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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00481
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 09-09-1993
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00481

Full Text



NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE


lISLAN DER'


Tax relief law may ease assessment


By Paul Roat
Fuming over the increased assessment on your
house this year?
Property owners may see some relief in the next
few years as a statewide constitutional change takes
place that is, if it withstands a challenge that has
brought the tax-limiting proposal to the Florida Su-
preme Court.
The proposal calls for all property eligible for a
homestead exemption to have the assessment increase
no more than three percent per year. The change was
due to go into effect this year, with the change to show


in next year's tax bills.
The challenge may delay that change a year.
Some assessments on the Island have climbed dra-
matically, particularly for waterfront property. Bob
Forney of Holmes Beach noted his property value
climbed more than $32,000 in one year.
But things could be worse. Sarasota County Prop-
erty Appraiser John Mikos said some residents in
Country Club Shores, on the south end of Longboat
Key, were seeing about a 68 percent increase in prop-
erty value.
Mikos gave an example of one house on Schooner


-s



-


Sailing toward a better Bay Islander Photo: Paul Roat
After four years of study, the Sarasota Bay National Estuary Program has released initial guidelines for
restoring and protecting Sarasota Bay. The options for bay improvement include water re-use and chemical
reduction. For more about the plan, see page 10.


burden next year
Lane, purchased for $240,000 in April 1990, showing
a 69 percent increase in its sale price 14 months later
- about five percent a month, Mikos said.
It was even worse on Lido Shores, the tiny island
just south of Longboat Key. The increase in assess-
ments on the exclusive island was as much as
$736,000 on some parcels.
How many people on the Island will see a break in
their property taxes if the three percent limit takes place?
Robin Tardiff of the Manatee County Property
Appraiser's office provided the following data to the
Islander Bystander:
Anna Maria City:
1,522 total parcels
566 homestead-exempt parcels (37 percent of total)
44 vacant and improved commercial parcels
1 improved industrial parcel
24 governmental parcels
32 condominium parcels (2 percent total)

Bradenton Beach:
1,383 total parcels
275 homestead-exempt parcels (20 percent of total)
67 vacant and improved commercial parcels
0 improved industrial parcels
52 governmental parcels
700 condominium parcels (51 percent of total)

Holmes Beach:
3,861 total parcels
1,428 homestead-exempt parcels (37 percent of total)
216 vacant and improved commercial parcels
4 improved industrial parcels
28 governmental parcels
1,212 condominium parcels (31 percent of total).

Tardiff said there are still a number of questions
that need to be answered on the three percent assess-
ment limitation issue. For example, if a business owner
lives on the site of the business, it is yet to be deter-
mined what portion of the property would receive the
assessment limitation.


Complainant pulls out of Sandbar complaint


By Joy Courtney
Editor
Stephen Foster, owner of a lot at the Gulf end of Pine
Avenue in Anna Maria City, has pulled out of a class-
action complaint originally initiated by him and 11 other
property owners along Pine and Spring Avenues to try to
stop the Sandbar Restaurant from expanding.
In a letter received by Anna Maria city hall on July
30, the property owners, represented by William Merrill
mI of the law firm Icard, Merrill, Cullis, Timm, Furen &
Ginsburg, of Sarasota, stated their case as to why the three
alley vacation petitions filed by Ed Chiles, owner of the
Sandbar Restaurant, should be denied.
Foster, in a notarized letter received at city hall on
Sept. 2, states he has no objection to the alley vacation
requests and disavows any association with any group
that is opposed to the alley vacation. He states he is
not, and has never been part of any group opposed to
the petitions.
Foster could not be reached to explain why he was


included in the class-action complaint if he "had never
been part of any group opposed."
Merrill, when advised of Foster's Sept. 2 letter,
stated he was "surprised" and unaware of the letter.
Fred Edmister of 108 Pine Ave., one of the com-
plainants, said Foster called him a couple of weeks ago
and said he did not want to be part of the group and,
except to say he was not against the Sandbar, added no
further explanation. "
"We are not against the Sandbar either. We are
against its expansion. We can't open our windows now.
What we hear is either live music, happy birthday being
sung to Joe or 'Anderson party of six,'" said Edmister. "If
it [patio dining] expands it will only get worse."
Edmister said that calls to the restaurant to tone
down the noise have met with intermittent cooperation.
"I know the property he [Chiles] needs to expand
his patio is zoned commercial. I would have no prob-
lem with a small restaurant like the Sign of the Mer-
maid going in there. It would be small, first-class and


Galati's take over Perico Harbor marina


By Pat Copeland
Islander Bystander
As of Sunday morning, the Galati brothers became
managing and majority partners in the Perico Harbor
Marina, now Galati's Perico Harbor Marina.
"Gulfwind Marine was a tenant and also owned a
percentage of the property and building," explained
Joe Galati. "We bought their interest plus an additional
percentage."
Galati said the family's marina, Galati Marine in
Anna Maria, has reached the point that it can no longer
expand, and the new facility at Perico Harbor will of-


fer that opportunity.
"There is tremendous potential here, and our inten-
tion is to turn it into a full service marine facility," said
Galati. "We will be moving the Chris Craft franchise
to Galati's Perico and putting in full service and parts
departments."
Galati said the new facility fills the gap, because
it offers rack storage. All slips at Galati's Marine in
Anna Maria are in the water.
Joe Galati will be the manager at Galati's Perico,
while Carmine and Michael Galati will manage the
Anna Maria marina.


especially, inside," said Edmister. "Once the Sandbar
has expanded, it's expanded. The noise and traffic will
only increase."
The three alleys represented in the petitions repre-
sent a continuous "L-shaped" alley located adjacent to
and on the east side of the restaurant, and are currently
part of the restaurant's parking area. If the petitions are
approved and two commercial lots owned by Reynold
Glanz of Anna Maria, which are located directly north and
adjacent to the restaurant, are acquired the groundwork
will be laid for filing for state permits to construct an ad-
dition. Chiles has previously stated he wants to expand the
restaurant's patio seating by 70 seats, expand the parking
area and build a park
The Planning Commission will hear the alley va-
cation petitions on Sept. 13.

FYI: The water was offfor several hours due to
a break in the line at Turtles on Tues., Sept. 7.






SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
Fire budget increase .....................Page 2
Opinions ........................................ Page 4
Those were the days.....................Page 5
Streetlife ........ ......................... Page 14
School menu ...........................P...Page 12
Outdoors & Fishing ............Page 16/17
Real estate transactions ...............Page 18
Classifieds ..........................Page 22/23


THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND


SEPTEMBER 9, 1993







ljM] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 2

Price clarifies fire tax increase, budget process


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
A month after final passage of the Anna
Maria Fire District's 1993/94 budget, rum-
blings over generous salary increases for em-
ployees, the tax rate increase and the budget
process are still being heard throughout the
community.
Even those who understand the budget pro-
cess undertaken by each Island city are con- ,
fused by the fire district's method of determin- /
ing its yearly increase. The terminology gov-
erning the process, "enabling act" and "five-
year plan," are foreign to the average taxpayer,
adding to the confusion.
The Islander Bystander met with Fire
Chief Andy Price who explained the terminol-
ogy, budget process and salary increases and
offered a breakdown of the district's five-year
plan along with comparisons to other districts
in the county.
The district is a 15-square-mile land mass
and includes Anna Maria Island and Cortez
Road to 86th Street. There are 9,000 to 10,000
residential and commercial parcels within the
district including 13 million square feet of resi- ^
dential property and 1.15 million square feet of 6
commercial property.

Enabling act
"Special fire districts were created because there
were areas where there was no fire service and the
county could not fund them," said Price.
The fire district was created in 1951 by an act of
the legislature called the "enabling act," Price said.
Each fire district is governed by its own enabling act
which establishes its board, functions, taxing cap and
methods, the ability to charge for certain services, etc.
Each year the enabling act, with any changes, is
presented as a bill to the local legislative delegation at
a public hearing in the fall. The delegation may make
.any changes in the bill and following the delegation's
approval, it is filed in Tallahassee and approved by the
legislature during the session which begins each year
in February.
"Having so many special fire districts is very con-
fusing," noted Price. "The state's fire chiefs are work-
ing on a uniform fire district act to have common leg-
islation for all districts."

The five-year plan
The five-year plan is a plan approved by the leg-
islature which establishes the district's tax caps and de-
tails proposed improvements.
"The legislature asked for the plan so they could -
see where we're headed," said Price. "The enabling act
contains the tax rates and the total five year increase
with limits per year. We have to show why we want an
increase and what we're going to dd with the money."
The 1993/94 budget year is the third year of the cur-
rent five-year plan. The plan was written by former Chief
Glenn Bliss with input from the board, said Price. The
plan's total cap for residential property is based on a base
rate of $65 plus $.05 per square foot over 1,000 square
feet. For commercial property, there is a base rate of $150
plus $.05 per square foot over 1,000 square feet.
The first year of the five-year plan, 1991/92, shows
a 33 percent decrease in the base rate and no increase in
the square footage rate for residential property and no
increase in the base rate and a 100 percent decrease in the
square footage rate for commercial property.
The second year of the five-year plan, 1992/93, shows
no increase in the base rate and a 50 percent decrease in


the square footage rate for residential property and no
increase in either rate for commercial property.
The third year of the plan, 1993/94 shows a 33 per-
cent increase in the base rate and no increase in the square
footage rate for residential property and a 12.5 percent
increase in the base rate and a 53 percent decrease in the
square footage rate for commercial property.
Percentages are based on amounts of increase ap-
proved in the five-year plan. The current residential
base is $65, which is the five-year cap, and the square
footage rate is $.01. The current commercial base is
$112.50 and the square footage is $.032. This is 38
percent below what is approved in the five-year plan
for the third year.

The budget process
The district's budget process begins in May with
a tax rate hearing, an advertised public hearing. The
tax rate is adopted by resolution and sent to the prop-
erty appraiser's office. The property appraiser's office
applies the rate to the tax roll and returns the tax roll
to the district.
"We have 21 days to review the tax roll and make
sure it is properly applied," explained Administrative
Secretary Mary Stephens. "We check all property to
make sure it's being taxed properly by calculating the
square footage, making sure it's in the right category,
etc. This year we found an additional $37,000."'
The tax roll is corrected and returned to the prop-
erty appraiser's office. Based on these figures, the
district begins formulating its budget. The budget is
drafted by the administrative staff and the board trea-
surer with input from other board members, refined at
a public work session and adopted at the board's pub-
lic meeting in August.
"The municipalities get automatic increases each year
because of higher assessments," explained Price. "Our
assessments are based on the size of the building. Unlike
ad valorem taxes, the value Is not included. In order to
provide the same services with increased costs or to in-
crease services, we have to increase our tax rate."
Another factor is that the district is .95 percent
built-out, limiting the amount of new property to be
added to the district's tax rolls.
After tax notices are sent to property owners, the dis-


trict schedules a tax appeal hearing, an advertised
public hearing, scheduled this year for Septem-
ber 20. Following the tax appeal hearing, the
board adopts a resolution certifying the final tax
roll and any appeals action.
"The appeals are not on the tax rate itself,"
explained Price, "but on how the rate is calcu-
lated. Traditionally, we have very few."
Salary increases
This year's budget was greeted with vocal
protest from Island property owners in part
due to salary increases of up to 29 percent.
Staffers, volunteers and three of the five board
members defended the increases as imperative
to keeping and attracting quality employees.
There were also other considerations, said
Price. One was the ISO or insurance rating. This
rating is based on a district's level of service,
training, equipment and other factors and is the
basis for the district's fire insurance rates.
"The board told people they would get the
ISO rating down before they increased taxes,"
said Price. "In 1991, the ISO rating went from
a nine to a five and the increases were imple-
mented. A study showed that over five years,
,) property owners would realize a $3 million
savings on insurance premiums because of the
reduced ISO rating. The savings they've got-
ten in premiums fully paid for any increases we've
made."
Price said the board also asked employees to forgo
any salary increases until, "we could prove we were
doing the best we could do. Once they got that done,
they would take care of our salaries, but the district
came first."
Employees only wanted their pay to fall in line
with other local districts, said Price. "We didn't real-
ize we were so far behind, and we need higher salaries
to maintain the quality of people we have. Also, state
requirements on the fire district have changed dramati-
cally in the. past 10 years, and we need more paid
people to deal with those."

Tax assessment comparison
According to Price, in a comparison with five
other local fire districts, Anna Maria assessments are
22 to 115 percent lower. Those districts are Braden
River, Cedar Hammock, North River, Southern Mana-
tee and Westside. All except Cedar Hammock are
combination districts, part volunteer and part paid.
Cedar Hammock is fully paid.
"Our combined base and square footage rate for
commercial is the lowest," noted Price. "Our residen-
tial has the lowest base rate, but the square footage is
slightly higher. Southern Manatee, North River and
Cedar Hammock have a large percentage of commer-
cial properties, so they don't have to charge as much
for residential property.
To arrive at comparisons, Price combined the
commercial and residential rates. The comparison is
based on a 2,500 square foot residential property and
a 10,000 square foot ordinary commercial property and
reflects the tax assessment that would be levied for
each district.
Comparisons are:

Anna NMaria $480.00
Braden River $1,034.50 (+115 percent)
Cedar Hammock $583.50 (+22 percent)
North River $724.75 (+51 percent)
Southern Manatee $654.00 (+37 percent)
Westside $985.00 (+105 percent)


800 MHz radio system brings Holmes Beach into the future


If the City of Holmes Beach's budget passes as
proposed, the police department will soon be convert-
ing from its current radio system to the 800 MHz sys-
tem at a cost of $30,600. .
According to Lt. Jay Romine, the department's
acting chief, the switch will give the department's of-
ficers the ability to communicate directly with every
police agency in the county, as well as public safety,
EMS and fire departments.
The bottom line is officer safety, said Romine.
"With our current system, if one of our officers is by
himself and requests back up, our dispatcher has to
pick up the phone and call the sheriff's department.


The sheriffs department then calls Anna Maria or
Bradenton Beach. There's no direct communication.
We can't talk to anyone anymore."
Although the department has three portable 800 MHz
units, Romine pointed out that, "if an officer has to bail
out of his car carrying two radios, it's ridiculous."
The $30,600 will allow the department to tie into
the county's state-of-the-art system, said Romine.
And because the county is a beta test site for the
system, the city will receive a 35 percent reduction in
the cost of equipment.
"The system in Manatee County is recognized as
a premier system," noted Romine. "Recently a delega-


tion from China came to look at it. More and more
agencies are going to the 800 MHz system because of
the expanded ability to communicate."
Romine said for residents, the new radio system
will not change anything, and the dispatch station will
remain the same.
"I'm very happy that the mayor and council made
the decision to do it," Romine said.
"You can't compromise officer safety with cost.
In this department, the city gets a good bang for the
buck and this will just improve the safety of our offic-
ers and their ability to service the community,"
Romine said of the radio system.






