HAPPY HOUR DRINKS
for Players
Double Elimination
Tournament
1st, 2nd & 3rd Prize
901 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Cafe


Now APPEARING

Jay
Crawford
Wed & Thurs
Jan 5 & 6
8 p.m. 12 am.
also
Fri & Sat
Jan 7 & 8
9 p.m. 1 am.

KARAOKE EVERY SUNDAY 6-10 P.M.

RICH KENDALL
Tues & Wed Jan 11 & 12 8 p.m.-12 am.

Open 7 Days Serving Food from 11 a.m.-midnight
Large Groups & Luncheon Parties Welcome
(separate checks available)
204 Pine Ave. 778-6969 Anna Maria


clothes that were hanging there. The subject dropped the
clothes and ran.
Dec. 26, warrant arrest, 100 block of 52nd Street
Dec. 27, vandalism, 603 Manatee Ave., Goldome. An
unknown person damaged the vacuum machine outside.
Dec. 27, vandalism, 5800 block of DePalmas. A
person unknown damaged a string of Christmas lights.
*Dec. 27, burglary, 8100 block of Marina Drive. Aper-
sonunknown entered aboat and removed battery andtools.
Dec. 27, petty larceny of a rattan chair, 200 block
of North Harbor Drive.
Dec. 27, burglary, 100 block of 77th Street. A per-
son unknown removed $20 in cash and $2750 injewelry.
Dec. 28, animal complaint, 31st Street and Avenue
E. The officer investigated a complaint of dogs defecat-
ing in a vacant lot and creating an unhealthy environment
Morning and evening patrols were initiated.
Dec. 29, boat complaint, 100 block of 49th Street on
the beach. The officer investigated a complaint of reck-
less operation of a jet ski and warned three males.
Dec. 29, missing person, 4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee
Public Beach. A lost boy was located after a search.





IO PAGE 20 E JANUARY 6, 1994 A THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


It's a new year with new rules, too


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor perspective
Well, it's a brand new year, and with it comes some
brand new rules.
First of all, be aware the new lower blood alcohol
level of .08 applies to boaters, just as it does to automo-
bile drivers. A police spokesman told me it makes no dif-
ference whether "powered vehicle is being operated on
land or water, the rule applies."
So while it should go without saying that drinking and
boating is a dangerous mix, we all know many people do
it to some degree. Now, everybody better be more diligent
about staying safe.
Another new rule, at least for the month of January,
are the newly staggered bridge openings on the Cortez and
Manatee Avenue bridges. They're being tried, I under-
stand, at the request of folks in Bradenton Beach.
During the past decade and a half, the bridges have
opened at 20-minute intervals when boat traffic was
present. Islanders have asked the schedule be changed to
open on the hour and half hour on Manatee Avenue, on
the quarter and three-quarter hour for the Cortez Bridge.
This schedule, like the old one, is in effect from 7 a.m.


Unsheepish.
sheepie
Jim Hansen of Bozeman,
Mont. was one of the
luckier fishermen during
the past period ofpoor
fishing, proudly showing
off a whopper of a
sheepshead.


Westcoast
MARINE CONRACTOyRS IC.
Chuck Potter 813/778-5084.
Owner Mobile 370-1077

Professional State Certified Contractors Lie CRC0056636
ST. PETERSBURG BRADENlIN SARASOTA FT. MYERS NAPLES


DIokI
BaLfts.




I I I


to 6 p.m. each day. The bridges open on demand at all
other times.
Judging from a letter to the editor authored by
Bradenton Beach Councilman Jim Kissick in a recent Is-
lander Bystander, the new schedule will not only improve
traffic flow, but also make the bridges last twice as long.
I don't know about all those claims, but boaters certainly
haven't offered their opinions on the new schedule yet,
and the matter won't be settled until they do.
After all, we are talking about a 50 percent reduction
in bridge openings here.
Councilman Kissick seems to see some great plot
afoot in the old three-times-an-hour openings and suggests
writing demanding letters to the Coast Guard pronounc-
ing the new schedule better before it's even been tried.
Where I come from, honey always seemed to work
better than vinegar when I wanted something, so I-suggest
that if you write the Coast Guard, be pleasant, logical and
hope for the best.
We ran the address lastweek, but in case you missed
it, here it is again. Commander (OAN), 7th Coast Guard
District, 909 Southeast First Avenue, Miami, FL. 33131.
For boaters who enjoy cruising around our great


state, local anchoring restrictions have always been a
problem. One community has one set of rules while some-
place a mile or two up the waterway has a completely
different set. That may all change soon.
Now the Florida Department of Environmental Pro-
tection has gotten involved and is trying to convince the
governor that all these anchoring restrictions should be
uniform. I've got no argument with that, but I'm certainly
interested in what those uniform rules will be. And you
should be interested too.
At present, state officials are discussing three differ-
ent options. One would allow anchoring 14 days without
restriction in any county during a three-month period as
long as the boat is in compliance with waterway laws and
regulations.
Secondly, an option would allow anchoring without
restriction except in areas designated as prohibited by the
state for reasons of habitat, water or endangered species
protection, or issues of public safety or navigation.
The third option would basically be option two, with
a six month time limit.
All of these options do away with the crazy quilt of
local rules on anchoring, which is just fine by me. Too
many communities have come to believe they somehow
own and control the local waterways when nothing could
be farther from the truth. Navigable waters have tradition-
ally been under the control of the U.S. Coast Guard, and
although some communities have tried to change that, it
still remains the law.
There are two important things to keep in mind here.
First, the fact that hearings on this whole matter will prob-
ably be held throughout the state in the coming year, and
if you're a cruising boater, you shouldn't miss them.
Second, the Coast Guard said in a recent opinion re-
quested by BOAT/U.S. the DEP really has no legal au-
thority to overrule waterway regulations.
We'll see.
Oh, a quick fact boaters might like to know. On
January 1, the Coast Guard announced that a record 3,656
Cubans escaped to Florida by boat last year. That was up
43 percent from the 2,557 in 1992, and the largest exodus
since the Mariel boatlift in 1980, when some 125,000,
Cubans came ashore in Florida.
As I've mentioned in earlier columns, after seeing the
conditions in Cuba a couple of months ago, my only sur-
prise is that there aren't more folks trying to sneak across
the Gulf Stream.
There's no record, of course, of the number of people
who died trying to make the trip to Florida.
I'll see you next week.


DOLPHIN
DREAMS
CHARTERS
GULF, BAYAND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
no fishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND


2004 ST. GEORGE DR. EAST PHONE
BRADENTON, FL 34208 (813) 747-3866

CAPTAIN TODD ROMINE
CHARTER BOAT
'T "7 Oca II"
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED
HALF DAY NATIVE OF MANATEE COUNTY
FULL DAY SPECIALIST IN LOCAL WATERS

r


Clancy Sail Charters
Relax aboard the "Sea Wench" 30' sloop.
Sail Tampa Bay or the Gulf of Mexico...
half day, full day or sunset cruise ...
$25 per person.
Hal day minimum 2 people.
Extended cruises available.


Janet M. Clancy
U.S.C.G. Uc. Capt.
Anna Maria Island


I wwww


PHONE J
778-1816


Fish Tales Welcome! Got a great fishing catch? We'd love to hear your fish stories, and pictures are
welcome! Just give us a call at 778-7978 or stop by our office in the Holmes Beach Shopping Center.


