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 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
 Subjects
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
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ANNA MARIA ISLAND'S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING SPORTS REAL ESTATE : AUGUST 5, 1993




ISLANDERS II1


Island trolley system killed by county commission


By Paul Roat
An Island trolley bus system apparently won't be
created, despite a $1.4 million grant from the Florida
Department of Transportation.
Both the Manatee County Commission and the
Town of Longboat Key voted against the proposed
system. Withdrawal of the county's support kills the
grant application which, ironically, was approved the
day of the county's denial.
"I think it's pretty much dead," said Manatee
Commissioner Kent Chetlain, a long-time advocate of
mass transit. He pointed out that a recent five-day rid-
ership survey indicated the existing Manatee County
Area Transit buses were running at low-to-no passen-
ger levels.

Maddox firing

endorsed;

appeal set
By Pat Copeland
Islander Bystander
Last week's firing of Holmes Beach Police Chief
Rick Maddox has set off a chain of events that may
stretch on for months. As city attorney Steve Dye re-
marked, "I think you'll see that this is not the end of a
process but the beginning."
Events began to unfold last Wednesday morning,
when Mayor Pat Geyer fired Maddox following a 20-
PLEASE SEE MADDOX, PAGE 2


Martini abstention

probed
On Friday, Holmes Beach Councilman Rich
Bohnenberger submitted a memo to Mayor Geyer stat-
ing his concern over Councilwoman Billie Martini's
refusal to vote on the firing of Holmes Beach Police
Chief Rick Maddox.
"The possibility exists that her action was a violation
of state law," said Bohnenberger, the city's legislative
committee chairman, in the memo. "For this reason, I re-
quested a legal opinion in the matter and if a determina-
tion is made that Councilwoman Martini's refusal to vote
was a violation, what action if any council must take."
Martini refused to vote at the special meeting called
last Thursday by Holmes Beach Mayor Pat Geyer. Instead
of voting on the matter, Martini handed a letter to City
Clerk Leslie Ford to read into the minutes.
In the letter, Martini referenced the accusation of
a Sunshine Law violation that was brought against her
shortly after she took office. She said she had been,
"accused and found guilty by many of my peers with-
out benefit of a trial," and in order "not to be found
guilty of judging him as I had been judged," she ab-
stained from voting.
Dye later said the abstention should be filed as a
conflict of interest.
Dye's memo to Mayor Geyer dated Aug. 3 clari-
fies Martini's and the council's responsibility. "It is
my opinion that the reason given for abstaining from
voting is not a conflict of interest recognized by state
statute. Unless a councilperson has a conflict of inter-
est that is recognized by state law, that council mem-
ber has a duty to vote," said Dye.
Dye states that according to the city charter, a coun-
cil member shall forfeit his/her office if he/she ... violates
any standard of conduct or code of ethics established by
law for public officials, such violation to be determined
by the remaining members of the Council. It further states
that in no event shall a council member be required to
forfeit his/her office without a public hearing.
Dye said, "Council should request an advisory
opinion from the Florida Commission on Ethics, how-
ever, if the commission finds a violation occurred, it
could trigger action by the state and severe penalties."


Sarasota County Area Transit buses have indicated
a 26 percent increase in ridership to Longboat Key.
Officials within all three Anna Maria Island cities
have indicated support of the program to provide trol-
ley buses running up and down the barrier islands from
the north end of Anna Maria to Lido Key in Sarasota.
A grant to provide for the purchase of six open-sided,
31-passenger buses was approved by the DOT last week,
according to state mass transit director John Starling.
He said the grant would have provided 90 percent
of the cost of the buses, or $1.188 million, as well as
50 percent of the operating costs at $230,000. Both
Sarasota and Manatee County would have had to split
matching funds totaling $472,000.
The state grant would have continued to pay half


Monument must be

moved: officials
By Bonner Presswood
The sentiments are dear and precious to those who
knew them, but the granite monument that appeared on
Manatee Avenue at the site of a crash that claimed two
young lives last year is inappropriate, according to the
state agency that controls the right-of-way where it has
.been placed.
It has to be moved.
Holmes Beach Det. Nancy Rogers said, "It's a
mystery to us." But according to Florida Department
of Transportation (DOT) spokesperson Cathy Palmer,
Bruce Manson, father of one of the girls killed in the
accident, was involved in the placement of the monu-
ment. DOT is willing to assist in finding an appropri-
ate location and in the re-location.
No local monument builder will take credit for manu-
facturing the elaborate memorial, but will only say they
have not been able to procure the likes of the expensive
pink marble used for some time. Rogers ventured an es-
timated cost for the monument of $8,000 to $9,000.
Holmes Beach Police Lt. Jay Romine said several
citizens have suggested Manatee High School as a
more appropriate location for the memorial.
In fact, Palmer has been in touch with Monda
Simmons, public information officer for the Manatee
County School Board, to discuss placing the monu-
ment at the school attended by the girls who were
killed. Simmons will be discussing the possibility with
the superintendent.
Palmer said that Manson understands that the
monument must be moved. The whole purpose of the
message on the monument, "please drive carefully," is
to save a life, at least to make people think. "Our pri-
mary function is safety," said Palmer. "If placed at the
school, it will be in the hope that more kids will see it.


of the maintenance costs of the trolleys for three years.
Sarasota County Mass Transit Director Jay Good-
will said there is money in the Sarasota County bud-
get for the trolley system. Sarasota County Area Tran-
sit currently serves Longboat Key as far north as the
Holiday Inn several miles into Manatee County.
The Longboat Key Town Commission voted 6-1
against the trolley proposal. Originally the group fa-
vored the concept, but a letter-writing campaign from
residents against the trolley buses apparently swayed
commissioners to cast the no vote. Residents appar-
ently were fearful the buses would not fit with the
ambiance of the Key.
Commissioners on Longboat are now advocating
an expansion of the current bus service to the island.