[J1 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 3

No vote at land development hearing in Anna Maria


By Joy Courtney
Editor
For the second time, the Anna Maria City Com-
mission did not have enough commissioners to form
a quorum during the second public reading of changes
to the city's Land Development Regulations (LDR).
The first public hearing held Aug. 19 had to ad-
journ for lack of a quorum.
The commissioners present, Dottie McChesney,
Doug Wolfe and Max Znika, used the evening to dis-
cuss areas of concern. Mayor Ray Simches has been on
vacation and Commissioner George McKay has been
in out-of-state on business since Aug. 2.
Commissioner Doug Wolfe had a bone to pick
with the Federal Emergency Management Act.
The LDR change reads:
"When a structure occupied by a nonconforming
use, which has been damaged to an extent greater than


50% of the fair market value immediately prior to the
time of its destruction, the nonconforming use may be
restored only to the density or intensity of use prior to
its destruction and provided that the applicable FEMA
regulations are met."
Wolfe stated that the fair market value "immediately
prior to the time of destruction" was virtually impossible
to determine because it's established by active negotia-
tions between a buyer and seller. In reality, only bank and
county records would be available, which do not reflect
current fair market value. He also noted that most dwell-
ings and businesses in Anna Maria City as well as on the
entire Island were nonconforming.
"This must be a FEMA regulation that the city will
have to enforce, but I believe it's a gross violation of
property owners' rights. It's a raw deal," said Wolfe.
Wolfe also noted an inconsistency between the
city's parking ordinance and the LDR amendment to
\


rights-of-way. The parking ordinance permits parking
within an eight-foot area from the edge of the pave-
ment. The LI)R amendment would permit trees, side-
walks, etc., to be placed seven feet from edge of pave-
ment or further. Other than the one foot conflict, Wolfe
stated he saw no reason to change the current code for
clear rights-of-ways, which is 10 feet.
"I disagree," said McChesney, "We need seven
feet for the greening of Anna Maria. This has been
recommended by the Planning Commission. A side-
walk may need to be placed at 10 feet, but to plant trees
we need seven feet."
"That's right. No trees in the rights-of-way. The
present ordinance has existed quite well at 10 feet,"
said Wolfe.
There was also discussion on fence height. The
new regulations establish permissible fence height to
be "not less than six feet high," The commissioners
discussed a flat, six-foot-high regulation.
The second reading of the LDR ordinance was
continued to Thursday, Sept. 9 at 7:30 p.m.


Summer games pay off Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
Ed Chiles (left), owner of the Sandbar restaurant in Anna Maria City which sponsors the "Endless Summer
Beach Games" to benefit the center, presents a check for $1,000 to Pierette Kelly, Anna Maria Island
Community Center director, Scott Dell, program director, and Deana Hartman, assistant director. Kelly
said the Sandbar was the leading company in Anna Maria City that worked to develop a corporate con-
science, demonstrated by its contributions to the center. The Sandbar sponsors two beach game fundraisers
a year, one to benefit the United Way and one for the center.


Anna Maria City
Thurs., 9/9: 10 a.m. Permits
Thurs., 9/9: 7:30 p.m. Continuation of 2nd
Public Meeting, Land Development
Regulation Ordinance
Mon., 9/13: 7:30 p.m. Planning Commission,
Vacation of Alley
Tues., 9/14: 7:30 p.m. Commission
Work Session

Holmes Beach
Thurs., 9/9: 7:30 p.m. Council Workshop
Tues., 9/14: 7:30 p.m. 1st Reading, City Budget

Bradenton Beach
Thurs., 9/9: 7 p.m. Commission Meeting
Thurs., 9/9: 1 p.m. Bid Award, Community
Development Block Grant


NEW ARRIVAL!

IT'S A BOY!

Born Saturday, September 4, 10:09 PM

JOSEPH LAMBERT HUTCHINSON
9.5 Lbs, 22.5 inches long


















Tropical, Fun, Classic Clothing
Artful Gifts & Accessories

131EACI-1-ST YI.IE

I3OUTIQUE
10010 GULF DRIVE AT PINE AVENUE ANNA MARIA
OPEN MON-SAT 9:30 6 and SUNDAY 11 5
(We're just one block north of the Sandbar Restaurant)
778-4323


I METIGS






rj THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 PAGE 4


I O i N M i


Caller I.D. please
Two weeks ago, we reported a story about oppo-
sition to plans for expansion at the Sandbar Restaurant
Within the context of the story, we noted that Gov.
Lawton Chiles, who is at least a part-owner in the cor-
poration owning the restaurant run by his son Ed,
called Anna Maria City Hall.
Two sources reported the Governor's phone call to
the Islander Bystander. The call and the conversation
were confirmed by Editor Joy Courtney directly with
Anne Beck, secretary for the planning department and the
reported recipient of the call at city hall.
Ed Chiles offers a contradicting view from this
report. He said the city received a call from the
Governor's office regarding certification requirements
for public work's department employees, as per his
request a favor Ed claims he performed at the re-
quest of then-public works director Frank Tyndall.
Anne Beck has reversed her previous statement and
has no recollection of speaking to the Governor or relat-
ing the alleged conversation to Joy Courtney or anyone
else. Beck states now that she recalls only "joking com-
ments made with Steve Lardas in regard to Ed Chiles fill-
ing out forms [for the petition to vacate the alleys] because
there were so many corrections."
But Steve Lardas, chairman of the planning commis-
sion, recalls his conversation with Beck very clearly.
"Anne told me that Gov. Chiles had called city hall
expressing concern that the city was giving his son, Ed
Chiles, a difficult time regarding the petition to vacate
the city alley by the Sandbar Restaurant," Lardas
states. "Anne told me that she informed the Governor
that this was not the case.
"Anne told me of her telephone conversation with the
governor in a most serious manner during a meeting I had
with her regarding planning commission matters."
Joy Courtney recalls her conversation clearly as well.
Did the Governor call? It seems only Gov. Chiles
himself can answer.
On Tuesday, Sept. 7, Lawton Chiles said, "I did
not make a phone call to Anna Maria City Hall about
anything."
It's a tangled web, Anne.
And why is all this important? Perhaps because things
at Anna Maria City Hall need to be taken more seriously.

Oops
In our story Sept 2, "Chamber voices opinions on
tourist rentals," it was stated that chamber members told
the Holmes Beach Planning Commission that the resort
overlay in the city district R4, mostly south of Manatee
Avenue, prohibits rentals of less than 30 days. Although
this is true in the district R1AA, covering Key Royale, the
R4 district limits rentals to less than seven days.


ISLANDERg MIN V iII
SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 VOLUME ONE, NUMBER 42
V Bonner Presswood, Publisher
V Editorial
Joy Courtney, Features Editor
Paul Roat, News Editor
Pat Copeland
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Jack Egan
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Kay Pruden
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Darla Becker
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Susan Runfola
V Production
Mike Atwood
Daria Becker
V Distribution
Darla Becker
Bob Tingler
Mary Stockmaster
c.VlE M 4,




With a lot of help from our friends. @ 1993
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5400A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
813778 7978 ,


SLICK by Egan


Art League opposes
'I Love Anna Maria Day'
The Board of Directors of the Anna Maria Island
Art League on Sept. 2 unanimously voted against par-
ticipation in the "I Love Anna Maria Day" art event
scheduled for Sept. 18.
The League has never received a formal request
for sponsorship of the event, nor has it been asked for
permission to use its facilities for a party that night.
The board felt it must take a position on the event, and
trusts the Islander Bystander will make this position
clear to the community.
As the community knows, the Art League is an
avid supporter of the arts, and especially of children's
involvement in artistic pursuits. However, most of our
board members are also avid lovers of the flora and sea
life that make our Island such a special place. To string
plastic tape all over the Island, where it is bound to
blow into the trees and Gulf and harm wildlife and the
environment, seems to the board to contradict the
theme of the event.
Many of our members are involved in the national
beach clean-up, scheduled to occur the same day as the
art event. They do not believe the two activities are
compatible.
The Art League is sorry for any inconvenience its
position may cause the community or the artists in-
volved in the event. However, in conscience the league
does not believe it can allow its facilities and name to
be associated with an event that its board members
believe is unsound environmentally.
Mary Devine Worobec, President;
Gail Cutting, Secretary
Anna Maria Island Art League
EDITOR'S NOTE: The "I Love Anna Maria" event
proposed by Woody Candish has been canceled.

For the Sandbar
This letter is in response to the petition being circu-
lated that opposes the Sandbar Restaurant's request for the
City of Anna Maria to vacate the alley lying between lots
7 and 8, block 34, Anna Maria Beach Subdivision.
The amazing thing to me is that the Sandbar has
been here for at least 40 or 50 years. Pine Street has
always been zoned mostly commercial. Now, the


people who bought in an area that is predominately
commercial in use and built residential homes want to
complain that the Sandbar is detrimental to the public
interest. This is sort of like a person who buys a house
near an airport, then complains about the noise.
I believe these people are not so concerned with
the public interest so much as their own personal
agenda. The Sandbar Restaurant is a first-class opera-
tion run by a great staff. The contributions of the Sand-
bar to the community are too many to list.
Joseph L Hutchinson, Anna Maria

A little bit of heaven
As a former Island resident who met and married
my husband on Anna Maria Island, I wanted to let you
know how much we enjoy your newspaper. We saw
our first issue when we were on vacation to the Island
in July.
We moved away from Anna Maria in 1964 and
left our special Island to come to Houston, Texas. We
are fortunate that we are able to come back each sum-
mer and capture our "little bit of heaven" for a few
weeks.
This year we enjoyed a particularly exciting event,
as you reported. We were able to watch a mother sea
turtle come out of the water and lay her eggs. And we
were there when the Turtle Watch people came to get
the eggs and put them in the Island hatchery.
I'll enjoy reading your paper and to see what is
happening on the Island and be dreaming of when
we'll be back again.
Nancy Martin Drymond, Houston, Texas
Strong presence in the
community
I closed yesterday on a $360,000 property located
at 638 Dundee Lane that I was wise enough to adver-
tise in the Islander Bystander.
The buyer called on your ad the same day it ran.
It is obvious that your paper has a strong presence in
our wonderful community.
Dick Maher, Neal & Neal Realtors, Anna Maria Island

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[] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 5


THOSE WERE THE AYS
Conclusion, Everybody's Talking
by June Alder


In 1902 linemen (one
of them probably Jack
Leffingwell) celebrate
the first Peninsular
telephone cable,
raised at Manatee
Avenue and Court-
house Square.


'QUITE AN INDIVIDUAL'


Some prodigies who amaze us in
their youth later lead undistinguished
lives. They burn out, we might say. In a
way, Jack Leffingwell who in 1895
at age 12 brought the telephone to
Manatee County and had his own tele-
communications business by the time
he was 15 fits that mold.
For he was a business failure at 16,
a college drop-out at 18 or so and a
wanderer going from job to job and
place to place thereafter. Though he
built up a good business by middle age,
he lost everything in the Great Depres-
sion and ended his days living in a
shack on Anna Maria Island.
Those are the bare facts. Now, here
are the details.
After he and his physician-father sold
out Gulf Coast Telephone Company in
1898, Jack enrolled in Stetson University
in DeLand, Florida. Dr. Leffingwell per-
haps hoped his son would follow in his
footsteps. But the academic life wasn't for
Jack. He soon quit college to hang around
Bradentown.
He was far from idle, however. He
strung a telephone wire west through
the scrub and mangrove coast to the
little fishing village of Cortez, the single
telephone there being the only means of
telecommunication for Cortezians and
Islanders for years. He laid out the
course of a street railway line from east
of Bradentown to Fogartyville -
which, unfortunately, quickly went
broke. And by 1903, at the age of 20, he
was in Orlando building its first tele-
phone system.
The Orlando job over, Jack shipped
out to see the world.
He signed on with the United Fruit
Company to survey for a railroad route
through the wilds of Nicaragua; worked
for sugar companies in Cuba; and, as to
be expected, had a hand in digging the
Panama Canal.
Patriotism and his yen for adven-
ture led him to go with the Florida
National Guard to patrol the Mexican bor-
der in 1916. The next year he was fighting
the Huns in France as lieutenant in com-
mand of the infantry company he had or-
ganized in Bradentown.
After the war, he was hired by a


sawmill company to install a telephone
system on Cuba's Isle of Pines. He
stayed on to operate the company for
nearly 20 years save for the six
months in 1921-22 when he was per-
suaded to return to Bradentown to
build a bridge to Anna Maria Island. (I
wrote a series of columns in July de-
scribing how Jack accomplished that
feat despite the damage wrought by the
fabled Hurricane of '21.)
A little violin music, please. It was
on the romantic Isle of Pines that the
footloose bachelor finally fell in love.
Jack was 50 when he married one of
his telephone operators lovely Ora
from California. Their only child, a
son, was bornin 1935. (He was named
John Brooks after Dr. Leffingwell,
who had died in 1930.)
But the music stopped for Ora
and Jack. The times turned bad. Jack
had to sell his island telephone com-
pany for a song $1,000 and take
his wife and little boy home to
Bradentown. Work was hard to come
by there, too, especially for a man in
his 60s. Somehow they made it
through the Depression, and during the
World War II years Jack labored in the
shipyards of Panama City and Tampa.
At war's end the Leffingwells settled
down on Anna Maria Island in an army
surplus barracks building not far from the
bridge he had built. There, in "Jack's
Shack," he began to put down on paper
some of the stories about life in Florida
he had stored up in his mind over the
years. They were popular features in lo-
cal newspapers and in adventure maga-
zines across the country.
But Jack wasn't finished meeting
new challenges. Somewhere along the
line he had learned to fly. He joined the
Civil Air Patrol in 1954; in 1957, at the
age of 74, he was named commander
with the rank of major.
"Quite an individual," the Braden-
ton Herald commented, when he died
four years later.
He was that and more. Jack
Leffingwell, as amazing a character as
any he wrote about, was a prodigy
right up to the end,
Next: Readers have their say


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IM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 6


Files reveal police department in turmoil


Picture a police department completely demoral-
ized by a tyrannical boss. This is the image that
emerges from the hundreds of documents which were
the basis of Chief Maddox's dismissal by Holmes
Beach Mayor Pat Geyer on July 28.
An "employee needs" survey was distributed to
police department members
early this year. Survey questions .-
included: the best and worst of
working for the department,
three wishes for departmental
changes, training topics to be
addressed and suggestions for a
management training program. ,
In the nine signed survey '
forms, the "worst" were:
Low or complete break-
down of morale.
Continuous policy and Dismissed Chief Ma
procedure changes by the chief.
Lack of leadership or
negative leadership by the chief.
The chief's demeaning attitude toward em-
ployees.
Constant criticism by the chief.
Tension in the workplace.
Lack of communication with the chief.
The chief s lack of confidence in his officers.
Each "worst" was cited numerous times.
"Wishes" had to do with the often mentioned
problems:
"To be appreciated for your input and discuss
the problems and needs of the department."
"To be treated as human and civil."
To have Maddox returned to his "1986-87
form or replaced."
"To be able to come to work during the week-
day shift without a thick cloud of tension hanging over
the entire building."
"To have a leader who does not constantly
belittle you and criticize your work without ever giv-
ing any praise for anything."
In addition, Lt. Jay Romine, now acting chief of
police, recently documented his problems and conflicts
with Maddox in a "journal." Romine's accounts were
corroborated by several other employees.
Also included in the documents are memos from
Maddox and Sgt. Dale Stephenson.
Here are summaries of the content of some of this


material:
On April 28, the
department's policy for in-
vestigative reports was the
subject of a memo from
Maddox to Romine and Ser-
geants Dale Stephenson and
Charles Anderson. Maddox
said the portable computer
system, utilized by officers
for field reports, was not
working, and he issued a
new rule. It required that,
"any report that is culmi-
nated in an arrest, or any
felony investigation, will
have a complete investiga-
tive narrative in addition to
probable cause affidavit and
computer entry." He further
requested that officers take
statements from "drunken
victims and/or witnesses."


the door for a defense attorney to destroy the credibil-
ity of the statement."
During a discussion on the issue, Romine said
Maddox became defensive and angry and "began to
scream at me and tell me that I didn't know what I was
talking about," said Romine.
Sgt. Anderson then entered the build-
ing and Maddox asked his opinion. When
Anderson agreed with Romine, Maddox
"immediately became completely unglued
and started yelling at Anderson and contin-
ued to do so for approximately 20 minutes,"
Romine wrote.
A May 4 journal entry concerned the
nomination for Officer of the Year, which
was to be written by the chief. Romine went
to a week-long seminar in Jacksonville and
.... -returned to find the uncompleted nomination
lox form in his box.
He wrote, "Dreading another verbal as-
sault from him (Maddox) for asking a simple
question, such as, 'Why didn't you fill out the nomination
form?,' I just decided not to say anything, as he had been
informed that it needed to be done before I even left for
Jacksonville."
Several days
later, Maddox asked
Romine if the nomi-
nation had been de-
livered. Romine said
he told Maddox the
nomination hadn't
been completed, and
Maddox "immedi-
ately lost control and
became very angry
and pointed his fin- Mayor Pat Geyer
ger at my face and
said, 'goddamn it, I delegated that to you and when I tell
you to do something, then, goddamn it I expect it to get
done.'"
Romine explained to Maddox that he had not del-
egated the task. After further arguing, Maddox acknowl-
edged that, but said he assigned it to Romine the follow-
ing week. Romine reminded Maddox he had been in Jack-
sonville. At one point in the argument, Romine said, an
extremely angry Maddox stood up on his toes about six
inches from his face and "I felt for the first time that he
was going to physically strike me."