OFFSHORE FISHING
ALL BAIT, TACKLE & EQUIPMENT INCLUDED
NO LICENSE REQUIRED
Fishing Diving Island Excursions


Anna Maria Island


13) 778-5489


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"Fishing the Islands"
The Island's 20 page
monthly fishing newsletter.
IS ND Sign up for your
DISCOUNT TACKEE FREE copy!
OPEN DAILY ANNA MARIA
7 ISLANDCENTER 778-7688
S1o 7 3240 EAST BAY DR.
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6 to 7 (Between Walgreens & Shells)


SAILING CHARTERS
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THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 M PAGE 21 Ii


Fishing cools as cold fronts lash area


By Capt Mike Heistand
It's not looking good out there, fishing fans: the cold
weather and water has caused the shrimp to burrow into
the muck; shrimp fishermen can't capture any shrimp;
without shrimp, backwater anglers are having a tough
time attracting fish to the hooks; and the back-to-back cold
fronts have caused any of us trying to go offshore to re-
ally take a beating.
It seems like a good time to stay in port and sip an
adult beverage or six while waiting out the cold
fronts ...
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said the anglers there
have been doing good with black drum, sheepshead and
a couple flounder. Saturday night action had a shark come
onto a hook.
Dave at the Anna Maria City Pier said fishing has


been slow about the best catch has been rays and
skates.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said sheepshead are
the best bet for the week. Try the bridges for the tasty
striped fish. Offshore, Bill said, amberjack, mangrove
snapper and a few grouper are the best bets.
Chris at Galati Yacht Basin said grouper and snap-
per are the best bets for those willing to brave the offshore
waters, while backwater fishermen seem to do the best
with sheepshead around bridges and pilings.
There are a few trout being reported by anglers fish-
ing out of Perico Harbor Bait and Tackle according to
Carl. There's also "lots and lots" of sheepshead out there,
too.
Capt. Todd Romine said he's been able to get his
charters on a few redfish, lots of sheepies up to five


pounds and a few flounder caught in deep water.
Capt. Tom Chaya said reds and sheepshead were the
week's best catches.
Capt. Rick Gross may have the best news of the
week: he finished 1993 with a limit catch of snook. Nice
going, Rick!
On my boat Magic I spent most of my time offshore
last week, bringing in good catches of yellowtail snapper,
lane snapper, porgies, trigger fish, and a few good-sized
grouper.
Capt. Phil Shields said the weather has really im-
pacted the fishing but, when he was able to get offshore,
he really did well with red and black grouper up to 10
pounds in size, mangrove snapper and a few amberjack.
Capt. Mark Bradow said trout, sheepshead, redfish,
flounder and snapper were all caught last week.


Adult soccer league features Island players


Islander Tim Bugna stops
the ball (near right photo)
in a play against a team
from St. Petersburg at G.T.
Bray Park in Bradenton
recently. Top right, a
player charges through the
air at Islander Ken Bowers.
Bottom right, Bowers
brings the ball across to the
goal. The adult league
teams are from throughout
Southwest Florida and
nearly all the players on
this team are from Anna
Maria.

Islander Photos:
Bonner Presswood


- .


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subscription to the "Best News on Anna Maria Island."
A subscription form for The Islander Bystander is available on page 7.








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ANNA MARIA
DAY AMHIGH
Thu 1/6 8:45 0.9ft
Fri 1/7
Sat 1/8
Sun 1/9
Mon 1/10
Tue 1/11 10:56p' 2.3ft
Wed 1/12 11:41p'2.2ft


ISLAND TIDE TABLES


AMLOW
1:24 0.0ft
2:34 -0.3ft
3:36 -0.5ft
4:28 -0.6ft
5:14 -0.7ft
5:53 -0.6ft
6:28 -0.5ft


PMHIGH
6:35 2.2ft
7:31 2.2ft
8:24 2.3ft
9:18 2.3ft
10:06 2.3ft
2:02 1.2ft
2:08 1.2ft


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I[ PAGE 22 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


KEY ROYALE
624 Foxworth Lane
100 feet on deep water canal. 3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, eat-in kitchen and formal dining room.
1,880 sq. ft. New sea wall and dock.
778-7837






waterfront 419 Pine Avenue,
Estates n (813) 778-2291
Vdeo Colecon M EVENINGS 778-2632


.a?' J Watch for oir
Anna Maria, Florida f listings on
PO Box 2150 1 Classivision,
FAX (813) 778-2294 channel 19.


JUST LISTED!
Quaint Anna Maria Cottage
Don't miss this cozy 2 bedroom, 1 bath getaway
located on quiet Spring Avenue. Includes central
air and heat, sunny screened lanai, new roof in
'91, washer, dryer and fenced back yard. Only
$124,900.


Associates After Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw..778-2847 Marcella Comett...778-5919 Nancy Gullford...778-2158


ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


ui
.I


;, -= :., .. .
"ll r IklV DI a A Pe oatlZ}oIa annrln nn hpsm tifn d WI=rRTaV COVE-I= LovcIv 3RR/2BA unit with -uD-


I irrl il r -., L. -- 40L-I l0A.l n i i i.. % 11 IU*UlU
beach for walking and watching sunsets. Lots of
storage. Game room, sauna. $169,900.
MLS#54905. Call Mary Ann or Janis, 778-2261.
Eves. 778-4796 or 778-4931.
WATERS EDGE 2BR/2BA condo completely
redecorated. Direct gulffront with drop dead
views. Shows like a model. $264,900. MLS#54981.
Call John Green, 778-2261 or 778-3167 eves.
WESTBAY COVE Lovely 2BR/2BA 2nd floor,
unit with view of the Intracoastal over the pool.
Watch morning sunrise over Bay. Tastefully deco-
rated. Furniture negotiable. $130,000.
MLS#54983. Call Bobye Chasey, 778-2261 or
778-1532 eves.
GULF SHORES Lovely 3BR/2BA Gulffront condo.
Light and bright unit located on beautiful renourished
beach. Reduced to $189,000. MLS#1725. Call Rose
Schnoerr, 778-2261 or 778-7780 eves.


graded carpet, ceramic tile. Lanai over Anna Maria
Sound and Sarasota Bay. Northernmost unit in com-
plex. Most desirable for soft breezes off water.
$157,000. MLS#54696. Call Rose Schnoerr 778-
2261 or 778-7780 eves.
KEY ROYALE 3BR/2BA in mint condition. Split
bedroom plan, beautiful lawn with sprinklers. Boat
dock on sailboat water canal. Lots of upgrades within
last 3 years. $229,500. MLS#10648. Call Hal
Gillihan, 778-2261 or 778-2194 eves.
PALM-CAY Spacious 1BR unit blocks from
beach. Heated pool. Laundry facilities in large rec.
room. Excellent rental history. $51.,500. MLS#54850.
Call Bill Bowman, 778-2261 or 778-4619 eves.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Rarely offered
downstairs 3BR condo on water. Enclosed lanai,
turnkey furnished. $179,000. MLS#53526. Call
Bobye Chasey 778-2261 or 778-1532 eves.


