<%BANNER%>
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00490
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00490

Full Text


NOVEMBER 11,1993


NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


ISLANDER


Entire Island now

coastal high hazard zone


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
"The state legislature now says that the coastal
high hazard area is everything affected by a category
one hurricane," revealed Gerald Smelt, staff member
of the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council, at a re-
cent forum on comprehensive plan changes. "In your
case it is the entire Island. It went into effect July 1."
Smelt's words had Islandplanning commission mem-


French film
crew hits
the beach
For a brief time this week,
the Island had a new
beach bar at Coquina -
or Quinquina Beach, as it
will befictionalized. The
bar was the backdrop for
scenes from the French
comedy "Seven Sundays,"
being filmed in Manatee
and Sarasota Counties.
Directed by Jean-Charles
Tacchella, starring
Thierry Lhermitte,
Mauicio Nichetti, and
featuring Americans Rod
Steiger, Molly Ringwald
and Susan Blakely, the
film is about two drifters
working to avoid work.
Production crews erected
a pair of beach-ey looking
structures at south
Coquina Beach for the
beachfront scenes last
week, with filming being
done Monday and Tues-
day. Pictured is director
Tacchella in a rare
moment in front of the
camera, and Lhermitte
taking a break while
waiting for another take.
The film is scheduled to be
released in April.
Islander Photos: Paul Roat


bers and elected officials buzzing about implications to new
construction and re-building after a disaster.
Hurricane Agnes in 1972 was a category one storm
which left in its wake 122 deaths and $2 billion in dam-
age. It barely brushed Anna Maria Island but resulted
in evacuation and substantial property damage. A cat-
egory one hurricane has winds of 74-95 mph.
Steve Lardas, chairman of the Anna Maria Plan-
PLEASE SEE HAZARD, PAGE 2


I I l
B1 TA


DOT officials

flip-flop, aren't

sure about

roundabout
The Florida Department of Transportation has erected
a roadblock to thwart Bradenton Beach's plan to install a
traffic roundabout at Bridge Street and Gulf Drive.
DOT officials initially endorsed -in fact, they made
the suggestion almost a year ago- to install a traffic circle
as a means of moving vehicles without the need of a traf-
fic signal, while allowing pedestrians easy access between
Bridge Street and the beach.
Last week, DOT officials in Tallahassee said the
roundabout wasn't big enough for big trucks to negotiate
the turn onto or off Bridge Street.
DOT's suggestion was to make the circle bigger, a
"modification" that Bradenton Beach consultant Richard
Fawley said would wipe out about half of two neighbor-
ing businesses, the Beach Barn and Key West Willy's.
Fawley suggested, and council members unani-
mously approved, a change in traffic use that would use
1st Street North and 3rd Street South as "truck routes" to
and from Bridge Street.
The DOT delay couldn't have come at a worse time
for Bradenton Beach. Work has been underway for about
a month on the redesign of Bridge Street, part of the city's
$500,000 federal grant to revitalize the area.
If the design work is not completed by Nov. 19, work-
ers will have nothing more to do on the street Costs to de-
mobilize the crews have been estimated at $3,000-
$10,000 on a project that has no money in its budget for
emergencies or contingencies.
Fawley said that almost all of the "extras" on the
project, like benches and decorative post-and-cable de-
signs, have already been ordered or delivered. The extras
could have been deleted if DOT officials had voiced their
concerns earlier and extra money could have been allo-
cated to alternative designs.
Why has DOT delayed raising the questions to this
late date?
"This is a classic example of a state agency that's solarge
that even when they want to do something, they can't," was
Bradenton Beach Attorney Alan Prather's comment
Fawley said there was no problem with through ve-
hicles using the roundabout, but the problem as DOT of-
ficials envisioned it was for large semi-trucks southbound
on Gulf Drive turning through the roundabout and then
east onto Bridge Street, or for trucks exiting Bridge Street
and going through the roundabout,,uthbound.
Fawley called the issue a "geometry problem" that DOT
District One officials in Bartow have no problem with, but that
DOT officials in Tallahassee have problems with.
"I believe it is an embarrassment to them," Fawley
said. "It looks like communication on this did not happen
internally."
A decision from DOT has been demanded by
Bradenton Beach officials by Nov. 16.
Although common in Europe, Australia and New
Zealand, roundabouts are uncommon in the U.S. The
roundabout would be the first such traffic configuration
on a state highway in Florida.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Don't talk to anybody! ................. Page 3
Businessman complains............. Page 4
Heritage Days this weekend ....... Page 5
Opinion ...................................... Page 6
The Way We Were..................... Page 7
He's still alive ........................... Page 10
School..................................... Page 16
Streetlife .................................... Page 19
Real estate.......................... ... Page 22


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND







-IG PAGE 2 E NOVEMBER 11, 1993 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Anna Maria businessman feels

short-circuited by city employee


By Jeannie Friedman
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Department of Public Works
has halted renovations to the former Islander newspaper
building on Pine Avenue and local businessman Paul
Horvat is hot under the collar about it.
Horvat came before the city commission last week to
appeal for permission to complete the remodeling project.
Horvat read a three-page statement to the commission
objecting to a stop order issued by the building inspector.
According to Horvat, public works employee Anne
Beck has refused to allow the installation of a circuit
breaker panel to replace an antiquated fuse box.
Beck says that she knows nothing of the circuit
breaker panel but alleges that Horvat, without a permit,
placed a door where a window was supposed to go.
Horvat claims that, even though a $2,500 permit was


issued for the installation of a new air-conditioning sys-
tem, Beck is insisting on an additional permit for the in-
stallation of a circuit breaker panel.
"I was informed that we need to submit sealed cur-
rent blueprints of the entire building and a parking layout
to go to the planning board," Horvat said. "For a lousy
$150 we have to go to the planning board?"
One tenant has already been lost, Horvat said, because
of city imposed hindrances. He stated that he was worried
other tenants will be lost if he has to wait two months to
go before the planning board again.
More than $12,000 has already been spent on phase
one of a three-phase project, according to Horvat.
"We cannot afford to wait two months for the plan-
ning board," he said.
The planning commission will meet later this year on
the matter.


Bridge Street turns HOT with land use changes


A subtle change in land use may be in store for the
Bridge Street area of Bradenton Beach.
As a complement to the $500,000 revitalization
project for the "old town" section of the city, officials are
contemplating a change in zoning to further attract busi-
ness to the area.
Outdoor dining in the area would be permitted, and
residences would be allowed above stores in the plan. The
land use changes are currently under scrutiny by city
council members. The first of two required public hear-
ings was held last week; the final hearing will be Nov. 18.
No opposition to the proposal was voiced in last week's
public hearing.
"It's all geared to the continuity of pedestrian traffic,"
City Planner Bill Brisson told council members of the
zoning changes. City officials have been working toward
developing the Bridge Street area as "pedestrian friendly"
as part of the revitalization effort currently underway, cre-
ating sidewalks and extensive landscaping to encourage
people to get out of their cars and stroll down the former
Main Street of the Island.
The Historic Old Town section of town council


Entire Island now a

coastal high hazard zone
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
ning Commission, said, "That governs everything con-
cerning construction, education, etc.; things that only ap-
plied to the beach area now apply Island wide."
Smelt replied, "By your definition of what used to be
a coastal high hazard area, yes."
Holmes Beach Councilwoman Mary Ellen Reichard
asked, "Would you address the aspect of re-building? This
affects every piece of property on the Island. Are we all
now under the jurisdiction of the DEP [Department of
Environmental Protection] as far as what we're able to do
with our property?"
Smelt replied, "Exactly what types of impacts this is
going to cause needs to be clarified. What you're going
to encounter is what they're encountering in Miami,
where all these homes now have to be elevated. There are
ways of addressing it in your plan, but there are still regu-
lations you're going to have to adhere to.
"It is a substantial change," said Smelt. "You cannot
increase density or intensity in coastal high hazard areas.
Before that was just everything seaward of the coastal
construction control line. Now it's everything from Anna
Maria Sound to the Gulf of Mexico, so anything new has
to meet all the requirements for construction in a coastal
high hazard area."
Smelt told the audience to read the coastal manage-
ment element of Rule 9J-5 of the Florida Administrative
Code and substitute the name of their city where it says
"coastal high hazard area."
"You can't take this in isolation," he stressed. "You
have to read it in light of what's in the whole rule."
"What if a disaster wiped out the Island before the
cities revised their plans to protect themselves against
building regulations that might be required by the new
coastal high hazard designation? Would the regulations
still apply?" asked an audience member.
Smelt replied, "In all three plans there are grandfather
provisions in the land use element We said if you were
rendered non-conforming by the adoption of the plan,


members seemed to like the idea of the Bridge Street area
as being "HOT' is from 1st Street North to 3rd Street
South, bounded by the Gulf and Bay.
Brisson said Bridge Street would continue to have its
more intensive use, with multi-family housing permitted
on the two bordering streets.
"What we've essentially done is allowed all the ex-
isting uses on Bridge Street," Brisson said, "while relax-
ing some uses to allow residences on or behind building
and open air dining."
Among the land use changes proposed:
Allowing development on existing platted lots of
any size, while otherwise maintaining a minimum lot size
of 5,000 square feet;
Allowing residential use behind as well as above
first-story nonresidential uses;
Making specific reference that required perimeter
landscaping be consistent and compatible with landscap-
ing included in the Bridge Street Improvement Plan;
Adding Lot #3 on the north side of Third Street
South to the Gulf Drive Overlay District;
Adding "ramps" to the list of pedestrian access features,


providing transition between buildings and sidewalks;
Adding the statement "or as determined appropri-
ate by City Council during plan review", to provisions
relating to the minimum distance between buildings in the
Bridge Street Overlay District, plus the additional require-
ment for a minimum 25 percent open space;
Changing the code throughout the city to have park-
ing requirements calculated by gross floor area rather than
just floor area;
Changing the perimeter landscaping requirement
from one tree per 50 feet to one per 20 feet;
Adding the statement that outdoor display or sale of
retail merchandise be associated with a principal retail use
that is conducted within a principal structure;
Changing the height of the required buffer fence,
wall or hedge from two to three feet;
Adding publicly owned or operated parking lots as
a special exception use within the area of Historic Old
Town.
The Nov. 18 public hearing on the matter will begin
at 7 p.m. If approved by council members, Brisson said
the changes could take effect by the end of January.


High home Islander Photo: Pat Copeland
This home being constructed within the coastal construction control line on North Shore Drive in Anna Maria
dwarfs the ground level, single family homes that surround it. DEP determines the elevation of structures built
forward of the line. In this case the elevation is 17feet, four inches, making it one of the highest structures in the
city. Other requirements for homes built in this zone include driving pilings, which may add $20,000 or more to the
cost of the home; construction of break away walls; and submission of two sets of engineer's drawings to DEP,
which must approve construction.


basically in terms of density, that you were considered to
be legally non-conforming. What we attempted to do was
address cases where density was reduced and protect the
property owner's right. If your plan addresses legal, non-
conforming uses, that provision would cover that."
Holmes Beach Public Works Director John
Fernandez advises residents not to panic.
"Everything is status quo. I have received no communi-
cation from the state Department of Community Affairs or the
Department of Environmental Protection to do anything dif-
ferently," he noted. "A lot of this is at the discretion of local
government We currently have several rules and regulations
that cover new construction and substantial improvement In
the case of a disaster, if a non-elevated home is damaged more
than 50 percent of its appraised value, it must be elevated. This


is already in effect"
Fernandez noted that in the draft revisions concern-
ing post disaster redevelopment there is language such as
"based on locally determined criteria" and "as deemed
appropriate by the local government."
"In our comprehensive plan and local zoning, we
have regulations that grandfather in many situations," said
Fernandez. "As I see it, they want to limit post-disaster
development. What would change things would be if we
had a hurricane the size of Hugo. It's very hard to antici-
pate what the aftermath would be and what kind of gov-
ernment regulations would be imposed."
According to Fernandez, attorney Patricia Petruff has
been asked to research questions concerning the new des-
ignation and its resulting implications for Holmes Beach.


Bus system

expands
Manatee County Area Transit has extended
Route 5 to include (among other stops) areas on
Longboat Key, including Whitney Beach Plaza and
the Holiday Inn Holidome, 4949 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Riders may transfer to the Sarasota County
Area Transit bus system at the Holiday Inn
Holidome four times daily Monday through Satur-
day.
Manatee County also is starting a Flash Pass re-
duced-fare program that offers unlimited rides for a
set monthly price.
Adults pay $28 per month for the pass; students,
handicapped persons and elderly riders pay $10 per
month.
For information call 749-7116.







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 E PAGE 3 [I-

Don't talk to anybody about anything: Supreme Court


By Paul Roat
A month-old Florida Supreme Court ruling may
change nearly two decades of governance.
Variances, rezonings and special exception proceed-
ings -the stuff which constitutes most local government
land use changes now appear to fall under the umbrella
of "quasi-judicial" proceedings. And that means:
governments must prove that denying a land use
change is not based on arbitrary, discriminatory or unrea-
sonable purposes;
in any challenge of a governmental decision, the peti-
tioner must prove that maintaining the existing land use is
confiscatory and therefore constitutes a taking ofhis property;
any challenge must be held in circuit court, and that


SAM members vow to

continue bridge fight
"Congratulations SAM, you did it. We were great!
We sent a powerful message. I want to congratulate ev-
erybody," said Melody Kramer, president, at last
Saturday's meeting of the Save Anna Maria group.
Kramer was referring to the number of people who
appeared at the two-phase bridge hearings held last week.
She also expressed her pleasure at the content and deliv-
ery of the comments made by those who spoke against the
proposed 65-foot fixed span bridge.
After congratulating members of the anti-mega
bridge group, Kramer urged them to continue their fight
against the bridge.
"Write, write, write, to your local officials and county
commissioners," she said.
She also recommended that SAM members telephone
officials, send telegrams, and go to local meetings and
urge officials to put pressure on the county.
"We've been doing all the work over and over and
over for our officials," she said. "It's time to hold them
accountable."
SAM members plan to attend a Nov. 22 meeting of
the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and are
asking opponents of the bridge to attend and to wear "No
mega bridges" badges and tee shirts. They hope at least
500 people will attend the meeting.


court may base its decision on the record of the rezoning pro-
cess and determine only if that process was conducted using
competent substantial evidence to support the rezoning denial.
Most importantly, and what will have the biggest
impact, is that quasi-judicial proceedings do not allow "ex
parte" communication, or communication outside of the
public hearing.
That means no letters to commissioners about land
use changes.
No talking to commissioners about land use changes.
No questions by commissioners about land use changes.
In short, the only communication between commis-
sioners and ANYONE about a land use change may only
be made during the public hearing on the matter.
The "gag rule" also applies to planning commissioners,
zoning commissioners, and anyone else in government who
would make a decision as a group on a land use change.
The changes, Sarasota City Attorney Dick Taylor
said, reflect the Supreme Court's ruling "that a change has
taken place which is necessary to ensure that local gov-
ernment follow the principles of comprehensive plans as
they are now structured under the State of Florida Growth
Management Act." The act, passed by the Florida Legis-
lature in 1975, mandates comprehensive plans for cities
and counties as a means to allow managed growth.
Prior to the Supreme Court decision, commissioners
could turn down a rezoning based on a decision that the
change would effect the health, safety and welfare of the
community at large. That ruling, the court apparently de-
cided, was too ambiguous.
Taylor has advised commissioners in Sarasota to
"avoid contacts outside of the public hearing process ...
this prohibition would apply to special interest groups
such as neighborhood associations and coalitions attempt-
ing to influence pending matters of a quasi-judicial nature.
In addition... avoid contacts with petitioners, petitioners'
representatives (including lawyers), and members of the
general public who will take a position, the purpose of
which would be to influence the outcome of the matter to
be heard by the City Commission as part of the quasi-ju-
dicial process."
Quasi-judicial proceedings are defined as "rezoning
actions which have an impact on a limited number of per-
sons or property owners, on identifiable parties and inter-


ests, where the decision is contingent on a fact or facts
arrived at from distinct alternatives presented at a hearing,
and where the decision can be functionally viewed as
policy application, rather than policy setting."
The dramatic change in the way government handles
land use issues was prompted by an attempted rezoning by
Jack and Gail Snyder of Merritt Island, in Brevard County.
The Snyders had a half-acre tract of land which was zoned for
single-family homes, although the comprehensive plan al-
lowed 15 units per acre. The Snyders requested a zoning
change, which was denied by the county commission based
on neighbors' complaints of added traffic.
The Snyders took the matter to circuit court, the district
court of appeal and, eventually, the Florida Supreme Court.
In its Oct. 7, 1993 ruling, the Supreme Court stated
that "historically, local governments have exercised the
zoning power pursuant to a broad delegation of state leg-
islative power subject only to constitutional limitations.
"Inhibited only by the loose judicial scrutiny afforded
by the fairly debatable rule, local zoning systems devel-
oped in a markedly inconsistent manner ... and 'zoning
decisions are too often ad hoc, sloppy and self-serving
decisions with well-defined adverse consequences with-
out off-setting benefits."




Anna Maria City
None scheduled
Bradenton Beach
SMonday, 11/15:10 am. Island Transportation
Planning Organization
Holmes Beach
Tuesday, 11/16:7:30 p.m. Council Meeting
Wednesday, 11/17: 9:30 a.m. Barrier Island
Elected Officials
Of Interest
Wednesday, 11/17:10 a.m., State Road 789 Task
Force meeting, Bradenton Beach City Hall


All Island city halls closed Nov. 11,
Veteran's Day







j]j PAGE 4 m NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER




en
ompany
~






E Kneeland Chase, Jr.
Investment Executive
Allen & Company of Florida, Florida's oldest investment brokerage firm, is pleased
to announce Mr. Chase as a new resident to the Anna Maria Island community. Mr.
Chase, a seasoned veteran in the investment business is now a full time resident and
will be pleased to service any of your current or future financial investment needs.
Call 800-950-2526
Allen & Company, established in 1932, is Florida's oldest investment brokerage firm
offering a full range of investment opportunities which include CDs, Treasuries, Money
Markets, Municipal Bonds, Stocks, Mutual Funds, Annuities, Insurance, Financial con-
sulting as well as Financial Blueprints. Member NASD


It's the best news on the Island ...
and you can send it to yourfriends and relatives.
Subscription form on page 7.


SERVING THE ISLANDS 15 YEARS
"Tropical Bugs Need A Tropical Service"
CALL US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
778-1337 778-1913
State Certified/Licensed
,.-^ and Insured, Erny Keller,
\ Island Resident is
Wrf } Owner-Operator .
3010 Avenue C. Suite A
Holmes Beach. FL 34217

Island
PEST CONTROL, INC. F

FULL SERVICE EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR
"Why call for TWO when ONE will do ...?"
EXTERIOR:
Deep Root Dry Fertilization Flea, Ant, Chinch Bug, Mole Cricket Control
We also arrangefor irrigation systems & lawn mowing service.
Raccoon Service (removal, relocation) Rodent Extermination
INTERIOR:
Roaches/Ants Guaranteed 6 mo. Fleas Guaranteed 3 mo.
We can also arrangefor carpet cleaning servicefor you.
CALL FOR LAWN & HOUSE PROTECTION Guaranteed



/AIR CONDITIONING/HEATING
Z SALES & SERVICE
SINCE 1982
UI Q Eg ~CACO 56298


Why heat yourpool with

a heatpump ...?
Clean and safe Efficient Cost effective 50% to 75% less cost than natural
or liquid propane gas 200% more reliable than solar assisted panel systems.
LOWER OPERATING COST MAKES AN AquaCal POOL HEATER
INSTALLED BY
AIR & ENERGY "Call today for a
"AFFORDABLE" ,-, fr a n fHmt,,n t"


AUTHORIZED

c- i- r


778-0773
FPL PARTICIPATING INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR


Commissioners nix water

tax hike, recycling plan


Proposed tax increases by the South-
west Florida Water Management District
(Swiftmud) and for a county recycling
project were unanimously disapproved by
Anna Maria City commissioners last week.
The commission voted on two reso-
lutions that will be forwarded to
Swiftmud and Manatee County officials.
The resolution opposing a tax in-
crease criticizes Swiftmud for over-per-
mitting withdrawal of ground water sup-
plies, failing to develop new water sup-
plies and being over staffed.
The document also asks that the
agency's focus be changed from regula-
tion to the development of new water sup-
plies.
If the tax is imposed, the commis-
sioners want the new revenue to be used
only for the development of new sources
of water as well as aquifer and ground
water recharge, not for increasing staff.
Mayor Ray Simches said, the Anna
Maria City Commission is opposed to tax
increases being imposed by non-elected
officials like the officials of Swiftmud.
The second resolution opposes
Manatee County's proposed mixed mu-


nicipal solid waste (MSW) composting
facility at the Lena Road Landfill. If this
method of garbage disposal goes into ef-
fect, all recyclables would be separated at
the landfill instead of citizens trying to sort
recyclable materials.
The resolution lists the reasons the city
officials are against the recycling plan and
asks county commissioners to find an alter-
native solution which would promote envi-
ronmental integrity, be cost effective and in-
volve citizen participation and education.
The four points of opposition are:
The process of sorting recyclables at
the landfill/plant site results in a contami-
nated end-product.
The proposed MSW program will cost
$8 million per year, whereas curbside recy-
cling and other alternatives have been proven
to be less costly.
The separation of recyclables at the
landfill sends a false message to citizens of
the community relieving them of personal in-
volvement
The City of Anna Maria already has
a workable and financially stable recycling
program that can be expanded to help
meet the state standards.