SKIMMING THE NEWS ...
AMC taxes .................................Page 3
Opinions ..................................... Page 4
Anna Maria Bridge update.........Page 8
Spunky Islander ..................Page 13
Streetlife ................... ........Page 14
Fishing ...................... ........Page 17
Classified .................. ........Page 22






Ig THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E AUGUST 5, 1993 N PAGE 2

Maddox charges 'half truths,

innuendos, grossly inaccurate' in

wake of dismissal


MADDOX CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


day probation. Geyer cited the following reasons:
Failure to effectively supervise the police depart-
ment employees.
Creating a hostile and counter-productive work
environment within the police department resulting in
low employee morale and productivity.
Failure to properly train police department per-
sonnel.
Failure to properly delegate responsibility within
the police department.
Lack of cooperation with outside agencies.
Lack of cooperation with other city departments.
Failure to complete projects on a timely basis.
Insubordination to me as your supervisor.
Maddox's reply to these charges came that after-
noon. "I'm trying to line up my legal representation,
'because it's not justified or appropriate. But it is what
I suspected was going to occur, because in these meet-
:ings we've had [meetings between the mayor, Coun-
,cil Chairman Don Howard and Maddox a condition
of the probation] there was no indication we were try-
ing to solve, resolve or deal with anything.
"There was the presumption that I had done every-
thing wrong and when it was explained, in virtually
every case it was shown that what I had done was
proper. In essence, I think this was a facade. I don't
know where I've failed to live up to any of my obli-
gations," said Maddox.
Maddox said, "Now maybe the truth will come
out, good, bad or indifferent, because I haven't been
allowed to know. When people sit there and try to
stonewall without knowledge of what is wrong, when
you receive notice that you are placed on probation and
they can't tell you what is wrong, then generally what
you have is a preconceived notion. There was already
a preordained thing that was going to occur since I
wouldn't resign willingly, and they weren't sure they
had grounds to fire me."
On Thursday, the mayor held a special session of
council to call for a vote on concurrence of her action.





Groin damage repair estimates sought
Manatee County Commissioners have instructed engineers to come up with a cost estimate to repair the
erosion control groins at Cortez and Manatee public beaches. The structures, three at Cortez Beach in
Bradenton Beach and one at the Manatee Public Beach in Holmes Beach, are in poor shape due to time and
tides. The jetties were also damaged in the March 13 winter storm. Commissioners hope to be able to bring
the jetty at the Public Beach up to a level of service safe for fishermen. The groins original purpose -
erosion control has been negated with the newly renourished beach along the Island. However, the
structures are popular with fishermen and surfers. No trespassing signs have been installed on the structures
for months, as have barricades in an attempt to keep people off the concrete piers.

Official bridge opening times every 20 minutes
It's official: bridge openings for the Anna Maria June 21, according to the Federal Register, the official
Bridge from Holmes Beach to the mainland will be on newspaper of all things federal.
demand every 20 minutes from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The change in times won't mean much to motor-
U.S. Coast Guard bridge expert John Winslow of- ists or boaters, since the every-20 minute schedule has
ficially changed the times from every half-hour on been in affect on a trial basis for some time.


Prior to discussion, she gave examples of each reason
cited for Maddox's termination (see box).
Maddox was then given an opportunity to reply.
"This is the first I've heard of any of this. Virtually
everything that has been said and virtually every alle-
gation that has been made is a half-truth, an innuendo
and grossly inaccurate," he said.
Councilman Rich Bohnenberger asked if the
mayor had other documented examples besides the
ones she listed. She said she did.
When it came to the vote, another twist was
thrown into the proceedings. All council members
voted to concur with the mayor except Councilwoman
Billie Martini, who handed a letter to City Clerk Leslie
Ford as her response to the vote.
In the letter, Martini referenced the accusation of
a Sunshine Law violation that was brought against her
shortly after she took office. She said she had been
"accused and found guilty by many of my peers with-
out benefit of a trial," and in order "not to be found
guilty of judging him as I had been judged," she was
abstaining from the vote.
Dye said the abstinence should be filed as a con-
flict of interest, but he would research the matter to
determine its validity.
Following the meeting, Maddox's attorney Paul
Rowell said he would file a request for an appeal hear-
ing on Friday. Dye said Maddox, as a department head,
is not entitled to a hearing, but becuase he has re-
quested one, the city is not going to deny it.
According to Dye, a city employee who has been
terminated may appeal but, "Maddox is an appointed
official and serves at the pleasure of the mayor."
On Friday, Maddox submitted his request for an
appeal hearing. According to Dye, a special board will
be appointed, comprised of one member of Maddox's
choosing, one member of the mayor's choosing, and
one member selected by the other two members.
A date will be set for the hearing on the return of
Maddox's attorney from vacation. It would normally
be held within seven days of the termination.


Mayor gives backup

for termination of

chief
In a memo dated July 28 to Maddox, Mayor
Geyer outlined eight reasons for Maddox's termi-
nation as Chief of Police. At the special meeting on
the following day, the Mayor read to council the
eight reasons outlined below, along with specific
instances related to the reasons for each item.
1. Failure to effectively supervise the police
department employees.
He would not allow supervisory personnel to super-
vise their staff, because he took an adversarial position
and bullied not only his supervisors but the staff.
He would stand in the office and verbally repri-
mand the supervisors in a condescending manner in
front of other employees.
2. Creating a hostile and counter-productive
work environment within the police department re-
sulting in low employee morale and productivity.
He used condescending language in a face to face
confrontation with a patrolman regarding the
patrolman's salary. When the patrolman disagreed
with him, the patrolman feared physical violence.
He kicked a dispatcher's chair and began to spin the
dispatcher around in the chair. When the dispatcher
tried to get up, he blocked the dispatcher's exit and pro-
ceeded to yell for approximately one hour.
When a part-time employee asked that a new pair
of uniform pants be ordered, he confronted the em-
ployee with derogatory language on procedures.
This was done in the presence of employees from
other departments.
3. Failure to properly train police department
personnel.
He sent several employees to training programs.
When they returned with lesson plans to train other
employees, he told them that the instructors of the
training programs didn't know what they were talk-
ing about and refused to allow in-house training.
He would not allow the sergeant, who is certified
in the use of the PR-24 baton, to train the other em-
ployees, even though three lesson plans were sub-
mitted. One of the plans was provided by the com-
pany that manufactures the PR-24 baton, but none
of the plans were good enough for him.
4. Failure to properly delegate responsibility
within the police department.
He offers no support for his supervisors' ability
and verbally attacks them to other employees.
In regard to the above, he takes the position that
no one else has the authority or ability to do any-
thing correctly.
5. Lack of cooperation with outside agencies.
When contacted by a neighboring agency, I was
informed that the Holmes Beach Police Department
had requested assistance on some under cover
work. However, the chief of that agency refused to
work with our department, because he could not
work with our chief. He knew that nothing his
agency would do would be acceptable to our chief.
The comments from Manatee County Sheriff
Charlie Wells in the July 29 issue of The Braden-
ton Herald.
6. Lack of cooperation with other city depart-
ments.
The public works department was trying to repair
a door knob in the police department but was un-
successful. He took the knob off the door, and while
yelling about the public works department's incom-
petence, he threw the knob toward the garbage can
and almost hit the clerk in the head.
General avoidance of him by other department
heads due to his attitude, condescending manner
and total lack of cooperation.
7. Failure to complete projects on time.
The police boat program has not been imple-
mented in a timely manner, and it appears that no
one is comfortable working on the program due to
his lack of support for their abilities.
There has been no attempt to improve relations
with outside agencies.
8. Insubordination to me as your supervisor.
* He failed at any time during this probation to ac-
knowledge that he had any problems or attempt to
correct them. He has continued to raise his voice at
me in the presence of the vice mayor.
* After he was placed on probation, he wanted to
place a written reprimand in the file of another em-
ployee. I explained that he could not and he said,
"You better read your administrative code." He
stated that he had the authority to do it.