60 Mn atee Avenue-Wst--Hle Bah- 401 PineAveue- -Ann ai
i s7826 TEMU IHSCCS"7824
1 CLL OLLFRE: -80-42-625 IL


;^Lftcz~.~r~aea^A *WgB^ l*' -*j '..'Sl
CONDOS FOR SALE!
ISLAND PARADISE luxury Gulffront! 3/2 $279,000 to
$289,000. -GULF BEACH PLACE-2/2-$179,000. *GULF
VIEW TOWNHOUSES 2/2.5 $129,000 SHELL POINT
-2/2-$112,500. Also, Duplexes & Homes from $79,900.
since CALL DEBBIE THRASHER 778-2259
1957 ANNA MARIA REALTY
UC. REAL ESTATE BROKER'
9805 Gulf Dr. (POBox 835) Anna Maria
1-800-845-9573 Fax778-2250
MAEN "We are the Island.
ulteBwEm.B* ________________________


778-1751
Evenings


buying or Selling, Ed can make your
Island Dream come true!


2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach
FL 34217


778-2246
Office


U UT


The Islander Bystander wants to deliver the paper to your home address
on Anna Maria Island .. if you want to receive it FREE give us a call at 778-7978.


Duplex 208 Peacock, Holmes Beach
I:t 4* 1930's Cottage plus possible buildable lot -
402 & 404 Magnolia
Luxury Key Royale lot Drive by Ivanhoe Lane

When you demand excellence in
REAL ESTATE SERVICE ...
S I -'"" M- -." ."--. Another one sold!
BEACH COTTAGE with over 2000 sq. CUTE BEACH COTTAGE- 301 23rd REACH RICHARD AT
ft. 209 Coconut, Anna Maria. St. Drive by ad take a look.'Won't last
at this price. 778-6066


When


SINCE 1939
Island Relocation
Specialist
ED OLIVEIRA
REALTOR


q


REDUCED -4 BEDROOM KEY ROYALE: Quality
custom home shows like a dream. Spilt bedroom design
with private guest wing, separate dining room, morning
room, parlor, Florida room with hand loomed carpet.
Other amenities include all appliances, heated pool and
spa, sprinkler system, well, central vacuum, intercom,
circle drive. Now $259,000. Call Carol Williams for
showing, 778-0777 office, 778-1718 after hours.


NEW LISTING: Well maintained 2BR/2BA horie
within walking distance of shopping and library.
Vaulted open beam ceiling in living room and kitchen.
Screened porch, utility room, workshop, carport. Nice
size lot, a must see home. $110,500. Please'call Zee
Catanese, 794-8991 eves.
THIS PLACE HAS IT ALL: Beautiful 2BR/2BA, el-
evated villa on a deep lot. Close to shopping and just
two miles from the beach. The private pool area is
great for entertaining, or rediscovering romance.
$75,000. Call Frank Migliore at 778-2662 for an ap-
pointment today,.
DUPLEXES:
DUPLEX within walking distance of the beach at the
north end of Anna Maria. 2BR/1 BA each unit. Upstairs
unit was completely remodeled, new kitchen, carpet,
plumbing, wiring. Priced to sell at $152,000. Please
call Zee Catanese.794-8991 eves.
INVEST SMALL WIN BIG: In this 1BR plus, each
side duplex. 100' to new beach, close to shopping,
banks, doctor and Gulf of Mexico. Homeowners War-
ranty included. $119,900. For private showing call
Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.
INVEST YOUR $$$ today in this modern elevated
Key West style duplex that is less than 10 years old!
Tons of storage plus 2BR/2BA in each unit. Gulf
beaches, bay waters, shops and restaurants are only
steps from your front door. All this for $179,000. Call
Sandy Greiner, 778-2864 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS 0


I


sc0th]






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m JANUARY 6, 1994 a PAGE 23 II


WHEN IN PARADISE SEE...






5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522









Waterfront Bargain Luxury at Bargain price de-
scribes this spacious 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo. Enjoy
canal front living with boating, tennis, pool, hot tub, and
much more all at a great location. Live like a king forjust
$79,900 Ken Rickett 778-3026.
Lowest Priced Unit at Island Village. Enjoy spacious
beach living in this over 1300 square feet 2 bedroom, 2
bath unit. Located near both beach and shopping. Life can
be good for just $98,900 Ken Rickett 778-3026.
Boaters Dream! Only seconds to Gulf! Direct
intracoastal view from this 2 bedroom, 2 bath turnkey
furnished unit. Features include fireplace, boat dock,
heated pool and elevator. $159,900 Call Lynn Hostetter
778-4800.
Exquisite Beach Townhouse -Enjoy top quality beach
living in this spacious 4 bedroom, 2 bath unit featuring
new carpet and decor. Fireplace, new appliances and lots
of storage. Reduced for quick sale to $139,900 Ken
Rickett 778-3026.
Beautiful unit in a Gulffront complex. This 2 bedroom,
2 bath unit is turnkey furnished and has a view of the Gulf.
Complex offers heated pool, tennis, and elevator. All for
only $175,500.


BISANDER m
If you want to be sure to receive The Islander Bystander in
your driveway EVERY WEEK, just call in your
Island address, 778-7978.
(Sorry, we can not home deliver to condos or trailer parks.)




.". : m. -
DIl De ASO CIATSAFURS:-













HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCEWell maintained Island $1,100 INCOME Per month from this modern du-
home with good central Holmes Beach location. 2BR, plex. 2BR/2BA each side. Amenities include dish-
2BA with large garage and storage area. One block to washer, disposals, laundry room, skylights and
gulf beaches. $112,500. Call Dave Moynihan. covered parking. $124,900. Call Stan Williams.









FAMILY STYLE Spacious five bedroom, 21/2 bath GULFFRONTI Magnificent views from all rooms of
Island residence on double lot with lush landscaping this great house. Popular rental. Expansive, sandy
and short walk to prime beach. Offered at $159,500. beach in all directions. Priced at $335,000. Owner
Call Dave Moynihan for details. anxious. Call Stan Williams for details.

* LA PLAYITA 2BR-2BA townhouse, close to beach SUNSET LANDINGS Gulf and Bay views from the
and shopping, large pool and recreation area, garage balcony of this 2 story, unfurnished townhouse. 2BR-
and storage for $79,900. Call Dave Moynihan. 2.5BA with extra storage and two carports on ground
* HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX Well maintained and level. Just across the street for a walk on the beach.
fully rented, makes this elevated duplex a super buy, Priced at $119,900. Call Stan Williams.
very close to wide beach. Offered at $112,500. Call SUNRISE OR SUNSET Pick your preference from
Dave Moynihan for details. one of these 2BR-2BA Gulffront or Bay View, unfur-
* MOTEL WITH OWNER FINANCING Island motel nished condos. Pool, elevator and close to shopping
close to beaches and Bay. Buyer's dream for on site and restaurants. Great beach just across the street.
management. $595,000. Call Stan Williams for details. Priced at $84,900 and $89,900. Call Stan Williams.
* HOLMES BEACH LOTS North of Manatee Av- BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Marine retail opera-
enue and close to sandy walking beach. Measures tion available at prominent Island Marina. Unlimited
100' x 200' and is zoned for 1-4 units. Offered at opportunity including boat and jet ski sales and rent-
$129,500. Call Dave Moynihan. als, ships store, bait and tackle, and much more.
Offered at $110,000. Call Dave Moynihan for details.