During a discussion on an issue
regarding reports, Lt. Jay
Romine said Chief Maddox
became defensive and angry and
"began to scream at me and tell
me that I didn't know what I was
talking about," said Romine. Sgt.
Charles Anderson then entered
the building and Maddox asked
his opinion. When Anderson
agreed with Romine, Maddox
"immediately became completely
unglued and started yelling at
Anderson and continued to do so
for approximately 20 minutes,"
Romine wrote.


In a May 5 memo to Maddox, Stephenson said it was
his understanding that if a detailed computer report could
be made, no written narrative was necessary. "I believe
that the added narrative, besides the other functions of the
officer's duty, will hinder the actual deterrent of the pa-
trol function," Stephenson said.
On taking statements from intoxicated persons,
Stephenson also disagreed. "I think that letting drunks
sign statements can only add more confusion when
they recant their stories at a later date," he wrote.
In a June 4 journal entry, Romine agreed with
Stephenson on both counts. He said the department has
never encouraged taking statements from intoxicated
persons but encouraged them to return and sign state-
ments when sober. He added that not only intoxication,
but the fact that the person has been drinking, "opens


Maddox and Romine also disagreed
over training policies and training as it
relates to civil liability. In one instance,
Romine recommended the officers be
trained in and carry pepper gas as an
alternative to their hands as a method of
non-lethal force. In a May 17 memo, he
requested to be certified in its use as the
departmental instructor.
In a May 27 memo concerning the
pepper gas, Maddox replied that "the
training aspect does not appear to be of
critical importance" and "I suspect the
written instructions concerning use of
this product will be adequate for policy
development and training determina-
tion."
Other disagreements centered around
lesson plans. Romine prepared a lesson
plan which he had used for several years
in teaching classes at the police acad-
emy.


When asked by another employee if the plan had
been approved, the employee "was informed by
Maddox in a very derogatory and condescending man-
ner that he was going to approve it this time, only be-
cause he had no choice," wrote Romine, "but that the
lesson plan that I had submitted to him was very poorly
written and was basically a piece of s--- that was not
pertinent to law enforcement. Maddox said that from
now on, all lesson plans would be pre-approved by him
before they were instructed."
Throughout several journal entries, Romine detailed
a problem with Maddox over validation form letters.
He wrote, "It is the policy of FDLE (Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement) that the letters are required,
and from the time of the audit, Maddox has disagreed with
the policy and stated that our follow-up investigation
should be adequate documentation, and that FDLE didn't


Hearing Delayed
Maddox, who was the city's chief of police
for eight years, is appealing his dismissal, which
was upheld by the city council in a unanimous
vote. The city's appointee to the three member
appeal board, Councilman Rich Bohnenberger,
and Maddox's selection, Pinellas Park Chief of
Police David C. Milchan, have still not agreed to
the third member of the panel.
Holmes Beach City Attorney Stephen Dye'
reports that he sent a letter to the Attorney Gen-
eral of the State of Florida requesting that
Bohnenberger and Milchan meet in person, "out
of the Sunshine," in order to come to an agree-
ment on the third appeal board member. Dye
states that according to cases cited in the sunshine
law, the board may be subject to meeting in the
"sunshine," but if not, they can handle the ap-
pointment of the third member with a phone call.
Dye has been notified that the attorney general's
office will render an opinion, but it may take some
time before their opinion is revealed and, therefore,
the hearing date can not be established.


have the ability to tell him what to do."
Romine lamented, "We spend countless hours of
manpower arguing over what should not even be an
issue... Now if I continue to do things the way FDLE
says to do, I am in trouble with him and have to deal
with his verbal and psychological abuse, or I do what


he says and the next
audit we have from
FDLE, we are in
trouble with them. I
think that it is a tre-
mendous waste of
my time that I have
to sit and document
everything that
happens just to pro-
tect myself..."
Another inci-
dent Romine re-
ported involved
school crossing
guard Cliff Stead,
who had requested
new uniform pants.
A public works de-
partment employee


When asked if a police
teaching lesson plan had
been approved, the em-
ployee 'was informed by
Maddox in a very deroga-
tory and condescending
manner that he was going
to approve it this time,
only because he had no
choice, but that the lesson
plan that had been submit-
ted to him was very poorly
written and was basically a
piece of [crap].'


said Maddox, "began verbally


abusing Cliff and started scolding him about proper
procedures, the budget and several other things," wrote
Romine. "The employee was so shocked by the out-


'Maddox will not allow
anything to be said that does
not completely agree with
what he is saying at the
time. He is verbally abusive
and lately has become
physically threatening if
anyone argues with what he
says. There are examples
after examples of where he
does not remember what he
says from one week to the
next, that people get
screamed at (in front of
other people) for doing
things the way he has told
them to do in the past. It is
constantly a situation now to
where everybody knows that
no matter what they do, it
will be wrong.'


burst and its
content and
Maddox's tone
of voice, he al-
most took the
risk himself to
intervene and
ask the chief
what Cliff did to
deserve to be
talked to and
treated like
that."
A journal en-
try involving a
problem trans-
mission on a pa-
trol car brought
this observation
by Romine:
"This is a perfect
example of
people being
afraid to do any-
thing because it's
always going to
be wrong. I have


seen people get yelled at because they simply wrote up
what the symptoms were...and didn't try and diagnose the
problem. Then people get afraid to write anything up be-
cause they are police officers and not mechanics."
A general comment by Romine in one of the jour-









Councilman Rich Bohnenberger will serve
on the review panel, along with Pinellas
Park Police Chief David Milchan. The
third member of the group is yet to be
named, and that inaction is holding up the
process of allowing Maddox's side of the
dispute to be aired.


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nal entries noted, "Maddox will not al-
low anything to be said that does not
completely agree with what he is saying
at the time. He is verbally abusive and


lately has become
physically threat-
ening if anyone ar-
gues with what he
says.
"There are ex-
amples after ex-
amples of where he
does not remember
what he says from
one week to the
next, that people
get screamed at (in
front of other
people) for doing
things the way he
has told them to do
in the past. It is
constantly a situa-


when both dispatchers are busy and
"both of their times have to be syn-
chronized for documentation."
Lalos wrote that a request for re-


'Senior dispatcher Bonnie
Lalos detailed numerous
incidents involving herself,
as well as other dispatchers
and employees. When I got
to my car, I was in tears and
my head was pounding. I
couldn't think straight. I
stopped to have my blood
pressure checked. It was 190
over 115 on 400 mgs of
SectraL'


tion now to where everybody knows
that no matter what they do, it will be
wrong."

Incidents with
dispatcher
Senior dispatcher Bonnie Lalos de-
tailed numerous incidents involving
herself, as well as other dispatchers and
employees.
On April 19, a public works depart-
ment employee came into the station, no-
ticed a door knob lying on the clerk's desk
and a hole in the office door, and fiegan to
install the doorknob, recalled Lalos.
She wrote, "The chief came out of
his office and started screaming names
at the employee such as 'stupid idiot'
and asked, 'Why on earth would he try
to install a broken door knob?'" Report-


imbursement for
mileage to Largo
for a field training
program was re-
fused, because the
chief said, "I
should have re-
quested the
amount for mile-
age before I left for
Largo." Lalos said
she had a memo
from the chief in-
structing her to
keep a record of
the mileage and
tolls for reimburse-
ment.


Verbal abuse was another problem
cited by Lalos. In one instance,
Maddox got angry over dispatchers
taking messages for other personnel.
"He then continued uncontrollably
yelling for approximately one-and-
one-half to two hours telling me how
incompetent I was as a supervisor, and
I need to find my dusty rules and regu-
fations and make a 50-question test and
present them to him for his approval,"
she said.
Another instance of verbal abuse
left her so distraught Lalos said,
"When I got to my car, I was in tears
and my head was pounding. I couldn't
think straight. I stopped to have my
blood pressure checked. It was 190
over 115 on 400 mgs of Sectral. I took
some aspirins and didn't settle down
for at least two hours."


edly, the chief then
grabbed the door
knob out of the
employee's hand
and threw it at the
clerk's wastebas-
ket, narrowly miss-
ing the clerk's head.
Numerous re-
quests for dispatch
supplies were
turned down by the
chief. A third re-
quest for uniform
shirts was declined
because "the chief
wears his shirts for
four to five years,


'We (employees) had discussed
among ourselves that we
thought he had a mental
breakdown because of the
changes in his actions and
personality (in the past five
years).We look forward to
holidays because the office is
closed, and we don't have the
tension of walking around on
eggs for fear the man is going
to go berserk and start scream-
ing and yelling.'


so should dispatchers," wrote Lalos.
A request for new recording tapes was
ignored, said Lalos, because the chief said,
"when he purchased the tapes they were
guaranteed for life." Lalos stated, "This
has been going on since 1990 when I
brought it to the chief's attention that the
tapes were completely worn out" and
"they are so garbled and scratchy, they are
not legible for transcription. This could
result in a liability."
A request to move the military
clock a few inches so both dispatchers
could see it was refused because "one
can ask the other for the time," Lalos
wrote. She stressed the difficulty of this


Lalos noted
that Maddox "has
to put you down
and play power
games with you to
prove he is in con-
trol. He now
speaks to his em-
ployees as if they
were five-year-
olds."
She also ex-
pressed concern
for Maddox's
mental condition.
"We (employees)
had discussed
among ourselves


that we thought he had a mental break-
down because of the "changes in his ac-
tions and personality (in the past five
years)," she wrote. "We look forward
to holidays because the office is
closed, and we don't have the tension
of walking around on eggs for fear the
man is going to go berserk and start
screaming and yelling."
Lalos concluded, "I love my job, and
so do the other 15 employees, or we
wouldn't have put up with the conditions
we work under. But at this point, every-
one is at the end of their ropes. Some-
thing awful is going to happen, and I feel
it's only a matter of time."


ISLANDER

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[g THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 X PAGE 8


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By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
When Pauline Kilts recently applied to the city coun-
cil for an occupational license to teach piano in her home,
the council reluctantly turned her down.
Kilts' application was denied because license cri-
teria does not permit traffic to and from the home. At
the time, council members expressed the desire to
have some method of granting licenses for profes-
sional artistic in-home teaching.
Holmes Beach resident Luke Courtney thinks it
ought to be OK for kids to take artistic lessons in pri-
vate homes as many adults did in their youth, and
presented a possible solution to the city's quandary
during its work session last Thursday.
In a letter to the council, Courtney pointed out:
The Cities of Bradenton Beach and Holmes
Beach have similar restrictions.
These codes prohibiting in-home instruction for
music, art, voice or dance are too restrictive and not
in the best interest of the community.
The land development code does permit family
day care homes in both the R1AA and RI zoning dis-
tricts for up to five children. The pedestrian traffic for
dropping off and picking up five children every day


would probably exceed the pedestrian traffic in con-
nection with in-home professional artistic teaching.
In addition to permitting family day care homes,
the land development code also permits preschools,
adult day care homes and after school care homes in
zoning districts R2, R3 and R4. Again, the pedestrian
traffic for these activities would probably exceed the
pedestrian traffic in connection with in-home profes-
sional artistic training.
Courtney offered a solution by means of modify-
ing the land development code and adding a "Profes-
sional/Artistic In-Home Teaching" definition to the
permitted uses in the zoning districts.:
He noted, "Allowing in-home teaching of music, art,
voice and dance would be beneficial for the community
and in keeping with the residential character of the com-
munity. The benefits to the children of the community by
keeping them busy, keeping them off the streets and pro-
viding.them the opportunity to learn from the talented and
experienced residents of the community would far out-
weigh the increase in pedestrian traffic connected with in-
home professional/artistic teaching."
He suggested that the city's newly revived plan-
ning commission consider land development code
changes that would permit such licensing.


Accident halts Island traffic Sunday


Labor Day weekend traffic to and from the Island
was held up for more than two hours Sunday as the
result of a head-on accident on Manatee Avenue near
the Bristol Bay development.
Police said that a westbound car driven by An-
drew Williams of Lakeland apparently crossed the
median strip and struck a van and boat trailer driven
by Dru Eastman of Bradenton.
The two vehicles struck head-on. The boat and


trailer also jackknifed into the car.
Williams and his wife, Thelma, were both hospi-
talized. Eastman and a passenger in his van, Patrick
Tschida of Bradenton, were treated at the scene.
No charges have yet been filed, and the investiga-
tion is continuing.
Florida Highway Patrol, Bradenton and Holmes
Beach Police assisted in the accident, which caused mo-
torists to traverse Sarasota Bay via Cortez Bridge.


New hauler for
Anna Maria City
Anna Maria City Commis-
sioner Max Znika stands
by the city's new 1989
GMC quarter-ton truck
purchased for the public
works department. The
new truck has 44,000
miles on it and replaces
the city's 1980 Toyota.
According to Znika, the
new truck retailed for
$6,900, wholesaled for
$4,700, and the city paid
$5,000. He also said the
GMC truck will keep its
original paint, dark gray
with red stripes, but city
lettering will be added.
Islander Photo:
Joy Courtney


YO9l OPI e-]


Flawed reply on bridge debate
Mr. Rolland Freeman followed his flawed origi-
nal letter with an equally flawed reply (Sept. 2) to my
critique of him.
He says the Florida Department of
Transportation's "bridge designers ... have built into
[their bridges] reasonable safety margins." On the
contrary, DOT engineers at their recent meeting with
the Florida Department of Environmental Protection
didn't know what category hurricane their proposed
Anna Maria Bridge was built to withstand.
Similarly, Mr. Freeman doesn't seem to know at
what wind speed high bridges will close. I'll tell him.
State policy closes mega-bridges at 40-45 mph.
Manatee County Safety Director Mike Latessa said
our bridges might have to close at 30-35 mph. Are
Islanders comfortable with that?
Mr. Freeman says he is concerned about lives, not
vehicles. But he ought to be concerned about vehicles,
too. Simply stated: high profile vehicles such as 18-


wheel trucks have blown over on high bridges due to
high winds, thereby blocking traffic.
Regarding DOT arrogance: yes, I think it exists.
DOT District 1 Secretary Dave May said, regarding
the bridge at a meeting of Islanders, "This is not your
bridge. You will have the 65-foot bridge." I regard that
as arrogance.
A referendum? I believe we would welcome an
Island-wide one. If it is to be a county-wide one, will
Longboat Key accept a similar referendum to their is-
land?
I regard my "vision" as bridge vision, not tunnel
vision, and indeed I am guilty of special-interest think-
ing I am thinking of the special interests of us Is-
landers.
Incidentally, what bridge does Longboat resident
Mr. Freeman use to evacuate, since Longboat refuses
to have a bridge of any kind between itself and the
mainland?
Kay Hoey, Bradenton Beach


Resident requests council

address artistic licenses


71







niM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 9


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Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
Teen leader
Mick Koczersut (center), teen coordinator at the Anna Maria Island Community Center, stands with his favorite
kind of kids teenagers. With him are Matt McClung (left), age 15, and Jared Culhane, age 12. Koczersut is
working to offer more Community Center programs involving middle- and high-school-age youth.