STHE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E AUGUST 5, 1993 m PAGE 3

Anna Maria City holds firm: no property tax hike


By Pat Copeland
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Commission has approved
a tentative millage rate of 1.41 for its 1993/94 budget.
This is the same millage rate as the 1992/93 rate.
The city's tentative budget of $706,213 shows an in-
crease in ad valorem taxes from $219,046 to $262,130.
City Clerk Peggy Nelson explained at last week's
meeting, "The tax valuation has increased and that allows
our 1.41 to bring in more money. It's not the city's taxes
but the valuation of the property that has increased."
Mayor Ray Simches added, "Even if we maintain
the same millage rate, the tax bills of the residents of
the city will go up, because you have other agencies
that use the property taxes here in the city to support
their programs. We must make it clear to the taxpay-


ers that this city, as far as taxes on their property go,
is only getting $14 on $10,000 (of assessed value)."
Simches said some residents are unhappy with the
city's reserve of $500,000 to $600,000.
"They say we're building up a reserve or bank
account by taking money they could be saving in their
own bank accounts. What needs to be stated clearly is
that the reserve generates revenue. We get income on
it which helps keep the budget down. It can go into our
budget to keep our millage down," said Simches.
Revenue for special projects is designated from
reserves, said Simches. Such projects "may but not
necessarily will, happen during the year," he noted.
Other ways the city keeps its millage down, said
Simches, are seeking grant funds, limiting the number
of employees and taking advantage of the tremendous


Bradenton Beach's newly planked pier Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood
Work is completed on the new planking on the Bradenton Beach Fishing Pier. The new deck on the
20-year-old pier should withstand another 20 years offishermen's feet, according to city officials.


volunteer effort of concerned citizens.
Commissioner Max Znika, citing increased ex-
penses and time on the job, asked about a salary raise
for the mayor and commission. Commissioner George
McKay said he had a problem with the mayor and
commission raising their own salaries. Commissioner
Dottie McChesney said, if it were done, it should be
done by a special committee.
Simches adamantly opposed any increase.
"I feel that in a small town, part of the elected of-
ficials' functions are public service functions," he said.
"This is not a career field. We get no benefits. It's re-
ally a contribution that people choose to make when
they run for office. There are a lot of people who con-
tribute their labor and efforts to the city. I think this is
what makes a small town work."
The commission's next budget work session will
be 10 a.m. Aug. 9. The first public hearing on the bud-
get will be 7:30 p.m. Sept. 8. The second public hear-
ing on the budget will be 7 p.m. Sept. 28.




Anna Maria City
Thurs., 8/5: 11 a.m. Charter Review
Mon., 8/9: 10 a.m. Budget Workshop
Tues., 8/10: 7:30 p.m. Commission Workshop
Wed., 8/11: 7:30 p.m. Civic Association

Bradenton Beach
Thurs., 8/5: 7 p.m., Council Meeting

Holmes Beach
Thurs., 8/5: 7:30 p.m. Council Workshop
Mon., 8/9: 1 p.m. Board of Adjustment
Tues., 8/10: 10 a.m. Island Public
Transportation Initiative

Of Interest
Island Emergency Operations Center, Wed.,
8/11, 10 a.m., AMFD Station 1,
Holmes Beach.


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11 THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER i AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 4

9 in93


Summer squalls hit
Holmes Beach city hall
We agree with city attorney Stephen Dye: the City
of Holmes Beach will be embroiled in this turmoil for
some time to come.
It would seem that no one came to the meeting
wanting to fire Police Chief Rick Maddox. Mayor Pat
Geyer said, personally she had agonized over her de-
cision but she ran for office to represent all of Holmes
Beach, not just one person. And now she had to tell the
council why she had decided to dismiss the police
chief and ask for a vote to concur with her action.
There were many friends of Maddox present -
they surely did not want to see him fired.
Everyone wanted to hear the underlying reasons
for Geyer's seemingly abrupt action. After all, it was
less than three weeks ago that Maddox was placed on
probation.
But after Geyer listed eight reasons for dismissing
Maddox, with two or three documented examples for
each, the audience had its answer. They were compel-
ling reasons indeed, Councilman Rich Bohnenberger
admitted after hearing Geyer read aloud the text of her
written statement.
And with the exception of Councilwoman Billie
Martini's abstention, the decision was unanimous.
Under similar circumstances it would be deemed pru-
dent to recommend counseling prior to taking official
action. Judging from the accusations, it may have been
prudent for Maddox and his entire department to undergo
counseling Maddox to deal with his temper, the em-
ployees to get over having to deal with his temper.
It can't be confirmed, but the Islander Bystander
has heard that the staff of the police department threat-
ened to walk out "en masse" a year ago unless the
Mayor met with them to iron out problems prob-
lems with Maddox. A 7 a.m. meeting was held be-
tween department employees and the Mayor and the
situation was apparently diffused that time.
Supposedly, the same situation just a few weeks
ago brought about the most recent action by Geyer,
although nothing exists in the file to confirm it.
But the problem was documented by former
Mayor Marguerite Thompson. Her strongly worded
reprimand six years ago is strikingly similar to Mayor
Geyer's comments last week: personality conflicts
both within the department, with other city depart-
ments as well as with county and state agencies.
We deeply regret the actions that took place last
week. A problem surfaced six years ago that, it would
appear, resolved itself last week with the termination
of the police chief. There will now be the inevitable