U .n[- I I U j.1'1 ^ .ui.I ~ -L W A 0 .i .1 : 4. .1 .A 1


MAGNIFICENT BAYFRONT PROPERTY ...
3BR/3BA, spacious family room. Floral and cit-
rus gardens. Many extras! Call T. Dolly Young,
778-5427. #55150 ... $450,000.
PRICED LESS THAN APPRAISAL! Upgraded
Island home, must be seen! 3BR/2BA. Newer
appliances/tile. Inground pool. Flower arbor.
Call Sally Schrader, 792-3176.... $147,000.
NEW LISTING! Freshly painted inside and out.
2BR/2BA. Nice quiet neighborhood. Furniture
negotiable. Call Robert St. Jean, 778-6467.
#55157... $74,500.

.... : Please stop in
for your 1994
Calendars.
Carol Heinze
CRS
Realtor"
Million Dollar Club
778-7246

LOOKING FOR GREAT bargain & dock space
for 30'boat? 2BR/2BA. Need some TLC. Fan-
tastic view on canal. Call Robert St. Jean, 778-
6467. #54844 ... $76,900.
WORTH CHECKING OUT! Gated entrance,
formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, fireplace,
caged pool! 3BR/2BA. 2 car garage. Call Rob-
ert St. Jean, 778-6467. #53686 ... $159,900.

Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory.
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


The Prudential
Florida Realty
5340-1 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217
(813) 778-0766


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2)


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PRICE REDUCED! Excellent opportunity to invest in this nice du-
plex only one house from Gulf. Both units have excellent access
to beach and nice Gulf view from upstairs apartment Downstairs
has 3BR/2BA and upstairs includes 2BR/1BA. Excellent rental
property and price to sell! Asking $219,500.






1B PAGE 24 M JANUARY 6, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Bridge fate


may be


decided


Thursday

is at best 12 inches.
One year and $1 million into the plan, they had to
abandon their proposed construction method, admitting
that utilizing barges would be impossible.
DOT has since proposed a method utilizing a series
of 12-inch hollow pipes drilled into the bay bottom, which
would be connected to form piers and jetties to serve as a
construction platform from which to erect the new, big
bridge.
The pier construction is likely more damaging to the
bay bottom than barges and far more damaging than the
DEP's preferred "top-down" construction. DOT claims
top-down construction is ruled out by the large distance
planned between spans, and they want to maintain the
spacing of the spans to allow for an improved view from
the land.

MPO Special Committee/
Public Hearing
After hours of public input and the delay of discus-
sion and the vote to another day, there was a great deal of
discussion from the members of the special committee
chaired by Manatee County Commissioner/MPO repre-
sentative Kent Chetlain on their recommendation to the
Metropolitan Planning Organization on the bridge. The
group voted 4-3 against the 65-foot bridge plan, but no
specifics were cited as to why they opposed the structure.
It was pointed out by one committee member that
they were not asked to make recommendations; to the
contrary, their job was only to decide whether it should
be a 65-foot bridge or not.
Their recommendation was ignored by the very board
that created the committee, the MPO. Public comments
held on the bridge issue by the special committee with
pleading, reasoning and technical evidence from more
than 100 opponents of DOT's plan was also ignored.
Only a handful of speakers favored the high bridge.
Some members of the committee expressed a prefer-
ence for a lower, bascule bridge. One member was bra-
zen enough to suggest rehabilitation of the existing bridge.
DOT's Bryan Williams, present throughout the pub-
lic hearing but absent for the discussion and vote, said
after the meeting that he believed the most compelling
reasoning against the 65-foot bridge was the loss of char-
acter to the Island a Megaa bridge" would inevitably im-
pose.
Why spend $14 million needlessly? The logical gov-
ernmental answer would follow that the money is
there. But no federal funds may be used on the project
because the bridge is not sufficiently deteriorated to merit
using other than state dollars for the replacement

Why not rehabilitate,.
the existing bridge?
The option to rehabilitate the existing bridge at Mana-
tee Avenue was never fully explored by DOT.
The original span of the Howard Frankland Bridge,
linking Pinellas and Hillsborough counties on Interstate
275, was rehabilitated without interruption of traffic flow
or substantial environmental impact by a company named
Blasters. Since the company was contracted by DOT, they
have refused local requests to evaluate the merits of reha-
bilitation on the Anna Maria Island Bridge.

Were the hearings legal?
Three public hearings sponsored by the agency are
required: a planning hearing; a facility and site/corridor
hearing; and a design hearing.
Affected property owners as listed on the tax rolls,
those located within 300 feet of the proposed new bridge,
"-^ are required by state rules and law to be notified. They
were not.
Only two of those public hearings were held: a pub-
lic information workshop on Feb. 27, 1989, and a design
hearing Aug. 10, 1989. DOT's mailing lists reveal that
property owners were not notified. Residents have said
they are poised to request an administrative hearing and,


if necessary, to file a lawsuit if the bridge is permitted by
DEP and the U.S. Coast Guard.
Published notices for the two hearings DOT held
.stated the project involves "replacement of a two-lane
bascule bridge with a parallel, fixed-span bridge."
Property owners at Westbay Cove South were noti-
fied of DOT s public hearings in October, but at that hear-
ing no design alternatives were offered. The hearing
opened with a description and a video detailing graphic
enhancements of DOT's proposed 65-foot bridge.
There were no viable options offered for rehabilita-
tion and, although there was discussion of 21- and 45-foot
bascule bridges, no plans were drafted as they were for
the 65-foot, fixed-span bridge.
At the previous hearing, the Manatee Chamber of
Commerce distributed flyers and presented a lengthy
statement supporting FOUR-LANE, 65-FOOT
BRIDGES to the Island. Bradenton Beach Mayor Katie
Pierola contends this is the silent hand that continues to
steer the 65-foot bridge drive.
Others believe Gov. Lawton Chiles, with substantial
business interests on Anna Maria, is the moving force.

Two lane bridge or two spans?
All state documents provide for a four-lane bridge -
a second span with two more lanes after construction
of the first 65-foot high span "phase." Construction plans
even call for the four-laning of Gulf Drive between Mana-
tee Avenue and Cortez Road, although local transporta-
tion planners have said that expansion would never hap-
pen.
The October 1993 hearings opened with one of the
first questions related to these dual bridge plans. DOT's
spokesperson for the hearing, Charlie Morgan, replied,
"Yes, the plan is for a second bridge but not in the present
work plan."
According to Morgan and DOT documentation, traf-
fic studies warrant consideration of four lane two spans
of two lanes of traffic by 2010.
DOT officials have said the new bridge is not in-
tended to carry additional traffic to and from the Island,
but is meant to improve service to emergency vehicles
with two safety, pull-off lanes. On one hand they claim
justification for replacement due to increased traffic
counts and projected traffic increases, then they claim their
plan merely replaces the existing two-lane bridge with a
newer, more modern, safer two-lane bridge.