The burden of proving ownership
of beachfront land at Coconut Avenue
in Anna Maria lies with the man who
claims the property, according to Anna
Maria City commissioners.
John Dooms has said that a pair of
1960-vintage resolutions passed by the
commission vacated the land to his
family. The land is commonly used by
neighbors as a beach access.
Commissioners last week decided
the resolutions are ambiguous and
charged Dooms with proving owner-
ship. The decision went against City
Attorney James Dye's advise of a
settlement, but was endorsed by a con-
tingent of neighbors who have stead-
fastly maintained the beach access is
and should remain public.
Dale Woodland, an outspoken
neighbor of Dooms, outlined four ar-
eas of concern: neither the city attor-
ney nor the city commission should
pursue the vacation of Dooms' prop-
erty (it is his responsibility); the city
should not give city property to any in-
dividual or commercial establishment;
the Coconut Avenue beach access has


It's back to square one for Ed Chiles as
far as the alley vacation adjacent to the Sand-
bar Restaurant is concerned.
Chiles submitted a new petition last
week to vacate an alley near the popular
Anna Maria City restaurant. The vacation
requests the city "vacate, close and abandon"
a 145-foot-long alley parallel to the Gulf
behind the restaurant. The alley has a num-
ber of encroachments from the restaurant,
including part of the main building extend-
ing two feet into the public right-of-way.
The request will have to go through the
planning and commission process. The first
hearing on the vacation has not yet been set
before the planning commission.
Last week's action is the latest in a
series of complicated land transfer re-
quests Chiles has made to the city. He has


been consistently used by both pedes-
trians and vehicles; the beach access
should be returned to public owner-
ship now.
The issue began several months
ago, when Dooms began landscaping
the property at 202 Coconut Avenue.
Review of titles to the land discovered
that the beachfront parcel of the street
had apparently been vacated to
Dooms' family in 1961, and again in
1962. Dooms stated that he owned the
beach access, installed a fence around
the property, and prohibited neigh-
bors' access to the beach via the land.
Upon investigation by Dye and
surveyors, discrepancies were found
between the two resolutions vacating
the property. Dye met with Dooms'
attorney and came up with a settle-
ment: the city would initiate a vacation
action in Dooms behalf, Dooms would
provide a beach access through the
property for neighbors, and neighbors
should refrain from trespassing on the
property until the matter is resolved.
Commissioners and neighbors
both rejected the proposal last week.


previously requested an alley vacation
swap, whereby he would gain use of one
alley near the restaurant in exchange for
giving the city an "exchange" alley farther
away from the main structure.
The previous request, worked out as a
compromise with the planning commis-
sion, was later withdrawn by Chiles due to
what he called a "problematic" concern.
Since the compromise alley exchange was
the only recommendation made by the
planning commission, and since Chiles
did not agree with it, city commissioners
denied the previous request.
The alley vacation petitions appar-
ently are a precursor to expansion of the
restaurant, although Chiles has filed no
plans to the city for any revisions to the
Sandbar.


ISLANDER


Burden of ownership

rests with Dooms: AMC


Here we go again: Chiles requests

alley vacation near Sandbar


I II II I- ,-


I r






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 E PAGE 5 10'


Nashville comes
to Island
"Nashville Now, a
country and western
variety show chuck full of
Island talent, will be the
grand finale for Island
Heritage Week. Looking
forward to the show on
Nov. 19 are Directors
Dottie McChesney (left)
and Art Ballman along
with entertainment
professionals guitarist
John G. Hamilton and
singer Penni Lyn.







Heritage Week


schedule of events


Saturday, Nov. 13, marks the start of
Island Heritage Week, co-sponsored by
the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter and the Artists Guild of Anna Maria.
The fourth annual Heritage Arts &
Crafts Festival will take place on Saturday
and Sunday, Nov. 13 and 14, at the Anna
Maria Island Community Center from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m., both days. Admission is
free to the indoor/outdoor show and hot
and cold food and drinks and children's
game will be available.
On Monday, Nov. 15, from 3:30 to
5:30 p.m. at the center, children in grades
kindergarten thorough fifth-grade are in-
vited to participate in the Artists Guild's
annual Children's Galleria. Ten super-
vised booths offering hands-on art projects
and creations are featured. Children are
encouraged to bring their own canvas


shoes, hats and shirts to decorate.
"Nashville Now" variety show will
mark the grand finale to the fourth annual
Heritage Week on Friday, Nov. 19, at 8
p.m. at the center. An array of Island tal-
ent will be joined by professional song-
stress Penni Lyn and guitarist John G.
Hamilton.
The seven-piece Heritage Week band
will be featured with Island songstress
Linda Greig, the Silver Spurs Country
Dancers, and the Manatee County
Cloggers. Tickets are $4 for adults and $1
for students and are available from the cen-
ter or the Artists Guild in the Island Shop-
ping Center in Holmes Beach.
Raffle tickets for more than 25 exciting
prizes are also available at the center or the
Artists Guild. Each piece of luck can be
purchased for $1 or six tickets for $5.


News about your club and social events are welcome ...
call 778-7978 to find out how you can be included in
The Islander Bystander.


Craft show
designers
Carol Mclntire (left), a
creators of soft sculp-
tures, and Inez Hansen,
known for her wearable
art pieces, are two of
the many local and
statewide artists whose
art will be featured at
Island Heritage Week's
4th Annual Heritage
Arts & Crafts Festival
on Saturday and
Sunday, Nov. 13 and
14.

Islander Photo:
Joy Courtney


City to adopt stiffer building codes


Holmes Beach Public Works Super-
visor John Fernandez said the city will
soon begin revising its building codes due
to new state mandates resulting from Hur-
ricane Andrew.
"We will be updating to a 1993 code,"
explained Fernandez. "Construction codes
will be stiffer because of the mandates, but
we have no choice the state says we


will adopt them. However, I don't see a
significant rise in the cost of construction
resulting from the new codes."
Fernandez said that after his staff
completes the new codes, the council
will have to pass an ordinance adopting
them. This process will include public
hearings. He said the new codes should
be in place, within the next six months.


Dine
out often!
And when you do,
please mention
The Islander
Bystander.


STCburtb of t* Annunation


HOLLY BERRY
BAZAAR
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20
9:30AM to 2PM
Christmas Gifts of Decorations,
Jewelry, PLANTS, Baked Goods,
Cutlery, Toys & Handcrafts, Christmas
Boutique & Raffle. Donuts & coffee in
A.M. Hot Dogs & Dessert in P.M.


4408 GULF DRIVE HOLMES BEACH


3 DAYS ONLY PRE-THANKSGIVING



Take an EXTRA 30% Off
A already reduced merchandise, for values of

X 50% to 75% OFF
on a selection of 1993
Swimsuits Sportswear Dresses


SALE STARTS THURSDAY, NOV. 11
THRU SATURDAY, NOV. 13
" -'s --
n-/n m "c


RESORT WEAR


Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach 778-1161


NEW ARRIVALS


AMI WEST
ANNA MARIA ISLAND, FLORIDA

Sportswear, Swimwear and Accesssories
Alexis Shopping Plaza
9801 GULF DRIVE*ANNA MARIA, FLORIDA. 778-6877
(2 blocks south of the Sandbar)


,L-


& -







i[] PAGE 6 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



No talking allowed
The October ruling by the Florida Supreme Court
regarding government proceedings involving variances,
rezoning and special exceptions is going to have some
serious repercussions especially right now in Anna i|
Maria. Please see the article on page 3.
Mayor Ray Simches and Vice Mayor Doug Wolfe, in
particular, are going to have to do some serious cleaning up.
That is, as in "clean up their act."
There won't be any more situations where the offi-
cials sit down and "hammer out the deal" before it is pre-
sented to council or the public.
As a matter of fact, as in the case of the current Sand-
bar Restaurant's alley vacation request, the neighbors may
not even be able to talk to each other about it. That may
be going too far, but it is clear they will not be able to
lobby the planning commission or the city commission
with their concerns.
No phone calls, no complaints. There can be no com-
munication outside the public hearing between the Sand-
bar, the neighbors, and the public officials.
In the case of the property owner at Gulf Drive and
Coconut Avenue, John Dooms, seeking to enforce a
1960s resolution vacating the street end Wolfe and
Simches won't be meeting with Dooms to resolve the
matter any more. They never should have, though.
According to a letter in the file from Dooms, they met,
but it's not clear whether they met with him together or sepa-
rately. But there certainly won't be any more letters like the
one from Wolfe, confirming what he and Simches obviously
agreed to as the city's intent in the resolutions.
In these matters, the Florida Supreme Court was clear.
The biggest impact is that these quasi-judicial proceedings
do not allow "ex parte" communication, or communica-
tion outside of the public hearing.
Of course, we can still report on the issues of vari-
ances, rezoning and special exception proceedings.
It's just not clear whether or not the officials can read
the story.


New bridge will save
much dinero
To the people who oppose the 65-foot fixed span
bridge on Manatee Ave:
1. How many of you have been to St. Petersburg?
You drove over a 65-foot bridge at the far end of the
causeway?
2. Do you realize the millions of gallons of gas we
will save in the future if we don't have to wait for one little


ISLANDER aI
NOVEMBER 1 1, 1993 VOLUME ONE, NUMBER 51
Editor and Publisher
Bonner Presswood
V Editorial
Joy Courtney, Features Editor
Paul Roat, News Editor
Pat Copeland
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Jack Egan
Jeannie Friedman
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Tomara Kafka
Kay Pruden
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Darla Becker
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Susan Runfola
V Production
Mike Atwood
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Darla Becker
Gene Rodgers
Mary Stockmaster




With a lot of help from our friends. 0 1993
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5400A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
FAX 813 778-9392 PHONE 813 778-7978
4 L I .i U V -.' t . u f. .J U* u I U' U c U a . u .i t


SLICK By Egan


lousy sailboat to sail through and that we would save over
$100,000 a year in salary savings?
3. Hope you don't have an emergency as I did when
I had severe ant poisoning. When we arrived at Blake
Hospital, the doctor said, "Another half-hour and you
would have been critical."
John Bacich, Anna Maria
Not building new bridge will cost
There are hidden costs to not building the proposed
65-foot fixed span bridge.
Those are the costs of the relief efforts, food, cloth-
ing and lodging which will be needed to rebuild a "nor-
mal" lifestyle for Islanders, after a major storm surge
wipes out Anna Maria Island. All this will be at the ex-
pense of the taxpayer.
Years ago I was an invited guest to a committee that
was to determine how much it would cost the taxpayers
to provide a "normal" lifestyle for one person. At that
time, in 1974, it came to $24,000 per a family of 2.75
persons. The amount could have only increased over the
last 20 years.
We must address saving lives. The Island is crowded
and most of the crowd is "us." Height is a minimal con-
sideration get us off the Island in time.
Pat Imperato, Palm Harbor and Holmes Beach

Old law stopping
school bus service
Florida State Statute Chapter 234 is allowing public
school systems around the state to cancel bus transporta-
tion for grade school students who live within two miles
of their school.
This statute became apparent to us parents of Gardens
of Gulf Cove in Port Charlotte, Fla., when on Aug. 25 of
this year we were informed that our children no longer had
a school bus to ride to school.
Statute Chapter 234 was written in 1939, and
amended in 1981. It states that children who live within
two miles from school must walk to school unless there
are no existing walkways (walkways include sidewalks as
well as bike paths) and have a minimum of 360 cars com-
ing at them per hour.
This is a law that has put Charlotte County grade
school students atrisk and is being "dusted off" as a cost-
4 aU B. U d us .'4 L


saving measure throughout Florida's public school sys-
tems. A statewide study done by Betty Castor's office
revealed the state could not amend the two-mile rule to
one mile because it would cost $80 million, which would
have to "come out of the classrooms."
If you have a school transportation system transport-
ing students who live within two miles of your schoolss,
be aware it can be canceled at any time.
We parents formed a grassroots campaign,
B.U.S.I.N.G., Better Understanding for Safety Involving
Neglected Gradeschoolers, to propose changes to Chap-
ter 234. We have the support of two state legislators, but
have been told that if the entire state is not interested in
changing the law, changes to 234 "will not fly." We need
your help to protect all grade school students of Florida.
Our top recommendations are:
1. Change limit from two miles down to one mile.
2. Change the criterion for determine "hazardous walk-
ing" to include the hazards that exist in suburban and rural
areas and add "two local parents" to the state's definition of
the school boards' Hazardous Walking Committees.
3. Require schools to have a call-back system in place
for absent students of parents who have not called in an
absence and provide a comprehensive educational pro-
gram for walking children to avoid hazards particular to
their community and route.
We need you to write your state senators and repre-
sentatives telling them you want the proposed changes to
234 to be enacted. Contact us for a copy of Florida Stat-
ute 234 and our proposed changes by writing
B.U.S.I.N.G., 13532 Romford Ave., Port Charlotte, Fla.
33981 or by calling Melissa Hunt at (813) 698-0904 or me
at (813) 698-0433. We are working mothers, so please call
back if there is no answer.
Mary Gundry, Port Charlotte
On writing letters to the editor
The Islander Bystander welcomes letters to the edi-
tor on any subject or issue. All letters are considered for
publication, but we cannot guarantee when or if a given
letter will be published. Letters that receive top priority are
concise, timely and of interest to the community.
Full first and last names, telephone numbers and correct
addresses must be given. Send your letters to Editor, The Is-
landerBystander,5400A MarinaDr;,Holmes Beach 34217.











THOSE WERE THE BAYS
Part 8, What's In a Name
by June Alder


Restored Gamble Mansion is now a popular tourist attraction.


THE SWEET LIFE


On the banks of the placid Manatee
River there once was a genuine southern
plantation community that could have been
right out of "Gone With the Wind."
On the broad north bank was Vir-
ginia-born bachelor Robert Gamble's
Doric-columned mansion on 3,450 ver-
dant acres, sweet- smelling with eucalyp-
tus, pine and cypress trees-and the heavy
aroma of molasses and sugar in the mak-
ing. Up to 160 slaves built the splendid
house for Gamble in the 1840s and toiled
in his sugar cane fields.
On the south bank of the river
Gamble's friend, Dr. Josph Braden, also
had a vast plantation. Together Gamble
and Braden created what was Florida's
largest sugar and molasses producing lay-
out prior to the Civil War.
Both mansions were the scene of
glamourous social gatherings in their hey-
days, but the sweet life came to an end for
Gamble when the sugar market fell and he
was forced to sell his property. Other
owners operated the sugar mill until near
the end of the Civil War. A company of
Union soldiers headquartered at Egmont
Key (the bay was blockaded throughout
the conflict) came up the river in 1864 and
laid waste to Gamble's elaborate sugar
works. The sugar industry in Manatee
County died then, never to be revived.
But the incident which made the man-
sion famous occurred in 1865. For two
weeks it was the secret hiding place of
Confederate Secretary of State Judah P.
Benjamin when he was being hunted by
victorious Union authorities. Archibald
McNeil and his family occupied the man-
sion at the time. McNeill and his friend,
Captain Fred Tresca, (both men had been
skillful blockade runners) spirited Ben-
jamin away to Key West, and eventually
Benjamin reached England where he be-
came a legal advisor to Queen Victoria.


Eight years later Major George Patten,
a wholesale cotton merchant of Savannah,
Ga., bought the plantation at auction for
delinquent taxes of $3,500. Patten sold off
much of theland and named the community
that grew up there, Ellenton after his
daughter, Mary Ellen.
The Braden plantation had a colorful
history, too.
In April 1856, at the beginning of the
Seminoles' final desperate resistance to
deportation to the West, Indians were
spied in the woods surrounding the man-
sion and a shoot-out took place. None of
the occupants of the "castle" was hurt,
but the Indians made off with three mules
and a number of slaves. Pursuing soldiers
later shot two of the Seminole band and
brought their scalps back for display-
"evidence that the Indians had been con-
verted to good Indians."
Thereafter, Dr. Braden sheltered
many of the residents along the river in a
stockade he put up about where the
Bradenton Central Library is today.
When William Iredell Turner later
opened a general store on the site of the
"fort" he honored the good doctor by
applying for a post office designation in
his name in 1878. The only thing was,
Turner was not a good speller. He mis-
spelled Braden's name, not once, but
twice in his application to Washington.
So the town was known as
"Braidentown" until the "i" wasofficially
removed in 1904. The "w" came out in
1924, giving us today's Bradenton.
Braden castle survived the Indian
wars, but succumbed to a woods fire in
1905. Its ruins can be seen today, en-
closed by a barbed wire fence in the
midst of a retirement community built on
the spot where once holiday "tournament
races" were held on the green banks of
the Manatee River.




Next: Old
Palma
Sola


Only a few ruins pf Braden Castle can,be seen today.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER. NOVEMBER 11,-1993 E PAGE 7 i[


:R E LAX!,
We can help!
o





FATCAT

Carpet Upholstery Cleaning


Dry Foam, Dries astW

We never use steam!


We have happy customers ...
"You came highly recommended and
now I see why. Our furniture and
carpet looks wonderful!"
Margie Carpenelli Palmetto


Clean Carpet Looks Better & Lasts Longer


.S
"^-;


For fast, thorough, friendly service
- call me Jon Kent, Island resi-
dent and owner of Fat Cat. Call
778-2882, 8 AM to 5 PM.
CALL TODAY!


MEMBER: ANNA MARIA & LONGBOAT KEY CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE




WE ARE


MAILING!

We mail the Islander Bystander weekly for a nominal $26 per year. It's
the perfect way to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island.
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community
happenings, people features and special events ... even the latest real es-
tate transactions ... not to mention advertising from businesses that you
need to stay in touch with if your "heart is on the Island." We're the only
newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is a free, community newspaper, and if you
live here, you'll never have to pay to get the Island news. But if you don't
live here and you would like to subscribe, please fill out the form below
and mail or prop off at our office with a check in the proper amount.

BULK MAIL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS START DATE:


O One Year: $26
1st Class Mail and
E One Year: $125


U 6 Months: $18 O 3 Months: $10
Canadian Subscriptions:
1 6 Months: $75


NAME
ADDRESS


CITY


STATE ZIP


SISANDER
MAIL OR DROP IN PERSON TO:
THE ISLANDER/BYSTANDER
THE FREE VOICE OF ANNA MARIA ISLAND
5400A Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217
We're located right between D. Coy Ducks and
Sthe Holmes Beach laundromat in the Island Shopping Center.
* a
il**agai.EgEEEaimaE giiMWm. aga.m iaMmu ilmiu giag


L -1


~s~--is~~h;
CC~eop.
II a.