Athletic leader to draw


more teens to Center


By Joy Courtney
Editor,
Mick Koczersut has a way about him that makes
teenagers stop and listen an accomplishment in any
parent's book.
Koczersut, Anna Maria Island Community
Center's teen coordinator along with fellow teen coor-
dinator John Lot, is putting into action a plan to draw
more teenagers to the center.
"Ideally we're working to give teens something to
do in the afternoon and early evening, six days a
week," said Koczersut.
The teen curriculum will entice teenagers, both
boys and girls, to the center through a variety of non-
contact and intramural sports such as flag football,
softball and indoor soccer or floor hockey. The plan
also includes involving teens in the center's after
school child care program, he said.
"Teenagers have a lot to offer. They just need to


be channeled. I can see many of them as role mod-
els for the younger children, helping them academi-
cally and just being a good friend," said Koczersut.
Currently Koczersut is studying ways to finan-
cially support a strong teen program at the center
through fundraisers or use donations, but that is not
stopping his department from implementing some of
the athletic programs now.
"I've learned a lot of life's lesson through athlet-
ics," he said
"I know that if we use a strong athletic program
to give teenagers a positive environment, physically,
emotionally and morally, and help them become in-
volved and stay involved in positive activities, it can
only benefit them and the community".
Koczersut earned a BA degree in physical edu-
cation with a minor in health from Franklin College
in Franklin, Ind. He is at the center Monday through
Friday from 1 to 9 p.m.


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Yarn spins yarn of 'going fishing' Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
Allen Yarn, Anna Maria City's maintenance man for the last 19-and-a-half years, will retire as of Sept. 16.
"There was a lot of open land in the city that was real overgrown when I started. It took me two-and-a-half
years to get everything cleared," said Yarn, remembering what Anna Maria City was like back in the early
'70s. "He was really more of a PR man for the city than he was a maintenance man," said Anna Maria
Commissioner Max Znika. "Allen was truly a goodwill ambassador for the city." Yarn and his wife, Vera,
.have seven grown children. Yarn said he had been working since he was nine years old and looked forward
to enjoying a lot of fresh water fishing.


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[I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 U PAGE 10


Sarasota Bay restoration options unveiled


By Paul Roat
Restoration of Sarasota Bay won't be cheap or
easy, but it is possible to regain much of the pristine
nature of the water body if residents and political
leaders are willing to help.
That's the message from the Sarasota Bay Na-
tional Estuary Program. The federal, state, regional
and locally funded program will present preliminary
management alternatives this week as program offi-
cials wrap up the five-year project.
A complete report outlining bay management will
be released next summer.

The nitrogen problem
The options of restoring and protecting the bay
focus on stormwater runoff and potable water manage-
ment, Program Director Mark Alderson said.
Stormwater runoff is the most dangerous of the
problems facing the bay. Water entering the bay from
creeks after it rains carries with it pollutants, such as
lead from automotive exhausts and other chemicals
from pesticide treatments on yards all of which
harm marine life.
But nitrogen is the most insidious of the chemicals
that enter and impact Sarasota Bay, according to
Alderson.
Nitrogen is also found in runoff from septic tanks


Stormwater runoff is
the most dangerous of
the problems facing
the bay. Water enter-
ing the bay from
creeks after it rains
carries with it pollut-
ants, such as lead
from automotive
exhausts and other
chemicals from pesti-
cide treatments on
yards all of which
harm marine life.


and sewage treatment
plants. Although sep-
tic tanks and sewage
plants all meet or ex-
ceed state and federal
guidelines for runoff,
the systems collec-
tively damage the bay,
Alderson said.
Manatee County de-
veloped a central
sewer system in the
late 1970s. Currently,
almost all homes,
businesses and devel-
opments here are
hooked up to the
county's sewer sys-
tem, which provides
advanced secondary


treatment of effluent as well as re-use capabilities. The
City of Bradenton also has a central sewer system
which highly treats effluent.
There are 70,000 septic tanks in Sarasota County,
with about 32,000 within the Phillippi Creek drainage
system. Septic tanks are effective when it comes to
removing harmful bacteria, Sarasota Bay Program
Staff Scientist Dr. David Tomasko said, but generally
are not designed to remove nitrogen.
The excess nitrogen has dramatically affected
Little Sarasota Bay, one of the most polluted bodies of
water within the Sarasota Bay Program's boundaries.
Alderson said goals of the Sarasota Bay Program
for reducing the amount of nitrogen entering the bay
include having wastewater meet or exceed advanced
treatment standards. Less treatment would meet that
goal if the effluent is stored or re-used. Septic tanks
would be able to meet the goal if they were retrofitted
to remove nitrogen or are more than 900 feet from the
bay or its tributaries.
Another nitrogen re-
duction goal calls for re-
claiming treated wastewa- In order to reduce the
ter and reusing it. Tomasko the quality of stormwa
said that in some parts of Bay, the Florida Yard
the United States, such as program has been dev
New Orleans, potable wa- calls for use of low-mi
ter has been re-used an es- tolerant plants that re
timated seven times.
timated seven times. water. The program is
The City of Sarasota is te methods program is
the focus of several meth- tve methods private ci
ods to deal with reducing restore Sarasota Bay.
nitrogen entering the bay.
Long under fire for violating federal and state
wastewater emission standards, the city completed a
multi-million dollar program to provide advanced
treatment of sewage in 1991, reusing most of the ef-
fluent through irrigation of golf courses and farms in
eastern Sarasota County.
The city's treatment plant has about 1.6 million


Tampa
Bay



Anna ..
Maria

Holmes
Beach



B--
Bradento C c
Beach :










Long I
Ke


Gulf
of
Mexico











S Top 25%


@Top 50%


wIBottom 50%


1 38


erra
Ceia Bavy


Lido


Siesta Key


'I


Casey Key


SBottom 25%


Water clarity varies from region to region in Sarasota Bay. The waters bounding Anna Maria Island are
some of the highest quality, clearest waters in the area and, in the case of parts of Palma Sola Bay, some
of the worst.

gallons a day of available capacity, Tomasko said. The efficient sewage treatment system.


program has a goal

quantity and improve
iter runoff into Sarasota
s and Neighborhoods
'eloped. The program
maintenance, drought-
quire less fertilizer and
one of the most effec-
itizens have to help


of adding Dolomite and
Kensington Park Utilities,
in northeastern Sarasota
County, to the city's sewer
system. The addition of the
two plants could reduce
nitrogen impact into Sara-
sota Bay through Whitaker
Bayou by up to 40 percent,
Tomasko estimated.
Alderson admitted
that the cost of improving
the county wastewater sys-
tems could be expensive


- some estimates are as high as $600 million but
he said such improvements are vital to improve the
health of Sarasota Bay.
Sarasota County Commissioners have agreed that
a centralized sewer system is an idea whose time has
come, and are working toward replacing septic tanks
and small sewage treatment plants with a larger, more


The stormwater problem
Although nitrogen from septic tanks and small
treatment plants has an impact on the southern end of
Sarasota Bay, about half the nitrogen that enters the
bay comes from stormwater runoff. Baywide,
stormwater runoff is the biggest source of pollution.
Three locations within Sarasota Bay are called
pollution "hot spots" due to pollution from stormwater
runoff. In fact, Hudson Bayou, just south of downtown
Sarasota, has the highest levels of lead in oysters found
anywhere else in the United States.
Other areas of concern are Bowlees Creek and
Cedar Hammock Creek, both in Manatee County.
Stormwater carries more than dangerous chemi-
cals to the bay, Alderson said.
As development of the watershed around Sarasota
Bay took place, creeks were straightened and edged
with seawalls and other hardened surfaces. Develop-
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
































Mangroves are an important element in preserving and enhancing the marine
life of Sarasota Bay, but from 1950 to 1990, 1,609 acres of tidal wetlands were
lost, a 39 percent decline. One of the goals of the Sarasota Bay Program is to
restore mangroves and salt marshes 18 and 11 acres annually, bay officials


state.
meant of houses and shopping centers
and creation of roads, sidewalks and
other non-porous surfaces gave rainfall
nowhere to seep slowly into the ground.
The result of the development was
that rainwater entered creeks in tremen-
dous "pulses" that sluiced chemicals
and sediments into the bay. The chemi-
cals lead from automobile exhausts,
fertilizers and pesticides from yards -
contaminated marine life, and the sedi-
ment covered productive seagrass beds,
a home for small fish and crabs.
The problem of stormwater runoff has
been partially addressed in recent years.
New regulations require developments to
detain stormwater runoff in ponds to allow
pollutants and sediments to settle. Older
developments do not have such detention
ponds, nor do most houses.
In order to reduce the quantity and
improve the quality of stormwater runoff
into Sarasota Bay, the Florida Yards and
Neighborhoods program has been devel-
oped. The program calls for'use of low-
maintenance, drought-tolerant plants that
require less fertilizer and water.
The Florida Yards program, Sara-
sota Bay Program Public Affairs Direc-
tor Heidi Smith said, is one of the most
effective methods private citizens have
to help restore Sarasota Bay.
Sarasota County has implemented a
stormwater utility, and Manatee County is
looking to start such a program later this
year. The utility fees will be used to cre-
ate filtering wetlands along tributaries as
well as create retention ponds to limit the
runoff of stormwater into the bay.

The wetland problem
Wetlands are a case study of chang-
ing attitudes during the past 30 years.
In the 1950s, the marsh and man-
grove areas of the region were thought
of as mosquito havens just waiting for
development. Thousands of acres of
mangrove forest were destroyed for
condominiums and single-family
homes, and the remaining areas criss-
crossed with ditches to flush out mos-
quito breeding grounds, damaging the
fragile trees.
It has only been in the past few
years that the environmental productiv-
ity of the formerly-thought-of swamps
has been widely accepted. But from
1950 to 1990, 1,609 acres of tidal wet-
lands were lost, a 39 percent decline.
The goal of the Sarasota Bay Program


is to restore 18 acres ofintertidal wetlands
per year, either through creation of new
habitat or reclamation of damaged man-
grove forests, and creation of 11 acres of
freshwater wetlands.
Another goal is the appointment of a
wetlands coordinator to assist in forma-
tion of a wetland management program.

The finfish,
shellfish problem
Fishing isn't as good today as it
once was, as any fisherman knows. De-
spite regulations on the quantity and
size of some sport species like snook
and redfish, commercial catches of
mullet have been going down. Peak
years were in the 1960s; mullet catches
have dropped 50-60 percent since then.
Clams, oyster and scallop harvest-
ing has also fallen off. Much of the bay
once was available for shellfish, but to-
day only a small area near southern
Longboat Key is regularly open for
oyster harvesting. Scallops, an indica-
tor of water quality in any bay, are vir-
tually non-existent in Sarasota Bay, al-
though scallops by the tubfull could be
gathered only 20 years ago.
Alderson said that by protecting man-
groves and seagrass beds, juvenile fish
should prosper in the bay. A project has
been underway for about three years to
identify seagrass beds in the bay to com-
bat errant boaters from running across the
seagrasses and ripping the beds apart with
boat propellers.
There is also preliminary success
with artificial structures placed next to
seawalls. The mini-reefs, which are
constructed out of plastic pipe and re-
semble red mangrove roots, provide a
home for tiny fish and crabs. Tomasko
said -that in areas without the mini-
reefs, four to five fish were found;
when the reefs were put in, 400-500
fish were counted.
The Sarasota Bay Program is also
looking to establish a conservation area
near Sister Keys, near the northern end
of Longboat Key, which would have
limited human access. Alderson said
that the Sister Keys area is one of the
most productive eco-systems in Sara-
sota Bay.
The program also hopes to improve
circulation in areas with poor water
transfer. Little Sarasota Bay and Palma
Sola Bay have been identified as areas
in need of attention.


I[] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 E PAGE 11


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I] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 I PAGE 12


'Back to School

Night' next week
"Back to School Night" at Anna Maria Elementary
School on Tuesday, Sept. 14, will offer parents an op-
portunity to meet teachers, parents of classmates, and
join the PTO.
At 7 p.m. there will be a short PTO meeting in the
school's auditorium with a message from this year's
President Millie Torres. After the meeting, all class-
rooms will be open. PTO representatives will be in the
classroom to help with membership.


Fire drill empties school
The 372 students of Anna Maria Elementary School passed their first fire drill of the year with flying colors.
"Remember, the most important rule in an emergency," said Principal Jim Kronus over the public address
system, "is listen to your teacher." Even the brand-new kindergartners did well during the drill.


Where, oh where, did he go?
Librarian Warren Phillips tells the students in
Lynne McDonough's K/1 split class at Anna Maria
Elementary about a gingerbread man who passed
through the library leaving only a clue about his
next destination. The students were hunting "The
Gingerbread Man," who led them, clue by clue,
throughout the school. As in the classic tale, the
gingerbread man taunted, "Run, run as fast as you
can. You can't catch me. I'm the Gingerbread
Man!" Maybe so, but the students did catch up with
him. Where? Back in their own classroom.

Islander Photos: Joy Courtney



S. Anna Maria

School menu
Thursday, 9/9/93
* Grandparent's Day
Breakfast: Scrambled Eggs or Cereal, Toast,
* Fruit Juice *
Lunch: Macaroni & Cheese & Ham, Mini-
* Chef Salad, Broccoli Cuts, Hot Roll, Jello
Friday, 9/10/93
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit
* Lunch: Pizza, Green Beans, Italian Salad, *
Cookie
Monday, 9/13/93
Breakfast: Cereal, Toast, Fruit Cup
Lunch: Toasted Cheese Sandwich, Carrots, *
Lettuce & Tomato, Orange Juice
Tuesday, 9/14/93
Breakfast: Waffle w/Syrup or Cereal,
Fruit Juice
Lunch: Breaded Beef Pattie, Mashed
Potatoes, Broccoli Cuts, Hot Roll,
Fruit Cobbler
Wednesday, 9/15/93
: Breakfast: Peanut Butter or Cheese Toast, or
Cereal, Fruit Juice
Lunch: Chicken w/Rice, Green Beans,
Hot Roll, Orange Juice
All meals served with milk.

5055001005500000000050000


A milestone kind
of day
Kindergartner Derek
Burger (center) is waiting
to start his first day at his
brand-new school, Anna
Maria Island Elementary.
Debbie (left), Derek's
mom, and Charles, his
dad, wait with their son on
his big day. The Burgers,
which also include older
siblings Tammy and.
Lance, not pictured,
recently arrived from
Annapolis, Md. "We've
frequented the Island a
lot," said Debbie. "We feel
blessed to have moved
here."