New public hearing
The most recent public hearing failed to produce a
detailed description of the type of construction activity
that will take place-- or a realistic cost.
Prior to the hearing, the cost estimate was $13.1 mil-
lion for the first span. It dropped to $8.4 million at the
hearing. Then it went to $14.6 million in the governor's
budget. These estimates do not include demolition of the
existing bridge after completion of the first span a cost
that could go as high as $10 million alone.
More than two years ago, cost estimates for a 65-foot
bridge at Cortez Road were in excess of $20 million. The
current figure for the proposed 65-foot bridge on
Sarasota's Ringling Causeway is $32 million.
The outcome of the hearing was analyzed by the same
consulting firm that engineered the bridge plan and in-
cluded only tables of numbers for and against the
bridge and for or against whatever else people commented
on. The full results were never presented to the MPO. May
commented to the MPO that no new information was pre-
sented by opponents of the bridge at these public hearings.

Environmental impact
DOT continues to pursue building the bridge on a
southern alignment in spite of documented correspon-
dence dating back to 1990 from DEP (formerly DER) stat-
ing that a southern alignment was unacceptable due to
seagrass bed impacts.
DOT insists, but has never provided any type of docu-
mentation, that the seagrass loss can be mitigated. The
majority of the seagrass beds affected are turtle grass.

Public safety and welfare
considerations
At today's meeting between DOT and DEP tak-
ing place at the site of the existing bridge safety will
not be a subject of discussion.
DEP Engineer Early Sorenson says that, according to
internal legal advice from DEP Office of General Coun-
sel, objections to the 65-foot bridge based on public safety
resulting from high winds may not be considered, even
though there is substantial evidence compiled by DEP that


the 65-foot height poses a hazard.
The DEP attorneys advise that DEP may only base
objections on environmental safety adverse affects to
sealife and seagrass.
Sorenson isn't happy about the decision. He has
stated in the past that, as a professional engineer, he took
an oath requiring him to put concerns of public health,
safety and welfare of citizens above all else, and that dis-
ciplinary action may occur if violations are proven.
The DOT engineers and their consulting engineers all
take the same oath, but appear willing to stand behind their
seal on the plans for the 65-foot bridge.
A letter from a group of concerned Islanders detail-
ing erroneous statements in the DOT plan along with
information on wind hazards and the accidental death of
a motorist on a 65-foot bridge on the east coast was sent
to the Florida Department of Business and Professional
Regulation, Board of Professional Engineers, last Decem-
ber.

Who supports the 65-foot plan?
The MPO, a board of 14 Sarasota and Manatee
elected officials, the DOT and, more locally, Holmes
Beach Mayor Pat Geyer as well as what appears to be
a handful of residents and business owners support the
big bridge.
Most supporters argue that the 65-foot bridge will be
safer. "Safer than what?" is often asked, but the answer
never becomes quite clear. There are no studies or recom-
mendations from any agency DOT included that
support the conclusion that a 65-foot bridge is safer than
a lower structure.
Islanders have expressed concern for safety in the
event of hurricane evacuation. DOT says the department
is not as concerned with hurricane evacuation as with
every day use by emergency vehicles. Safety lanes on the
new fixed-span bridge, and the obvious lack of delays due
to bridge openings, will eliminate the need for notification
to the bridge tender to hold the bridge closed in emergency
situations.
DEP says that DOT insists that unimpeded use by
emergency vehicles is an important factor to consider, yet
DEP can't find an Island elected official who knows of a
problem with emergency vehicles leaving the Island.
The debate on the high bridge has caused a lot of of-
ficials both on and off the Island to flip-flop their position
on the issue. Among them, all three Manatee County"
Commissioners represented on the MPO: Stan Stephens
and Joe McClash both opposed the 65-foot bridge plan
during elections and, once in office, appeared to succumb
to pressure from the Manatee Chamber of Commerce to
support the 65-foot bridge.
Commissioner Kent Chetlain did an about-face when
he chaired the MPO special committee hearing in Janu-
ary 1993, where he pledged to support the outcome a
vote against the 65-foot bridge.
In recent discussion at the MPO, McClash again
stated he believed a 65-foot bridge would be safer for area
residents. And Chetlain voted for a 65-foot replacement
bridge on the Ringling Causeway.

The present situation
DOT continues to strive for a 65-foot, fixed-span
bridge to be located on the south side of the existing
bridge.
DEP still refuses to approve the permit.for the plan,
primarily on the basis of seagrass bed impacts.
The Coast Guard cannot issue a permit until DEP
approves DOT's plan.
If the plan changes to a northern alignment, DOT will
have to reapply for the permit they have already received
from the Army Corps of Engineers as well as from South-
west Florida Water Management District with regard to
stormwater runoff.
If DEP issues an "intent to permit," objectors -
SAM and residents at Westbay Cove South will re-
quest an administrative hearing. If DEP denies the permit,
DOT is likely to request the hearing.
If the change in alignment is considered a "significant
change," new public hearings will be required.
At Thursday's meeting between DOT and DEP at the
bridge site, they will look at the area of seagrass to be
impacted on either side. They will discuss the faults with
the DOT plan that DEP staff continues to question. The
discussion will also focus on plans related to a northern
alignment and the effects on the channel to Leverock's
Restaurant and Galati's Perico Harbor Marina.
The meeting is scheduled to take place at the bridge
at 10:45 a.m., Thursday, Jan. 6, with discussion to follow
at The Islander Bystander offices in the Island Shopping
Center, 5400 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.




















SUBSCRIBE NOW- FORM ON PAGE 7








*OUT THESE CLUB CONDOS
802 Audubon Dr.-1/1 ... $79,900
SOLD "40 Sandpiper-- .." 0,900
843 Audubon Dr 2/2 ... $107,000
912 Sandpiper Cr 2/ ... $95,900
1217 Spoonbill Landings Cr-
2/2 ... $117,900
1227 Spoonbill Landings Cr, furnished -
2/2 ... $129,900
1237 Spoonbill Landings Cr-
2/2 ... $116,900
1171 Edgewater Cr -2/2 ... $142,000
1163 Edgewater Cr 3/2 ... $209,000
Buying or Selling ,
Perico Bay
CALL TODAY!! *
Marilyn Trevethan "
Evenings 792-8477
neaLl neat REALTORS
(813) 778-2261
Toll Free 800-422-6325



Please
call
Karin
Stephan
RFEALTOR'
Ich Spreche
Deutsch
Office:
r: 813-778-0766
'A After Hours:
813-388-1267
Mobile:
813-350-5844

BEAUTIFUL LARGE DIRECT GULFFRONT
condo! Wall of mirrors in living rm. Light & bright:
panoramic view of Anna Maria's sunsets. 2 bed-
room/2 bath. #5KS64 $339,900.
GULF BEACH PLACE only $244,900 for large turn-
key furnished 2 bedroom/2 bath condo w/extra stor-
age. Enclosed balconies overlooking Gulf. Super
Gulf & Bay views from roof. #5KS39.
COUNTRY STYLE CHARM. Energy efficient
house close to town. 3 bedroom/2 bath. Screened
deck/spa, Corian counters & Euro cabinets, fire-
place. #5KS35. $154,900.
ISLAND VILLAGE! Newly decorated and fur-
nished. Great rental potential. 3 bedroom, 2 bath.
Extra storage, covered parking. Steps to beach.
#5KS86. $145,000.
PERICO BAY CLUB beautiful view of lake from 2
bedroom/2 bath home. Tennis, pool, putting green.
Only minutes to beach! #5KS35. $106,000
PERICO BAY CLUB! Enjoy the best of life here! 2 bed-
room/2 bath. Tumkey furished. Tennis, pool, putting
green, security guard. Easyto rent. #5KS07. $105,000.
SHELL COVE Enjoy fabulous GULF sunsets from
your balcony! Turnkey furished, 2 bedroom, 1 bath.
Close to everything! 5KS41. $99,900.
4 LOTS in Ellenton 100 x 120, 2 with pond.
#5KS15.
For information and to see any of these, please call
Karin Stephan at 778-0766 or 388-1267 evenings.