ISLANDERI8R6 .iJ51
AUGUST 5, 1993, VOLUME ONE, NUMBER 37
V Bonner Presswood, Publisher
V Editorial
Joy Courtney, Editor
Paul Roat, News Editor
Pat Copeland
June Alder
Bob Ardren
Jack Egan
V Contributors
Doug Dowling
Mike Heistand
Kay Pruden
V Advertising Sales
Jan Barnes
Dolores Knutson
V Classified Services
Darla Becker
V Advertising Services
and Accounting
Susan Runfola
V Production
Mike Atwood
Darla Becker
V Distribution
Jesse Johnston
Galene Shorter
Mary Stockmaster
(lVE Mf




With a lot of help from our friends. 1993
Editorial, Sales and Production Offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5400A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
813 778 7978


claims, charges, counter-charges and blame-laying that
may split the council and the Island along personality
lines. Councilwoman Martini's decision not to vote on
Maddox's dismissal is only the beginning.
Sadly, there doesn't appear to be a compromise
here for Maddox. He clearly lost the confidence of the


Statistical trends available
I want to call your attention to an important publica-
tion recently released by The Heritage Foundation, the "In-
dex of Leading Cultural Indicators." Written by William
Bennett, the "Index" is a comprehensive statistical portrait
of behavioral trends over the last 30 years.
It shows, for example, that while population has
increased 41 percent since 1960, violent crime has in-
creased 560 percent; illegitimate births have increased
more than 400 percent; divorce rates have quadrupled;
the percentage of children living in single-parent
homes has tripled, and the teenage suicide rate has in-
creased more than 200 percent.
As a member of The Heritage Foundation, I am
eager to see the facts in this document given wide pub-
licity. Only if we admit we are in a crisis of values can
we begin to reverse our cultural decline.
You may already have received a copy of the "In-
dex." If so, I urge you to keep it on hand and use it as
a resource. If you haven't yet seen it, you can obtain a
copy by calling The Heritage Foundation's Publica-
tions Office at 202-546-4400.
Henry Barbour, Bradenton Beach


Have your say
The Islander Bystander welcomes and en-
courages your letters to the Editor.
The Islander Bystander reserves the right to
edit letters for length. Letters must be signed, and
include the city you reside in anonymous letters
will not be printed. All letters to the Editor will
remain on file in our office and available to the
public.
Mail or drop your letters off addressed to
Editor, The Islander Bystander, Island Shopping
Center, 5400A Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
34217.


council and mayor.
A police chief has been terminated, another needs
to be chosen, and the business of the city has to be
conducted. Unfortunately, a storm is eminent, one that
contains hearings, appeals and lawsuits.
We hope the squall passes soon.


Bowling thanks
Thanks to all the Anna Maria bowlers who partici-
pated in the second annual Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center Bowling Tournament.
We had 40 more people than last year for a total
of 171 and because of that raised $400 more for a to-
tal of $1,265.
Not only were we able to purchase a new public
address system for the center and much needed sports
equipment, but the tournament committee was able to
donate funds to the center's summer camp scholarship
program. The scholarship program sends Island kids to
camp who otherwise could not afford to go.
The manager of Galaxy Lanes wants all our
bowlers to know that our tournament set a record for
the number of people who fell. The total was seven -
up from last year's total of four. He also assured the
committee that there wasn't any damage done to the
lanes from the dropping balls, letting the ball go from
behind the bowler or from throwing the ball into the
next alley.
As always there are special thanks due to people
who without their help, the tournament would not have
been such a success. They are: Joy Courtney from The.
Islander Bystander; Spanky from Shuckers Dockside
Grill; Sean Murphy of the Beach Bistro; Paul from
Rotten Ralph's, Steve from the Sandbar restaurant,
Bob Slicker from D. Coy Ducks, and Andy Toombs of
the Anna Maria Island Privateers.
Thanks again and we hope to see everyone back
next year.
Billy O'Connor, Tournament Committee


For more of

Your Opinion,

see page 9


9 B93 9* 9 =,










THOSE WERE THE DAYS
Postscript to the Hurricane of 1921,
by June Alder_


An island is no place to be in the midst of a raging storm.

TALES OF

HURRICANES PAST


They called them "equinoctials" be-
cause they most often hit in the season of
the autumnal equinox. The 19th century
settlers of Tampa Bay respected and
feared hurricanes but took them in stride.
The hurricane of October 1846 flat-
tened the log home of Manatee pioneers
Julia and Joseph Atzeroth on Terra Ceia
Island. Only the hen house remained
standing. "Madame Joe" and her hus-
band moved to where Palmetto is today
and started over again.
Elbridge Ware's house just west of
Ware's Creek also blew away that
night. The family had retreated to the
detached kitchen and there, at the height
of storm, Louise Ware gave birth to a
son, believed to be the first white male
child born south of the Manatee River.
One more tale from that storm:
Hector Braden was returning on horse-
back from a trip to the northern part of
the state. Trying to cross the swollen
Little Manatee River, Braden and his
horse drifted into a sink hole. When
found days later, the story goes,
Braden's corpse was seated upright in
the saddle, eyes wide open, reins and
riding crop still clenched in his hands.
No sooner had a lighthouse been
built on Egmont Key two years later
than another hurricane hit. Anna Maria
Island and Egmont were both com-
pletely covered with water in that fierce
1848 storm.
Driven from his cottage by the
pounding waves, the lighthouse keeper
put his wife and children in a rowboat
and lashed it to a palm tree. Next morn-
ing the lighthouse was gone, but the
family had ridden out the storm safely.
(The replacement lighthouse was con-
siderably sturdier than the first one. It
stands on the north end of Egmont Key
to this day.)
Returning home from its maiden voy-
age to New York with a full cargo, the
schooner "Atlanta," built by pioneer
Henry Clark, had the misfortune to cross
the path of the 1848 storm. The vessel
went to the bottom and with her went the
young captain, William Gamble. No won-
der his brother, Major Robert Gamble,
later took pains to build his Ellenton man-
sion to withstand hurricanes. He made the
floors so they would sway in a gale like the
deck of a ship.
In May 1903 Captain Will Fogarty
and three other men drowned when