New head custodian hard at
work
Anna Maria Elementary School welcomes Bill
Sizemore of Bradenton as its head custodian.
Sizemore comes to the Island school from Harllee
Elementary and has worked for the Manatee County
School system for seven years.


Roll 'em out
Question: How do you produce over 200 freshly
baked dinner rolls within a matter of minutes?
Answer: Have Lillian Kacuras, who has worked in
the Anna Maria Elementary School cafeteria for 23
years, make them. Kacuras has a method of squeez-
ing dough up between her thumb and index finger of
her right hand forcing out perfectly-sized roll
bubbles. A multitude of baking trays were filled
within minutes. It was like watching a machine.






]1|M TFIE TSLANDER BYSTANDER M SEPTEMBER 9,1993 PAGE 13


Congo missionary celebrates life
Islander Vernon Anderson celebrates his 97th birthday in the home of his daugh-
ter and son-in-law, Elnora and Bill Worth of Anna Maria City, along with his five
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Anderson has lived on the Island
since 1986 and recently moved from his family's Island home to reside in
Westminster-Asbury The Manor in Bradenton. Anderson was a Presbyterian
missionary in the Belgian Congo, now Zaire, for 40 years. After his return from
the Congo, he ministered in Texas until his retirement in 1975.


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Corned Beef Hash, 2 Eggs & Toast........................................$3.50
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[Jf THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 I PAGE 14


4 T 9Z Zb --- =


Off Island happenings
Become a sponsor or participant in the 7th Annual
Southeastern Guide Dog Tennis Tournament sched-
uled for Sept. 24 26 at The Racquet Club of El Conquis-
tador now. The purpose of the doubles tournament is to
raise at least $8,600 to provide a blind recipient with a
guide dog. Call Nick Kish at The Racquet Club of El
Conquistador, 753-1512, or Sharon Stein, Public Rela-
tions Coordinator, 751-2841, for details.
The 1992 Grammy winner and recent inductee to
the Grand Ole Opry, Alison Krauss & The Union Sta-
tion Band, will grace The Players of Sarasota stage
on Sunday, Sept. 26 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 and seat-
ing is reserved. For information and tickets, call 365-


Island police reports
<, City of Anna Maria
Unavailable
Bradenton Beach
Aug. 25, 2408 Gulf Dr. N., Villa Roma, cri
nal mischief. In the past few weeks, an unknown p
son has broken water fittings and defecated in the p
Aug. 25, 2500 block of Gulf Drive North, b
glary. The suspect entered the residence through a s
ing glass door and took a microwave oven, a porta
television, a vacuum cleaner and a telephone.
Aug. 26, Coquina Beach, burglary of walletE
cash from an automobile.
Aug. 27, 100 block of Bridge Street, disorder
intoxication and resisting arrest without violence.I
defendant's vehicle was parked on the street un
tended and blocking a business driveway. Accord
to the report, the investigating officer was approach]
by the defendant, who was visibly intoxicated.
defendant began yelling at the officer who placed
in custody and had to physically place her in the
trol car. She was charged with disorderly intoxicat
and resisting arrest without violence.
Aug. 28, 2408 Gulf Dr. N., Villa Roma, cri
nal mischief. An unknown person knocked ove
large, shell planter and broke a light fixture.


2494 or stop by The Players on US 41 at Ninth St. in
Sarasota from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays.
The Manatee Community Blood Center's
bloodmobile will be at Wal-mart, Manatee Ave. W.,
from 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 11.
Manatee Community College will offer two
courses on how to profit from cultural diversity in the
workplace. The first is "New Worlds to Conquer: If
You Can't Sell It Here, Why Not Export It?" The class
meets Wednesday, Sept. 15, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
and the fee is $10. On Friday, Sept. 17, the class, "Cul-
tural Diversity in the Workplace," will be held. The
class meets from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the fee is $50.
For more information, call 755-1511, ext. 4246.


- Aug. 29, 2513 Gulf Dr. N., Circle K, retail theft
of $6.88 worth of gasoline.
Aug. 29, Gulf Drive North and 2nd Street, war-
rant arrest.
Aug. 29, Cortez Beach, burglary of purse, credit
cards, checkbook and cash from a van.
Aug. 31, Coquina Beach, burglary of purse and
mi- credit cards from an automobile.
per- Sept. 1, Leffis Key, burglary of Visa card from
ool. an automobile.
)ur- Sept. 1, 2601 Gulf Dr. N., Sandpiper Park, theft
lid- of a bicycle.
ible Holmes Beach
Aug. 27, 2700 block of Gulf Drive, warrant arrest.
and Aug. 27, 600 block of Manatee Avenue, posses-
sion of marijuana and paraphernalia with the drug. The
erly officer observed Scott Rodriguez, 18, of Bradenton
The make a U-turn in front of several vehicles at East Bay
nat- Drive and Manatee Avenue. The officer stopped the
ing vehicle and Rodriguez got out and told the officer he
hed had a warrant on him from Sarasota.
The The officer performed a warrant check and found
her a bench warrant for driving with license suspended and
pa- possession of paraphernalia. The officer asked if he
ion could check Rodriguez's vehicle and was given per-
mission. The officer found a white pipe with burnt
mi- residue and an unburned substance that appeared to be
,r a marijuana. Rodriguez said it wasn't his pipe. He was
arrested and charged with possession of marijuana and


Manatee County Central Library will co-spon-
sor a program on Landlord/Tenant Law on Tuesday,
Sept. 14, from 7 to 8:45 p.m. at the library, 1301
Barcarrota Blvd., Bradenton. The program is free and
open to the public. Seating is limited so come early.
Call 748-5555 for details.

Senior coffee social at center
A Coffee Social will be held Monday, Sept. 13, at 10
a.m. at the Anna Maria Island Community Center to of-'
fer time for retired people to mix, mingle and determine
what social activities they'd like the center to offer.
The social is open to the public and transportation
is available. Call the center at 778-1908 for details.


paraphernalia with the drug.
Aug. 28, 3900 East Bay Dr., Island Foods, auto-
mobile burglary. The victim stated that Morris Miller,
22, and Ernest Martin, 22, both of Bradenton, were
taking the battery out of his pick up truck in the park-
ing lot of Island Foods. The pair was identified by the
victim and witnesses. They were arrested and charged
with burglary to an automobile.
Aug. 30, 3018 Avenue C, storage units, suspi-
cious person. Two of the units were found open and
there were pry marks on several others.
Aug. 30, 700 block of Manatee Avenue, refusal
to sign a UTC (uniform traffic citation) and possession
of paraphernalia. James Bryant, 29, of Holmes Beach
was stopped for unlawful speed and refused to sign the
UTC. The officer told him he would be arrested if he
did not sign, and he continued to refuse. Bryant was
placed under arrest and charged with refusal to sign a
UTC. During an inventory of Bryant's vehicle, the
officer found two marijuana pipes with residue in the
glove box and a pair of surgical clips over the driver's
visor. Bryant was also charged with possession of
paraphernalia.
Aug. 31, 200 block of 68th Street, vandalism. A
mailbox was damaged.
Sept. 1, 3800 East Bay Dr., Sunbow Bay, noise
complaint. Juveniles were setting off fireworks.
Sept. 2,205 36th Street, Sierra Apartments, tres-
pass. Juveniles were trespassing in the swimming pool.


Sunday Satellite Football
Monday Night Football
Free Hot Dogs During Games
Tuesday Nights -
Restaurant Appreciation Drink Specials


Presents

Rich

Kendall
WEDNESDAY
through
SATURDAY
Sept. 8-11
9 PM to 1 AM


BANTAM PLAZA 10104 CORTEZ RD. WEST
1.5 MILES EAST FROM BEACH ON CORTEZ RD.


SWEET
SEarly Bird Special
7AM 9AM


O Two Eggs
N Toast
E 5340 Gulf Drive
S&S Plaza
778-9803


ISLANDER

I 1 11


Best Homemade Breakfast & Lunch Specials on the Island
FRESH BAKED Thursday- PRIME RIB SPECIAL EGGS BENEDICT
PIES & BISCUITS Full cut, potato, All Day..7 Days a Week
vegetable, salad, rolls $5.95


s0 EYE OPENER...2 eggs, toast,
Some fries and coffee...Only $1.75

Island Inn R staurant
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK7AM-2PM
l 1701 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach 778-3031UJ


Make a trip to
France on
Longboat Key
North End of L. B. K.
7003 Gulf of Mexico Dr.


Enjoy dining in the comfortable atmosphere of a
French Country Inn, where all dinners are personally
prepared by the chef owners, Francis and Michel.
Reservations suggested 383-2421
1 Mon. thru Sat. 5:00 10:00 PM


Freshly Cut & Freshly Made to Order
DELI SANDWICHES,
SOUP & SALAD BAR
Served for Lunch and Dinner
ALL OCCASION PARTY TRAYS
FRESH BAGELS
*ICE CREAM CAKES
& FROZEN YOGURT PIES (ON REQUEST)
EVERYTHING HOMEMADE!
Mon-Sat 10AM-9PM Sun 1-9PM
Eat-In or Take-Out
Island Shopping Center *5318 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
(813) 778-7386


I .. PBANANAS order Blue Crab for
"1901 b. the Weekend!
Local GROUPER '
And ',I. .
"VINE RIPE" MAKO SHARK pi
I TOMATOES Little Neck& Steamer LIVE MAINE
ICE COLD CLAMS LOBSTER
ICE COLD Sweet Louisana
N WATERMELON OYSTERS
____ ___ _ EBy he dozen of bsh SHRIMP
S SWEET CORN
FRESH DAILY-

"YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET'

I.eAe aE W cntM e).

i .^ ^, ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ ,^ ^ ^ ^







IM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 15


A 9^M^^g


Centennial excitement builds
Details of the next year's Anna Maria Island Cen-
tennial will be discussed at the Thursday, Sept. 16
meeting of the Anna Maria Island Historical Society.
The meeting will be called to order at 7:30 p.m. by
President Doug Wolfe at the Anna Maria City Hall.
The public is invited.
Newly published 1994 calendars depicting histori-
cal scenes from the Island will be available at the meet-
ing. They are a perfect gift item for a $7 donation.
Islanders are encouraged to join the Historical
Society, and members are reminded to pay dues, which
are $10 for adults. Donations are always appreciated.
Early settlers bread will be on sale at the museum,
402 Pine Avenue in Anna Maria, every week. Open
hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday, Wednes-
day, Thursday and Saturday. Admission is free.
Welcome to Chess
The Anna Maria Island Chess Club resumes play
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center on Thurs-
day, Sept. 9, from 12:15 to 3:15 p.m.
Persons interested in the game are invited to play


THE HUNT CLUB
RESTAURANT
Early Birds from $4.95
4:30 to 6:00 pm
Lunch & Dinner Daily
British Style Fish & Chips
All You Can Eat $6.95
Moi-Thlurs. only
5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key
Located in the Centre Shops
383-0543


The Island Spirit is at...


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
British-Style
Fish & Chips
ALL YOU CAN EAT $6.95
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY
OPEN 7 DAYS 11AM to 10PM
902 S. Bay Blvd, Anna Maria
Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Dine out often with our advertisers ...
and please be sure to mention us when you
do ... The Islander Bystander.


"The best hamburgers and
the coldest mugs of beer
this side of Heaven.'" fii
u-ffg, Pat Geyer, Owner. \ ,
Across from Manatee Public Beach Mon-Sat 11 am-7pm
Sun 12-7pm Closed Tuesday Takeout e 778-2501



qThe Mutiny Inn

'Pitcairn's Island" -1 A Pstaurant


** I *







Something Innovatively 9New
SIn Tradition

Serving Dinner 5 to 10 PM
Tuesday thru Saturday
Reservations Suggested
Sunday Brunch 10 AM to 2 PM
605 Manatee Avenue k& Holmes Beach
(813) 778-5440
Formerly O'9Kefe's Wine Celfar


during the weekly, fall-to-summer sessions. Skill levels of
the players vary, and club members are available to assist
newer players with their game. The club is involved in
promoting chess among school children as well.
If chess is a game you enjoy, join the club at a
Thursday session. There is no charge for the first
couple of sessions and a $2 per session or $18 an-
nual fee for membership if players wish to continue.
Call club president Roy McChesney at 778-3045 for
more information.
High Twelve Speaker
Featured speaker Mark Mixon of Mixon Insurance
Co. will follow up on last weeks "hurricane warnings" at
the Sept 9 meeting of the Anna Maria High Twelve Club
on Thursday at Shucker's Bar and Grill in Holmes Beach.
Social hour begins at 11 a.m. followed by luncheon.

Community Youth Chorus
begins fall season
The Community Youth Chorus directed by Cliff
Burgeson, director of music at Roser Memorial Com-
munity Church in Anna Maria City, will begin its fall



Joe's Eats & Sweets

The Best Homemade Ice Cream and
Yogurt made by Joe on premises.
If you can dream it,
we'll make it!
Sugar Free, Fat Free Sundaes.
Closed Tuesdays
219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach, 778-0007
6 Blocks South of Cortez Bridge.





ANCHOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
7AM to 2:30AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085
The D.T.'s
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Sept. 9, 10 & 11 9:30 p.m. 1:30 a.m.

Monday Night Football
Hot Dogs 500
We Now Have
Satellite
for all Sporting Events!
Check Us Out!
"Z" Kitchen is now open
Late night menu available


season on Wednesday, Sept. 15.
All Island and area children from second grade on
up are invited to participate.
The chorus will learn and sing folk and fun songs,
hymns and spirituals, and patriotic and seasonal mu-
sic. The emphasis this fall will be on Thanksgiving and
Christmas music.
The chorus will meet Wednesdays from 3:30 to
4:15 p.m. A snack will be served. Transportation can
be arranged from Anna Maria Elementary School.
For registration and information call Molly Parks
or Roy McChesney at Roser Church at 778-0414.
Working TVs and VCRs needed
by school
Anna Maria Elementary School needs seven pref-
erably working televisions and two VCRs to be used
in classrooms now outfitted to receive educational
cable programming.
Nineteen-inch or larger TVs are preferred, but any
size will be appreciated. Receipts will be given for tax
purposes.Contact the school office at 778-1908 if you
have a donation.


ITropical
I Twilight Dinner
SChoice of $9
Chicken, Pork, 795
I Beef or Fish.
i Includes Soup & Salad.
With coupon. Limit one per person.
Exp. 9/1 W93 Take out & Catering Available
Lunch M-Sun 11:30 to 3 Dinner M-Sun 4 to 10
4304 14th St. West Bradenton 758-6390
I Behind Rooms to Go
L ... --- ~---


IISLANDERi iI

Open the door
to your dreams.
Read the real estate section and the
classifeds to find a home or condo for
your family on Anna Maria Island.
There's nothing like living in paradise!




Cafe Robar


SUPER SPECIAL
EARLY BIRDS
Tuesday thru Thursday 4 to 7 PM


Chicken Caesar
Liver & Onions
Fettuccini Alfredo
Beef Stroganoff
Fried Chicken


Fish & Chips
Spaghetti & Meat Sauce
Vegetarian Lasagna
Roast Beef
Chopped Sirloin


Sunday 11 AM to 7 PM for a Limited Time Only
*Regular Menu also available ... 4 to 10 pm
Sunday Brunch 9 AM to 1 PM

-Sunday Football &
Monday Night Football
For the Serious Football Lover
Open Monday 4pm-til end of game
with Celebrity Bartender Adam Kenney
250 DOGS
All the Way or Anyway
(During Game Only)

778-6969


204 Pine Avenue


Anna Maria


A Casual Waterfront Atmosphere.
Lunch 11:30-5:00
Dinner 5:00-10:00; Fri. & Sat. 5:00-10:30
Seven Days a Week for Lunch and Dinner
BY LAND ... 760 Broadway St., Longboat Key
BY SEA ... Marker 39, Intracoastal Waterway
(813) 383-2391
FULL BEVERAGE SERVICE


i


MEMMEOW







[IM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 M PAGE 16

BEA
0 GOOD
/ SPORT!