The Prudential


Florida Realty


5340-1 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach FL 34217


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER U JANUARY 6, 1994 A PAGE 25 1Ij



JUST CALL
... for free home delivery anywhere* on Anna Maria Island. You don't want to miss
the BEST news on the Island. You may also call to stop home delivery if necessary.
778-7978
SSorry, individual unit delivery is not available at most mobile home parks or condominiums.


I2nd House From Beach:


One of Anna Maria's most popular
neighborhoods rarely available!
Gorgeous home completely renovated throughout with
new kitchen, family room, new carpetand decor. SEPA-
RATE GUEST HOUSE for mother, hobbies, studio or? Tile
roof, garage, huge 100 x 100 lot. Drive by this quality home
at 112 Peppertree Lane (beach side near Baptist Church)
and call...


3 reen
REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA


778-0455
9906 Gulf Drive
Next to the
Anna Maria Post Office


oil
::. v .


GULFFRONT
Ocean Park Terrace Condo- 3BR/2BA fully
fumished. Two screened porches & Roof Top Sun
Deck overlooking entire Gulf, Intracoastal Waterway.
& Island. $199,900.


ISLAND 6-PLEX
2/2 each unit. Close to beach, restaurants and
shopping. Pool and laundry facilities.
RUNAWAY BAY
2 BD/2BA Unit, Turnkey Furnished, Completely
updated, custom ceramic tile throughout.
UNOBSTRUCTED VIEW OF
TAMPA BAY
This lot is ready for you to build your dream house.
$114,900.
GULFFRONT COMPLEX
DESIRABLE TIFFANY PLACE-2 BR/2BA, all
the amenities, elevator and turnkey furnished.
$169,900.
Call Mary Ann Schmidt 778-4931
or Janis Van Steenburgh 778-4796
Neal & Neal Realtors 778-2261
or Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 MIS UE.


7Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
S 9701 Gulf Dr. (P.O. Box 717) Anna Maria, FL 34216
Sax# 778-7035 -
778-2307 or 778-1450
We at Fran Maxon Real Estate want
to say "Thank You" to all our friends,
clients, and customers fro their
patronage and for adding
excitement to 1993.
Our wish for you this coming
New Year is much health,
happiness and prosperity.
Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson,'
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
and Kay Kay Hardy
.WEEKDAYS 9AM to 4:30PM P
SATURDAYS 9AM to NOON .




Vacation


Rentals

Anna Maria Island
Great Selection of
Seasonal Properties

Beachfront* Bayview Gardenview
Weekly rates from $500.00
Monthly rates from $1,200.00
Contact: Debbie Dial
800/881-2276
813/778-2275
Michael Saunders & Company
Licensed Real Estate Broker
3222 East Bay Dr., Holmes Beach FL 34217 (813) 778-2275


ANNA MARIA ISLAND


GULFFRONT CONDOMINIUM-U$175,000
Contemporary 1BR/1.5BA with den/guest room. Partially
furnished. Prime beach location. 778-6654.
* *
YACHTSMAN'S DREAM Mariners Cove ... the pre-
mier boating community on Florida's West Coast.
Choose from 2 or 3 bedroom units from $215,000.
Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
PERICO BAY CLUB 2BR/2BA unit has estuary view plus
a beautiful turnkey furniture package, garage, screened lanai
and gated community all for $114,900. Bob Fittro, 778-0054.
LARGE LOT IN HOLMES BEACH Good area only 3
blocks from best beach. 8415 sq. ft. $67,500. Terri
Robertson, 795-2676.
BEACHFRONT IN ANNA MARIA 3BR/2BA.house with
one of the finest walking beaches and gorgeous views. Fam-
ily room, stone fireplace, deck, garage and fruit trees.
$425,000. Jeanette Rampone, 747-2244.


Anna Maria Island Centre / 813-778-6654
3224 East Bay Drive / Holmes Beach, FL 34217


~~--- -
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EIr PAGE 26 0 JANUARY 6, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy'\ Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
awn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service 12YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
5 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
778-1345 AND SATISFACTION








SCAVANAGH MARINE REPAIR
GAS DIESEL I/O INBOARD
ENGINES DRIVES GENERATORS
FULL SERVICE MARINA* MOBILE SERVICE
795-7264 124TH ST. CT. W AT CORTEZ ROAD


A-NEW LOOK
PRESSURE CLEANING
Mildew Removal
Cement Patios and Boats
Free Estimates Insured Tom Thompson
792-4659


CHRISTIE'S
f PLUMBING
,i COMPANY
.Commercial & Residential
Open- Saturday
S24-Hour Service
No Overtime Charges!
778-3924 or 778-4461
"Remember, it pays and saves to get a second estimate."
5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach (RF0038118)


*Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468:



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
PRESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
*LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


SABAL I PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
SDECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Yearlsland Resident


J. IL

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates

778-2139


SLANER CLASSIF'IESi


COMPUTER Tenex Turbo 286-12, with 2 floppy 5.5,
star printer, 14" color monitor. Almost new, boxed with
books and cords. $400. 778-6835.
COMMODORE COMPUTERS 128,2-64 keyboards,
14" color monitor, printer, 2 disk drives, all books and
cords. $250.778-6835.
PHOTO EQUIPMENT: Complete camera system -
NIKON EM body with 50 mm lense, auto winder, strobe,
plus 28 mm and 70-300 zoom lenses, and bag. Com-
plete $450. 778-9392.
WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In-Line Skates. A re-
lentless rush! For skating information and sales call
778-3880.
FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels... and everything else
in THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
CAR CLEAN SPECIAL Wash and vacuum every week
all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Convenient
service at your home or office. Call Fine Details mobile
phone # 356-4649.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!



DON'T MISS THIS! Gigantic church sale. Sat., Feb..19.
8 am to 2 pm. Appliances, clothing, baked goods, col-
lectibles, housewares, jewelry, linens. BBQ chicken
dinner. Carry-out available. Island Chapel, 6200 Gulf of
Mexico Dr., Longboat Key.

HUGH GARAGE SALE Moving. Contents whole
house. Furniture, lamps, TV, dishes. Everything! Sat.,
Jan. 8 323 Hardin Ave., Anna Maria. 10 am to 5 pm.
GARAGE SALE 306 64th St., Holmes Beach. Sat., Jan.
8. Clothes, furniture and a lot of stuff.


YOGA classes beginning in Holmes Beach. Jan. 3,
GeritleYoga for seniors. Jan. 13 Beginning Yoga. En-
rollment information. 778-3892.


BEN AND IRENE'S Dog Babysitting Service. At our
home with constant supervision. No cages/kennels.
House calls(Island only). Cats included. 778-1012.