Fogarty's schooner the "Vandalia" went
down in a storm off Cape Romano. The
ship was rebuilt and became part of the
Favorite Line fleet of freight and passen-
ger boats docking at Anna Maria Island.
It burned up in 1914.
A bad storm in 1906 was a stroke
of luck for the homesteaders on Anna
Maria Island. A three-masted schooner
loaded with lumber got stranded off
Egmont Key and the captain had to jet-
tison his cargo. Most of the lumber
piled up on the shores of Anna Maria
Island. Wilbur and Mary Hall (she was
the daughter of first Island home-
steader George Bean) and other settlers
salvaged the lumber for home con-
struction and repairs.
In the October hurricane of 1911
the steamer "Mistletoe," which had
been stopping at George Bean's dock
on Anna Maria Island since 1895, sank
at dockside in Tampa. But it was resur-
rected and lasted for another decade
until it sank again, this time for good.
The hurricane of 1921 failed to
knock down the Cortez bridge, but the
Island's second bridge-built from
Anna Maria Island to Longboat Key in
1926-was the victim of a bad storm in
March 1932. It picked the bridge up
like a toy and sent it sailing across the
pass, alighting on what is now called
Jewfish Key. It was salvaged and
ended its days on Snead's Island.
In the past half-century hurricanes
with feminine names inflicted consid-
erable damage on the Island. Elena was
the scariest of the sisterhood. She
wobbled up the Gulf and took aim at
the Island on Friday of the 1985 Labor
Day weekend. Some 20,000 residents
of Anna Maria Island and Longboat
were rousted out of bed in the middle
of the night and sat around in shelters
all day Saturday waiting for Elena to
make up her mind. When she suddenly
skipped away Sunday morning (leav-
ing behind some $10 million in prop-
erty damage) people rushed back
home, creating an awful traffic jam.
So hurricanes do take some funny
twists. But they are no laughing matter.
Skeptics who scoff at hurricane evacu-
ations are wrong-dead wrong.
Sticking around on the Island for
hurricane fun and thrills would be as
foolish as long-ago horseman Hector
Braden plunging into that raging river.


UM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 5


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newspaper that gives you all the news of Anna Maria Island.
The Islander Bystander is a free, community newspaper, and if you
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[f THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 6

Sarasota Bay is center of global dolphin studies


" -_ IU - : : _- ..: ,'.. ....
'. ,' -' :v ... -,;-, '
-- j .? ,i. -


Capt. Larry Fulford surveys his "catch" of dolphins in Palma Sola Bay.


Volunteers take samples
from the dolphins briefly
captured recently. A host
of tests are conducted on
the animals to further
scientific study. Dolphins
have been studied more
intensely in Sarasota Bay
than anywhere else in the
world. As a result, marine
mammal researchers use
the data compiled here as
a basis for their research.

Photos: Paul Roat


By Paul Roat
Sun, sand and surf may attract tourists to the area,
but marine mammal researchers have another reason
for enjoying the amenities of the Sarasota Bay area.
Dolphin have been studied longer and more in-
tensely here than in any other part of the world. Those
studies have caused the world's dolphin researchers to
focus their attention on the 96 resident dolphins in the
Sarasota Bay area and their leading analyst, Dr.
Randall Wells.
Wells began studying dolphins as a student at
Riverview High School in 1970. In the 23 years since,
he and other scientists have amassed data through
more than 800,000 dolphin sightings in the area from
northern Anna Maria Island south to Siesta Key.
The dolphin studies, under the auspices of the
Dolphin Biology Research Institute, have taken on a
slightly more intensive bent during the past few years.
During the month of June, Wells and volunteers from
Earthwatch briefly captured selected dolphins. Infor-
mation about the animals' body condition, growth rate,
whistles, blood test and the like is taken. In fact, 18
different scientific tests were run on the mammals
during the brief capture.

On a recent slick-calm morning, more than 45
volunteers set out to find dolphins. The half-dozen
boats with sunscreen-slathered, eager-eyed dolphin
spotters spread out from Tampa Bay south through
Anna Maria Sound.
Wells and his associates, Blair Irvine, Andy Read
and Michael Scott, were looking for several specific
dolphins for further testing. In charge of the "hunt"
was Cortez commercial fishing Captain Larry Fulford.
The search was a quick one. As soon as the boats left
the Shuckers boat basin, radios crackled into life. A dol-
phin was sighted in the channel leading from the basin, but
it was not one of the animals on the priority list.
More dolphins were seen to the north, and even
more to the south. The mammals were elusive, often
surfacing less than a score of feet from the boat, then
diving and vanishing from view. None of the half-
dozen animals were in water conditions suitable for
capture, and the hunt moved to the south.
The dead calm was an aid to spotting the mam-
mals, but the quiet air made for a hot day for the spot-
ters. Water bottles made the rounds of the thirsty vol-
unteers. Sunscreen was applied frequently as protec-
tion from the dazzling sun as the entourage of boats
slowly moved into Palma Sola Bay.
It was there that things started to happen. Fulford
spotted two dolphins that Wells said were high on the
priority list a pair of males that had been captured
several times in the past few years. Data from these
creatures would be invaluable for the researchers, and
the boats began to try to urge the creatures into posi-
tion for capture.
The dolphins were skittish with all the boat traf-
fic, and eventually a blockade was established at the
mouth of the Bay to keep the creatures from leaving.
Three boats, led by Fulford, drove the two males into
shallow water.
In a rush, Fulford moved into position. The net
was let loose from the stern of his 23-foot vessel. With
a roar he circled the animals. Again.
The circle of net was getting smaller and smaller
as volunteers jumped into the water to make sure the
mammals wouldn't become entangled:
No worries. The pair of males were calm in the
circle of net.
All the boats converged to the site, and soon all 45
volunteers were standing in chest-deep water outside
the net. Several of the more veteran volunteers moved
inside the net as others "walked" the net toward the
animals.
"He just brushed by me," a woman said calmly as
a swirl of water circled her.
"Why don't you grab him?" Irvine asked.
She reached out, hugged the dolphin, and he qui-
etly stayed in her arms in the water. The dolphin
"hunt" was over.
For the next two hours, the dolphin were the focus
of an intense study. Ultra sound readings were taken
of the pair of young males, as well as myraid other
tests including a recording of the chirps and whistles
of the two mammals.
Once the tests were completed, the dolphins and
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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[E THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER m AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 7


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.11 1w.-. .j .- :--,..,t! -











One of the 96 resident dolphins who spend most of their time in Sarasota Bay
breaks the surface for a breath of air in Palma Sola Bay.
'r -t": ". ": .,, ., ,;..s;~'::., ,W ,...' .
.': ... +
"-: .- '.: :, :'1. ""-' "~t"'"' +... '....
'-: " "': '; ''
: '- 9-:

,& ,,:
,'._. , ,... . -., .: , :: . _,. .
''~ '+ I, --,. ,' " '
:'' ,..,- .+.-' .....,
,,: ,:, .',:: .':,',: ...
One of the 96rsdn opiswh pn oto hirtm nSrst a
breaks the"' surftc fo abeahofar nPam Sl By


researchers prepared for the release. A
bright red blimp equipped with a video
camera was positioned over the animals
to record their release from the net and
monitor the speed of the creatures as
they swim off.
The net was lowered, and the mam-
mals raced off. Grins appeared on all
the faces of the volunteers and research-
ers, reminiscent of the perpetual smiles
on the faces of the dolphins.
Two successes.