I








IIlj] PAGE 8 W NOVEMBER 11, 1993 W THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
I I ~ Crm rehenskiv nlan charnges


Pleiades Press / Studio Graphics Workshop
Barbara Neustadt

SShowcase o0 Unique
S Museum Quality Etchings
Works on handmade paper for
descr;imnating collectors of Amercan Art
3014 Avenue C Holmes Beach, Florida (813) 778-2466
-- By Appointment


Choose
.... .Art!
20% OFF
SArt Prints
toDec. 1


PHOENIX FRAME

Custom Framing
Art Supplies
5306 Holmes Boulevard
Holmes Beach
778-5480






509 Pine Ave., Anna Maria
Open Tues.-Sat. 10-5 Closed Mon. & Wed.
Extended Sunday hours 11-5
For Early Christmnas Shopping
An Art Gallery exhibiting
an extensive collection by the
most talented Florida Artists.
Painting, Sculpture,
Three Dimensional Art,
Glass & Pottery.
778-4655


lengthy, complex


THE BROWN PELICAN


GIFT SHOP
NOW SERVING
French Market" Coffee
Soap Sets Pewter Miniatures Jewelry
Many Items on Sale!
9908 Gulf Drive Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
Mon thru Sat 10 to 5 778-1645


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
Island planning commissioners got a preview of the
looming battle to review and revise their comprehensive
plans from a member of the Tampa Bay Regional Plan-
ning Council recently.
Planning commissioners from the three Island cit-
ies met with Gerald Smelt of the TBRPC staff to discuss
a draft of comp plan changes recommended by the state
Department of Community Affairs (DCA), which must
review and approve each city's comp plan. Changes will
be adopted by DCA by the end of the year, said Smelt.
"Your comp plans will be undergoing some fairly
substantial revisions as a result of the past legislative ses-
sion," explained Smelt "Particularly, we're talking
about the Environmental Land Management Study
(ELMS) III Committee recommendations. That set of
recommendations came out of Governor Chiles' call to
revise the growth management statute after complaints
that the process was not sensitive to local government,
that there was no vision and that all the plans were ba-
sically cookie cutter."
Smelt said the following draft changes to state leg-
islation will have the greatest impact on the Island
communities and will have to be adopted as amendments
to each plan:

Coastal Management
"The purpose of this element is to plan for, and,
where appropriate, restrict development activities where
such activities would damage or destroy coastal re-
sources, and protect human life and limit public expen-
ditures in areas that are subject to destruction by natu-
ral disaster."
"Major impact," said Smelt. "In all three jurisdic-
tions on Anna Maria Island, the coastal high hazard area
was identified as everything seaward of the coastal con-
struction control line. The legislature adopted a new defi-
nition, which how says that the coastal high hazard area
is everything affected by a category one hurricane. In
your case it is the entire Island.
"I asked one of the members of the ELMS Commit-
tee, 'Do you realize what this change means?' The re-
sponse was that it came in toward the end of the process,
and no one really thought through what it meant Now
they realize what that change in definition can mean,"
said Smelt.
The term coastal area is also being redefined in this el-
ement to read, "Coastal area means the 35 coastal counties
and all coastal municipalities within their boundaries desig-
nated by the state land planning agency."
Smelt pointed out that a new portion concerning
dredge spoil sites is being added to this element. It re-
quires cities to identify on their existing land use maps
any existing and future dredge spoil disposal sites.

Housing
"The purpose of this element is to provide guidance
to local governments to develop appropriate plans and
policies to demonstrate their commitment to meet iden-
tified or projected deficits in the supply of housing. These
plans and policies address government activities as well
as provide direction and assistance to the efforts of the
private sector."
"When we were writing the original plans (for the
Island cities), there was a question about what is afford-
able housing," said Smelt. "It's become deeper than that.
In the original plans you had to address low and mod-
erate income housing, and now you're going to have to
address very low and moderate housing. This also calls
for an affordable housing needs assessment.
According to Smelt, this element was re-written be-
cause DCA discovered that "when the original plans
were done, everybody was saying, 'We don't have an af-
fordable housing problem; everything is fine here.' Pro-
jecting ahead the rate of growth in the mid-80s, every-
one just kept moving that forward, while we've discov-
ered with the recession that all those projections did not
occur. They attempted to bring some reality into the
housing element"
Smelt said the cities could work with the county to
meet the provisions of very low income housing.

Transportation
"A local government which has all or part of its juris-


diction included in a designated Metropolitan Planning Or-
ganization (MPO) are pursuant to s. 339.175, shallprepare
and adopt a transportation element consistent with the pro-
visions of this rule and Chapter 163, Part II. The transporta-
tion element shall replace the plan elements of. traffic circu-
lation; mass transit; ports; aviation and relatedfacilities; cir-
culation of recreational traffic; and off street parking facili-
ties as provided in this chapter.
Within a designated MPO area, the transportation el-
ements of the local plans shall form the basis for the ur-
ban area transportation plan of the MPO. The MPO plan
shall be designated to reflect and support the goals, ob-
jectives and policies of the various local comprehensive
plans. The purpose of the transportation element shall be
to plan for a multi-modal, multi-option transportation
system which places emphasis on public transportation
systems in a manner that promotes energy efficient devel-
opment patterns, protects air quality and provides more
efficient mobility of residents and goods."
"You'll have to re-write your traffic circulation ele-
ment to be consistent with this new rule," said Smelt This
speaks to mass transit, parking, bicycle paths all have
to be addressed."

Intergovernmental coordination
"The Intergovernmental Coordination Element shall
establish a process to determine if development propos-
als would have significant impacts on other local govern-
ments or state or regional resources or facilities identi-
fled in the applicable state or regional plan."
"In this case, they've tacked onto the existing rule
provisions for an intergovernmental process," explained
Smelt. "With this particular portion of the rule, it might
be worthwhile for all three Island cities to work together
to write a common element. You also have to deal with
the county and Longboat Key. This process involves all
adjacent jurisdictions, because what takes place on the
other side of the water affects you."
Smelt said the element also calls for the development
of a dispute resolution process. The cities may adopt the
TBRPC's process or develop their own.

Concurrency management
"The purpose of the concurrency management system
is to establish an ongoing mechanism which ensures that
public facilities and services needed to support develop-
ment are available concurrent with the impacts of such
development."
"In many ways this isn't going to affect you because
of your size," said Smelt. "Many of these provisions aren't
going to apply, but you do have to have the basic concept
in place. This rule is 20 pages long."

Evaluation and Appraisal Report
"The purpose of the evaluation and appraisal report is
to assess and evaluate the success or failure of the local
government's comprehensive plan, including the validity of
the projections, the realization of the goals and objectives,
implementation of the plan's policies, reflection of changes
in state and regional policies on planning and growth man-
agement and thorough adoption of related amendments, to
update the local government's comprehensiveplan to address
the issues raised in the report"
"Basically it says to look at your plan and see if you
have achieved what you wanted to achieve by the dates
identified," said Smelt. "The regional planning council
will have to rewrite the regional policy plan, so your plan
will also have to reflect those changes. We're talking
about almost rewriting your comprehensive plan."
Smelt pointed out that the report must contain appro-
priate statements, including data, analysis and conclusion,
using words, maps, illustrations, schedules or other geo-
graphic formats that address, at a minimum, the follow-
ing:
Major problems of development timing, infra-
structure and financial feasibility
Major problems or physical deterioration public
buildings and facilities, commercial and industrial struc-
tures and housing stock
Location of land uses
Social and economic effects of the problems iden-
tified above
Condition of each element of the comprehensive
plan at the time of adoption
PLEASE SEE COMP PLAN, NEXT PAGE


The Hair Cottage, etc. .
FULL SERVICE SALON
--



invite you to
DISCOVER THE FEELING OF JOICO
5500 "IN A WORD,
Marina Dr. It's
Holmes Bch. Unforgetable."
Florida Facials by
34217 appointment.
778-6868
Gift Certificates Available


I






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 I PAGE 9 I[]


Bradenton Beach City
Council members agreed
last week to hold a special
workshop session to
discuss the city'sfishing
pier in an effort to improve
operations. The action
came at the suggestion of
a Bradenton winter visitor.
J.Islander Photo: Paul Roat







Bradenton Beach pier


'unpolished jewel'


Lou VonVille likes the Bradenton Beach Fishing
Pier, but thinks it could be better.
The Columbus, Ohio resident spends his winters in
the area, and likes to fish off the area's piers. VonVille was
a regular at the Bradenton Beach pier for quite a while, he
said, but changed his allegiance to the Rod and Reel Pier.
'I asked myself why," he told the BradentonBeach City
Council last week. "Your pier has more fish, prettier scenery,
less driving, the same parking. The Bradenton Beach pier had
as much going for it, if not more, than elsewhere."
VonVille described the pier as "an unpolished jewel,"
and offered suggestions to council members on how to
polish it.
The retired business consultant said city officials
should view sightseers as potential customers. He urged
council members to revisit the pier with that thought in
mind, and suggested all signs that prohibit be removed.
All residents should be encouraged to be "ambassa-
dors of good will" at the pier. An informational brochure
should be created to explain the history and services of the
pier, VonVille suggested.


As to physical changes, he said drilling holes in the
pier for fishing poles would be a good first step. Placing a
sign at the end of Bridge Street describing the pier, with
another sign over the pier entrance, would serve to draw
more customers. VonVille said the signs should be of a
rustic nature in keeping with the pier, and should welcome
both fishermen and sightseers. Damaged pier railings and
benches should be repaired as well.
Free buckets for live bait should be offered, and
unique menu items at the pier's restaurant could be of-
fered. "Uniqueness is the key here," he said.
As a way to keep fishermen coming to the pier,
VonVille suggested installation of fish cleaning facili-
ties, fishing lessons by local charter boat captains, and
perhaps pictures of the week's biggest catch.
Finally, he suggested raising the fee to fish at the
pier from 50-cents to 75-cents but only if the im-
provements are made.
City council members said they would schedule a
special workshop soon to discuss the pier and
VonVille's suggestions.


Outrage caused a resident to withdraw his request to
operate a gun dealership out of his home in Anna Maria City.
T.H. Cole asked the Anna Maria City Commission to
issue a home occupational license, which would allow
him to operate a weapons business from his residence.
"It would be unlikely that I would sell guns. I want the
license because there are certain advantages to being a dealer.
Dealers get certain privileges at gun shows," said Cole, who
collects weapons and attends gun shows as a hobby.
SBut several members of the community adamantly
opposed the request.
"I'm appalled at the idea," one resident said. "With
the crime rate in the state and the nation, this motion is un-
acceptable."
Other citizens voiced concern that unsavory Charac-
ters would be drawn to the city if word got out that guns
were being sold on the Island. Although Cole insisted that


CONTINUED FROM PRECEDING PAGE


Condition of each element of the comprehensive
plan at the time of the report
Comparison of the plan's adopted objectives with
actual results
Unanticipated and unforeseen problems and oppor-
tunities which occurred since adoption.
Effect of changes in state comprehensive plan, re-
gional policy and comprehensive plan legislation on the
local comprehensive plan
Identification of any needed actions to address the
planning issues raised in the report with five and 10-year
time frames
Identification of proposed or anticipated plan
amendments to address or implement the identified
changes
Description of the public participation process used
in the preparation of the report
Holmes Beach must have this report completed by


he would not advertise or promote his business and
would probably not sell his weapons, the permit would
have allowed him to do so if he wished.
Chairman of the Code Enforcement Board Tom Turner
defended Cole's request.
"A person should not be discouraged from having
a hobby," he said.
Commissioner Dorothy McChesney made a motion
that the request for the permit be denied. The motion was
seconded by Commissioner George McKay.
"We should not have such a business in our city,"
McChesney stated.
Cole then requested that his motion be withdrawn,
but before he left he had a message for the crowd:
"A law should be passed to require everyone to have
a gun," he said. "If you don't have a gun in your home,
you should have one." His statement was booed loudly.


May.1996. Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach have un-
til the year 2000 to complete theirs.

Vision statement
Smelt said ELMS III recommended that each local
government develop a vision statement.
"What it is calling for is three steps," he said. "You need
to assess where you are, what you want to be and how to get
there. For the three Island cities, it might be wise to write a
vision for the Island, recognizing that each city has its own
characteristics that need to be protected."
Smelt said participation from political, business and
civic leaders; environmentalists; citizens and developers is
essential to formulating the vision statement. All must be
included in the process and come to a consensus at the end.
"The vision statement has to be consistent with your
plan," he said. "Write your plan, then when you revise your
plan, revise it to reflect your vision statement. Then you've
got the foundation for any amendments you make to your
plan above and beyond these that are called for."


A UAiR- 5ALOr,4
sOo rr"OOoC
000000000ooo

000000 C
0000 o
1oooc ^ \ooooc
DOOOO oc
S00
0ooc
0000000
n - nor


Style Artist
* Style/Image Consulting
* Photography Make-Up/Hair
* Private Studio Atmosphere
"A Drive Worthwhile"

inuiiu609


'~'2L

~f~


Beautiful

WARM-UP

SUITS

Straight
Leg Style
with no
zipper
at ankle
ALSO -

Many other
styles in
Great Fall
Colors!


lr^^un


, eoc- h --
Island Shopping Center 5418 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach 778-2169


'
i:'
h'S~.
"

t


Commission blown away by gun

dealer's request


Comprehensive plans lengthy, complex


"Miracles" of the Sea
S Everything Under "Creation"
6011 Cortez Rd. W., Bradenton 794-6196
"CASH & CARRY"SPECIAL 498
A COLORFUL, FRESH FLOWER
THANKSGIVING CENTERPIECE
WE SELL Visit Our Year-Round CHRISTMAS SHOP
FLORIDA Featuring Annalee Character Figures
LOTTERY and From Our Florist Shop
TICKETS FRESH & SILK FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS
Plus Our Famous SHELL & DRIFTWOOD
WEACCE-P MOS DESIGNS SHELLS GIFTS JEWELRY
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS



... you will love our Shop...
WE SELL IT FOR YOU '
ANTIQUES FURNITUREf
*LADIES AND CHILDREN'S
CLOTHING
& FURNITURE
5712 MANATEE AVE.
BACK AREA OF FACTORY CARPET OUTLET
MON FRI 9:30-5 SAT 9:30-2 79-3257

Social News is always welcome at

I SLANDE i"a'11
call 778-7978.

r--< i i ii -IF=_ i r =f -1





Ladies & Men's Wear

~ SWEATER

SALE
50% OFF Men's 100% Cotton Pullovers
50% OFF Ladies' select group of
Jeweled Holiday Sweaters
30% OFF Ladies' Coat-Style Cardigans
S& S Plaza, Holmes Beach 778-4505


S.-.- -






EIM PAGE 10 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


'I believe he's still alive'


By Tomara Kafka
Islander Correspondent
The two eyewitnesses reported that
Maj. John O'Grady's wounds were only
superficial when he parachuted down to a
mountian ridge just miles from the tiny
village of Ban Ba Loc, North Vietnam.
That was April 10, 1967.
O'Grady's plane had been shot down
in one of many bombing missions close to
the Ho Chi Minh trail. The cluster of four
planes was headed back from the direction
of Hanoi. O'Grady's was the only one to
get hit, and he had to eject from his
doomed aircraft. The last American who
saw O'Grady was another pilot who re-
ported his parachute had opened and
O'Grady was headed toward the tree-lined
mountainside.
On landing, the tangled cords of his
own silk parachute tied O'Grady's hands
behind him ironically, he was already
imprisoned before local militiamen found
him. Ho Huan and Ho Cam were among
the small group who took his identifica-
tion, gun, parachute, a few other items and
shared his last pack of cigarettes.
Ho Huan and Ho Cam, as well as five
other men, fashioned a temporary litter out
of two poles and a straw mat to transport
O'Grady to the village of Y Leng, where
they handed him over to the regular North
Vietnamese army.


Vietnamese-American intrepreterNgaThoung Van Le talks (left) to the eyewitness,
Ho Huan, who captured Maj. John O'Grady and turned him over to the North
Vietnam army in the village of Y Leng 26 years ago. Patricia Parsels (right) asks
questions of Huan through the interpreter.


Huan and Cam later reported that
O'Grady suffered a cut behind his ear and
a broken leg.
The official storyis that O'Grady died of
serious injuries four hours after his capture.
But 26 years after his capture, Maj.
John O'Grady's eldest daughter, Patricia
O'Grady Parsels now feels she has proof
from reliable and first-hand sources that
the official report is not true.
"I have a very strong feeling that he is


still alive," she says with conviction.
Like the parachute cords that bound
O'Grady as prisoner, government reports
and information sent to the Parsels over
the years, as well as many other families
of soldiers listed as POW (Prisoner of
War) or MIA (Missing in Action), remains
a tangled and twisted web of miscommu-
nication and a self-imposed, locked-up
system of misinformation.
Federal records remain classified, and


Parsels said what little communications pro-
vided often is contradictory and unreliable.
Parsels took her family and a few
extra people to Vietman in March. The
purpose of the trip was to untangle some of
the contradictions and to visit the last-known
site before O'Grady's disappearance.
The travelers consisted of the Parsels
family: Patricia O'Grady Parsels; John
Parsels, her husband and a former three-
year Vietnam POW himself; Eamonn, 11
years old; and Amanda, 10 years old,
Parsels' son and daughter.
Also accompanying the Parsels family
were several professionals to help with this
historic journey: Sydney Schanberg, the
pulitzer prize-winnning journalist (his book
was the basis for the Academy Award-win-
ning movie The Killing Fields), who would
write a three-part series of the trip for New
York Newsday which appeared in August;
and two Vietnamese-Americans, Chong
Xiong and NgaIhoung Van Le, who served
as interpreters.
It was not an easy trip. Nor was it cheap.
The flight to Hanoi took 12 hours.
The first jeep into the rugged terrain of
Vietnam took 18 hours and the second
jeep trip was an eight-hour ride.
Patricia wanted her children Amanda
and Eamonn to go on this intensely rugged
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


The package you've been waiting

for has finally arrived!



This is the newest and most exciting
service to be offered by Paragon Cable!
With the PARAGON PACKAGE you


get:


xpiuorme secrems-,
Hollywood's special effects wizards.



MOVIE MAGIC


THURSDAYS 9 PM




EXPLORE YOUR WORLD


* Standard Cable Service
*HBO
* A Pay-Per-View Box
* A remote control


ALL FOR ONE LOW PRICE

ORDER NOW & YOU'LL RECEIVE
Cable Installation on 2 Outlets* FREE!
A Remote Control FREE!
(as long as you staying the Package)
Two Pay-Per-View Movie Coupons* FREE!

CALL 748-1822


PARAGON
C A B L E


Installation offer available in cabled areas only. Residential applications only. Other restrictions may apply. FCC Regulation may effect prices. Installation qn interior walls maybe additional charge.*You must ask for this offer to receive it, Expiration date 11.13 93


You


can

win

big





if you play
The
Islander
Bystander
Football
Contest on
page 14.


THE MAGIC CLOSET ,i
Resale Shop
June, July & August
Consignments REDUCED
25%, 35% & 50%
Now Accepting Consignments in Good Condition
* 778-8375 *
Consignment Business By Appointment Only
5344 Gulf Drive (next to Holmes Beach Post Office)


Shop for carpet at home AND
SAVE money with Carpet Network!
Now Carpet Network brings you the easy and economical way to
find the perfect carpet-right in your own home. With our mobile
showroom, we bring more than 1,200 carpet samples to you.
Carpet Network is a national chain, so we get volume discounts-and
pass the savings on to you. We carry a full line of ceramic tile and
vinyl too. The convenience of shopping at home is free!
CARPET Call now.
L N.ETT/ORK We'll be right over!
.. 778-7311
-d I-Z W U K ,r y


SFancy That
Craft Consignments
Over 100 Local Artisans
for you to choose your
Holiday Gifts & Decorations
795-2677
Mon. 10-3 Tues. &Wed. 10-7 Thurs.-Sat. 10-5
8108 Cortez Rd. W. Bradenton Closed Sunday






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 PAGE 11 IE


CONTINUED FROM PROCEEDING PAGE
but very important Vietnam trip for several reasons. "It was
a gesture of goodwill," explains Patricia. "Vietnam is a fam-
ily-oriented society. Children are important to them." She had
done her research and felt that the children could help with the
diplomatic relations on the trip. And those on a high level in
the Department of Defense backed her up. "They were indi-
rect but enthusiastic that we bring the kids."
Language was a barrier and the cultures divergent, but
Amanda and Eamonn played their parts well. "Kids are
kids every place," says Patricia. "There is a language of
children that creates an instant comraderie. The rapport
was amazing."
Eamonn explains how his mother taught some of the
Vietnamese children to sing songs like "Farmer in the
Dell," but what they learned and loved to repeat, he says,
was "Hello, hello, hello. Good-bye, good-bye, good-bye."
But there were plenty of meetings with Vietnamese dig-
nitaries, too, and the children had to behave through many
difficult hours. "They understood the seriousness of it," says
Patricia about her 10-year-old daughter and 1 I-year-old son.
"They were perfect Kids sort of rise to the occasionn"
The decision to go was not an easy one. The trip had
a huge price tag. But the Parsels knew it was time to go
when they found out about the eyewitnesses to her father's
capture. "We had to sell the house that John had owned
for years and years in Bradenton," explained Patricia in
order to help finance the $20,000 trip.