Send the Islander
Bystanderto your
distant friends and
relatives. It's the best
news on the island.
See the form on page
5 to subscribe.


Family Owned and Millwork
Operated for Over Wood Cut
12 Years To Size





OPEN:
7:30 to AND
S Saturday HARDWARE
8 to 12 HARDWARE
We specialize in custom cabinet making:
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street, Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just West of the Island Shopping Center


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspective
While the number of loggerhead turtle nests
dropped by half on Longboat Key this year, the increase
on Anna Maria Island more than made up for it.
Anna Maria's turtle savior, Chuck Shumard, re-
ports that the Anna Maria Turtle Watch worked a
total of 140 nests this season, up from 86 last year.
Longboat, on the other hand, reports a total of 48
loggerhead nests this year, compared to 87 in 1992.
"Really, I think much of the increase this year here
on the Island is due to Longboat's
decrease," Shumard commented. "I Don'tforget F
really don't know how they got per- Cleanup Day
mission to dredge during nesting Cleanup Day
season, but they did." you're willing
So far the Anna Maria Turtle up a stretch of
Watch Program has released give Dee Steve
"around about 6,000 hatchlings so Keep Manatee
far this year, and we've got aways 795-8272. And
to go," Shumard said. The last nest more spare tim
found on the Island was August Bay Program i
31, at 36th Street. That was the to help plant
first nest found in three weeks fh y ln i
Leffis Key inB
a good indication the nesting sea- Beach beginni
son is about over. Beach begin
Nearly 250 sailors joined in Give them a ca
the competition at the Sarasota
Sailing Squadron's Labor Day
Regatta last weekend, and two skippers from Braden-
ton walked off with the honors. Bill Fisher's 35-foot
Morning Glory won the Spinnaker A class, while
Scott Pagington's 24-foot Summer Wine captured
PHRF Spinnaker B.
Brave people, those spinnaker sailors, in my
opinion. Even in light air, such as the racing Satur-
day atd Sunday, I always sit down and count my fin-
gers after launching one of those scary sails. To tell
the truth, years ago I came very close to losing a
couple of fingers to a spinnaker one dark night in the
Gulf- hence my dislike for anything bigger than a
Genoa sail.
There's one thing I couldn't help but notice in
Sarasota Bay, especially New Pass, over the week-
end. Folks with power boats, especially big power
boats, still don't seem to have gotten the message
about the manatee protection zones.
As if to drive the point home, I saw a very large
(aren't they all?) manatee coming through New Pass
about 5 p.m. Saturday, right along with heavy boat
traffic. Lucky for this manatee it stayed close to the
shoreline and appeared to be out of harm's way.
But it really upset me to see those jerks flying
through the pass, completely ignoring the "Slow
Speed, Minimum Wake" signs along the way. Not


lo

to
flo
rso
Be
'if
\e,
nee
tat
fra
ng
ll


everybody mind you, but a lot of folks were doing it.
And one of the worst offenders was a lady at the wheel
of a rather huge yacht.
Ah well, they'll really whine when the zoning
doesn't work and prop guards become the law.
And now some good news.
Only 96 tarpon were killed by fishers in Florida in
1992. At least intentionally.
According to a report from the Florida Marine Insti-
tute in St. Petersburg, the $50 permit required to possess
a tarpon, beginning back in 1989, has drastically cut down
the number of tarpon killed each sea-
rida Coastal son.
Most tarpon fishing tourna-
9t. 18. If ments are now wisely catch-and-re-
help clean- lease events and let's hope they all
cal beach, become that in the near future.
n a call at We can probably all remem-
eautiful at ber days at Boca Grande when it
you have any seemed at least 96 tarpon were
the Sarasota brought to the docks, mostly to show
eds volunteers off and then rot. It was an embarrass-
ive plants at ment, in my opinion. Thank good-
dentonness those days are gone.
By the way, tarpon fishing in
Sept. 21. both canals and river mouths is hot
at 361-6133. right now and probably will be until
the first real cold front drives them
offshore, ending this season.
Gov. Lawton Chiles has signed a new catastro-
phe preparedness law with an interesting provision
for boaters. It prohibits marinas from requiring vessels
to be removed from the marinas during a hurricane
watch or warning.
As crazy as that requirement sounds, many mari-
nas both large and small have had the rule for years,
supposedly to protect their facility.
Beginning March 1, 1994, no marina operator will
be able to require you to remove your boat in the face
of a hurricane. Now lets hope you can make it through
this season intact.
And a couple of things for your calendar.
Don't forget Florida Coastal Cleanup Day Sept.
18. If you're willing to help clean-up a stretch of lo-
cal beach, please give Dee Steverson a call at Keep
Manatee Beautiful at 795-8272. Some 493 volunteers
helped out in Manatee County alone last year, collect-
ing nearly four tons of trash from our beaches.
If you have any more spare time, the Sarasota Bay
Program needs volunteers to help plant sea oats and
other native plants at Leffis Key in Bradenton Beach
beginning Sept. 21. If you're willing to help, just give
them a call at 361-6133. The planting will take place
over four days.
See you next week.


AMERICA'S
LONGER LASTING
DESIGNER KITCHEN SINKS


SPRING RAM



MADE FROM THE REVOLUTIONARY MATERIAL
THAT CHANGED EUROPEAN KITCHENS


LaPensee
Plumbing, Inc. ,
778-5622 UC. .RF0049191
5348-B Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach


A beautiful day except for a sailboat race
Light winds plagued sailors during the weekend's Labor Day Regatta at the Sarasota Sailain Squadron.
Despite the almost total lack of wind, more than 200 entrants participated in the festivities. Pictured is one
of the sailors strolling to her awaiting pram.


6,000 turtles to sea and

'still a ways to go'


4jltning Season

is upon us...


Protect your investment for only
$49.00...install a
Lightning Arrester on your
air conditioning unit today!

Don't forget you tune-up...
your system is working overtime.
.~ i, SINCE
/ -,B_ 1982


AIR CNDITIONING/HEATING SALES & SERVICE
FPL PARTICIPATING
INDEPENDENT 778-0773
CONTRACTOR CACO 56298






[M THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 N PAGE 17


Angler knows no
handicap
Stottie Stoddard from Longboat Key
caught and released several redfish like
the one she proudly shows off as she
sits in her wheelchair. Fishing with
Captain Mike Heistand, some of
Stoddard's catches were up to 30
inches.


Snook season off to


shakey start


By Captain Mike Heistand
Right now redfish and snook seasons overlap.
Everyone agrees the reds are out there, but for most
fishermen catching snook was a challenge last week.
Margaret from the Bradenton Beach Pier said her
pier customers were catching some nice-size snook,
flounder and trout.
Bill from Island Discount Tackle said his cus-
tomers reported lots of redfish and just a few snook
being caught all the way from the Manatee River to
Sarasota Bay. Bill also said snook season is off to a
real good start so far. Offshore, he's had reports of
dolphin, barracuda, red and black grouper up to 15
pounds and mangrove snapper up to six pounds.
Captain Phil Shields told me he caught yellow-
tail and mangrove snapper, red grouper and dolphin
last week with dolphin being his best bet.
Dan from the Anna Maria City Pier said pier
customers were catching redfish, mangrove snapper,
pompano and a couple of snook.
Captain Todd Romine told me he thought snook
fishing was average this season with limit catches ev-
eryday so far last week.
Carl from Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle said his
customers have come in with their limit of redfish, trout
have been real productive and customers have brought in
one or two snook. He said the snook are hiding.


Captain Tom Chaya said snook fishing has
been fair with a few nice-size fish being brought
aboard his boat. Todd also said he produced redfish
for his clients all last week.
Jamie from the Miss Cortez Fishing Fleet re-
ported the fleet's four-hour trip averaged 45 to 75
head of Key West grunts and vermilion snapper. Its
six-hour trip averaged 75 to 120 head of vermilion
and lane snapper, porgies, and red and black grouper.
Its nine-hour trip averaged 50 head of red and black
grouper, and mangrove and yellowtail snapper.
Captain Mark Bradow said his best bet last
week was redfish with his catches bringing in 12 to
15 fish per day with most in the 18-inch and 27-inch
limit.
Ray from the Rod & Reel Pier said the pier's
anglers brought in redfish, mangrove snapper, pom-
pano and a couple of snook.
Captain Rick Gross reported lots of snook with
most of them being small, but he was able to produce
a few keepers for his clients last week.
As for me on my charter boat, "Magic," my cli-
ents caught approximately 50 redfish on the last two
trips out. Out in the Gulf, mackerel have made a good
showing with some them running as large as 24
inches. Several small black nose sharks also came
aboard last week. Good fishing, good catches!

A lot of kickin'
S at soccer
Jamboree
YThe Anna Maria Island
SCommunity Center Soccer
League held its organiza-
tional Jamboree last
Friday in preparation for
the 1993/94 soccer season,
which started yesterday.
Withpizzaandpop
available, members from
ages 5 to 14 of the league's
16 teams got their uniforms
and played 15 minute
demonstration games.
Ryan Quigley (left) of
Holmes Beach said he
couldn't wait for the
season to start.
Islander Photo:
Joy Courtney


Snook Season *
Rapala Sale
S- CD-18's ...........$9.99
CD-14's ...........$8.99
Sliver's.........$7.99
ISLA N D l1-Mag's .........$7.99
DISCOUNT TACKLE
OPEN DAILY ANNA MARIA 778-7688
7 to 7 ISLAND CENTER
3240 EAST BAY DR.
WEEKENDS HOLMES BEACH AME VSA
6 to 7 (Between Walgreens & Shells)


.,IZED SERVICE

ANNA MARIA
DAY AMHIGH
Thu 9/9 5:17 2.3ft
Fri 9/10 6:35 2.3ft
Sat 9/11 7:59 2.3ft
Sun 9/12 9:15 2.4ft
Mon 9/13 10:20 2.5ft
Tue 9/14 11:19 2.5ft
Wed 9/15 12:03 1.9ft


Johnson, Evinrude, OMC
E Sea Drive & OMC Cobra Stern Drive

ISLAND TIDE TABLES
AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
-- 1:19 0.5ft
10:56 1.6ft 2:39 0.5ft
12:351.5ft 11:11 1.6ft 3:39 0.4ft
2:31 1.5ft 11:30 1.7ft 4:28 0.4ft
3:41 1.2ft 11:45 1.8ft 5:07 0.4ft
4:34 1.0ft 5:39 0.5ft
5:23 0.7ft 12:14 2.4ft 6:08 0.7ft


Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later.


CALL 778-7978 FOR FREE HOME DELIVERY
ANYWHERE ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND.
THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER


BEWARE OF TELEPHONE SOLICITORS
BEARING OFFERS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE -
THEY USUALLY ARE!
BE SURE YOU KNOW WHO YOU'RE
DEALING WITH BEFORE YOU ALLOW
THEM INTO YOUR HOME.
These days, you can't be too careful
about offers at your door or over the phone. If you
have to decide right now, or the offer isn't good
after today, the offer probably wasn't good to
begin with.
Any reputable company wants you to
shop around and make a decision at your conve-
nience, not theirs.
BE CAREFUL!

WE T CO AST
REFRIGERATION


& HEATINGA

778-9622 Ac044365
5347 GULF DRIVE #4 HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217-1748




Problem with

Inirance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and
Casualty Joint Underwriting
Association. (State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 .......







jla THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 1 PAGE 18

F I: fi1 *If2i-*i ; f2T0 AfoktijW[ ^4


City

Anna Maria





Bradenton Beach


Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot

208 Magnolia
52x145

409 N Bay Blvd
50xl10 bay over parl

303 Bay Dr N
50x130 bay

211 84th St
90x100 deeded slip

22 Seaside Court
26x89 canal

2801 Gulf Dr
50x100


STYLE/rooms AGE/size

ground duplex 1972
4bed/4bath 1600 sfla

residential lot


2 story home 1960
4bed/2bath/lcp 2736 sfla

ground home/pool 1974
4bed/2bath/1.5car 1550 sfla


ground townhouse
2bed/2bath/lcp

residential lot


32 Seaside Court ground townhouse
10x90x42x90 canal 2bed/2bath/lcp


SELLER/BUYER/when

Green/Wilson
8/11/93

Lacios/John
8/11/93

Joiner/Hinds
8/11/93


Wilson/McMullen
8/11/93


1964 Smith/Heger
1000 sfla 8/11/93

Ilexhurst/Hobson
8/11/93

1964 Madsen/Kerper
962 sfla 8/11/93


SALE4/LIST$

$147,500
list $149,500

$100,000
list uk

$175,000
list uk

$157,000
list $159,000

$85,900
list $89,000

$53,200
list $55,000

$85,000
list uk


540 Key Royale Dr ground home/pool 1960s/1988 Walter/Beckwith $372,500
100xl90/canal 3bed/4bath/3car 2500 sfla 8/11/93 list $395,000


6325 Gulf Dr
North Beach Village


elevated twnhse
3bed/2bath/2car


1988 Berra/Rodgers
1300 sfla 8/11/93


$135,000
list $143,000


by Doug Dowling, Lic Real Estate Broker, 778-1222


Call 778-7978 for FREE home delivery of the Islander Bystander on Anna Maria Island!


Ralph F. Harles
Ralph F. Harles, 71, of Sheboygan, Wis., and a 5-
year winter resident of the Island, died Sept 3 in HCA/
L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Minnesota, was a salesman for Kohler Co.
Plumbing Supplies in Sheboygan.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


SALE OF WEEK
211 84th St in Holmes Beach has a caged and solar
heated pool. This and a deeded boat slip made this
three-plus bedroom, two-bath, ground level home
an attractive island purchase at $157,000. A
sprinkler system with separate meter is a huge
bonus in today's water market and this house has
one. Exclusively marketed by Carol Williams, a
broker with Smith Realtors of Holmes Beach.


Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING SERVICES

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


jRuser .iernnrial Monununiti (qIjurrh
The Rev. An Interdenominational Christian Church
Frank W. Serving the Community Since 1913
Hutchison,
ast 10 AM ................... Sunday Worship
10 AM ............Children's Church
S 7 PM .......Sunday Seaside Worship

512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
- Transportation & Nursery Available
Come, Celebrate Christ 778-0414


FUNERAL HOMES

KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager

BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 748-4480
(813)748-1011 FAX 746-6459


ISLANDER i WliiIn

ANNA MARIA ISLAND'S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER


FREE HOME DELIVERY ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND
CALL 778-7978






[In THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 U PAGE 19


OBITUARIES CONTINUED

He is survived by two sons, R.D., and Mark, both
of Oshkosh, Wis.; and a sister, Marie, of Sussex, Wis.