Back at a huge house where volun-
teers stay in Holmes Beach donated for
the research on Sarasota Bay dolphins,
Wells conducts an extremely informal
discussion on dolphin behavior.
He said the Sarasota Bay dolphins
seem to be divided into three general
groupings mothers with calves, sub-
adults composed of mostly males, and
roving groups of older males. There are
more than 600 dolphins in the Sarasota
Bay area, but the Sarasota Bay dolphin
community numbers 96. There is great
interaction between the groups, though,
as the bands move through the bay.
Dolphins spend their days in five
general ways, Wells explained. The
mammals feed, travel, play, rest and
mill about throughout the day and night.
It is while feeding that Wells no-


ticed one of the most unusual acts of
dolphin behavior something he calls
"fish whacking."
Dolphins will often attempt to herd
fish into a confined area to feed, he
said. As the fish attempt to escape,
they occasionally will get past a
dolphin's mouth but not its powerful
tail. And as the fish tries to dart past
the dolphin, the mammal will flick its
flukes and hurl the fish into the air.
When the fish lands, stunned, back in
the water, the dolphin will leisurely
gobble the fish down.
Wells said he has seen fish
"whacked" more than 20 feet into the air.
Although dolphin have more than
90 cylindrical teeth in their always-
smiling mouths, Wells said dolphin do
not chew fish, but swallow them
whole.
Play is an important element of a
dolphin's day. We're not talking about
doing tricks with balls and rings here.
As Wells puts it, "Dolphins use sex
like humans use a handshake."
Wells said that about three percent
of the dolphins in the study area have
had some boat collision scarring.
"Don't just assume they can get out
of your way," Wells warned boaters.
"Assume you may be dealing with naive
youths or older, injured animals."


One of the dolphin is briefly hoisted into the air to be weighed.

*' ' '" ""* . " ". _;" "," .


Researchers prepare to release the dolphins. The blimp, equipped with a video
camera, is used to gauge dolphin swimming speed.


G9ET ABOARD OUR BIBLE SCHOOL SPECIAL




D 0 0 a1
It's Vacation Bible School
at
Island Baptist Church

8605 Gulf Dr., Anna Maria
Rev. James M. Metts, Jc Pastor

Please fill this oul and mail or bring with you to VBS.


NMon., Aug 9 Fri., Aug 13
9:00 AMl 12:00 Noon
(Please arrive 8:30 AM
Monday for Registration)


V For: Ages 3-Grade 5

V All children are welcome
V Free transportation. If
required, call 778-0719
V All materials and supplies
provided without any charge


*ih E I 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10

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[fl THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 8


Custom
"Self-Inking"
ADDRESS

Eliminates Stamp
Lifetime guarantee
Convenient re-Inking 0
FROM $1200
STATEWIDE
STATIONERS
Palma Sola Square 794-1119
59th & Manatee Ave.


FRAME

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* Custom Framing
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5306 Holmes Boulevard
Holmes Beach


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most talented Florida Artists.
Painting, Sculpture,
Three Dimensional Art,
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OPEN AUDITIONS
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BABY (MUSICAL) SEPT. 19, 7:30 PM
BAREFOOT IN THE PARK DEC. 5, 7:30 PM
STEEL MAGNOLIAS JAN. 23, 7:30 PM
EDUCATING RITA MAR. 20, 7:30 PM
Scripts are available for perusing in the Island Library
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Environmentalists hold firm


for northern aligned bridge


By Bonner Presswood
About a dozen Islanders ventured to East Tampa
for another round of talks between state agencies over
the proposed replacement for the Anna Maria Island
Bridge.
The meeting was held on the date of the latest dead-
line extension just one of many deadlines since en-
vironmental regulators issued their intent to deny a per-
mit to the transportation department last February.
The outcome was yet another extension of the
deadline, this one in early September.
The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) have
gridlocked in the past- first over seagrasses, then align-
ment, and now the issue of public safety and evacuation
on a 65-foot, fixed span, high rise bridge.
According to DEP officials, none of these issues
have been answered to their satisfaction, and there
are more.
The environmentalists have been telling the
bridge builders since 1989 that they weren't going to
permit their proposed bridge.
At this most recent meeting, key player Dave
May, district secretary for DOT, was absent. In his
place was James Wilt, district permit engineer.
According to Jim Kissick, bridge opponent and
councilman from Bradenton Beach, DEP opened the
session arguing that DOT has sufficient right-of-way
and room to build on a northern alignment. DOT
eluded any reasoning and failed to answer previous
questions that would explain why they so adamantly
refuse to consider the northern alignment. They claim
now, in spite of allowing Leverock's construction
and marina development to proceed, that too much
property would have to be taken.
DEP claims that according to DOT's own plans,
only a few parking spaces would be sacrificed and
land remains on the other side of both properties.
But DOT held out for a southern alignment, which
DEP claims will destroy acres of seagrasses. DOT's con-
struction concept changed, however, from a barge sys-


tem to a "new plan" that would require the placement of
more than 90 steel tubes 20 inches in diameter in the bay
bottom, serving as "legs" for a cross-bay platform from
which cranes would work to build the new bridge.
However, at meeting time, DOT had not located a
subcontractor, and was vague about additional millions of
dollars added to the overall cost of construction, now be-
lieved to be $25-30 million in state money. No federal
dollars are involved in the project because the sufficiency
rating on the bridge is not low enough to qualify. The
Anna Maria Island Bridge is considered functionally ob-
solete but quite obviously operational.
Kissick states that the official meeting closed in a
standoff. DOT requested written criteria from DEP while
DOT alluded to a request for an administrative hearing.
DEP willingly allowed for a 30-day extension.
Then came citizen input (whereby the reporter
from a local daily newspaper closed her notebook and
merely observed). Kissick said, "for me, this was the
coup-de-gras."
Several meteorological documents from impressive
sources were offered to the officials, proving that hurri-
cane winds at 21-feet (the level of the current bridge) were
about 20 percent of maximum velocity. At 80-feet (the
maximum traffic level of the proposed bridge), the maxi-
mum velocity of winds are nearly 70 percent.
Included in the documentation was a letter from
Dr. Bob Sheets, director of the National Hurricane
Center, stating that the lower the bridge, while remain-
ing above storm surge level (18-feet) the safer the
motorists would be in high wind situations.
Appearing somewhat embarrassed, DOT officials
could not provide operating cost data for existing
spans, and it was provided by an Island resident, as
was the cost data for rehabilitation of the existing
bridge, providing for a safety lane and sidewalk.
DOT had no information on the environmental
impacts of their new pier construction plan and offered
no criteria and no studies for DEP to consider on the
safety of the 41 DOT high-rise bridges they have al-
ready built throughout the state.