Anser 3ffiemnrial GTmmuniti qTlurcr
The Rev. An Interdenominational Christian Church
Frank W. Serving the Community Since 1913
Hutchison,
Saor 10 AM ................... Sunday Worship
10 AM .................. Children's Church
S 6:45 PM Saturday Seaside Worship

S 512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
S-- Transportation & Nursery Available
Come, Celebrate Christ 778-0414


Patricia O'Grady Parsels with daughter Amanda, son
Eamonn and husband John.
John Parsels had lived in Bradenton since he was 15
years old, and is a graduate of Southeast High School. His
mother and father still live in Sarasota, and his sister is a
Bradenton businesswoman.
Parsels was captured in the Vietnam War in 1970
when his Huey helicopter crashed. Three years and many

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING SERVICES

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Saturday 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.


r~~~~~ -~~~ --~~ --I

Se Financial Education Workshops
at the Island Branch of the Manatee County Library
S 5701 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach

I All workshops begin at 10:15 am
Saturday Tuesdays Topic
Nov. 13 Nov. 16 Financial Strategies For The Nineties
Dec. 11 Dec. 14 Tax Strategies-Keeping More Of What You Earn
Jan. 8. Jan. Estate Planning Not Just For The Wealthy
Feb. 12 Feb. 15 Advanced Investment Strategies: Beyond The Basics
Mar. 12 Mar. 15 What's So Taxing About Annuities?
Apr. 9 Apr. 12 Seven Biggest Mistakes People Make With Their Money
May 14 May17 Making The Most Of Your Retirement Dollars
June 11 June 14 Funding Options For A Child's Education
July 9 July 12 Mutual Funds How They Work, Are They For You?
Aug. 13 Aug. 16 Insurance What Do You Need?
Sept. 10 Sept. 13 Straight Talk About Investments And Investing
Oct. 8 Oct. 11 Financial Planning For Single People
In order to provide adequate seating and workshop materials, reservations may be made in person at the Library.
(sign up sheet at circulation desk) or by calling 755-7000.
0 Clip and Save for workshops in 1994.
L :r -- .. __ """"""~,-"-- __--,----- ------ -


POW camps later, he was released after the signing ofthe
Peace Accords in 1973. Dubbed "Operation Homecom-
ing," Parsels was among the 591 prisoners sent back to the
United States and claimed by both sides to be last remain-
ing POWs in Vietnam.
Both Patricia and John were working on the high levels
of MIA/POW movement in Washington, D.C. in the 1980s
when they met They both served on the board of directors for
the National League of Families, a Washington-based MWA
POW organization. Together they have worked with groups
such as Grassroots America, the Live POW Committee, the
National Forget-Me-Nots, and the National Alliance ofFami-
lies of POWs/MIAs. Together they share a commitment that
is both personal and world-wide.
On their return from Vietnam, they moved to Anna
Maria. "We absolutely love it here," says Parsels. "John
wanted to stay in the area," and she said she couldn't live
in town. Anna Maria was the compromise.
They've been invited by the Vietnamese to go back. "We
hope to go back before the end of the year," says John. This
time they hope to be talking to the Vietnamese about repara-
tions for political prisoners, which is something they've been
talking to Ross Perot about many times.
"Reparation is a humanitarian issue," says Patricia.
"The money (we pay for war prisoners) goes to the people
of Vietnam to build bridges, roads, hospitals and clinics."
It is money, says Parsels, that the French paid to get the
French prisoners back to their homeland. "But our gov-
ernment is not willing to pay."




FUNERAL HOMES
KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager
BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813) 748-1011 FAX 746-6459



'"^ea Stable's

SWIMSUITS
"The Island's Best Selection"
...arriving daily!
r"-- ~-- """T^~^^CSI"-- --- --
r . B BRING THIS AD FOR

5.00 OFF YOUR SWIMSUIT '
I PURCHASE OFFER EXPIRES
PUR CH AS NOV. 30,1993-
L JI.
Mon.-Sat. 9 to 6 SC --1
Sunday 10 to 5 tble '
Buttonwood ESOTn
Plaza
3170 Gulf of MexicoDr. '
Longboat Key, Florida
383-2288


For

Women

Only

Why go to a club designed for men?
Join the Bradenton Health Club
We Specialize in:

* Certified Women Trainers.
* Equipment designed for women.
* Aerobic & Step Classes just for
women.,
* Fitness programs designed to
achieve results Women Crave!
Bring this Ad & receive $50 Off your Enrollment
Good until 11/30




7451 Manatee Ave. 794-2111







[] PAGE 12 W NOVEMBER 11, 1993- THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Cheri6 A Deen, LMT
Neuromuscular Certified
Massage Therapist
Now Accepting Appointments


792-3758


MMA.014561
MACKI2461


Gift Certificates Available 9801 Gulf Dr. Alexis Plaza


S i


ire l-M 11 I IILXMf - I
STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631




Classic

Travel

Senior Coupons* ABRING
4 Coupon 8 Coupon FOR
$596.00 $1032.00 REBATE

CRUISE SPECIALS:
3 Nights, Miami to Bahamas
from $195.00. P.P.D.O.
4 Nights, Port Manatee to Mexico
from $299.00. P.P.D.O.
5 Nights, Port Tampa to Mexico
from $395.00. P.P.D.O.

BEACHWAY PLAZA
7318 Manatee Ave. W., Bradenton, FL 34209
813-794-6695 800-873-2157


Veterans' Day in honor


of the courageous


THE LAW OFFICE OF
LINDA K THOMAS
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
3737-B MANATEE AVENUE WEST
BRADENTON
747-5500 "-
GENERAL PRACTICE OF LAW
PROBATE SIMPLE WILLS Mnber An Maria rad
GUARDIANSHIP Chm,, of Comm
bn linf a a liawyeu is an imartan dtckitat dI tuld no i l be as d solely upon alveriseet.
'Be.l e you decide, a* uI to snl youc Ire niutn knrmalion a b aor qualification and expeiece.


Complete Mortgage
Lending Services
FHA/VA
Conventional
20 Years Experience!
Local and Nationwide
E REMN
Jack Knoedl, Jr. NEWEST MORTGAGE
Office: 745-1994 HNEWM
Pager: 953-8911 America's #1 Mortgage Lender


MASSAGE THERAPY


SSpecializing in Corrective Muscle Therapy
Rachel Barber, LMT #MA0015167 778-8575
By Appointment Most Insurance Accepted




MASSAGE CAN HELP:
Arthritis (non-inflammatory) Joint Immobility
Back, Neck & Shoulder Pain Poor Circulation
Chronic Headache & Migraine Sciatica & Tendinitis
Hip, Knee, Leg & Foot Pain Sport Injuries
Fibromyalgia Stress Related Problems
Insomnia And More


Ode to veterans on Veterans' Day
On Veterans' Day, please publish this small tribute to the men and women who served in the United
States Army Air Forces during the Second World War: David Bentley, Holmes Beach


The vapor trails spread out far behind
like lines on pages in my mind
The stillness and serenity, Oh so sweet
belies the hell we go to meet.

Again we must use the gift of flight
as just.another means to fight
Against those who would seize our world
and over our homes, their flag unfurl.

I treasure these few moments of peace
as I watch the sunlight flicker and dance
Across my ice rimmed window pane
and far below, the green fields of France.

Too soon my reverie is torn apart
as clouds of flak explode like thunder
With every beat of my racing heart
I pray our winged home is not torn asunder.


To our left and right, they tumble down
our friends who flew and gave their all
No tribute to their passing now
a blue sky scarred by black gray palls.

One thing we will be spared today
the hounds are home, the wolves at bay
No fighters slash across our path
we know not why nor do we ask.

Onward we drone through freezing air
the holes in our ragged formation filled
I picture the faces and whisper a prayer
a silent good-bye, to our comrades killed.

One by one we struggle through
to deal our blow and turn for home
I'm hoping that we'll live to see
Another sunny Sunday afternoon.


Want a flag that flew over

the U.S. Capitol?


U.S. flags that have flown over the U.S. Capitol are
available for purchase.
Flags come in two sizes: three feet by five feet and
five feet by eight feet. The cotton flags cost $8.50 for the
small size and $18.75 for the large. The nylon flags cost
$7.50 for the small size and $17.50 for the large.
Flags may be ordered through the Washington office
of your senator or U. S. representative. Checks sent to a
senator should be made payable to: Keeper of the Statio-


nery. Checks sent to your representative should be made
to House Office Supply Account FL 1330.
A certificate signed by the architect ofthe Capitol ac-
companies each flag. In your request, include the name of
the person you want to honor on the certificate, even if that
person is you.
If you are celebrating a special occasion, say so in
your letter and send it a month before the date. You will
receive the flag within six weeks of the day it is flown.


By Joy Courtney
World War I was the war of wars claiming the
lives of almost eight million soldiers, more lives lost than
in World War II, the Korean Conflict and Vietnam com-
bined in the greatest struggle the world has ever seen.
Veterans' Day, Nov. 11, is time set aside to remem-
ber all soldiers men and women who have served and
are serving their country some to do so and live and
others to do so and die.
World War I began July 28, 1914, when two Serbian
bullets shattered the mortal remains of Archduke Francis
Ferdinand and his wife in Sarajevo, the capital of the
Austrian province of Bosnia. The shells continued their
trajectory to ricochet throughout the fabric of Europe, still
unsettled from the days of the Franco-German War in
1870 and 1871, and ended their destructive flight at the
feet of the United States.
Twenty-three countries became involved in World War
I, with the United States entering the fray on April 6, 1917.
In May 1917, Congress passed a Selective Service Act draft-
ing men from ages 21 to 30 to register for military service.
To meet the demand in manpower, the age limits were soon
increased to 18 to 45. By the time the armistice was signed
18 months later, more than one fourth of the men in the
United States between the ages of 18 and 31 a total of
4,000,000 U.S. soldiers were in the armed forces.
When the devastation stopped, the United States re-
ported total casualties of 307,092 81,553 dead,
221,059 wounded and 4,480 prisoners or missing, and
had spent close to 35.5 billion dollars to finance the op-
eration. World War I gave the United States a military
draft system in force until 1973 and its first body to be laid
to rest in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers.
During the war, the "blue and gold star" tradition for
families began a blue star displayed in a window
means that the soldier in that particular family is living,
and a gold star means that the soldier died. And World
War I elevated air warfare from an experiment to an art
form, which would be fine tuned in World War II.
World War I ended in an armistice, which changed
the international definition of "armistice" forever. Previ-
ously, international politics dictated an armistice to be an
agreement to cease active hostilities while negotiations
took place, with the understanding that fighting would


resume if a deal was not reached.
The Armistice of Nov. 11, 1918 (acknowledged as
Armistice Day in the United States until President Dwight
D. Eisenhower changed its name to Veterans' Day in
1954) between Germany and the Allied powers in World
War I would enable future warring countries to talk in pri-
vate before considering an armistice, thereby keeping pre-
negotiations confidential. An example of this took place
recently between Israel and Palestine behind-the-
scenes negotiations led to a "sudden" peace, which sur-
prised the world community.
The 1918 armistice also included, for the first time,
financial, political, and military responsibilities which the
loser agreed to before, instead of after, hostilities ended.
This made the resumption of hostilities virtually impos-
sible for Germany, and also ended the use or need of ar-
mistices forever.
On that first Armistice Day it is reported that Austra-
lian journalist George Honey called for two minutes of
silence as the treaty was signed at 5 a.m. in a railway car
in the Forest of Compiegne, France. The world answered
his call with many radio broadcasts signing-off for two
minutes at 11 a.m., when hostilities officially ceased. The
"Great Silence" allowed time for those still alive to re-
member those who had fallen and established a tradition
adhered to today in many communities throughout the
United States, along with many parades and ceremonies.
It is also reported that an English flower vendor by the
name of Abbie celebrated Nov. 11 by bullying passersby
into buying poppies from her. But she handed them out
free to soldiers, establishing the little red flowers as sym-
bols that the soldiers who died did not die in vain.
A national ceremony takes place in Arlington Na-
tional Cemetery in Virginia every November 11 at 11 a.m.
at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldiers. The President and
other dignitaries lay a wreath at the tomb now shared by
soldiers of World War II, the Korean Conflict and the
Vietnam War.
Etched on the tomb are the words:
"Here Rests In Honored Glory
An American Soldier
Known But To God."
By our words and deeds on Nov. 11, we must add
"But Never Forgotten."






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 1 PAGE 13 i


Happy Birthday,
United States
Marine Corps
Marine Corps Corporal
Joy Smith Courtney
(right), dressed in the
female marine's Dress
Blue Uniform, participates
in the Corps' 196th
birthday celebration on
Nov. 10, 1971. Happy
birthday to all marines on
the Corps' 218th birthday,
celebrated today, Nov. 10,
1993.


A girdle, the Marine Corps and me


By Joy Courtney
Features Editor
In 1965, when hostilities in Vietnam and at home
were in full swing and I was a girl of 16 I announced
to my parents that I was going to join the armed forces.
They didn't believe me. They were sure that my life
after high school would include at least two years of col-
lege then marriage. I was sure I would make the right
choice between protecting the United States on the land,
in the air or on the sea.
I can still see the slick recruiting brochures lined up
like soldiers on the floor of my bedroom. Should it be the
Army, the Navy, the Marine Corps or the Coast Guard?
Over and over again I digested every word. The decision
came to me from three words "be the best," be a United
States Marine.
Instead of giving me away, my father signed me
away. As the spartanly-haired recruiter turned each page
of my "permission" documents, my father looked up at
me and said, "Are you sure you want to do this?" Every
time I said yes, his eyes glistened a little more.
The news quickly spread throughout my Cleveland
neighborhood, "The Smith girl is joining the service." Just
as quickly, a neighbor paid a visit. I overheard her say to
my mother, "I can't believe you're going to let your
daughter do this. You know as well as I do what KIND
of women are in the service. If you do let her go, I hope
you have enough sense to insist she wear a girdle."
As I stood there in shock, scared that my mother
would try and stop me from "signing-up," she hissingly
answered, "Miriam, when Joy leaves she will be 18 years
old. My job is done. If I've done my job well, she won't
need a girdle. IfI haven't, I'm sure she'll figure out how
to take it off. I believe I did a good job." She did.
Boot camp was in Parris Island, South Carolina. I
marched, I did a horrific amount of physical training,


learned how to iron the Marine Corps way and found out
there really was spit in spit-shine.
I also met "the twin everyone.has somewhere in the
world," who turned out to be evil. She and I looked so much
alike my own mother walked over to HER instead of me,
after the graduation ceremony. I did sit-up upon sit-up as
punishment for my twin's indiscretions. Marine Corps dis-
cipline dictated that recruits could not speak to their platoon
"gods," unless spoken to. I couldn't defend myself. This was
the way I found out life isn't always fair.
During my three years in the regular Marine Corps,
I was secretary to a two-star general who was the deputy
commander of FMFLant, Fleet Marine Force Atlantic, in
Norfolk, Va., second-in-charge for all Marine Corps ac-
tivity in the Atlantic region. As a junior ranking marine
I was privy to and involved in "the big picture" of our
country's national defense, working with classified docu-
ments communicating international shenanigans that
made me shudder and shook off what naivete I had left.
From that experience, I hold to the axiom "the best
defense for our country is to always be prepared." My
uniforms, though now snug, hang in the ready.
Over the course of my 20-year enlistment, complet-
ing 17 of those years in the United States Marine Corps
Reserve, I was attached to every type of military unit,
from fixed-wing to the MPs. I rose from the rank of pri-
vate to Master Sergeant as I participated in changing
women's roles in the military. We went from duties lim-
ited to "free a man to fight," as it was when I joined, to
"fight with him." It was my generation of women soldiers
who pushed the female contribution to the military team
beyond manning typewriters to flying million-dollar
military aircraft it was bumpy, but it was quite a ride.
It was the right decision I made back in the 60s. Now
I bear the title of veteran, a proud one, and a United States
Marine. Semper Fi.








For a job well done
Marine Corps Corporal Joy Smith
Courtney (right), receives a Meritorious
Mast from her boss, Major General
Youngdale, deputy commander FMFLant
Norfolk, Va., in 1970for a job well done.
For all marines, receiving a Meritorious
, Mast is quite an honor.


INSURANCE NOTICE
If you are having difficulty with insuring your home
or other personal property please call us. You
may qualify for one of our preferred companies
or the Florida Residential Property and Casualty
Joint Underwriting Association. We can help you.
Please call.

778-2206

S IJohn P. Huth
INSURANCE AGENCY, INC.

5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL.
"Since 1960"


OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED
ACCOUNTING, BOOKEEPING
AND YEAR AROUND TAX SERVICE
Individuals, Corporations, Partnerships & Estates


WE HAVE MOVED

Our new office is located at:
3909 E. Bay Dr. (Suite 110)
Holmes Beach
NEXT TO BARNETT BANK

s y O wy Ef ,-d4 t 778-6118
Licensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.


Factory Direct Prices!
.951-6066 State Lic.
1-800-942-3230 IC049534
10590 Oak St N.E., St. Petersburg,
Providing quality home products since 1955! I







I'j PAGE 14 A NOVEMBER 11, 1993 [ THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


IIsJ~IYIDt


Johnny Temple (all correct)
Helen Putnam





$100 FOOTBALL CONTEST
PICK 15 WINNERS COLLECT BIG BUCKS 2 WINNERS EVERY WEEK $50 BUCKS EACH
* The Islander Bystander will pay $50 to clude name, address and phone number. Winner Advertiser
two persons with the most correct game The names of all of the advertisers must 7
winning predictions, be in the entry to be eligible to win. 8
* All entries must be postmarked or hand Only one entry per person, per week. 9
delivered to The Islanderby noon Saturday Winner Advertiser 10
the same week the contest is published. 1 11
* In the event of a tie, a winner will be drawn 2 12
from the tying entries. The decision of The 3 13
Islander Bystander judge is final. 4 14
* All entries must be submitted on the form 5 15
below or a reasonable copy. Be sure to in- 6 FILL IT OUT NOW!


* Name


Mail or deliver to The Islander Bystander 5400A Marina Drive, Island Shopping Center Holmes Beach
SAddress Phone


Holl l mesi B eachI

us.clal v -asin-1o


Cafe Robar
Monday Night
Football
Open 4 PM til
End of Game
25 DOGS
All the way or Anyway
(During Game Only)
204 Pine Ave
778-6969
SLouisville vs TXA & M


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU P FULL BAR
Monday Night
Football
Kansas vs LA. Raiders
OPEN 7 DAYS 11 AM to 10 PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Prompt Professional
Service
All Plumbing Repairs
Drain & Sewer Cleaning
Water Heaters Disposals
SRemodeling
Bath & Kitchen Fixtures
SHouston vs Cincinnati

LaPensee 4 5
Plumbing, Inc. *
778-5622
5348 B. Gulf Dr Holmes Beach





ANNA
MARIA
ISLAND
LIQUORS
& PARTY

Phoenix vs Dallas

Island Shopping Center
5416 Marinb Drive
778-2023


3



GLASS &SCE EN






Minnesota vs Denver

301 AVNEC
HOME BAC
( d a
778-2022~Y


-I


g QUEST
Fi a- ri.- Ba"
.Shpf .SIO
CorlgnsnIl/Drokerag
SBulk Ol-In your cw lalner
BOAT RENTAL
Five O'Clock Marine
412 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria
778-5577
Johnson, Evinrude, OMC
Sea Drive & OMC Cobra Stem Drive
SALES AUTHORIZEDSERVICE
San Fran. vs Tampa Bay


RESTAU4RA/T AND LOUNGE




reen Bay vs New Orleans
101 S. BAY BLVD.
ANNA MARIA
778-9611


OMA PIZZA
RESTAURANT
778-0771
-or 778-0772
*1.000 FF
ANY PIZZA OR DINNER!
*Home d e words Largest Piza, 1991'
DINE IN OR ENJOY
OUR FREE HOME
DEUVERY
201 N. Gulf Dr.,
Bradenton Beach


award winning surfside dining
778-6444




DOCK
INN


MONDAY NIGHT
FOOTBALL
LIVE MUSIC
THURSDAY
THRU SUNDAY
I "
3610 East Bay Dr.
Holmes Beach
778-7034





ISLANDER
^OW
Play the game and
advertise here!
There's a space left
for your business in
the Island's most
talked about
football contest!
Washington vs NY Giants
Call 778-7978
to feature your
business here!