Hilda Harper
Hilda Harper, 86, of Holmes Beach, died Aug. 29
in HCA/L.W. Blake Hospital.
Born in Trufant, Mich., Mrs. Harper came to the
area from Fort Lauderdale in 1960. She was a manager
of a real estate company. She was a member of Epis-
copal Church of the Annunciation.
No local visitation was held. A memorial service
was held at Episcopal Church of the Annunciation in
Holmes Beach, with Rev. Rick Fellows officiating.
Memorials may be made to the Episcopal Church of
the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, Fla.
34217. Griffith Cline Funeral Home was in charge of
arrangements.


RENTALS:
BRIDGEPORT 2BR, 2B unfurnished
condo with pool. $575 plus electric.
ANNA MARIA HOME 2BR, 1B unfur-
nished with garage. $575 plus electric.
CANAL FRONT HOME 2BR, 1B with den
and carport. $600 plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH 1BR, 1B furnished or
unfurnished with garage. $475 plus utilities.
HOLMES BEACH 1 BR, 1 B. $450 plus utilities..


I DICK

R LT R
AGNER
EALTY INC.


813) 778-2246
FAX 778-4978
2217 Gulf Drive
Bradenton Beach, FL 34217


The Island Poet
You hope you'll live to a ripe old age, but I
doubt if you will make it,
'Cause for every dollar you get in, there's two
guys who want to take it.
They say things are going down and gas is the
best buy by far,
But a lot of good that does when you can't
afford a car.
The politicians say they can't get by, so they
give themselves a raise,
But they never stop to think it's the little guy
who pays.
And if they raise our tax again, it can only
lead to grief,
'Cause where will they get the money if we
are all on relief.
Bud Atteridge


EASY ISLAND LIVING


, J /,/titn i *i" . .. .. . .
.


.r :*: ***.flifl _- -. ":''-

Real comfort in this Key Royale canal home. 3 bedroom, 2
bath, eat-in kitchen, dining area and family room. $199,900.
Call Toni or Herb King
795-2211 After Hours 778-1985
The Prudential __ Florida Realty


Specializing in
Tropical Properties
DARCIE DUNCAN REALTORDAssociate
OFFICE: (813) 778-0777
EVES: (813) 778-1589 FAX* (813) 778-6944


REACTORS.
5203 Gulf Dr Holmes Beach


MLS K Tol Free 1-800-741-3772 Ext 55


Use the form on page 11 to guar-
antee free home delivery
every week of the best news on
Anna Maria Island ...
the Islander Bystander.
Island Duplex
1/1 each side steps to Gulf.
ONLY $119,500. CALL:
S 'SANDY GREINER REALTOR*Associate
S' .Attt Hrs 778-3794 Pager 333-1864
*i T REALTORS*
,L 5203 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach
S Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1 MLS 1800-741-3772 Exi 55 OPEN SEVEN DAYSAWEEK

Cul-De-Sac Canalfront Spacious, open 2 bedroom, 2 full
baths, with a beautiful dock. 511 65th Street. $165,000.
BRAND NEW 3/2 Holmes Beach. Over 2,100 sq. ft.
of living area with glimpses of the Gulf. $182,000. Re-
ally spacious floor plan and a huge garage.
Island Livinig-At It's Best New 2 bedroom, 2 full baths, close
to the Gulf at the low price of $125,000, nothing to compare with.
LOT WITH VIEW Good Gulf views from this second lot in
from the water. 2803 Ave. E. Asking $72,000. Cleared and ready.
NICE DUPLEX Just listed ground level 2/1 each side big
double carports & across the street from the Gulf. All this for
$160,000. 201 69th St. Holmes Beach.
Affordable Island Living 1BR Mobile Home. Turnkey
furnished C/P and family room. $17,500.


Dolores M. Baker
Licensed Real Estate Broker


778-7500


ls] -TA q


ISLAND

HISTORY

BUFFS!
June Alder's
column highlights
the heritage of
Anna Maria Island
this week and
every week in the
ISLANDER
BYSTANDER.
Don't miss an issue.
You can even mail it
to friends up north!
See the form on page
5 to subscribe.


Anna Foley

*0 i


REDUCED 4 BEDROOM KEY ROYALE: Quality
custom home shows like a dream. Split bedroom design
with private guest wing, separate dining room, morning
room, parlour, Florida room with hand loomed carpet.
Other amenities include all appliances, heated pool and
spa, sprinkler system, well, central vacuum, intercom,
circle drive. Now $269,000. Call Carol Williams for show-
ing, 778-0777 office, 778-1718 after hours.
COZY AND CONVENIENT: Attractive 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Holmes Beach home. Comer lot with circular driveway.
Many new updates. Homeowner's Warranty. $119,000. To
see this home call Zee Catanese, 794-8991 eves.
ISLAND DUPLEX: Modem elevated duplex with 1 car
garage and carports, convenient enclosed stairway to liv-
ing areas. Each side is 2 bedrooms, 2 baths with private
balconies. Short stroll to beautiful Gulf Beach. Best
priced elevated duplex on the Island at $122,900. To
see, call Debbie Walther, 794-6295 eves.
ANNA MARIA LOT-PICTURESQUE SETTING:
Wooded lot close to beach access on quiet street. Fi-
nancing information available. Priced at $74,900. Please
call Carol Williams, 778-0777 or 778-1718 for details.


REALTORS


I 5203 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772 Ext. 55 OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK MLS L


PROFESSIONAL

RENTAL

MANAGEMENT

Looking for someone to manage your
property? Contact Usa Varano or
Anna Foley to discuss your needs.



DICK WAGNER REALTY, INC.
2217 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach, FL 34217
813 778-2246 FAX 778-4978
Serving Anna Maria since 1939


Find your "place in paradise" in the
pages of the Islander Bystander.


S Fran Maxon
LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER
SALES AND RENTALS
701 Gulf Dr. (P.O. Box 717) Anna Maria, FL 34216
Fax # 778-7035
778-2307 or 778-1450










BRAND NEW LISTING Luxurious 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath,
fantastic home. Featuring a huge living room for great en-
tertainment, floor to ceiling sliding glass doors overlook-
ing very spacious decks with GULF VIEWS. Genuine
cedar woodwork and an extra large lot make this an ex-
traordinary home. Elegant living experience, close to the
GULF. $229,900. Eves. call Agnes Tooker, 778-5287.
Broker. Nancy Ungvarsky
Associates: Frances V. Maxon, Prue Maxon-Yost, Agnes Tooker,
Kathleen Tooker Granstad, Janice Tressler, Pat Jackson,
Kenneth Jackson, Rosemary Schulte. Mike Schulte,
and Kay Kay Hardy
WEEKDAYS 9AM to 430PM D[P-
SATURDAYS 9AM to NOON


ISLAND

REAL ESTATE
., OF ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Maureen Dowd, Lic. Real Estate Broker
CENTRALLY LOCATED
ANNUAL SEASONAL RENTALS
AVAILABLE NOW ...
Spotless 3 bedroom/i bath duplex apartment,
freshly painted and well-maintained, $575/mo
plus electric.
Cozy I bedroom/1 bath duplex apartment
with nice yard just steps to great beach, $474/
mo plus electric.
(813) 778-6066
6101 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217
( Sales & Rentals & Property Management


ANOTHER SALE PENDING BY ROSE
SCHNOERR No. 1 Producing Agent
with the No. 1 Producing Company
1991-1992
ROSE
SCHNOERR
Realtor@
GRI, LTG, RRC
"Team Up
With
Success"
N at the sign
of Success.


Call Rose ... Office: 813 778-2261
Free Long Distance: 800 422-6325
After Hours: 813 778-7780
Always available on mobile & pager service
READY TO LIST YOUR PROPERTY
OR FIND YOUR DREAM HOME ... TODAY


.0


:saacn







[] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 0 PAGE 20

- -"nea L&nneakL .


BAYFRONT VACANT LAND 2.15 acres in-
cludes a single family home. R-3 Multi-family
zoning. Possible 18 family units located 200'
East of Gulf Drive on 17th St. in Bradenton Beach.
$365,000. Call Nick Patsios day or nitee."

Nick G. Patsios
Broker/Salesperson
Island Specialist for 15 years
"The One Who Knows"
778-2261 or 778-4642 '

Toll Free 1-800-422-6325


(A. PARADISE, INC.)


REALTOR
3001 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522


Efficiency Unit in a Gulffront Complex. 500 sf
washer/dryer in unit. Heated pool. $72,000. Turnkey
furnished.
Island Duplex 2 bedroom, 1 bath each side. One
block to the beach. Currently producing $950 per
month income. $142,000.
Price Reduced This is the only 2 bedroom, 1 bath
condominium for sale on the Island under $60,000.
Turnkey furnished for $59,000.
Rentals: Day Week Month.
Complete Rental & Property Management
Questions concerning buyer's broker??
Call Dennis McClung at 778-4800


CALL 778-7978 TO GUARANTEE YOUR FREE WEEKLY HOME DELIVERY
OF THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND!



___ _ ___ i-nReaL&neaL-


BLUE RIBBON HOME
Bonny two bedroom, two bath Island home in pleasant
neighborhood near beach and shopping. Has all the
goodies, including spacious family room with white
brick fireplace, large screened lanai, generous master
suite with walk-in closet, top notch kitchen with ample
storage, brand new shingle roof and sprinkler system.
A special home and a great investment! Priced to fit
your pocketbook at only $142,500, furnished.


jsoat ou ear .tate. P ofersisionad. S ia alz2 in M l'J nlett.i o lal luif ye. ONE YEAR
Associates Atter Hours: Barbara A. Sato...778-3509 Christine T. Shaw...778-2847 MarcellaCornett...778-5919 Nancy Guliford...778-2158 -


U-


ISLAND LIVING AT IT'S BEST. Lovely 3BD/2BA
home on deep water canal with new seawall cap
and dock in 1992. No bridges to Bay. Beautiful lawn
with auto sprinklers and HOME OWNER'S WAR-
RANTY. $239,500.
Hal Gillihan Office 778-2261
Evenings 792-2194

neaL neaL-
.MLS
___ N~'


127 Hammock Road in Anna Maria. 3 BR, 2BA.
Secluded area. Dock for small boat. Reduced
from $229,000.


DICK MAHER
REALTOR@ ASSOCIATE


CALL
DICK MAHER
REALTOR ASSOCIATE
Evenings: 778-6791
TOP PRODUCER -
Island Office -
1st Six Months -1993
neaL neaLRealtors
Toll-free 1-800-732-6434


GULFFRONT DUPLEX
Looking for CHOICE GULFFRONT PROP-
ERTY? Drive by these two turnkey units located
at 106 Oak Ave. and view one of the Islands
best income producing duplexes on NATURAL
Gulf Beach! Great partnership investment &
asking only $408,500. CALL TODAY!
ANNA MARIA REALTY, INC.
LIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER
"We are on the Island!" ... since 1957
9805 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 835
Anna Maria, FL 34216 (813) 778-2259


for short or long term
VACATION
on
Beautiful
ANNA MARIA ISLAND

HORIZON REALTY
OF ANNA MARIA, INC.
420 Pine Ave P 0 Box 155
Anna Maria, FL 34216
(813) 778-0426 FAX 778-1849


SALES RENTAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND REALTY T
GROUP OFFICE! Four ISLAND real estate offices working together to
-provide personal and professional services. Over 75 combined years of
ISLAND business experience shows we are long established ISLAND offices!







A BOATMAN'S DREAM 202 LAKEVIEW
Fantastic deep water canal with easy access to 2 bedroom, 3 bath home with 2 car ga-
Tampa Bay. This charming 2 bedroom, 2 bath rage. Heavy dut boat davits. Seawall and
house has many extras including a large deck ge. Heavy dutyboat davits. Seawall and
overlooking a 27 foot dock with water and elec- dock. Fireplace, central vacuum. Renova-
tric. Room for a pool. Call today. $185,000. tions done ready for offer. Asking
Eves. call Pat Jackson 778-3301. $.U49OG t.5-.,O. $.41W+7. $169,000.
FRAN MAXON REAL ESTATE DOUG DOWLING REALTY
Licensed Real Estate Broker Lic Real Estate Brokers of Anna Maria Island
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 P.O. BOX 1667 409 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria, FL 34216 Anna Maria, FL 34216
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307 (813) 778-1222


LARGE FAMILY ISLAND HOME
405 28th St. 6 bedrooms, 4 baths, pool, deep wa-
ter canal with boat lift and great views. This home
is immaculate and it is definitely not a drive by!!!
REACH RICHARD FOR YOUR PERSONAL
SHOWING:778-2261 of After Hours: 778-2284
neaLsneaL .
Richard Freeman, Realtor@ Associate []3 ML$
.,_______" ___






|11 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 M PAGE 21


The Prudential
Florida Realty
CAROL HEINZE, CRS
REALTOR-ASSOCIATE*
Million Dollar Club
5340-1 Gull Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-0766 ip,
Fax (813) 778-3035
After Hours (813) 792-5721


Michael Saunders & Co.
of Anna Maria Island, Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Broker
FEATURE OF THE WEEK








MAGNIFICENT ISLAND HOME
Freshwater lake in front and sugar sand beach behind this
3 story spacious home. 3BR/3.5B with pool/spa, wood
burning fireplace and many more extras! $975,000.
Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
WATERFRONT BARGAIN Luxury at a bargain price
describes this 2BR/2B spacious condo. Enjoy canalfront
living with boating, swimming and much more at a great
location! $78,900. Ken Rickett, 778-3026.
ADORABLE ISLAND HOME Tastefully renovated, steel
roof, Mexican tile throughout, tongue and groove paneling,
new Magic Chef appliances and great backyard. Only
$113,900. Paul Collins, 778-4330.
EXPERIENCE FLAMINGO CAY Beautifully remod-
eled 2BR/2B split plan home with great room that opens
to solar heated, caged pool and patio. Formal living/din-
ing room. Davits and new dock. $229,600. Don and Karen
Schroder, 778-2200.
BAYFRONT HOME with private dock in lovely tran-
quil setting. Mother-in-law suite with private entry. 4BR/
2.5B. $204,900. Paul Collins, 778-4330.
Anna Maria Island Centre (813) 778-6654
3224 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


Dave.M.ynihan ................... 778-797

EA T I.RelEtate113To EamaI.......1..........' 778]F rkl-6760
Be


$53,900 Will buy this 2BR-1BA, fully furnished SUNSET VILLAS-JUST REDUCED Two duplexes,
condo. Convenient to shopping and across the side by side, only one-half block to sandy walking
street from the beach with pool, private patio and beach. Offered at $179,900. Possible owner financ-
cook-out area. Call Tom Eatman for details. ing. Call Dave Moynihan.


BEACHES, SUNSETS AND AMBIANCE Direct
Gulffront 2BR 2BA unit that is turnkey furnished.
Great walking beach. A proven money maker for
rentals. Protected parking. All for $164,900. Call
Stan Williams.


ISLAND DUPLEX Well located and maintained Is-
land duplex in desirable area Holmes Beach. Short
walk to prime beach area and canal docking. Priced
at $129,900. Call Dave Moynihan.


GULF VIEW TOWNHOUSE Spacious Gulf view SUNRISE OR SUNSET Pick your preference from
townhouse with 3BR-2BA, private 2 car garage and one of these 2BR-2BA Gulffront or Bay View, un-
over 3200 sq.ft. under roof. Complex offers two pools, furnished condos. Pool, elevator and close to shop-
tennis, lush grounds and short walk to prime beach. ping and restaurants. Great beach just across the
Offered at $159,900. Call Dave Moynihan for details. street. Both priced at $89,900. Call Stan Williams.


Whether BUYING OR SELLING,

REACH RICHARD! MLS

1 .,;oF


*-- U L :?