At the July 28 encounter between environmen-
tal and transportation officials regarding the pro-
posed high-rise bridge to Anna Maria Island at
Manatee Avenue, the issues of public safety and
evacuation came to a head.
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)
officials believe, as a result of this latest meeting, that
it is clear that a study needs to be done as to whether
a 65-foot bridge cuts into evacuation time.
After the meeting, DEP Professional Engineer
Early Sorenson said, "DOT will have to provide rea-
sonable assurance that the project will not adversely
affect public safety."
According to Sorenson, DOT has built 41 high-
rise bridges throughout the state, and has never done
a performance study as to the affect of winds or
storms on the closings of those bridges. Sorenson has
had some input from citizens as to the affect of clos-
ing bridges before evacuation was completed, but he
wants answers from DOT.
George Craciun, environmental supervisor for
DEP is still concerned about the minimization of im-
pacts to seagrasses. Why isn't the northern align-
ment, with a minimum seagrass impact, viable? DOT
claims they will bring in more data on seagrass miti-
gation from an expert consultant. But DEP is less
than skeptical there is no history of success in
mitigating turtle grass among environmental scien-
tists.
Sorenson said, "They (DOT) were told in 1989
we weren't going to permit the bridge and they cir-
cumvented our office through Tallahassee. They
knew seagrasses were going to hold it up."
As for the northern alignment, DOT has only
shown economic impacts, taking property from
Leverock's and the marina at a high cost. Sorenson
said that the maps DOT provides show what they
claim they have to take, but nothing shows why.
Aside from the existing right-of-way, only a few


parking spaces will be eliminated and there are 113+
vacant acres adjacent to the existing commercial prop-
erties to provide additional parking.
Sorenson asks, "why is this the only design?" And
Sorenson says they don't get explanations other than
DOT continues with the plan in hand the one for
which they have already spent more than a $1 million.
He believes DOT will seek approval from the process
of an administrative hearing, and find out if a hearing
officer will give them what they want.
Meanwhile, Sorenson is working on a list of questions
and issues remaining to be answered, requested by DOT
from DEP, prior to the next round of talks in September.


... while task force
stalls vote again on
Ringling Bridge
A special task force charged with making a rec-
ommendation on the replacement of the Ringling
Bridge once again balked at taking a stand on what
to do with the controversial structure.
Ringling Bridge Task Force members re-
quested detailed traffic counts and circulation es-
timates across the bridge linking the mainland
with Bird Key, as well as circulation patterns in
surrounding areas, by their next meeting Aug. 25.
The task force began meeting more than a
year ago with the goal of making a recommenda-
tion to the Florida Department of Transportation
on the bridge: should it be replaced or repaired?
After countless meetings on the score of pro-
posals for a replacement bridge, the task force de-
cided earlier this year that a new bridge north of
the existing structure was needed, but stalled on
the issue of how high the new bridge should be.


Safety becomes a major issue

of proposed high-rise bridge


PHOENIX*

LIMTED EIiTI*ONS
FineA rn t .. iin y .





778-5480








_UROPINIONmS]


Cruel lesson to be
learned?
The taxpayers of this Island are about
to learn a cruel lesson. The Anna Maria
Fire District has raised taxes and changed
assessments to increase revenue by ap-
proximately $188,000 for 93/94. The en-
tire budget for 92/93 was approximately
$626,000. That is a thirty percent plus in-
crease. Of the total increase, $148,480 is
for two new proposed firefighters (I won-
der whose son or brother or son in law
needs ajob now) and the remainder is for
salary increases.
The proposal is for the chief and two
captains to receive $10,000+/-, and this is
only the tip of the iceberg. Do you know
that an on-duty fireman was injured and
this district had not paid their workmen's
compensation premium, he and was to-
tally without coverage. And if he wins his
lawsuit, the commission itself could have
to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars to
satisfy the claim. Maybe the District Trea-
surer and Day-to-Day Liaison should pay
this out of his pocket, since he was ulti-
mately responsible for paying the pre-
mium.
All taxpayers of this Island and in
Cortez should be at the meeting Aug. 9 to
stand up for their rights before it is too late.
Lee R. Edwards, Holmes Beach

Work that must be done
Recently, I requested to appear before
the Holmes Beach Council on budget
items, particularly the broader question of
a special tax district.
One must assume that equity in allo-
cation of cost (taxes), is not achieved if a
major expense is borne by all taxpayers
when a significant benefit is received by
an identifiable few.
The Equity is achieved when the ben-
efit is more closely parallel to the costs
allocated.
One method of achieving this equity
has been adopted by many taxing entities,
in Florida and elsewhere, i.e., the Special
Benefit Tax District.
Florida law may or may not permit
the governing board to establish a Special
Tax District. Ifit does not, then it probably
permits the governing board to call for a
referendum of the affected taxpayers to
determine that such a district be estab-
lished. In my opinion our board should
call for such a binding referendum
whether required or not. That way the
board can feel comfortable that it did not
"guess" at what the electorate wanted, it is
mandated to take the action dictated by the
results of the referendum.
In my estimation, our Holmes Beach
has played ostrich about several subjects
it should be planning to face. In the cases
I outline below, they are known to be com-
ing problems but they are not being ad-
dressed. In my opinion, to address them is
hard political decision for the department
head who does not want to be the messen-
ger of bad news, for fear the messenger
may be shot. The elected officials don't
ache to bring these subjects to light. What
benefit would it do them? The citizens are
hopeful that the problem won't come up or
that someone else will provide the funds to
address them when they do come up, if
ever.
For those and many more reasons we
don't address these problems until they
become "emergencies." Then everyone
Smay say, "It's not my fault, it just hap-
pens."
The second side of this issle is to es-
timate the cost to be incurred at the next
"happening." The third side is to estimate
the time between now and when the hap-