Ow


l.Oun0


O0


[O1


ED


10






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 1 PAGE 15 iS


Ai!!UM1~~^


Flag football at center
Registration for boys and girls to play flag football at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center will be open
until Thursday, Nov. 18. The registration fee is $5 and the
forms are available at the center.
For more information, call Mick or Scott at the cen-
ter at 778-1908.
Anna Maria Garden Club to meet
The Anna Maria Garden Club will hold its next meet-
ing on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at 1:30p.m. at Roser Church
in Anna Maria City.
The guest speakers will be Ron and Paula Nichols,
who will talk about "Crime Prevention."
Refreshments will be served. The public is welcome.
Haunted homes topic
at historical meeting
Renal Hook of Bradenton Beach will speak at the
Anna Maria Island Historical Society meeting on Thurs-
day, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m., at Anna Maria City Hall.
Hook's topic will be "The Haunted Houses of
Bradenton Beach."
Island Library needs cookbooks
The Friends of the Island Branch Library are seeking
donations of cookbooks for the organization's annual
cookbook sale to be held in January.
Gift contributions of cookbooks should be deposited
at the branch during the library's business hours. Proceeds
will directly benefit Island Branch's facility and collection.
Donations will be accepted through Jan. 15. For fur-
ther information visit the library or call 778-6341.
Little League meeting coming up
The Anna Maria Island Little League will hold an
organizational meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 16, at 8 p.m. at
the community center in Anna Maria.
Anchorage hosts chamber mixer
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce will
hold its November member-mixer on Tuesday, Nov. 16,
at the Anchorage Restaurant and Lounge in Anna Maria
from 5 to 7 p.m.
All members and their guests are invited.


Privateers' Christmas parade
gearing up
The Anna Maria Island Privateer invites the commu-
nity to participate in its 1993 Christmas Parade to be held
Saturday, Dec. 18.
The parade travels through the three Island cities start-
ing at 10 a.m. at Bayfront Park in Anna Maria Island and
ends at Coquina Beach. The route is the reverse of last
year's.
Applications to enter your float or vehicle, decorated
in colors and in a style to reflect the holiday season, are
available by calling 778-5934.
Medicare problems resolved
Free help is available every Friday morning from
10:15 am. to 12:15 p.m. at the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center in Anna Maria City to resolve Medicare
problems and fill out forms.
Columnist to speak
at Roser's Men Club
The Roser Memorial Community Church Men's
Club will meet at the church in Fellowship Hall on Tues-
day, Nov. 16, at noon.
The speaker will be John Hamner, columnist for the
Sarasota Herald Tribune. All members are urged to bring
a friend.
Littoral Society hosts
three programs
The American Littoral Society is sponsoring a
Beachwalk and Seining Trip on Saturday, Nov. 13, from
9 to 11 am. in Bradenton and an Environmental Library
Lecture "Silent Spring" on Wednesday, Nov. 17, at
Gulf Gate Library, Cutriss Ave. in Sarasota.
These events are followed by a cruise in Sarasota Bay
to collect and observe marine life at Bayfront Park,
Sarasota, on Thursday, Nov. 18, from noon to 2 p.m..
Call the society at 951-0884 for fees, reservations and
additional information.
Off Island happenings
A program on the "Signers of the Declaration of
Independence" will be given by JoAnn Cook at the
Thursday, Nov. 11, meeting of the Manatee Chapter Na-


tional Society Daughters of the American Revolution. The
meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. at Christ United Method-
ist Church, 5512 26th St. W., Bradenton.
Advance reservations will be accepted until Thurs-
day, Nov. 18, for the Art League of Manatee County's
Wearable Art Fashion Show to be held at the Art
League of Manatee County on Saturday, Nov. 20, at noon.
The event will feature unique designs for adults and chil-
dren in the clothing, jewelry and accessory categories.
Call 746-2862 for information and reservations. The
league is located at 209 9th St. W., in Bradenton.
Senior Slow-Pitch Softball League is gearing up for
the upcoming baseball season at the Longboat Key Com-
munity Center. The League is looking for men, age 60 or
so, who would like to play on Saturdays at 2:30 p.m. and
Tuesday at 9 am. For further information call Nate
Hurwitz at 383-8347, or Sherry at the center at 383-3136.
The Players of Sarasota is scheduling tryouts for the
musical comedy "Mame" on Sunday and Monday, Nov. 14
and 15, at 7:30p.m. The cast calls for numerous singers, danc-
ers and actors of all ages including aboy ageeight to 12. The
director is Garry Breul. For information about music and
dance audition requirements call the Players at 952-0282.
Volleyball enthusiasts are invited to play in the
Longboat Key Community Center Volleyball Tourna-
ment. Co-ed teams of three and three will begin at 10 am.
on Saturday, Dec. 4, and finish a round robin tournament
on Sunday, Dec. 5. The entry fee per team is $10. Call the
center at 383-3136 to sign up.
The Art League of Manatee County is featuring an
exhibit of photographs from the Bradenton Herald in the
league's new Janet Reid Hodges Gallery until Wednes-
day, Dec. 1. In addition, the newly renovated Spotlight
Gallery is featuring paintings by Janet Reid Hodges, the
benefactress for whom the new gallery was named. Call
the league at 746-2862 for more information. A schedule
of gallery events through May is also available.
This year, part of the annual St. JudeChildren's Research
Hospital Longboat Key extravaganza will "step" into the
Sarasota Quay Courtyard. The Step for Life benefit to be
held Friday, Nov. 12, will give area residents the chance to
participate in a one-hour step aerobic class. Registration for
the class will begin at 5:30 p.m. with class starting at 6 p.m.
Call 383-2466 or 1-800-654-8563 for more information.


8hdL


Seafood, Shellfish & Whatnot

778-5997
3200 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach


Something very special is happening
on Anna Maria Island.


qIhe Mutiny Inn

fitcairn's Island"
A Pstaurant








Something Innovativefy New
In Tradition


Mutiny ithanksgiving

Wisth us

Whole Turkeys roasted & carved
individually per party.
Innovative & Traditional Side Dishes
Desserts & Select Wines Included
(Leftovers packed for you to take)

Reservations taken eclfusizvdy
(Partis of4 or more)

Please calf 778-5440
605 Malnatee Ave. at East Bay Drive
HolCmes Beach
Formerly The "OKeefe's Wine Cellar"


I







li PAGE 16 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
S.W ,


School votes for cool colors Islander Photos: Joy Courtney Apples a dry subject
The entire student body had a difficult decision to make choosing the school's Trish Mixon, grandmother of student Melissa Mixon, helped Ann Russell'sfifth-grade
official colors. In a runaway election, the colors of teal and orchid won. Pictured are class celebrate National Apple Month. Mixon brought a basket offresh-picked apples
kindergartners in Maureen Loveland's class exercising their rights as junior citizens from Vermont to the classroom and showed the students how to dry them, just like the
of the United States. pioneers did well almost. Mixon used an American Harvest Dehydration machine,
the pioneers used Mother Nature. ,


Calculating the
odds
Ann Jenkins (upper right),
a volunteer at Anna Maria
Elementary School, makes
it possiblefor students to
have a special class
dedicated to learning how a
calculator works. Using an
outline ofmathematical
problems, the students
press enough buttons to get
more than just simple math
out the indispensable
machine.


Eating right
Millie Torres, Anna Maria Elementary School's cafeteria manager, holds a
class on proper nutrition. More than afew students were surprised to find out
that M&M's were not part of the five major food groups.


EARLY BIRDS 11:30am 6pm
Prime Rib Sirloin
Beef Ribs Grouper
SShrimp & Scallops Cheeks
includes salad, choice of potato, bread & butter
I|l Ii '\ Seniors: 10% off dinner check anytime!
(Alcoholic beverages not Included)
Chuck Senrick
/ Wed & Thurs, Nov 10-11, 9 PM 'til
Sunday, Nov 14, 7 PM'til
X S/ E Monday, Nov 15, 5 9 PM
Tues Thurs, Nov 16-18, 9 PM 'til
Formerly Pete Reynard's * *

Coming ...
Thanksgiving Blow Out
Dance Away all the Turkey & Stuffing
Friday, Nov 26 and Sat Nov 27, 9 PM til ? with ...
Smokin' Stevie & The Backbreakers
Make Your Thanksgiving Dinner Reservations Now!
(- Football Season! Come watch the games ... G
ON 10 TVS! Happy during games!
Karaoke Returns Fri & Sat Nov 12 & 13 9-1 2 Prizes Nightly
Leading to ... GRAND PRIZE Trip to the Bahamas!
CHAMPAGNE IS BACK ON THE FABULOUS SUNDAY BRUNCH BUFFET 10 TO 2
Make Christmas Party Reservations Now! Dates are filling up fast!


Hot & Cold Food 'til Midnight Always Banquet Facilities Available
Anna Maria Island, Florida Open Daily Entertainment Nightly -No Cover, No Minimum
5325 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-2233


ISLAND

SEAFOD01)

SPECIALTIES

Maine Lobster
Live or Steamed starting at $479 lb.
Stone Crab Season
Stop In to See Us for the Freshest Fish Availab
Special Prices on Whole Fish
Also Available Smoked Fish!
Open 10 to 6 Monday thru Saturday d
5704 Marina Drive Hol


mes Beach 778-0333


ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
FINE WINE SPIRITS BEER ICE
Free Delivery Full Service Low Prices
5904 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-2507


I








Great job
These are the
"Students of the
Week" at Anna
Maria Elementary
School for the week
ending Oct. 29.
Kneeling are Devon
Mertz Casey
Rygiel, Heather
Taylor and Jessie
Brickse. Middle
row are Steven
Shannon, Joshua
Huffine, Julia Lalli,
Lauren Brickse and
Alexandra Blossom.
Back row are
Daniel Van Andel,
Tom Bucci, Marc
Manali, Mike
Armstrong, Evan
Goldsen, Alan
Jenkins and Star
Beard.
Islander Photos:
Joy Courtney


The town the
kids built
The students in Lynn
McDonough's
kindergarten and
first-grade split class
put the finishing
touch on their study
of communities by
building one. The
students made a
model of "Their
Town," complete with
police department,
bank, school, library,
gas station, grocery
store and more.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 PAGE 17 Ij

King to hold

visitation days
King Middle School will have Open Classroom Visitation
Days in honor of American Education Week.
Sixth grade parents are invited to attend Wednesday, Nov.
17, from 8:30 am. to 1:30 p.m. Seventh and eighth grade par-
ents are invited on Thursday, Nov. 18, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m.
Refreshments will be provided by the Future Homemak-
ers of America at King Middle School.


Anna Maria School menu
American Education Week
National Children's Library Week
Monday, 11/15/93
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit
Lunch: Hot Ham Pattie w/Cheese on Bun, Potato Rounds,
Tomato & Lettuce Salad, Pudding
Tuesday, 11/16/93
Breakfast: Scrambled Egg, Toast or Cereal, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Breaded Chicken Pieces, Seasoned Noodles,
Broccoli Cuts, Hot Roll, Apple Crisp
Wednesday, 11/17/93
Breakfast: Cheese, Toast or Cereal, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Hamburger Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, Green
Beans, Hot Roll, Orange Juice
Thursday, 11/18/93
Librarian's Choice Day
Breakfast: Peanut Butter Cup, Toast or Cereal, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Baked Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, Lettuce &
Tomato, Hot Roll, Fruit Cup
Friday, 11/19/93
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Fiestado, Mexican Corn, Tossed Salad, Cookie
All meals served with milk.


Oops
The child identified in the photo entitled "Picking a
Pop" in last week's issue was Stephanie Borkowski, 21
months, of Holmes Beach. The caption said otherwise.


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch Specials on the Island!


FRESH BAKED
PIES & BISCUITS


Thursday: PRIME RIB SPECIAL
Full cut, pota, to,5.95
vegetable, salad, rolls $5.95


EGGS BENEDICT
All Day...7 Days a Week


I$i jEYE OPENER...2 eggs, toast,
W W home fries and coffee...Only $1.75

SIsland Inn Restaurant
r^ OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7AM 2PM 778-3031
/.B\1 1701 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach 778-3031



"Ifyou haven't tried it yet,
you're infor a pleasant surprise."


CAFE ON THE BEACH
On Beautiful Manatee Beach
Known for Good Food at Moderate Prices.
Open 6 a.m. 7 days a week
Breakfast Lunch & Dinner Specials
Live Entertainment Every Evening from 5-8 (Weather Permitting)
Plenty of Parking
At the Gulf end of Manatee Ave.! 778-0784


Dine out often!
And be sure to mention
you saw the ads in
The Islander Bystander.


Chez Andre


Fine Selection of
Imported French Wines
Breakfast
Daily Special Luncheon
Intimate Dinner
Try our authentic
Hot Croissants, French Bread
& Pastries


Breakfast and Lunch
Tues thru Sat
AM-2:30PM
Sunday 8AM-1:30PM


Dining in France
Thur, Fri & Sat
6-10PM
Sunday 5:30-9PM


Reservations Suggested for Dinner
Island Shopping Center 5406 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Carry-out available for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
778-5320


Joe's Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes.
Closed Tuesdays i
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge.


If Il RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
C u 0 778-9611
A-AND ---
S N OYSTER BAR ON
RESTAURANT1 ANNA MARIA CITY PIER
& LOUNGE 778-0475

F RID'S# I WATERFRONT LOCATION...
Lunch Specials From $5.95
Early Birds From $6.95
Dinner Specials From $8.95
A S* AR-
CAUGHT DAILY FROM OUR BOATS...
STONE CRAB CLAWS YOUR CHOICE
1 LB. DINNER s1495
OR $ 4
WHOLE STUFFED FLORIDA RESERVATIONS
LOBSTER DINNER ACCEPTED
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT TUES., THUR., FRI., & SAT. i]
4 I 101 S. BAY BLVD. ANNA MARIA ISLAND I I.


i ----~ --- -~ ---- -- ~-~--~-~---~----- ----~- ---- 'lf~8nlP


L -j --- -~ -..- -- -.1----- L-~


IL


[






j] PAGE 18 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER

Love blind to six foot waves


By Joy Courtney
Features Editor
Romance almost backfired on Greg Keeper of Bristol
Bay in an effort to find a special way to propose to his
girl, he almost had his dreams washed out to sea.
Koeper decided that he would propose to Maryann
Drabik, also of Bristol Bay, on her birthday, Oct. 30. Pick-
ing the day to pop the question was easy, he said, but to
find THE right way to ask her took some thought.
Koeper 's first idea was to hide his lady's diamond
engagement ring inside a clam shell. Then he would toss
the clam into the Gulf of Mexico during a romantic stroll
on the beach and Drabik would find it at her feet. But this
idea was nixed by Keeper's jeweler the clam could
easily be washed out to sea.
Agreeing with his jeweler, Keeper came up with a
more prudent idea. He took a foot of fish line and tied the
ring in a dangling fashion to a red and white fishing bob-
ber. This way, he said, the ring would float and could be
easily spotted. But the best part was he could release it
while the couple snorkeled and surprise Drabik with a cool
piece of ice shimmering under the water.
"I was sure it would work," said Koeper. "I tested it
in the bathtub."
When the couple got down to the Gulf at 47th Street
in Holmes Beach on Saturday, Oct. 30, the water was
rough. A cold front was coming through causing six-foot
waves to crash into the beach.
"We couldn't snorkel, so I had to think of something
quick. I decided to lay the bobber in the sand away from
the water. Then I'd turn Maryann around and she'd find
it lying there," Koeper said.
What Koeper didn't anticipate was a twist from
Mother Nature. While his back was turned, an exception-
ally strong wave came in covering the bobber with water
and sea foam.
"It was gone," said Koeper. "I was in a panic. I went






ANCIIHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
7AM to 2:30AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085
Happy Hour 9-11 a.m. & 3-7 p.m.
Drafts Beer Well Drinks
*BUSTIN' LOOSE **
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Nov. 11,12 & 13 9:30 p.m. 1:30 a.m.
(Previously Played at Memorial Day Beach Bash)

Kitchen Open Daily
NOW SERVING BREAKFAST
Sunday Morning 7:30 11:30


II

Cafe Robar

Now Appearing
BRIAN BEEBE
Tues & Wed Nov 9 & 10 8 p.m. 12 am.
Fri. & Sat. Nov. 12 & 13 9 p.m.- 1 a.m.
BOB COMEAU
Thurs. Nov. 11 8 p.m. 12 am.
RICH KENDALL
Sunday Nov. 14 8 p.m. 12 a.m.
HOWIE BANFIELD
Tues. & Wed. Nov. 16 & 17 8 p.m. 12 a.m.

Lobster Tails or Crab Legs
$.95
Includes Salad, Potato, Vegetables, Rolls & Butter


Sunday Brunch


) 9


204 Pine Avenue 778-6969


AM to 1 PM


Anna Maria


over to where I had put it and started looking around.
Maryann asked me what I was doing so I told her I was
looking for a fishing bobber I thought I had seen. After
about 20 minutes, she said, 'Greg, you have fishing bob-
bers at home.' That's when I had to tell her. She dove in
the water with me."
The couple searched 30 feet of beach surrounding the
"drop" point for two hours. Passersby, curious as to why
two frantic people were in the water on such a bad beach
day, stopped to help, said Keeper. Some of them gently
searched in the sea foam while others got to their knees
in the water.
One of the passersby was Janice Searl-Kolsh, who
resides on 47th Street.
"I lent them a rake," said Searl-Kolsh. "I felt so sorry
for that poor little girl. She was so pretty and crying so
hard."
An unknown couple told Koeper that they had just
seen a man with a metal detector at the Manatee County
Beach and that they would walk back to see if he would
come and help.
He did.
Wayne Minton of Holmes Beach looked for about 45
minutes and found the ring, still attached to the bobber, 40
yards away from were everyone was searching.
"When Mr. Minton held up the ring, I ran to him and
hugged him," said Keeper. "Than Maryann came and
wrapped her arms around both of us. I can't explain to you
what I was feeling at that moment.
"We have so many people to thank for helping us.
The only name I got was Mr. Minton's. I wish I could
thank everyone personally," he said.
Did Koeper get around to proposing?
"Yes, after the hug and the excitement, I took
Maryann to the side and asked her to marry me. She said
yes as long as her wedding ring had nothing to do with
the water."


Dorothy G. Lohnes
Dorothy G. Lohnes, 75, of Holmes Beach, died Oct 31.
Mrs. Lohnes came to the Island ten years ago from
Cary, Ill. She was a receptionist for Drs. Hillstrom, Bryant
and Wall and co-owner, with her sister Phyllis, of Golden
Butterfly in Crystal Lake, Il. She was a volunteer at HCA/
L.W. Blake Hospital.
Survivors include two daughters, Jerri-Lynn Frey of
Roundlake, Ill, and Susan K Nardi of Crystal Lake, Ind., and
two sisters, Phyllis Kirchberg, Jr., ofWoodstock, Ill., and
Evelyn Trautman of Tucson, Ariz., and five grandchildren.
Private interment was held in Illinois. Griffith-Cline
Manatee Avenue Chapel was in charge of the arrangements.
Edwin T. Monez
Edwin T. Monez, 93, of Holmes Beach, died Nov. 1
at home.
Born in Morris Plains, N.J., Mr. Monez came to
Holmes Beach from there in 1966. He was a retired em-
ployee of Nedicks Co., New York.
He is survived by two daughters, Shirley Bowker of
Greensboro, N.C, and Joan Prentiss of Morris Plains; six
grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.
No local visitation was held. Graveside services were
held at Manasota Memorial Park with Dr. Jim Metz offici-
ating. Memorials may be made to Hospice of Southwest
Florida, 406 43rd St W., Bradenton, Fla. 34209. Manasota
Memorial Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.



The Island Poet
Love is what makes the world go round,
This is a fact that most folks have found.
There's the love of a girl for the boy that
gives her a rush,
That we used to call a school girl crush.
And the sweet love of a child for its mother,
Or the love of mankind we have for each other.
But there is one love that will always prevail,
It's the love of a woman for a sign that says "sale."
Bud Atteridge


The finest Italian/Spanish/American4"
restaurant that does breakfast too!
Just a Sampling of our Dinner Menu
Italian Specialties Spanish Delights
Large Selection of Pasta Dishes Spanish Picadillo
Fried Chicken Yellow Rice & Chicken
Veal Parmigiana Cuban Sandwich
Veal Marsala Black Bean Soup
Prime Rib Spanish Bean Soup
Shrimp Pasta Spanish Pizza
Rotini Bolognese Spanish Flan
Cannoli
12for 1 Early Bird Specials 4:30-6pm Daily
Ches's Delicious Nightly Specials
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Hours: Breakfast, 8am-noon; Lunch, 11am-2:00pm;
Dinner, 4:30pm-10pm
L.. S&S PLAZA 5348 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach
r l UO ,r ,illF -'.