778-2261
After Hours: 778-2284


Old Florida Charmer
301 22nd St. North. Location is the key in this
4Bd/2Ba beach duplex. Close to Bay and beach.
A must see. Great investment! $109,500.


Great duplex, great invest.
ment. 208 Peacock, Holmes Beach.
2BR/2BA on each side of this up-
graded duplex. Close to wide beach.
Good rental history. $135,000.


Fantastic beach cottage. 209
Coconut, Anna Maria. Updated. A
must see, not a drive by. Fireplace,
beautiful dining area. Best of all, next
to world class beach. $169,600.


Priced Right. 301 23rd St. N.,
Bradenton Beach. Two Bedroom,
one bath. A cute, little updated cot-
tage. Turnkey furnished. $116,500.


Richard A. Freeman, Island and Key Specialist, Realtor Associate, neaLSneaL REALTORS Toll free 1-800-422-6325


T. C. F. W.
Too cute for words. Renovated beach house, two
bedroom, 1.5 bath, directly across from the beach.
Twelve years experience
specializing in Creative
Transactions.
Make your dreams and
goals a reality with

S PaulCollins
REALTOR-ASSOCIATE
dL. MAfter Hours (813) 778-4330

Michael Saunders & Company
Licensed Real Estate Broker
3224 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 (813) 778-6654


FaflSpeciafs

On Anna Maria Island

Looking for beachfront or
close-to-beach getaway?

We Have them.

4-day/3-night packages
start at $240 + tax.

Weekly and monthly specials.
Call now to reserve your
Fall Getaway.
Contact Debbie Dial
800-881-2276 or 813-778-2275

Pick up logo address


-L..J=


VAAL.







[IJUl THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 E PAGE 22


Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630
Lic. No. 4467







KILTS PIANO STUDIO
ENROLL NOW for Private Music Instruction x /
Piano to Keyboard Youth to Adult
Instruction at 6608 Marina Drive
Paulette Kilts Holmes Beach* (813) 778-3788






---------- -H--r--,
I CAVANAGH MARINE REPAIR I
GAS DIESEL I/O INBOARD
ENGINES DRIVES GENERATORS
FULL SERVICE MARINA MOBILE SERVICE
795-7264 124TH ST. CT. W. AT CORTEZ ROAD
A I.

a10




CHRISTIE'S
1 PLUMBING
COMPANY
SCommercial & Residential
Open Saturday
24-Hour Service
S .0 No Overtime Chargesl
778-3924 or 778-4461
"Remember, it pays and saves to get a second estimate."
5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach (RF0038118)



STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES,
i MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558


Elaine is still here ...

Painting by
Elaine Defenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
:. .Serving the Islands Since 1969.
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468

Islanders "dine in style" when they choose
from the pages of the Islander Bystander.


USED SECRETARY DESK Good condition. Black
and walnut color. 794-1119.
MICROSOFT WORD for DOS 5.5 Never regis-
tered or used (includes Grammatik IV). Retails for
$370. $150 or make an offer. 778-9392.
WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In Line Skates. A
relentless rush! For skating information and sales
call 778-3880.

FIND GREAT DEALS on wheels... and everything
else in the ISLANDER BYSTANDER

4 X 8 ENCLOSED UTILITY trailer. New tires and
axle. Strong I-beam construction. Great condition.
$550 OBO. Call mobile # 356-4649 or 778-9392.

VEGAS BLACK JACK table. Full table and equip-
ment, stools, complete enclosed. $200 OBO. 778-
3729. Ask for Rick.

MARY KAY COSMETICS Free facials. Free deliv-
ery. Call Donna Jean 383-3202.
STACK WASHER/DRYER full size, 2 years old,
$450. Stack washer/dryer, mini, $150. Dresser/
chest, white, 6 drawer, 3 to choose from, $80 each.
778-6335.
ARTICLES FOR SALE Antique chaise lounge
$300 firm. Large bird cage with stand $150 firm.
778-4824.


LOST SUNGLASSES: Costa Del Mar with pre-
scription lenses in hard shell, black case. 778-9392.


WANTED Cat lover to watch declawed inside cat
(all shots) in their home. October 18 thru Novem-
ber 3. For fee. 778-6267 pm.


LOW COST health insurance. $10,000,000. On the
job coverage, small groups, prescriptions included.
Preferred provider hospitals. Over 10 years expe-
rience. Call 778-2324.


HONDA PRELUDE 1981. Rusty from the beach
but well cared for mechanically. Very reliable,
clean, small car. Perfect for a student. $850 firm.
778-9392.


13-FT SPIN DRIFT DAYSAILER Main sail and jib,
center board and kick-up rudder. Galvanized
trailer. All in excellent condition. $1000. 778-2963
after 5 PM.


14-FT '92 CAROLINA SKIFF 25 HP Tohatsu, can-
vas dodger, cooler seat, front deck, storage seat,
many extras $3000 OBO. 778-3358.


BAY CRUISES Egmont Key or Sunset. Custom-
ized charters. Economical. Shaded and open deck.
Very comfortable for up to 6 persons. Call Rick at
794-5605.


EXTRA TIME on your hands? The Anna Maria Is-
land Chamber of Commerce needs you. Volun-
teers please call 778-1541 or 778-2277. Ask for
Mary Ann.


MATURE COMPANION Do you need a mature
companion in your home? Non-smoker, island resi-
dent, cook, drive, etc. Part-time, not live-in. 778-
8216.
ISLAND HOUSEWIFE looking for home to care for
on P/T or F/T basis. Not afraid'of hard work. Will
also house sit. Mrs. Roberts 383-7447.


CHILD CARE Any age. Mature woman to care for
children by the hour or overnight while you go out
for the evening. 778-0262.
ISLAND GARDENER will turn your boring land-
scape into a yard bursting with blooming flowers
and color. For beautiful ornamentals, perfect for the
beach environment all summer, call 778-2260.
AFTER SCHOOL CHILDCARE. Available eve-
nings and weekends in our home. References
available. 778-6438.
ISLANDER CLASSIFIEDS
The best news in town and the best results from
classified ads ... for only $3.00.
PRIVATE MUSIC INSTRUCTION Piano or key-
board. Youth to Adult. Enroll now. Call 778-3788 for
interview.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office,
or dock-at your convenience. Complete detailing
includes wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly
cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and much more. Protect your investment
Call Damon on mobile number 356-4649.

VAN-GO PAINTING 15 yrs experience. Residen-
tial/Commercial, Interior/Exterior, Pressure Clean-
ing, Wallpaper hanging. Island resident with Island
references. Call Bill Chamberlin at 778-5455.

ON THE ROCKS Bartending Services. Private par-
ties or any occasion. 794-5947.


INSLANDER|:lIsi



IF YOU KNOW NEWS ...

PLEASE, GIVE US A CALL AT 778-7978.
If you know something that would be of interest to Islanders, don't hesitate to
call. We're interested in stories about people and events that have to do with
Anna Maria Island. Kids, adults, grandparents. From anniversary parties to
garden club meetings ... there's always something happening and there will
always be someone who wants to know about it.
Call or write:
Islander Bystander
Island Shopping Center
5400A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(813) 778-7978







[i THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 N PAGE 23


JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodel-
ing specialist. State licensed and insured. Many
island references. 778-2993.
PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, WINDOWS, moving
help, organizing, whatever! 18 1/2 years on this
Island! (20% discount to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE SERVICE.
Professional repairs & installation. Fully insured
and a Manatee County resident for 25 years. Call
Ken Montgomery for your free estimate today at
792-9252.

ISLAND LOCKSMITH and Golf Shop has moved!
Our new location is 315 58th St, Holmes Beach.
Same phone number 778-1661.
ALUMINUM VINYL CONSTRUCTION. Remod-
eling & repairs. Screen rooms, roof-overs, siding &
soffit, etc. Insured, references, reasonable. LIC
#RX-0051318. Rex Roberts 795-3757 or 778-
0029.
FAT CAT HOME WATCH Will care for your home
or condo while your are away. Call Jon Kent mo-
bile #745-4723 for information.
ASK ME ABOUT the Mary Kay Cosmetics oppor-
tunity! You could qualify. Call Donna Jean 383-
3202.


HOLMES BEACH $700 month. 2/2, 1200 sq ft, W/
D, decks and garage. Near beach. Gulf Bay Realty
778-7244 or 778-2151.

UNFURNISHED ISLAND RENTALS
... Large family, 4/3, pool, deep water, $1500.
... 2/2, pool, 3100 Gulf Dr, $600.
... 604 North Shore, 2/1, on canal w/dock, $625.
MAINLAND RENTALS
... MOBILE HOME, furnished, annual, 2/2,
2107 Palma Sola Shores #85.
Neal & Neal Rentals, Inc.
813-778-9477 or 1-800-422-6325.

ANNUAL UNFURNISHED, over 1200 sq. ft. w/2
decks & garage. 2/2, 1 blk. from beach. $700 mo.
Gulf-Bay Realty. 778-7244 or 778-2151.
YES! We have a few seasonal rentals available.
Yvonne Higgins Real Estate. 778-1999.
ANNA MARIA UNFURNISHED 2/1, new kitchen,
carport, washer/dryer hookup, close to beaches,
shopping and tennis. $550 month plus utilities.
Available Sept. 1st. 778-3119.
LOVELY FURNISHED Anna Maria gulf front apart-.
ments. Sundeck & porch. No pets. Wk/Mo/Sn. 778-
3143.


ONE LARGE COMMERCIAL Studio. Gulf view.
Ideal for small business, office, crafts, etc. Rent ne-
gotiable. Call Frank...778-6126.

RENTAL TO SHARE Anna Maria waterfront, boat
dock, washer/dryer, own phone number, nice loca-
tion. $79 week plus deposit. 778-1273.
HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX 1/1, one block to
beach. October thru January., April and May. $350
week, $1075 month plus tax. 778-3757.
APARTMENT FOR RENT 1/1 1/2, unfurnished.
Seaside Gardens. 778-6746.
HOLMES BEACH Furnished, remodeled, 2/1
home. Large screen room, cathedral ceilings,
decks, one block from beach. Seasonal. $1500
month everything included. Available November
thru May 1994. 778-3358.
HOLMES BEACH duplex. Furnished. 2 bedrooms.
3016 Ave E. 778-5341.
HOLMES BEACH Furnished condo with pool. 2/2.
Living room, kitchen, basic cable covered parking
and laundry room. Steps to beach. Available No-
vember to December 15. $200 week/$600 monthly
plus electric. 813-778-4560 or 813-681-8508.
HOLMES BEACH 2/2, washer/dryer, cable TV,
phone, 1 block from beach. Seasonal $1500 month
including utilities. Available November thru April
1994. 778-5419.


CANAL FRONT LOT for sale by owner. Corner of
Tern & Gladiolus, Anna Maria. $99,000. Negotiable.
778-4084.
DIRECTLY ON THE Intra Coastal. 2 story duplex.
2BR upstairs, 1 down. Garage and sea walled lot.
Deep water. $139,9000. 778-7980.
DEEP SAILBOAT WATER LOT 60 X 100. 211 N
Harbor Dr, Holmes Beach. $89,900. 778-4253.
$56,000 1 bedroom condo with enclosed garage,
tile floors, newer appliances, excellent floor plan.
Owner may finance. Yvonne Higgins Real Estate.
778-1999.
TWO BEDROOM townhouse condo, redecorated
in floral colors, very close to beach, lovely pool.
Great home or rental. Yvonne Higgins Real Estate.
778-1999.
GULF VIEW Charming cottage. Excellent first
home or rental. Large fenced lot, new roof, carpet
and kitchen. Beach within 300ft. $85,900. 102 12th
St, North Bradenton Beach. 778-0785.
BY OWNER Holmes Beach. Furnished condo with
pool. 2/2, kitchen, living room, extra room in com-
mon area with laundry room. Covered parking.
Near beach. $72,000. 813-681-8508.


Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sa Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauling By the cut or by the month.
SService *12 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
77 41345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
SAND SATISFACTION







Finishing Touches Wallpapering
YOUR PAPER HUNG WITH PRIDE & CARE
FREE ESTIMATES 778-2152


Island Typing Service
Computer Operated
FAX Service: Send & Receive
| e FAX #: 778-8390
310 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-8390


J.R.

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
Free Estimates

778-2139


AUTO g
BOAT
DETAILING
WASH WAX SHAMPOO
Engine & Underbody
Leather & Vinyl
Tires & Trim
Every detail is cleaned and
protected. Your car or boat
can look like new again...
and maintain ils value!
By appointment, at your
home or office.
Most cars $85.
Call mobile service #
356-4649 or 778-7978.


IS"IANDERI U1


GETS THE

JOB DONE!

THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
readers are eager for
your business and your services.
Call 778-7978 for Information about
Classified and Service Advertising.









24-Hour Emergency Service
We are a full service
Electrical Contractor
New Homes
Remodel
Ceiling Fans
Electrical Service Changes
Lightning Arrestors
5345 GULF DRIVE, SUITE 100
HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217
WILL BURNS OWNER (813) 778-7774 U ER0010206


PiiW GLASS
TB .s S k m mR

EVERYTHING IN GLASS!
Mirrors Tabletops
Windows & Screens
/l\ Boat Windows
1 Residential & Commercial
Sales & Repairs

5347 GULF DRIVE NORTH HOLMES BEACH
(813) 778-7808


IISLANDERTT' LI ]0 l



HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

THE DEADLINE IS NOON ON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in person at our office after all, who can afford to
invoice for our low fee of $3.00? Our office is located at 5400A Marina Drive, in the
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. We're on the corner between D. Coy
Ducks and the laundromat. Hours 8 to 5, Monday thu Friday, Saturday 9 to 2.
CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $3.00 for up to 3 lines.
Additional lines: $1 each, Box: $1,
Headlines 100 per word.
For more information,
call 778-7978.


I--


.1





[U THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER N SEPTEMBER 9, 1993 E PAGE 24


Island Foods
3900 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 7 AM to 10 PM SUNDAY AM to 9 PM* PHONE 778-4100
We Welcome Food Stamps
PRICES EFFECTIVE NOW THROUGH TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1993


RIGHT HERE ON THE ISLAND!


80% LEAN
GROUND


39


LB.


CHICKEN
Leg Quarters
10 LB. BAGO

'" < 2~0" LB.


WHITE OR RED SEEDLESS
GRAPES QQ


Green Onions
A BUNCHES
SFOR
^^i^^^ 99^^^^B*


Our Famous Whole-Roasted
CHICKENS
Ready-To-Eat ie t AI


* EA.


BAKERY FRESH
CHOCOLATE CHIP
COOKIESS


THANK YOU FOR SHOPPING ISLAND FOODS ...


- - I ~II -
~.-% .~


POLAR PAK


ICE
CREAM


990


1/2 GAL.
ALL
VARIETIES


* WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU SEPT 14 I
V j[ LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER PLEASE -
Q--- "----T"---10


,~r -r -r


o-ff,- --. w.r,


] / MILK !i
I 3 I4
MILK i
I '990
S WITH THIS COUPON NOW THRU SEPT 14
S LIMIT ONE PER CUSTOMER PLEASE
Q- ---- - ---- I


HELMANN'S
1 Mayonnaise
$179
32 OZ.
JAR
I WITH THIS COUPON
NOW THRU SEPT 14
LIMIT TWO PER
CUSTOMER PLEASE
A-------- ---


QUARTER LOIN
PORK -


DELI SLICED
Turkev Breast


99


LB.


U ~ 1L -


ANY 1/2 GALLON
CLOVER FARM


J