CAR CLEAN SPECIAL: Wash and vacuum every week
all year on a $15 weekly contract basis. Convenient
service at your home or office. Call mobile phone # 356-
4649 for more information or an appointment.


15' 6" RIVIERA Tri hull with open bow. 35 HP Johnson.
Magic tilt trailer. $1200 OBO. 778-6569.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. 1/2 &full day. Reservations please. Call 778-1990.


EXTRA TIME on your hands? The Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce needs you. Volunteers please
call 778-1541 or 778-2277. Ask for Darcy.
RETAIL SALES Experienced. Beach-Style Boutique.
778-4323.
PIECEWORK Earn good money at home at your own
pace. Ideal for young mothers, retirees and some handi-
caps. No auto necessary. Also artist needed. Call
Lesley 778-7765.
HOUSEKEEPER Needed part-time for beachfront
motel. 15 to 20 hours per week Apply in person at Sand
& Sea Motel, 2412 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach.
HOUSEKEEPER Beach resort, pays up to $7.50 per
hour. 778-6628.
HOUSEKEEPER for beach motel on Anna Maria Is-
land. Must be clean, pleasant & willing to work. Apply
in person, Mon. to Fri., 9 to 1. Blue Water Beach Club,
6306 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light clean-
ing, spring cleaning, WINDOWS, moving help, organiz-
ing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island! (20% dis-
count to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.


HOME REPAIR-Kitchen & Bath, handyman and home
repairs. Island resident, 23 years experience, local ref-
erences. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office, or
dock-at your convenience. Complete detailing includes
wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly cleaning,
leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim dressed and
much more. Protect your investment. Call Damon on
mobile number 356-4649.
PROFESSIONAL YACHT & Boat cleaning by Carleen.
15 years experience. No job to small. For free estimates
call voice pager 813-252-0080. Island resident.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED The best news in town
and the best results from classified ads and service
advertising!
CHEERFUL, REFINED mature companion for home
care, driving, shopping, errands, appointments and light
cooking. Dependable Island resident. 778-0601.
EXPERIENCED LADY for home companion (former
Island resident). Cooking, appointments or shopping.
Non-smoker. 795-5003.
TREE SERVICE Topping, trimming, removal of all types
of trees. including palms. Insured, reasonable, Island resi-
Sdent. Local references. Call Brewers 778-7790.


HOME REPAIR SERVICE -Professional tile installa-
tion, marble work, plaster & stucco. Interior/exterior. All
repairs. Excellent Island references, 23 years experi-
ence. Call Mark at 778-5354.

VAN-GO PAINTING 15 years experience. Residential/
Commercial, Interior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning, Wall-
paper hanging. Island resident with Island references.
Call Bill Chamberlin at 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling"
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many Island ref-
erences. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE Professional in-
stallation and repair. Fully insured. Manatee County
resident 25 years. Call today for a free estimate. Ken
792-1084.

FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water heater,
sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the Island for
17 years. 778-0181. Lic. # RF0038400.j

Interior/Exterior Painting, Call Jim Bickal 778-1730.
Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. All types.
New installation and repairs. Insured and references.
LIC #RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 778-0029.
ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free esti-
mates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repairs, 778-
4335.121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
HOME REPAIR Seniors discount. Special rates for
mobile homes. 24 hours service. Island resident for 22
years. Call Pete 778-2812.
HANDYMAN Jack-of-all-trades. Guaranteed neater
work habits and better workmanship at lower prices.
Island resident. Call Art 778-7765.


ONE LARGE commercial studio. Gulf view. Gulf Drive.
Ideal for small business, office, crafts, etc. Neg. Call
Frank at 778-6126 Eves. 778-6127.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT! ISLANDER CLASSIFIED.
NORTH BEACH VILLAGE Seasonal, annual available
rentals. 3BR/2.5B. 2 car garage. Fumished or unfur-
nished. Also units for sale. Excalibur Realty. 795-4394.

GULFFRONT-Wonderful viewsfrom thisfumished, 2/1,
apartment with pool and sandy walking beach in quiet area
- of Holmes Beach. Availabilities from Dec. to Apr. 94 at
$625 per week. Call Pat eves. 813-778-7976.

SEASONAL BAYFRONT condo. Open Jan. and Feb.
due to cancellation. Large 2/2, beautiful view, tennis,
pool, washer/dryer, etc. $1800 month for Jan. & Feb.
or $2100 for 1 month. Island Real Estate 778-6066.
HOLMES BEACH 2/2 and 1/1, furnished duplex apart-
ments. Seasonal or annual. 778-0468.


vianSB






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I JANUARY 6, 1994 0 PAGE 27 i3


IISLwWN iE:E7CLASSIFIEDS 4'
RENALS ENAL


FURNISHED ANNA MARIA home. 3/3, living room,
eat-in kitchen, dishwasher, washer/dryer. On canal
with dock. 1.5 block to beach. Bring boat and clothing.
722-4700.
COTTAGES FOR RENT on the beach. Anna Maria
City. Wk/Mo/Sn. 813-735-1488.
BRADENTON BEACH 1BR home. 1/2 block to gulf
beach/city pier. Completely furnished. Seasonal. 114
3rd St. S. 778-2896
ANNUAL Unfumished, 2/2 in Anna Maria with gorgeous
open water view. Boat dock included. Won't last long!
$800 month plus utilities and security. Call Debbie
Thrasher, Anna Maria Realty, Inc. 778-2259.
SEASONAL Gulffront/canal homes and condos.
Weekly and monthly. Call Debbie Thrasher, Anna Maria
Realty, Inc. 778-2259.
ANNA MARIA Just re-decorated 2/1 with 1 car garage.
One block to gulf beach. $1600 month. Available Feb.
1. 813-778-4073 or 717-484-2167
SEASONAL RENTAL Available now. Turnkey 3/2
house across from beach. 778-1180.
ANNA MARIA North Shore cottage. 2/1, central air,
rattan furniture, cable and w/d. $1200 month includes
utilities. Jan. thru April. 778-8233 weekends/813-251-
0944 weekdays.
SIMPLY CHARMING Newly renovated 3/2 north Anna
Maria cottage. Available January 1. $1700 per month
includes everything. Two month minimum. 746-6269.
ANNA MARIA 805 Bay Blvd. 3/1, screened porch, sun
room, boat dock. Great view of canal. Completely fur-
nished. Across from bay and two blocks from city pier.
$1000 month plus deposit. 813-985-1965 or 985-1745.
BRADENTON BEACH waterfront duplex. 2/1, w/d
hookups, davits, view of Intracoastal, walk to beach,
carport and central A/C. Annual $700 month. 1st/last/
security. 778-1288.
BEAUTIFUL 2/1 unfurnished ground floor duplex. Two
blocks to beach, cathedral ceilings, skylights, fans,
screened lanai, carport, central A/C. Extras. Must see.
Holmes Beach. $600 month. 778-0413.
SIMPLY CHARMING Newly renovated 3/2 north Anna
Maria cottage. Available Jan. 15. $1700 per month in-
cludes everything. Two month minimum. 746-6269.
MAGNIFICENT 3/2 Anna Maria beachfront home.
Panoramic sunset views of gulf from every window.
Beachfront patio steps to water. Available now and all
1994. All amenities. Hurry!. Wk/Mo/Sn. 778-3171.