307 PINE GENERAL STORE

Deli Delights
Deli Turkey ........................................ 2.99 lb.
Boiled Ham .............................................. 1.89 Ib.
Homogenized Milk ................................... 2.79 gal.
OVER 50 SANDWICH SELECTIONS


BEER
SPECIAl CS 1


ME


1 E M.1
For Fast Service ...
Call 778-4656


Dell Closes at 9PM


307 Pine Avenue Anna Maria


Freshly Cut & Freshly Made to Order
DELI SANDWICHES,
SOUP & SALAD BAR
Served for Lunch and Dinner
ALL OCCASION PARTY TRAYS
FRESH BAGELS
SICE CREAM CAKES
& FROZEN YOGURT PIES (ON REQUEST)
EVERYTHING HOMEMADE!
Mon-Sat 10AM 9 PM Sunday 12 to 9 PM
Eat-In or Take-Out
Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
(813) 778-7386


f9]:Ill lfT;Il7W


F=n






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 1 PAGE 19 I[


Island police reports
City of Anna Maria
Nov. 1, theft of a cable box, 500 block of Pine Av-
enue.
Nov. 3, theft of purse from trunk of vehicle,
BayfrontPark.
Bradenton Beach
Oct. 28, animal complaint, 2300 block of Canasta
Drive. The officer investigated a complaint about a black
chow dog roaming the neighborhood and chasing other
dogs and children. The dog had chased a deer from its
cage and after a two-block chase, caught the deer by the
nose and antlers. The officer attempted to catch the dog
but could not get close. The officer followed the dog to a
home where the occupant said it was a stray he took in for
safekeeping. The county animal control department was
called to pick up the dog.
Oct. 29, burglary of $260 from purse in vehicle,
Coquina Beach.
Nov. 3, robbery and resisting arrest without vio-
lence, Coquina Beach. While on foot patrol, Sgt John
Cosby observed two white females get into a pickup truck
and two white, juvenile males exit the truck. The first ju-
venile stopped a man and woman walking on the beach
and the second jumped the man from behind. While the
second juvenile was wrestling with the man, the first ju-
venile grabbed the man's wallet Both ran south in the
direction of Cosby and while running, the first juvenile
passed the wallet to the second. Cosby ordered both to
stop. The first turned and ran north; the second ran past
Cosby. Cosby caught and secured the second juvenile and


Sunday Satellite Football
Monday Night Football
Free Hot Dogs Monday During Games
Tuesday Nights ~
Restaurant Appreciation Drink Specials


BAMBOO
Wed. & Thurs.
Nov. 10&11
9 p.m. 1 a.m.

IUCH
KENDAII
Fri. & Sat.
Nov. 12 & 13
9 p.m. 1 a.m.
KITCHEN OPEN DAILY 11 AM
BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


recovered the wallet which the juvenile had thrown to the
ground. Cosby then caught and secured the first juvenile
who was running toward the truck. The victim and wit-
ness positively identified the juveniles, who were placed
in the patrol vehicle. The females had fled.
Holmes Beach
Nov. 2, assistance, 200 block of 67th Street. The
complainant heard something in her bathroom banging
around. The officer checked and found a large rat in the
bathtub.
Nov. 3, suspicious person, 200 block of 67th Street.
The complainant said a white male subject walked into her
home through an unlocked front door, turned on a light,
looked around as if confused, turned off the light and ca-
sually walked out the door. She said the subject looked
intoxicated. The officer found the subject walking on 67th
Street. The subject said he thought he was on his block on
70th Street and walked into the wrong house. The officer
drove him home.
Nov. 3, burglary to an automobile, 5300 block of
Marina Drive. The victim said she left her vehicle in the
parking lot of Shuckers Bar and Grill while she went to
visit friends. When she returned to the vehicle, she discov-
ered damage to the paint, trunk, roof, hood and left side
and a makeup bag missing. The victim found the business
card of a former boyfriend in the door of the vehicle with
an obscenity written on the back. The officer questioned
the suspect, who admitted to the crime and signed an af-
fidavit to that effect.
Nov. 3, burglary of the lower unit of a boat motor,
400 block of 28th Street.
Nov. 3, animal complaint, 6200 block of Holmes
Boulevard. Two dogs were chasing cars. The owner said
they escaped from the back yard. The officer told her to


Fire district summary/October
# of Calls $Loss
Structure Fires .................... 2
Brush Fires ......................... 0
Vehicle Fires....................... 1 .......................... 300
Miscellaneous Fire Calls..... 0
Investigations/Good Intent.. 5
False Calls ...................... .... 0
Fire Alarm/Alarm Calls ...... 12
Power Line Calls ............... 5
Emergency Medical Calls ... 25
Rescue Calls ....................... 7
Service Calls....................... 0
Motor Vehicle Accidents .... 11
Hazard Material Calls ......... 1
Mutual Aid Calls ............... 0
Total Number of Calls ........ 70 ................................. 300
20,000
Year to Date ....................... 818 ..................73,710.00
Total dollar loss, year to date.........................2,196,400
Average number of personnel per call: 5.1
Average response time: 4.53 minutes


keep them on a leash.
Nov. 4, suspicious person, 81st Street and Gulf
Drive. Complainant said juveniles were standing in a city
owned planter and damaging plants.
Nov. 4, burglary of wallet, credit cards and driver's
license from a vehicle, 100 block of 46th Street
Nov. 5, assistance, 3000 block of Gulf Drive. Of-
ficer assisted French tourists who had locked their keys in
their vehicle.


Tropical i
Early Bird
Dinner Specials
4-6 p.m.
Buy 1 Entre6, Get 2nd FREE!
(Free Entre of equal or lesser value. Seafood specializes
20% of only. 15% gratuily added before discoun Exp. 11/17/93
Open Daily for Lunch 11:30 to 3 and Dinner 4 to 10
4304 14th St. West Bradenton 758-6390
Take out & Catering Available. (Behind Rooms to Go)


T 5702 MARINA DR.
HOLMES BEACH
778-8363
SPIRITS FOOD
HAPPY HOUR:
11 a.m.-7p.m.
CLOSED ENTERTAINMENT 5 NIGHTS A WEEK
MONDAYS
ye, DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS ; ,,
Jet FROM $3.95 az
Tuesday: LADIES' NIGHT $5 All You Can Drink, 9 p.m.-Close
Wednesday: B.A.R.E. (Bartender & Restaurant Employee Night)
PROMOTIONAL GIVE-A-WAYS WEEKLY
500 Drafts, $1.50 Wells, $2.50 Calls (Must wear uniform or bring ID)
Thursday: MEMBERSHIP NIGHT 2 for 1 from 1'0 p.m.-Close
Fri. & Sat: ENTERTAINMENT Sunday: V.I.P. Night
Happy Hour Prices All Night for Club Members
THE BAND LINE-UP

NOV 11, 12 & 13- DTs
NOV 18,19 & 20 John Prestia






Retreat from the heat..
join us for Happy Hour 4-6

Authentic British Atmosphere
8 British Drafts on Tap
Live British Soccer via satellite TV
Saturday, 10 am
Coronation Street
Monday thru Wednesday, 3 p.m.
Fish & Chips Mixed Grill Shepherds Pie
Steak & Kidney Pie Bubble & Squeak

Open Daily
BRITISH PUB 12 Til?
Serving Lunch &
RESTAURANT Dinner
o i? 12-10pm


2519 Gulf Dr. N., Bradenton Beach 778-5173


THE HUNT CLUB
RESTAURANT
Early Birds from $4.95
4:30 to 6:00 pm
Lunch & Dinner Daily
British Style Fish & Chips
All You Can Eat $6.95
Mon.-Thurs. only
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key
Located in the Centre Shops
383-0543


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven." flis. -
Puffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. \ ee ,'s
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout 778-2501






Uli PAGE 20 m NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Have lots of manatees and they will come


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor perspectives
Well, it's official you can make bucks on manatees.
So says University of Florida biology professor Steve
Humphrey, speaking at a Florida Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission conference in Haines City last week.
Citing a recent study in Volusa County, Humphrey
reports that having large numbers of manatees clearly
helps create jobs by attracting tourists interested in a close-
up look at the critters.
So there you have it. Next time somebody asks "What
good are those darn things anyway?", you can say "Hey,
tourists come to see them, spend money and then, thank-
fully, go away, leaving their bucks behind.
Actually, the two-day conference was a little more seri-
ous than that, but not much. Humphrey suggested that wild-
life advocates learn a little basic public relations and hire
lawyers. Saying that future policy decisions about wildlife will
be made in the courts of both law and public opinion, he ad-
vocated showing how what I call ecotourism can line the
pockets of both government and citizens.
"We need to get more astute about politics and the
public's perception of what we're doing," he allowed.
Some of his other points include the eventual demise
of the Florida panther due simply to eventual development
of its habitat, and that all hunting licenses will eventually
be awarded by lottery, much as those for alligators are
awarded now.
It's not a bright picture the fellow paints, but you can't
help but know he's right if things such as population
growth and rampant urban sprawl continue anywhere near
their present pace. Thus far we don't seem to have lead-
ers bright enough or brave enough or honest enough to
control the latter, even if they can't control the former.
One of the people we're looking to lead us out of this
situation is Florida's own Carol Browner, the Environ-
mental Protection Agency chief appointed by President


WE'VE GOT ESP*
AND WE WANT YOU TO HAVE IT TOO!
Our ESP* (ENERGY SAVINGS PLAN)
is a twice-a-year inspection, lubricating, adjust-
ing, and cleaning of your heating/cooling sys-
tem to keep it running at peak efficiency.
At $48.00 for both visits, it's a bargain you
won't want to pass up.
NO high pressure sales.
NO unneeded parts replacement
NO phone solicitations
You'll have to call us or we'll never meet.
Just call and say, "I want ESP, too!"



REFRIGERATION



CAC044365

778-9622 Holmes Beach
A lan FPL
PARTICIPATING
CONTRACTOR


Clinton. A native of Miami, graduate of the University of
Florida and former head of the Florida Department of
Environmental Regulation, she seems to hold bright
promise for environmentalists.
But now Rolling Stone magazine has viciously at-
tacked her, saying she's just an Al Gore flunky he happens
to like, so she got the job. It's true Brown worked for
Gore, and all we can hope is that usually-more-accurate-
than-we-want-to-believe-Rolling Stone is wrong this time.
Specifically, the magazine says Browner has little
administrative experience and that she's simply in way
over her head in her job. We'll see.
If you'd like to know some more about local envi-
ronment bird and critters here's your chance.


Want to hear an aquifer burp?
The National Geographic Society and National Public
Radio present another hour-long special, "Water, Thirst-
ingfor Tomorrow" on WUSF 89.7 at 4p.nm Saturday,
Nov. 13; repeating at 6:30p.m. Monday, Nov. 15. Tune in
and you'll get to hear the Ogallala Aquifer burp. Perhaps
more interesting to Floridians, the second segment of the
show willfeature giant Ginnie Springs in north Florida.


MACKEREL*
Spoons .................. 99
WhiteJigs ........... 25
Leaders ..........3/P.19
ISLong ShankHooks .. 2.99
100 Ct.
DISCOUNT TACKLE
OPEN DAILY ANNA MARIA -76
7 to 7 ISLAND CENTER 778-7688
3240 EAST BAY DR.
WEEKENDS HOLMES BEACH ISAI
6 to 7 (Between Walgreens & Shells)

Family Owned and Millwork
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size




Mon.-Fri.

7:30 to 5 AND
Saturday
81 8H2 HARDWARE
We specialize in custom cabinet making:
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street, Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located Just West of the Island Shopping Center


The American Littoral Society is sponsoring a field trip
to Fort DeSoto Park Nov. 28, beginning at 9 am. Environ-
mental dynamo Bill Boothe will lead a group around the park,
and there's no way you won't learn something.
Bring your own lunch, binoculars, wettable shoes and
what they call wettable clothing. Swimsuits are suitable
if you can stand the water temperature this time of year.
The charge is $5 for Society members and $7 for non-
members. If you'd like more information, call Debbie
Deering at 951-0884.
Well, I'm just back from three days in Mexico
City followed by four in Havana. I finally got my little
taste of Cuba, and you'll probably be hearing about it off
and on as I collect my thoughts.
For now I can say that I now understand why fathers
take their families aboard flimsy rafts and chance death
heading for Florida. I'm quite sure that I'd do the same in
their situation. Havana is really hell for the locals. Maybe
it always has been, I don't know.
But now, food is downright scarce. Soap is almost
unattainable for the average citizen, and only foreign tour-
ists and others with hard currency (US$), live what we'd
consider a normal life.
I was propositioned three times in five minutes while
taking pictures in front of the national cathedral. It's awful.
More later.
Want to hear an aquifer burp? You can.
The National Geographic Society and National Pub-
lic Radio present another hour-long special, "Water,
Thirsting for Tomorrow" on WUSF 89.7 at4 p.m. Satur-
day, Nov. 13; repeating at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 15.
Tune in and you'll get to hear the Ogallala Aquifer
burp. Perhaps more interesting to Floridians, the second
segment of the show will feature giant Ginnie Springs in
north Florida, "one of the most beautiful swimming holes
on the Santa Fe River."
See you next week.

DOLPHIN

DREAMS
CHARTERS
GULF, BAY AND BACKWATER FISHING
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE
all bait, gear & equipment supplied -
no fishing license required -
CAPT. TOM CHAYA (813) 778-4498
U.S. COAST GUARD LICENSED ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Fish Tales Welcome!
Got a great fishing catch? We'd love to hear your fish stories,
and pictures are welcome! Just give us a call at 778-7978.








A T S Q L M IC T T


We've been in business right here since 1955. Check us out when you need to:
Of Buy a Boat or Outboard (we sell only the best)
!f Service your Boat or Outboard (our reputation says it all)
Cf Rent a boat (we've got the finest rental fleet in the area)
You can get what you need at Cannons Marina.

2 MILES FROM LONGBOAT'S NORTH END 383-1311 MARKER 33 ON THE ICW


VM- I ITE
13t <>1P^ IF-


17 orIds I
1111 ~I Fa


BOS"TON --
WMAS.ILER
,80.rrol









Soccer season finale
schedule
Monday, Nov. 15 Soccer Playoffs (if needed)
to determine first place in divisions. Division II game
will be at 6 p.m. Division I will play at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 16 Soccer All Star games. Di-
vision II plays at 6 p.m. Division I plays at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 15 Coaches game will be
held at 6 p.m. Division II awards presentation will
take place between 7 and 7:30 p.m. Division I awards
presentation will take place between 7:30 and 8 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 18 Division III Round Robin
game finale from 6 to 7:30 p.m. followed by awards
presentation at 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
All events will be outside on the scheduled day.
In case of bad weather, all scheduled events advance
to the following day. The concession stand will be
open during all events.

AMICC soccer standings
Division 1
11 to 13 year olds, standings for week ending Nov. 5
Galati Marine 10-0-1 52 pts.
LaPensee Plumbing 8-2-1 42pts.
B&M Heating & Cooling 4-6-1 22 pts.
Island Garden Center 3-8-1 17 pts.
Pettigrew & Peak Sharks 1-10 5 pts.
Division II
8 to 10 year olds, Standings for week ending Nov. 5
Island Animal Clinic 7-2 35 pts.
Moore's Restaurant 6-1-2 34 pts.
Rotten Ralph's 4-2-3 26 pts.
Manatee Sports Unlimited 4-4-1 22 pts.
D. Coy Ducks 2-5-2 14 pts.
Island Auto Body 0-9 0 pts.

Snook Trout Redfish Flounder

LIGHT TACKLE ^
SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
/2 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 PAGE 21 JlI

Christmas in November:


sheepshead are
By Capt. Mike Heistand
The cold fronts and cooler water are bringing in an
unexpected Christmas gift for fishermen sheepshead,
usually not found until the holidays, are starting to come
to the lines of fishermen in the area.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said very large red-
fish are being caught off the fishing piers. If you're brave
enough to tempt the weather offshore, grouper fishing is
improving as the weather cools.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he has been doing well on
backwater trout, with some tipping the scales at four
pounds. Mark added that there are a lot of mangrove snap-
per out there right now, too.
November is the month for cobia, according to Chris
at Galati Yacht Basin. He said the big fish migrate south
from the Panhandle this month, and may be found off-
shore or near the inshore wrecks. Live bait is the best bet
to catch 'em. Grouper may be found in 80-100 feet of
water offshore, and snapper are around the ledges and by
the wrecks. Chris added that backwater fishermen are
doing a booming business bringing in big trout and reds,
most caught with shrimp as bait.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay H brought in a real mixed-
bag of fish this week: snook, reds, flounder, trout and
mangrove snapper. The catch of the week for Capt Zack
was a 5-pound flounder Friday.
Bradenton Beach Pier fisherman Bob Dare has been
doing good with big black grouper, some up to 24-inches
in length. Tom at the pier said fishermen were doing well
with trout in the evenings, and some big flounder have
been found on the bottom but they will come up for a
shrimp snack.
Capt. Dave with Gulf to Bay Charters said offshore

SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.


starting to show
fishing has picked up with the passing of the cold front.
The deep-water fishers are reaping big payoffs on big
barracuda, mangrove snapper and yellowtail snapper, all
caught on greenbacks and live shrimp. Mackerel are out
there, but Dave says they are staying on the bottom.
Jamie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the fish-
ing has been fair offshore. The four-hour trips are bring-
ing back 40 to 80 head of lane snapper, vermilion snap-
per, Key West grunts and a few red and black grouper. The
nine-hour trip is averaging 25 head of red and black grou-
per, amberjack and even a shark or two.
Capt. Tom Chayahas still been doing well with reds,
even though the weather hasn't been the best.
Capt Rick Gross said the cold front pretty much damp-
ened snook fishing. The few snook he was able to put his
charters onto were near the mouth of the Manatee River.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier anglers had
been catching a few sheepshead, a lot of redfish and one
skillful angler was able to land a big snook Saturday.
Capt. Todd Romine offers an ominous tip as a sign
of the season with his observation that bait is getting
harder to find during the day. Best bet is to try the beaches.
Capt Todd has been doing okay on reds.
At the Anna Maria City Pier, Victor Derioncour
caught two big snook Saturday using shrimp as bait Dave
at the pier said they are also catching sheepshead and a few
mackerel.
Capt. Phil Shields is still doing good with grouper,
both in quantity and quality. Some of the whoppers are
coming in at better than 30 pounds.
On my boat Magic, I've been doing well with reds,
mangrove snapper and a few flounder.
Good luck and good fishing.


LARRY'S BACK
AT
BRIDGE STREET BARBER
Appointments Available
"Best Haircut on the Island"
S121 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
.J 778-3973


BE A GOOD
SPORT!

Subscribe to the
Islander
Bystander.
You'll be in touch
with all the Island
happenings
weekly just like
being here.
Call 778-7978


GALATI
YACHT BASIN


Open and
Covered Slips
Available!


... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
OPEN DAYS WEEK 8 TO 5 0
(83 7805 *-92SO.sAYBLV *ANNmMRI


SALES & SERVICE f j
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


BOAT GP QUALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD

Z ," ,. .. 4-E


Starting at $6439.
-n' -- .i"


Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'
Starting at $325.


b Five O'Clock Marine
' ) "Quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices" c
SP.O.Box 775 412 Pine Ave ,
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA ISLAND TIDE TABLES
DAY AMHIGH AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
Thu 11/11 10:49 1.611 3:38 0.0ft 9:16 2.4ft 2:39 1.211
Fri 11/12 12:00N1.6ft 4:27-0.3ft 9:48 2.6ft 3:11 1.311
Sat 11/13 10:21p2.711 5:16 -0.511 1:09 1.511 3:33 1.4ft
Sun 11/14 11:00p2.711 6:02-0.611 2:16 1.5ft 3:52 1.411
Mon 11/15 -- 6:50 -0.611 11:42 2.711
Tue 11/16 -7:36 -0.5ft -
Wed 11/17 12:27 2.5ft 8:25 -0.311 -
Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and
Casualty Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon
Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center g-
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 '.-









Soccer season finale
schedule
Monday, Nov. 15 Soccer Playoffs (if needed)
to determine first place in divisions. Division I game
will be at 6 p.m. Division I will play at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 16 Soccer All Star games. Di-
vision II plays at 6 p.m. Division I plays at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 15 Coaches game will be
held at 6 p.m. Division II awards presentation will
take place between 7 and 7:30 p.m. Division I awards
presentation will take place between 7:30 and 8 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 18 Division III Round Robin
game finale from 6 to 7:30 p.m. followed by awards
presentation at 7:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
All events will be outside on the scheduled day.
In case of bad weather, all scheduled events advance
to the following day. The concession stand will be
open during all events.

AMICC soccer standings
Division 1
11 to 13 year olds, standings for week ending Nov. 5
Galati Marine 10-0-1 52 pts.
LaPensee Plumbing 8-2-1 42 pts.
B&M Heating & Cooling 4-6-1 22 pts.
Island Garden Center 3-8-1 17 pts.
Pettigrew & Peak Sharks 1-10 5 pts.
Division II
8 to 10 year olds, Standings for week ending Nov. 5
Island Animal Clinic 7-2 35 pts.
Moore's Restaurant 6-1-2 34 pts.
Rotten Ralph's 4-2-3 26 pts.
Manatee Sports Unlimited 4-4-1 22 pts.
D. Coy Ducks 2-5-2 14 pts.
Island Auto Body 0-9 0 pts.

Snook Trout Redfish Flounder *
i k
4 LIGHT TACKLE
Q| SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS
12 DAY FULL DAY CHARTERS
Bradenton, Florida (813) 794-3308 J.
Grouper Snapper Kingfish Cobia


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 PAGE 21 li

Christmas in November:

sheepshead are starting to show


By Capt. Mike Heistand
The cold fronts and cooler water are bringing in an
unexpected Christmas gift for fishermen sheepshead,
usually not found until the holidays, are starting to come
to the lines of fishermen in the area.
Bill at Island Discount Tackle said very large red-
fish are being caught off the fishing piers. If you're brave
enough to tempt the weather offshore, grouper fishing is
improving as the weather cools.
Capt. Mark Bradow said he has been doing well on
backwater trout, with some tipping the scales at four
pounds. Mark added that there are a lot of mangrove snap-
per out there right now, too.
November is the month for cobia, according to Chris
at Galati Yacht Basin. He said the big fish migrate south
from the Panhandle this month, and may be found off-
shore or near the inshore wrecks. Live bait is the best bet
to catch 'em. Grouper may be found in 80-100 feet of
water offshore, and snapper are around the ledges and by
the wrecks. Chris added that backwater fishermen are
doing a booming business bringing in big trout and reds,
most caught with shrimp as bait.
Capt. Zack on the Dee Jay II brought in a real mixed-
bag of fish this week: snook, reds, flounder, trout and
mangrove snapper. The catch of the week for Capt. Zack
was a 5-pound flounder Friday.
Bradenton Beach Pier fisherman Bob Dare has been
doing good with big black grouper, some up to 24-inches
in length. Tom at the pier said fishermen were doing well
with trout in the evenings, and some big flounder have
been found on the bottom but they will come up for a
shrimp snack.
Capt. Dave with Gulf to Bay Charters said offshore


SAILING CHARTERS
Aboard "SPICE"
Half Day Cruises $25 per person
Half Day Cruise to
Historic Egmont Key $25 per person
Sunset Cruises $20 per person
Swim Picnic Snorkel Shelling
Complimentary Soft Drinks Coolers Welcome
*-ED HARTUNG 778-3240
U.S.C.G. Lic. Capt.


fishing has picked up with the passing of the cold front.
The deep-water fishers are reaping big payoffs on big
barracuda, mangrove snapper and yellowtail snapper, all
caught on greenbacks and live shrimp. Mackerel are out
there, but Dave says they are staying on the bottom.
Jamie at the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet said the fish-
ing has been fair offshore. The four-hour trips are bring-
ing back 40 to 80 head of lane snapper, vermilion snap-
per, Key West grunts and a few red and black grouper. The
nine-hour trip is averaging 25 head of red and black grou-
per, amberjack and even a shark or two.
Capt. Tom Chayahas still been doing well with reds,
even though the weather hasn't been the best.
Capt Rick Gross said the cold front pretty much damp-
ened snook fishing. The few snook he was able to put his
charters onto were near the mouth of the Manatee River.
Kevin at the Rod and Reel Pier said pier anglers had
been catching a few sheepshead, a lot of redfish and one
skillful angler was able to land a big snook Saturday.
Capt. Todd Romine offers an ominous tip as a sign
of the season with his observation that bait is getting
harder to find during the day. Best bet is to try the beaches.
Capt Todd has been doing okay on reds.
At the Anna Maria City Pier, Victor Denoncour
caught two big snook Saturday using shrimp as bait. Dave
at the pier said they are also catching sheepshead and a few
mackerel.-
Capt. Phil Shields is still doing good with grouper,
both in quantity and quality. Some of the whoppers are
coming in at better than 30 pounds.
On my boat Magic, I've been doing well with reds,
mangrove snapper and a few flounder.
Good luck and good fishing.


LARRY'S BACK
AT
BRIDGE STREET BARBER
Appointments Available
"Best Haircut on the Island"
U 121 Bridge Street Bradenton Beach
778-3973


BE A GOOD
SPORT!

Subscribe to the
Islander
Bystander.
You'll be in touch
with all the Island
happenings
weekly -just like
being here.
Call 778-7978


______ _____'


GALATI
YACHT BASIN

lk~


Open and
Covered Slips
Available!


... with each slip rental, receive a DISCOUNT on gas or diesel.
GAS & DIESEL
100 OFF per gallon with the purchase of 100 gallons or more.
50 OFF per gallon with a purchase of $50 or more.
BEER ICE SODA SNACKS LIVE & FROZEN BAIT TACKLE
OVERNIGHT DOCKAGE PUMP-OUT STATION
0 OPEN DAYS WEEK 8 TO 5 0
(81) 78-755*'02 O.:AYBLV:*ANNA ARI


SALES & SERVICE
Walk-Around and Center Console
Fishing Boats from 18' to 25'


QUALITY THAT SETS THE STANDARD

) -4 f


Starting at $6439.


Vee Bottom & Jon Boats
available 10' to 18'

Starting at $325.


Five O'Clock Marine
quality Services and Products at Affordable Prices" ?
P. O. Box 775 412 Pine Ave
Anna Maria Island, FL 34216 813-778-5577


ANNA MARIA
DAY AMHIGH
Thu 11/11 10:49 1.611
Fr 11/12 12:00N1.61t
Sat 11/13 10:21p2.71t
Sun 11/14 11:00p2.7ft
Mon 11/15
Tue 11/16
Wed 11/17 12:27 2.5ft


ISLAND TIDE TABLES


AMLOW
3:38 0.0ft
4:27 -0.3ft
5:16 -0.5ft
6:02 -0.6ft
6:50 -0.6t1
7:36 -0.5ft
8:25 -0.3ft


PMHIGH
9:16 2.4ft
9:48 2.6ft
1:09 1.5ft
2:16 1.5ft
11:42 2.7ft


PMLOW
2:39 1.2ft
3:11 1.3ft
3:33 1.4t1
3:52 1.411


* Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later.


* Fuel Live Bait
* Ship's Store
* Bottom Painting
* Boat Storage
* Bulk Oil
* Consignment/
Brokerage
* BOAT RENTAL


Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and
Casualty Joint Underwriting Association.
(State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr:, Island Shopping Center *'
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253-........


I


II








ID PAGE 22 N NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER



SI have questions about real estate ...

SQ ANNA NLARIA ISLAND and.'or 0 SURROUNDING AREAS
REAL ESTATE Please send more information: Price Range: S
| CiO HOUSES: Q For Rent 1l For Sale Br.,'Ba.
.. .. L '"' .. I \ CONDO Q For Rent Q For Sale Br. 'Ba.
1 1 LAND -i SHORE FRONTAGE Q CANAL, L NEAR BEACH
Name:
Address:
lState'Zip: _Area Code Tel No._

S SEND TO. Betsy Hills Real Estate PC Box 2.151.1
I I -., .Anna Maria. Florida 34216 813-7 7S-'2291 Fax 7 '-2i291
IL. S .. ... .- -- ---


Buy it! Sell it! Find it!
Check out The Islander
Bystander classified.


ea~s'fn ^a. n ff







PELICAN COVE
10 boat slips, heated pool, tennis and direct Gulf
view. 2Bd/2Ba turnkey furnished, covered park-
ing. Great Rental history with over $17,000 income
in 1992. $119,000. MLS 54326.


ANNA MARIA ISLAND DUPLEX
On lot and a half. See Gulf sand and water one
block away. Downstairs has 3Bd/1Ba. Upstairs
has one bedroom and one bath with new carpet
and vinyl. None to compare to this price.
$99,900. MLS 53274.

PERICO BAY CLUB
Recreational Living
Perico Bay... A premier waterfront, gated
community, two miles from the beach.
975 Sandpiper Circle $84,900
852 Audubon, Osprey $89,900
706 Estuary, 1st Floor $98,500
913 Waterside, Garage $99,900
969 Waterside, Water View $117,000
Call Rose to see these or any listings in
Perico Bay Club: 778-2261 or after hours
778-7780. Toll-free 1-800-422-6325.
ROSE
SCHNOERR
Realtore
GRI, LTG, RRC
0 1993 Member of
the Year: Florida
State Women's
Council of Realtors.
2,000 Members.

MLS 0


Michael Saunders & Co.
of Anna Maria Island, Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Broker
FEATURE OF THE WEEK









SUGAR SAND BEACHES
Pool, privacy, Gulf views and a double Gulffront lot are the
setting for Anna Maria's best of the best $975,000. Wendy
Foldes, 755-0826.

A PERFECT LOCATION! Just 2.5 miles to the beach
from this beautiful Perico Island townhouse. Pool, tennis,
clubhouse. 3BR/3B, large kitchen, formal dining. $113,000.
Don and Karen Schroder, 778-2200.
CHARMING BEACH COTTAGE Totally renovated
2BR home across from the beach. Mexican tile, tongue and
groove paneling, all new appliances. This one you must see!
$113,900. Jana Chilsom, 778-7588.
YACHTSMAN'S DREAM Mariners Cove ... the pre-
mier boating community of Florida's West Coast. Choose
from 3 waterfront units, 2 or 3 bedrooms and ALL the
amenities. $215,000 $350,000. Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
BREATHTAKING VIEW OF TAMPA BAY Luxuri-
ous 4BR/4.5B home on Anna Maria Island. Exercise room,
office/den, 4-car garage, and dock, davits and boatlift, too!
$750,000. Don and Karen Schroder, 778-2200.
Anna Maria Island Centre (813) 778-6654
3224 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217










5203 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813)778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522









Picture Perfect 3 bedroom, 2 bath canal home at
prime Anna Maria location. Near the beach. Home
features fruit trees, hot tub, boat lift and much more.
MUST SEE! $229,000 call Ken Rickett at 778-3026.
Luxurious Spanish Style Villa Unique design 3
bedroom, 3 bath. Mexican tile and carpet, custom
wood moldings, large spiral staircase to private roof-
top terrace with expansive views of the Gulf and Bay.
Top of the line appliances. Fireplaces on both 1st and
2nd levels, 2 car garage, lush landscaping. $299,500.
Call Lynn Hostetler at 778-4800.
Efficiency Unit in a Gulffront Complex Turnkey
furnished including washer & dryer. Complex offers
heated pool and miles of beach. Very nice unit for
only $72,000. Call Dennis at 778-4800.
Quality Gulffront Complex Spacious unit over-
looking pool and Jacuzzi with views of the beach.
Complex also features tennis court and elevator.
Turnkey furnished. $175,000. Call Brian at 778-4800.
Gulf Watch We still have a few choice units avail-
able in this desirable Island complex. 2 bedroom, 2
bath with great rental history. Turnkey furnished units
start at $89,500.


m


RESORT LIVING! #53696 $595,000... 8 unit
Anna Maria motel plus 2 bedroom owner
home adjacent! Call T. Dolly Young, 778-5427.
BEAUTIFULLY WELL-KEPT & CLEAN!
#54378 $160,000 ... Deep water canal near
Intracoastal. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Call Horace T.
Gilley, 792-0758 evenings.
... RENTALS... SEASONAL ... RENTALS...
MARTINIQUE! ... 2 bedroom, 2 bath, $2500/
mo + tax.
WEST BAY COVE! ...Large 1 bedroom,
heated pool, walk to beach/shopping. Avail
Dec, Jan, Apr.
LUXURY CANAL FRONT HOME!... 2/3 bed-
rooms, spa, fireplace, extras. $3000/mo + tax.
Call T. Dolly Young, 778-5427
"There's No Substitute For
-- Experience."
Call Carol Heinze
now and put her
experience to
work for you ...
Carol HeinzeCRS
RealtorP
Million Dollar Club
778-7246


Karin Stephan
Realtor-Associate
Ich Spreche Deutsch
Office:
813-778-0766
After Hours:
813-388-1267
Mobile:
813-350-5844


iIL


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory,
Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


The Prudential dift
k2
Florida Realty
5340-1 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217
(813) 778-0766


l1


CL


LI1~L~lli~p~ru







THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N NOVEMBER 11, 1993 0 PAGE 23 IIj


- r~ .=.=


I at A r U p T y h


6 Mo. A.R.M. 1 Yr. FXED 5/25 FIXED 7/23 FIXED
N. O. "Nick" Patsios 2.50% 3.00% 6.25% 6.50%
BROKERISAESPRS A.P.R. 4.87% A.P.R. 5.68% 0 Points 0 Points
BROKER/SALESPERSON
Island Specialist for 15 Years Rates & Terms Subject to Change
"The One Who Knows"
EXECUTIVE MORTGAGE
778-2261 or 1 778-4642 UCENSED MORTGAGE BROKERAGE BUSINESS
1290 Palm Ave., Sarasota, FL 34236 957-3616
Toll Free 1-800-422-6325 RANDALLJ. SMITH ALLRATES BASED
Licensed Mortgage Broker ON $100,000 LOAN
Call 778-7978 for free home delivery of The Islander Bystander to homes on Anna Maria Island.


I "-- -l- IT H


GULF FRONT! Magnificient views from all rooms HOLMES BEACH RESIDENCE 2BR 2BA home
of this great beach house. Popular rental. Expan- with short walkto excellent beach. Well-maintained
sive, sandy beach in all directions. Priced at and has 1,000 square foot garage and storage
$349,000. Call Stan Williams for details, area. Offered at $112,500. Call Dave Moynihan.


*ONE OR TWO duplexes with a total of four, fully
furnished, 1 BR 1BA units for only $175,000. Or
buy just one duplex for $87,500. Well-mainta
ined and located in quiet neighborhood. Only two
blocks to great beach.
* MOTEL WITH OWNER FINANCING! PLUS a
cap rate of 13.4%. A Buyer's dream with 9 units
plus owner's home. Priced at $595,000. Call Stan
Williams for an appointment.
* BEACHES, SUNSETS AND AMBIANCE Direct
Gulffront 2BR/2BA unit that is turnkey furnished.
Great walking beach. A proven money maker for
rentals. Protected parking. All for $164,900. Call
Stan Williams.
* BEST BUY ON THE BEACH Wide sandy beach
in front of lovely 2BR 2BA, turnkey furnished
condo. Many conveniences including eat-in kitchen,
washer/dryer, 2-car covered parking, pool, security
entrance. Priced at $139,900. Call Stan Williams.
*BAYFRONT LOT Central Holmes Beach loca-
tion with deep water dockage and fabulous view.
Lot is cleared and measures 85' x 130'. Offered
at $192,500. Call Dave Moynihan.
* BAY VIEW DUPLEX Unobstructed Bay view from
this custom duplex with large utility and storage
area. Short walk to beach and City Park. Priced at
$139,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
. . . .-.- . -. I -....I.. .. . I.. . . L. --, -


* SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT Fully furnished
2BR-2BA top floor, end unit with fabulous view of
the Bay. Deep water boat dock one block to prime
beach. Offered at $125,000. Owner financing. Call
Dave Moynihan.
* SUNRISE OR SUNSET Pick your preference
from one of these 2BR-2BA Gulffront or Bay View,
unfurnished condos. Pool, elevator, close to shop-
ping and restaurants. Great beach just across the
street. Both priced at $89,900. Call Stan Williams.
* $1,100 INCOME Per month from this modern
duplex. 2BR/2BA each side. Amenities include
dishwasher, disposals, laundry room, skylights
and covered parking. PRICED AT $124,900. Call
Stan Willliams.
* PRIME BUILDING SITE North of Manatee Av-
enue and close to sandy walking beach. Mea-
sures 100' x 200' and is zoned for 1-4 units. Of-
fered at $129,500. Call Dave Moynihan.
* HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX Well maintained
and fully rented, makes this elevated duplex a
super buy, very close to wide beach. Offered at
$112,500. Call Dave Moynihan for details.
* VIEW OF GULF & BAY from the front yard of this
well maintained, 2BR-2BA home. Double car ga-
rage, large porch with sliding screens, partially
fenced and landscaped yard. Priced at $130,000.


WATERFRONT PARADISE
212 ft. of waterfront on a deep water canal, graces this
lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bath home. A large deck overlook-
ing the water, floor to ceiling glass and cathedral ceilings
are just a few of the special features this unique property.
Walk to the GULF. Must see to appreciate. Call days
778-2307 or eves. Agnes 778-5287 or Kathy 778-4136.


BAYFRONT LOT
In City of Anna Maria. Lot size is 60' x 85'. $16896 0.
$165,000.


DOWUNG
REALTY
409 Pino Av.
Anna Maria
778-1222


Doug

Dowling

Realty
778-1222


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
ISLAND REALTY GROUP ... The ONLY Island Real Estate Group
offering you ALL REAL ESTATE SERVICES We are Anna Maria Is-
land Real Estate Specialists extending both PERSONAL AND PRO-
FESSIONAL SERVICES In New Construction & Design, Existing
Property Sales, Lot Sales, Free Market Analysis, Home Warranty,
Free Network to Other Areas. Best Property Management, Annual
AND Vacation Rentals. 75 Combined Yrs. Experience AND SMILES!


tt.,~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ l *iVIt., .-, Yt.'t!.2t1 -.- -- .-- -..-- -.


"


l*


__________. _.___







IU PAGE 24 I NOVEMBER 11, 1993 N THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Cul-De-Sac Canalfront Spacious, open 2 bedroom, 2 full
baths, with a beautiful dock. 511 65th Street. $165,000.
BRAND NEW 3/2 Holmes Beach. Over 2,100 sq. ft.
of living area with glimpses of the Gulf. $182,000. Re-
ally spacious floor plan and a huge garage.
Island Living At It's B'SOL bedroomm, 2 full baths, close to
the Gulf at the low price .. ,- nothing to compare with.
LOT WITH VIEW Good Gulf views from this second lot in from
the water. 2803 Ave. E. Asking $72,000. Cleared and ready.
NICE DUPLEX Just listed ground level 2/1 each side big
double carports & across the street from the Gulf. All this for
$160,000. 201 69th St. Holmes Beach.
Affordable Island Living IBR Mobile Home. Turnkey fur-
nished C/P and family room. $17,500.


Dolores M. Baker
Licensed Real Estate Broker


778-7500 .-


F R]S ;:-1 -R i i.] ET:- F q :-rU


The Islander Bystander is the best
news on Anna Maria Island.


DIRECT BAYFRONT CONDO just steps away from
the beach. Two bedroom, two bath. View of Bay from
porch. living room and kitchen. Great Buy $109,900.
Please call Zee Catanese 794-8991 eves.


ENJOY A CAREFREE LIFESTYLE: in this three bed-
room, two bath home with a caged pool and deep water
canal. Other amenities include boat dock, sprinkler sys-
tem, 70% stone lawn, fruit treed, double garage. Room
for expansion. Reduced to $229,500. Please call Carol
Williams, 778-0777, 778-1718 after hours.


NORTH POINT HARBOUR: Two story bedroom, 2.5
bath. Canal front home. 2nd floor office could be 3rd
bedroom. 2 fireplaces, exercise solar heated pool -
new Berber carpet throughout. $269,000. For more
information & to see this lovely home, please call
Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.
DUPLEXES:
BEST OF ALL WORLDS: 1BR/1BA each side Island
duplex only steps to Bay and Gulf. Separate building
for hobby or workshop. $119,500. Great rental poten-
tial. Sandy Greiner, 778-3794 eves.
MORTGAGE IS ASSUMABLE on this modern el-
evated duplex within steps to pristine Gulf beaches,
restaurants and shops. Stable tenants in place 8 years
now. Sandy Greiner, 778-3794 eves.
DUPLEX within walking distance of beach at the North
end of Anna Maria. 2BR/1BA each unit. Upstairs unit
completely remodeled, new kitchen, carpet, plumbing,
wiring. $152,000. Zee Catanese. 794-8991 eves.


REALTORS


5910 Marina Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS [=
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . I" I 1 1"' "


Exclusive
Waterfront 419 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria, Florida
Estates REALTOR (813) 778-2291 P.O. Box 2150
,tieo Collection MLS EVENINGS 778-2632 FAX (813) 778-2294


r Associates After Hours:
Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847
SMarcella Cornett...778-5919 Nancy Gullford...778-2158

ONE YEAR
WARRANTY


CANAL FRONT HOME IN ANNA MARIA 2BR/2BA
home with natural cedar siding. Great room concept
w/open kitchen. Great decks off rear of home w/view
of Tampa Bay. $198,500. MLS#M10483. Dick Maher
or Tom Nelson. 778-2261.
DUPLEX-GREAT INVESTMENT POTENTIAL
Quiet, tranquil street w/easy access to restaurants,
shopping & best beach. Excellent income potential
for studio and large 2/2. $174,900. MLS#53947.
Call John Green. 778-2261 or 778-3167.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Rarely offered
downstairs 3 bedroom condo on water. Enclosed
lanai. Turnkey furnished, $179,000. MLS#53526.
Call Bobye Chasey. 778-2261 or 778-1532.
KEY ROYALE BOATERS DELIGHT! Deep water
dock, minutes to open water. Tastefully furnished
2BR/2BA home. Stone lawns, security shutters.
$220,000. MLS#54173. Call Nick Patsio. 778-2261
or 778-4642 eves.