ANNUAL Charming 1/1, close to beach. $375 month
plus electric.
SEASONAL Jan. 1 to April 15. Gulffront 2/2, turnkey
furnished. $650 week or $2200 month. Delightful.
HIDEAWAY MANSION Sleeps 10 at the beach. Avail-
able Feb. $650 week or $2400 month.
FISHERMAN'S PARADISE 2/2, elevated on bay with
dock. $1650 monthly. Gulf Bay Realty, 778-7244.

APARTMENT FOR RENT 1/1, furnished. $900 month
seasonal includes utilities. Bradenton Beach. 1.5 blocks to
beach. Quiet neighborhood. Annual optional. 778-9413.
SEASONAL Feb 1 thru June 1.3/1 with bayview, close to
beach. Covered parking, sundecks, big kitchen, w/d, cable
tv, $1,40(0month. 778-9546.


IISLANDE:


FOR RENT 2/2 duplex apartment. West of Gulf Drive.
Three houses from Gulf. Completely furnished. Cen-
tral A/C & heat. Florida room. Yearly fumished $1000
month plus utilities. Seasonal $1520 month plus tax
and utilities. Call Betty Cole 813-778-2422.
UNFURNISHED 1/1, ground floor duplex. Close to
beach. Clean, carpeted, fans plus air. Carport and stor-
age. Annual $400. Available 5606 Carissa St., Holmes
Beach. 778-1017.
HOLMES BEACH 2/2 and 1/1 fumished duplex. Two
blocks to beach and shopping. Covered parking. Sea-
sonal or annual. 778-0468.
VACATION COTTAGE 1/1 Available weekly $400.
Monthly $1200. Includes central heat & air, cable TV
and telephone. Call after 6:00 pm. 778-2832.
LOVELY GUEST HOUSE 2/1,65th St., Holmes Beach.
Newly remodeled with lanai overlooking tropical garden.
One block to beach. Weekly or monthly rates. 778-
3892.
HOLMES BEACH 2/1 unfurnished. One block from
beach. Washer/dryer area available. Annual lease $500
month. 798-9811.
UNFURNISHED ISLAND RENTALS
... Large family home, 4/3, pool, deep water, 104 Peli-
can, $1500 month
... 3/2,307 57th St.., $850 month
... 2/2 loft, Bay Winds, bay and gulf view, $850 month
... 2/2, Perico Bay, $900 month
Neal & Neal Rentals, Inc.
813-778-9477 or 800-422-6325

KEY ROYALE 3/2 pool, dock. New and lovely fur-
nished. Quiet and private. Available Jan. 21 thru Mar.
4. 778-2477.


HOLMES BEACH By owner. 3/3 elevated duplex.
Owner financing available. $169,500. 778-0468.
WATERFRONT 2/2, approx. 2000 sq. ft. home near
beach. Deep canal to Intracoastal. 15 X 30 solar pool.
516 56th St., Holmes Beach. $187,000. 778-2952 for
appointment.
KEY ROYALE 624 Foxworth. 100 ft. canalfront. 3/2.5,
living room, dining room, kitchen with eating area. 2 car
garage. $225,000.778-7837.
BY OWNER Two story brick. 4/2.5 with family room.
Oak floors. Completely renovated. Two car attached
garage. Separate brick studio. Northwest Bradenton.
Best schools. Must see. Call 794-0145.

GULF OF MEXICO home. 3+2+2+. Divorce sale by
owner. New air, appraisal, great walking beach, rock
fireplace, etc. 619-329-0193.

HOLMES BEACH Large 2/2 and 1/1 elevated duplex.
Two block to beach and shopping. $169,500. 778-
0468.

OPEN HOUSE 812 South Bay Blvd. beachfront in
Anna Maria. 3/2 house with one of the finest walking
beaches and gorgeous views. Family room, stone fire-
place, deck, garage and fruit trees. $425,000. Jeanette
Rampone, Michael Saunders & Company 747-2244.


MiBYiSi


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
THE DEADLINE IS NOON ON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in person and paid in advance at our office we do
not invoice or handle credit card charges. Our office is located at 5400A Marina Drive,
in the Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. We're on the corner between D. Coy
Ducks and the laundromat. Hours: 9 to 5, Monday thu Friday, Saturday 9 to 2.
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $4.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $1.50 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 250 per word.
BUSINESS CLASSIFIED:
Minimum $6.50 for up to 3 lines 21 WORDS.
Additional lines: $2 each, Box: $2, One or two line headlines 25o per word.
Call 778-7978 for information and assistance.


778-2586


|


M MA Ry' IKAV


Eve: 778-6771


25% OFF
WITH THIS AD ONLY


S Island Typing Service
SComputer Operated
FAX Service: Send & Receive
NOTARY PUBUC
310 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-8390

y KILTS PIANO STUDIOS
ENROLL NOW for Private Music Instruction
Piano to Keyboard Youth to Adult
Instruction at 6608 Marina Drive
Paulette Kilts Holmes Beach (813) 778-3788

HOLMES BEACH MINI STORAGE
1 MONTH FREE STORAGE with 12 month Pre-Pay
Auto Storage & Office Suite Now Available
SALL SIZES AIR CONDITIONED HUMIDITY CONTROLLED
3018 AVE C Holmes Beach 778-5549


Anna Maria Pest Control


FREE SNOW A
REMOVAL!
Lawn Maintenance
& New Plant
Installation a
Little Extra.
Call David at
778-6972 0


LMES RENTAL

SPACES
AVAI ABLE
BEACH "V'L


BUSINESS


CENTER

C 3 ZONING ...
Office Suites Mini Storage
Retail or Service Units
CALL 778-2924 NOW
5347 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach


Mobile Service Special...
We come to you!

Most Cars $85







AUTO & BOAT DETAILING
WASH WAX SHAMPOO
Engine & Underbody
Leather & Vinyl
Tires & Trim
Every detail is cleaned and protected. Your
car and boat can look like new again ...
and maintain its value!
By appointment, at your home or office.
Most cars $85.
Call mobile service #
356-4649 or 778-9392.


r.


CALL (813)


778-1630


Lic. No. 4467




D3] PAGE 28 M JANUARY 6, 1994 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


island


3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1994


'oods


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


Check Out These Breakfast Coupons ...


"*," 1 ,1ilT)-" I
1 MINUTE MAID-64 OZ. CTN.
ORANGE
JUICE
99 A.
I REGULAR, COUNTRY STYLE
OR CALCIUM FORTIFIED
WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU JAN 11
LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
m--- - -- -----------,


ZI %


~V2 -- -~ - -n-rn-.


LEAF OR ROMAINE
LETTUCE


PORK LOIN CENTER CUT


RED, WHITE, SPANISH
ONIONS


BONELESS CENTER CUT
PORK $299
ROAST LB.




IN OUR DELI
Provolone
Cheese


-$3.LB.


/\
/*


LB.


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK
Every Friday
11A.M. to NOON


COUNTRY STYLE
SPARE $129
RIBS LB.


IN OUR DELI
HARD OR GENOA
SALAMI
& A CtI LB.


BAKERY FRESH
SPLIT TOP
WHITE BREAD


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