JUST
Mountain Ch
Space and light abounc
2 bath contemporary
knotty pine paneling is 1
dral ceilings and cust
Fixed panes of glass
There are 2 fireplaces
spiral staircase leads u
views. A truly unique at
just steps from Bean P


Watch for our
Classivision,
.m.. channel 19.

LISTED!
ialet by the Sea
d in this delightful 3 bedroom,
home. Tongue-in-groove,
featured in the soaring cathe-
om made kitchen cabinets.
are filled with sky and light.
adorned with red brick, and a
p to the gigantic loft with GuOf
nd very special home located
oint. $259,000.







ea
S4.


t .^^ .


KEY ROYALE 3BR/2BA home in mint condition.
Split plan, lots of upgrades, boat dock on sailboat
water canal. Beautiful lawn w/ auto sprinklers.
$229,500. MLS#M-10648. Call Hal Gillihan. 778-
2261 or 778-2194 eves.
ROMANTIC BEACH GET-AWAY Charm & style
are evident in this romantic contemporary A-frame
with 3BR/3BA. Large decks & spa. $199,900.
MLS#53239. Call John Green. 778-2261.
SHELL POINT Updated 2BR/2BA unit with lots of
extras. Walk right out to Bay. Can be "Lease Pur-
chased" with 7% down. $119,000. MLS#M-10631.
Call Marilyn Trevethan. 778-2261 or 792-8477.
ANNA MARIA ISLAND BEACH HOME Charm-
ing ground level 3BR/2BA remodeled home. Gulf
view from 5 rooms! Lighted bar in open pool area.
Vaulted & Beamed ceilings. Private little courtyard.
$158,000. MLS#M54103. Rose Schnoerr. 778-
2261 or 778-7780.


605ManteeAvenue-West Hle ec 0 ieAvenu Ann ai
77-26 "EAAP IT UCES"77-24
CAL TLL RE: 180-42-32 NL


Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
9701 Gulf Dr. (P.O. Box 717) Anna Maria, FL 34216
Fax # 778-7035
778-2307 or 778-1450


GET A LOT FROM MAXON

$79,500 ... 413 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria. Great location. Commercial zoning in
a busy spot on Pine Street. 52.1 x 145 sq. ft.
$85,000... 501 Magnolia Avenue
Anna Maria. 105 x 115. Extra large lot in an area
of fine homes. Great buy on the corner of Tarpon
and Magnolia.
$175,000... 42nd Street and 6th Ave.
Holmes Beach. 200 x 200. Zoned for four du-
plexes (8 units). One of a kind property. Within
walking distance of the GULF. Great Investment.

Broker: Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte, Mike Schulte,
and Kay Kay Hardy
WEEKDAYS 9AM to 4:30PM -
-n SATURDAYS 9AM to NOON _...


m


n L & nRAS


E' ''>


--~dle~ s--~
'.Lf3":;.,







Ij[ PAGE 26 E NOVEMBER 11, 1993 m THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630
Lic. No. 4467

Island Typing Service
FAX Service: Send & Receive
Closed for vacation Nov. 22
k-.e Reopening Nov. 29
310 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-8390


STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR.
S ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
S LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


I Re

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates
778-2139


A U


ISLAND LOCKSMITH and Golf Shop has moved! Our
new location is 315 58th St., Holmes Beach. Same
phone number 778-1661.
BOXBOXBOX
AVON Serving the Island 29 years. Call Millie 746-
4431.
YOGA in Holmes Beach. Beginning, Advanced and
Senior classes. Starting in December for 6 weeks. Call
778-3892 for enrollment information.


BEN AND IRENE'S Dog Babysitting Service. Have
your dog stay with us at our home, lots of love and
constant supervision. Day, week or month. No cages
or kennels. New service, house calls (Island only).
Cats included. 778-1012.


LOST SUNGLASSES: Costa Del Mar with prescrip-
tion lenses in hard shell, black case. 778-9392.
LOST GOLD RING with diamonds, near 75th Street
beach, Holmes Beach or west shore of Egmont Key.
Reward. 778-9652.


HONDA PRELUDE 1981. Well cared for mechani-
cally. Perfect small car for a student. Very reliable,
clean. $850 firm. 778-9392.
CHRYSLER LEBARON 1980. All power, good condi-
tion. $1200. 778-9163.
1982 MERCURY Grand Marquis. 9 passenger
wagon. $1450 OBO. Eves 778-6088.


1992 16 FT STUMP JUMPER 30 HP Tahatsu. One
year left on warranty. Magic tilt trailer, bimini, full cover,
extras, all immaculate condition. $4100 OBO. 778-
0413.
SEABREEZE 18', 135 HP Johnson outboard, and
trailer. Make offer. 778-6158.
SLIP FOR RENT Holmes Beach. 778-7039.
CLASSIC LAPSTRAKE wooden sailboat dinghy with
trailer. Tanbark sails. Like new. Reduced to $1695.
792-4128.


CHARTER FISHING with Capt. Mike Heistand aboard
Magic. 1/2 & full day. Reservations please. Call 778-
1990.


EXTRA TIME on your hands? The Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce needs you. Volunteers please
call 778-1541 or 778-2277. Ask for Mary Ann.
ASK ME ABOUT the Mary Kay Cosmetics opportu-
nity! You could qualify. Call Donna Jean 383-3202.
HOUSEKEEPER NEEDED Part-time for beach front
motel. Start immediately. Apply in person at Sand &
Sea, 2412 Gulf Dr., Bradenton Beach.


PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, WINDOWS, moving help,
organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this Island!
(20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED
The best news in town and the best results from clas-
sified ads and services!
HOME REPAIR-Kitchen & Bath, handyman and
home repairs. Island resident, 23 years experience,
local references. Call Mark at 778-5354.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office, or
dock-at your convenience. Complete detailing in-
cludes wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly
cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and much more. Protect your investment.
Call Damon on mobile number 356-4649.
PROFESSIONAL YACHT & Boat cleaning by
Carleen. 15 years experience. No job to small. For
free estimates call voice pager 813-252-0080. Island
resident.


ON THE ROCKS Bartending Services. Private parties
or any occasion. 794-5947.
T.L.C. DELIVERY Groceries, pharmacies, dry clean-
ing, for any delivery needed. Call Marcie 778-9325.

FREE FINANCIAL needs analysis. Consultation in the
privacy-of your own home. Serious calls only please.
Collette 778-3256.

TRASH HAULING brush or construction. Call Charile
729-4003.
PRESSED FOR TIME Beautiful work for a reasonable
price. Ironing and cleaning. Call Shelia 778-1767.
MATURE HOME COMPANION Former Island resi-
dent. Shopping, cooking, appointments. Non smoker.
795-5003.


HOME REPAIR SERVICE Professional tile instal-
lation, marble work, plaster & stucco. Interior/exterior.
All repairs. Excellent Island references, 23 years ex-
perience. Call Mark at 778-5354.

VAN-GO PAINTING 15 yrs experience. Residential
Commercial, Interior/Exterior, Pressure Cleaning,
Wallpaper hanging. Island resident with Island refer-
ences. Call Bill Chamberlin at 778-5455.

JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
specialist. State licensed and insured. Many island
references. 778-2993. Lic# CRC 035261.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE SERVICE. Pro-
fessional repairs & installation. Fully insured. Mana-
tee County resident for 25 years. Call Ken Montgom-
ery for your free estimate today at 792-1084.

ALUMINUM -VINYL CONSTRUCTION. Remodeling
& repairs. Screen rooms, roof-overs, siding & soffit,
etc. Insured, references, reasonable. LIC #RX-
0051318. Rex Roberts 795-3757 or 778-0029.
FAUCET PLUMBING Remodel, service, water
heater, sewer cleaning. 24 hour service. Serving the
Island for 17 years. 778-0181. Lic. # RF0038400.

Interior/Exterior Painting. Call Jim Bickal 778-1730.
Free Estimates 28 year Island Resident.

ISLAND UPHOLSTERY Danish craftsman, free esti-
mates, pick-up and delivery. Furniture repairs. 778-
4335. 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
ISLAND CARPENTRY Kitchens, baths, counter tops,
tile, carpentry work, remodeling. Island references.
Professional, reasonable, responsible. Free esti-
mates. Call Marty 778-4560.
FINISHING TOUCHES WALLPAPERING Your paper
hung with pride and care. 778-2152.

THE CARPET ACE
Padding & Installation
Repairs Restretches No job to small
Free estimates. Insured.
745-6644 Beeper 954-6644



RENTAL WANTED Mature responsible couple seeks
6 month rental starting Nov. 1. Leave a message for
Gene at 778-9392.
ONE LARGE, ONE SMALL commercial studios. Gulf
view. Gulf Drive. Ideal for small business, office, crafts,
etc. Call Frank at 778-6126.
BUY IT! SELL IT! FIND IT!
ISLANDER CLASSIFIED.

EXCELLENT GULF VIEW
Fumished duplex apt.
1. 2BR/1.5B, washer/dryer, cable TV
dishwasher, central heat/air, carpeted/
ceramic tile. $1400/month
2. 2 room efficiency, cable TV, a/c,
carpeted/ceramic tile. $800/month.
Available November ... lower rates for 5 or 6 months.
778-5959.


SABAL PALM
CARPENTRY
A FLORIDA COMPANY
SMALL HOME REPAIRS
CUSTOM FENCES
DECKS SIDING
FASCIA SOFFITS
DOORS WINDOWS
ODD JOBS
Fully Insured Reasonable Rates
778-7603
Rick Lease
32-Year Island Resident


eftail
PERSONALIZED AUTO DETAILING




S



AUTO & BOAT

DETAILING

WASH WAX SHAMPOO
Engne (
Underbody
Leather & Vinyl
Tires & Trim
Every detail is cleaned and protected.
Your car or boat
can look like new again ...
and maintain its value!
By appointment, at your
home or office.
Most cars $85.
Call mobile service #
356-4649 or 778-9392.


...-"






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m NOVEMBER 11, 1993 N PAGE 27 I-]3


ISLANER CLASSIFE4DS


NORTH BEACH VILLAGE Seasonal, annual avail-
able rentals. 3BR/2.5B. 2 car garage. Furnished or
unfurnished. Also units for sale. Excalibur Realty. 795-
4394.
EFFICIENCIES $150 per week. No deposits. Pool,
near beach, laundry, TV, A/C, everything included.
Haley's Motel. 778-5405.
STEPS TO BEACH 2/1, washer/dryer. $575 month
plus security. 778-1345.
ANNA MARIA 2/2 beautifully furnished duplex. Cable
TV, phone, 1 block to Island's best beach. $650 month
plus electric and phone. Fran Maxon Real Estate.
778-2307.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED 2/2 Holmes Beach duplex,
washer/dryer, utility room $600 plus utilities. Fran
Maxon Real Estate. 778-2307.
UNFURNISHED 2/1 duplex apartment. Close to
beach. $550 month plus utilities. Fran Maxon Real
Estate. 778-2307.
LOVELY FURNISHED Anna Maria gulf front apart-
ments. Sundeck and porch. No pets. Wk/Mo/Sn. 778-
3143.
SEASONAL 1 bedroom in Holmes Beach. Large liv-
ing area w/garage. $1200 month. Available Dec. 1st
thru June. Steps from beach. 813-985-6765.

VACATION RENTALS Reserve for season now! Neal
& Neal Rentals. 778-9477 or 800-422-6325.

HOLMES BEACH 2/2, newly furnished, pool, washer/
dryer, dishwasher, cable, covered parking, steps to
beach, total remodel just completed, new paint, tile,
carpet, very nice. Available last 3 weeks of November,
all of December. Booked Jan., Feb. and March. 778-
4560 or 778-9293.
RENTAL WANTED for Month of March by three
adults with two dogs. 778-0065.
HOLMES BEACH 2/2, washer/dryer, cable TV,
phone, 1 block from beach. Seasonal $1500 month
including utilities. Available Jan. thru April 1994. 778-
5419.
HOLMES BEACH Nice 1/1, 5608 Guava. $525
month/annual, all utilities included. Call Robin at Gulf-
Bay Realty. 778-7244.
ON INTRACOASTAL 1/1, $400 month or $125 week.
Furnished. Deep water. Great view. 778-7980.
ANNUAL RENTAL Fairway Bay, Longboat Key. 2/2
townhouse, beautifully furnished, pool, large garage,
private beach, secured area, available Dec. 1. $1800
month, furnished. Janet Clancy, Island Real Estate of
Anna Maria, Inc. 778-6066.
HOLMES BEACH Unfurnished, 2/1.5, carport. Annual
lease. No pets. Very nice. First, last and security. $650
plus utilities. 778-7610.
GULF FRONT Large 1/1 duplex, private beach, cable,
telephone. Available Nov., Dec. and Jan. $1100. 813-
988-1344 or 778-1725.
ANNA MARIA North Shore cottage. 2/1, rattan furni-
ture, central A/C, cable, washer/dryer. Seasonal
$1200 month includes utilities. Available Jan. thru
April. 778-8233 weekends or 813-251-0944 week
nights.
LOVELY DUPLEX unit, 3/2, 210 81st St., Holmes
Beach. Available Jan., Feb. & March. 813-962-0817.
HOLMES BEACH Walk to beach from bright newly
decorated ground level duplex. Sleeps four. Cable,
washer/dryer. Darling. 778-6158.
UNFURNISHED DUPLEX 1BR, close to beach and
shopping. Holmes Beach. $400 month/annual, plus
deposit and utilities. 778-5523.
SEASONAL: 707 S. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria. Beauti-
ful second story two bedroom owner's unit. Large
deck in rear looks down canal and front deck at Bay.
Spacious with all the goodies. 201 69th St., Holmes
Beach, close to new beach, 2/1 with Florida room and
carport. 2903 Ave. B, Holmes Beach, 2/2, quiet 1/2
duplex, 2 blocks from beach. 2815 Ave. E, Holmes
Beach, small cottage, 1/1 with Florida room. Many
others, call for information. Dolores M. Baker Real
Estate. 778-7500.
FOR RENT Efficiency with washer/dryer and cable TV.
$200 week including utilities. 778-4796 after 5 p.m.


WATER VIEW RENTAL!
Nov. & Dec. Special
Large 2/2, completely furnished, utilities included,
washer/dryer, dishwasher, microwave and phone.
Only $1200 month. Don't miss this opportunity! Green
Real Estate of Anna Maria. 778-0455.

FOR RENT Efficiency with washer/dryer and cable TV.
$200 week including utilities. 778-4796 after 5 p.m.

WINTER FOLKS!
A FEW BEACH RENTAL STILL AVAILABLE
Starting at $1100 month. Fully furnished, well
equipped and CLEAN! Hurry & select yours today!
Green Real Estate of Anna Maria 778-0455.

BRADENTON BEACH 100' to Coqunia Beach. 1BR,
remodeled. $110 week/annual, includes utilities. 778-
2036.
VACATION RENTAL Golf course condo in Baja. Ideal
for honeymoon, Marlin fishing, scuba, sight-
seeing,etc. For rates call 794-6762.
ANNA MARIA Unfumished 2BR duplex. $475 plus
utilities. Eves 778-6088.

YEARLY RENTAL Unfurnished 2B/2B ground floor
duplex. Central heat & air. Holmes Beach cul de sac.
No pets. $600 month including water, trash & lawn
care. Plus security. Evenings: 778-3995.

LOVELY DUPLEX unit, 3/2, 210 81st St., Holmes
Beach. Available Jan., Feb. & March. 813-962-0817.
COTTAGES FOR RENT on the beach. Anna Maria
city. Wk/Mth/Sn 813-735-1488.


GULF VIEW Facing gulf, less than 150 ft, to beach.
Will build on contract, 3/2, elevated home. Information
box at 3014 Ave E, Holmes Beach or will mail infor-
mation. Offered by owner at $252,000. 713-782-6573.
CANAL FRONT LOT for sale by owner. Corner of
Tern & Gladiolus, Anna Maria. $99,000. Negotiable.
778-4084.

PERICO BAY CLUB condo. 2/2, appliances, quiet,
lake view, pools, tennis, close to beaches and shop-
ping. $89,500.794-6472.

CONDO FOR SALE by owner. Holmes Beach. Sun-
bow Bay. 2/2, furnished with new large capacity
washer/dryer. Two pools, tennis court. One block from
beautiful beach. $89,900. 792-1554.
BEACH & BAY VIEW lot, 75' X 87.5', zoned R-3, 6th
St., North, Bradenton Beach. $79,500. 778-9555.
HOUSE ON CANAL Davits, pool, 3/3, family room/
dining area, living room, fenced, shaded with garage.
Spilt plan. By owner. $245,000. 778-2134.
DUPLEX ON INTRACOASTAL Deep water. Seawall.
Great view. Upstairs. Owner may finance or trade.
$155,000. 778-7980.
CONDO 2/1 w/enclosed garage and new washer/
dryer. Near Holmes Beach City Hall. Best deal on the
Island. Owner financing. Principals only! $56,000.
779-2400.
DEEP CANAL HOME 2/2, approximately 2000 sq. ft.
Direct access to Intracoastal. 15 X 30 solar heated
pool. 516 56th St., Holmes Beach. $187,000. 778-
2952.
DUPLEX BY OWNER Holmes Beach 2/2, tiled and
carpeted. Very clean. Asking price $124,900. 778-
6221.
HOLMES BEACH Partly furnished. 2/1, family room
with Franklin fireplace, large living room, dining area,
utility room, washer/dryer, shuffle board, 1 car garage,
ground level on 90 X 100 lot. 778-2528.


DEADLINE: MONDAY at NOON for Wed. publication.
Up to 3 line minimum includes approximately 21
words $3. Additional lines $1 each. Place in per-
son -Sorry, but who can afford to INVOICE$3 clas-
sified? Stop by 5400A Marina Drive, between D. Coy
Ducks the Laundromat in the Island Shopping Cen-
ter. More information: 778-7978.


Anna Maria Laundromat
9906 GULF DRIVE ANNA MARIA
In the Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
OPEN 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK


Commercial Residential Free Estimates

Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
Service 12 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
\ l778 .1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
7 78-134 5AND SATISFACTION








Painting by
Elaine Deffenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
We repair popcorn ceilings
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468

-- ---------- -
I CAVANAGH MARINE REPAIR I
SGAS DIESEL I/O INBOARD
ENGINES DRIVES GENERATORS
FULL SERVICE MARINA MOBILE SERVICE
795-7264 124TH ST. CT. W. AT CORTEZ ROAD

I -]'day


I
I
*


IRK WIJ.
E 1T


I
I
I


It-_---------------



*Ki GLASS
EVERYTHING IN GLASS!
Mirrors Tabletops
Windows & Screens
k Boat Windows
Residential & Commercial
Sales a.Repairs

5347 GULF DRIVE NORTH HOLMES BEACH
(813) 778-7808


KIMBALL
IIOMEI REPAIR

Handyman Repairs
Installation & Repair Interior & Exterior
STile & Marble Masonry & Stucco
Carpentry Decks Dry Wall
Kitchen & Bath
23 Years Experience Island Resident
Local References
778-5354





JUST



CALL

... for free home delivery
anywhere* on
Anna Maria Island.
You don't want to miss the
BEST news on the Island.
You may also call to stop home
delivery if necessary.

778-7978
Sorry, individual unit delivery is not available at
most mobile home parks or condominiums.


I ----~P~a -II I _, I _




KM PAGE 28 n NOVEMBER 11, 1993 1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


island Foods


' 3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK* 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY 7 AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1993


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


DELI FRESH
\ SLICED
BOLOGNA


99
LB.


HOMEMADE HOT OR SWEET
Italian Sausage


179
LB.
N OUR
MEAT
DEPT.


I DELI FRESH


Muenster
Cheese


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


FREE BLOOD
PRESSURE CHECK 0
Every Friday
11 A.M. to NOON


USDA BONELESS
CHUCK
ROAST $ 79
ffij, LB.


BAKERY FRESH
CRACKED WHEAT
BREAD


$ 2
WHEAT
1 LB. BRE
LOAF -


~3 11I I ~I II I IIW