opening will occur. It will also be neces-
sary to eslitlmale the "mean time between
failure" for each of the items mentioned
below.
With those statistics the board will be
in a position to determine how much
money (taxes) must be raised to face
these issues and yet continue to operate
the city.
None of this is extremely difficult, as
in some cases you have had the failures
occur twice, already.
What are the major maintenance
projects I foresee in our near future?
1. Key Royale Bridge. A district
comprised of all properties on Key
Royale and North Point.
2. Dredge the channel between Anna
Maria City and Holmes Beach and ex-
tended waterways therefrom. A district
composed of all properties with direct ac-
cess to any boat slip in the city.
3. City owned seawalls. All proper-
ties which have laid claim to or occupy a
boat slip adjacent to the seawall. Other-
wise if abutting private property, then
that private property.
4. Dredge debris and trash from the
bottoms of existing canals. One third to
each property facing the canal and one
third to the city in general. When "T"
ends are included, then assess the prop-
erties of those who have laid claim to the
slips.
As the city moves along this path-
way it will become evident that the city
is not well served by its ownership of the
lands along Marina Drive and the seawall
thereon. I have no idea who owns, or
thinks they own, the docks extended
from the city-owned seawall into the ca-
nals. Is it possible that the city has a liabil-
ity for the maintenance of these docks? If
so, you should immediately have your
public works folks give you a rough as-
sessment of the condition of those docks.
It is obvious as you drive by them, some
should be removed immediately.
Perhaps the best idea would be a
public auction of all these slips and re-
move the city from the ownership and
responsibility of them. You can bet this
will become an issue someday, and the
city has the deepest pockets to sue when
that day comes.
Yes, we are talking about a lot of
work. But it is work which must be done,
and the sooner the better. We should stop
living from emergency and begin to rec-
ognize coming problems and plan for
their solutions.
William S. Mullon, Holmes Beach

Thanks from the
Germans
The German Youth Orchestra has re-
turned home taking with them many
wonderful memories of their two weeks
spent on Anna Maria Island.
From their first day's warm recep-
tion given by the Island Chamber of
Commerce to the farewell dinner hosted
by the Anna Maria Rotary Club, the
young musicians sang the praises of our
Island and its warm, friendly people.
They were housed in 18 different
homes on the Island and each young visi-
tor felt like "one of the family." Their
performances at Roser Memorial Church
and St. Bernard Catholic Church were
greeted with standing ovations as were
their other appearances in the area.
On behalf of the Island Community
Center, sponsor of the 26 young German
musicians, I want to thank all of the many
people on the Island who made their visit
such a memorable one.
Barbara Wright, Coordinator


[g THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993. 0 PAGE 9
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If] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 10

New beach officially termed success


The new beach on the Island works when it comes
to storm protection of property.
That's the assessment by Manatee County offi-
cials, based on the March 13 near-hurricane that swept
through Southwest Florida.
"Despite the severity of the storm, I did not ob-
serve any structural damage to buildings or roads
along the coastline as a result of the storm," said Ri-


Andre wine tasting
Janet Frishkorn, left, Francois and Chef Andre Gotti
recently hosted a wine tasting for patrons of Chez
Andre, the Gotti's restaurant in the Island Shopping
Center in Holmes Beach. The tasting included a six-
course dinner and four wines. The hors d'oeuvres
table in the foreground included Smoked Salmon
Andre (hearts of palm wrapped with smoked salmon
and dolloped with cream cheese and caviar),
Mussels Toulousaine, seafood pdti, fresh fruit and
cheeses. We're happy to report "all was delicious."


chard Spadoni, vice president of Coastal Planning &
Engineering, Inc., the beach consultant for the county.
"The beach renourishment project performed well
in providing storm protection to the upland property,"
Spadoni said. "W "
However, some residents may have shoreline con-
cerns as the more active period of hurricane season -
approaches. :
"A small section of the beach nourishment project, -- ..
located south of Manatee County Public Beach, was <
damaged by the storm," said Manatee County Envi-'-
ronmental Projects Coordinator Jack Gorzeman. "This- _
area can be considered a 'hot spot' or an area which -
will erode faster than the overall beach project." ."-
Gorzeman said it would cost $1.5-$2 million to /
renourish the section of eroded beach. Due to cost, -
permitting questions and the possibility of accreting -- .'
sand during the summer are prohibitive to any extra Islander P : B r
Islander Photo: Bonner Presswood
sand pumping there, Gorzeman said.
S p mp g t e w s id Except for this 'hot spot' just south of the public
There is some good news for residents along that
Thee is s e gd n s fr rsid s a g tt beach in Holmes Beach, the newly nourished beach
stretch of beach. Spadoni said that "most of the build-
does indeed appear to protect people 's property.
ings in that location have retained coastal armoring
structures, despite the construction of the beach buildings in that area," he concludes.
renourishment project. The "hot spot" area will be modified through addi-
"As in the past, these armoring structures will tional sand during the next nourishment project, all
serve to provide some protection to the homes and agreed.

Beach planting meetings set for September


Interested in helping protect the newly renourished
beach?
A pair of informational meetings will be held
Thursday, Sept. 9 by Manatee County Environmental
Projects Director Jack Gorzeman in Bradenton Beach
and Holmes Beach to talk about dune creation and
beach plantings.
Another public meeting will be held later in Sep-
tember at St. Bernard Catholic Church to provide even
more details about what residents can do to help pro-
tect the beach.
Manatee County has $460,000 to create dunes,
dune walkovers and plant beach vegetation. However,
that sum is adequate only for the portions of the beach
fronting the Manatee Public Beach in Holmes Beach
and Cortez Beach in Bradenton Beach.
For residents to plant beach vegetation such as sea
oats or railroad vine in front of their homes or condos,


certain conditions must be met.
Gorzeman says a plan must be drawn up showing
the location of the building, the shoreline, and the
scope of the plantings. The plan may be sketched, but
it must be to scale.
The plan then must be forwarded to the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection in Tallahas-
see for review, and a $250 permit fee paid.
Once the plan is okayed by the DEP, planting may
begin.
Most local nurseries stock beach-tolerant plants
suitable for plantings.
The plants are important to maintain the beach.
The sturdy root structure of beach plants such as sea
oats will help hold the beach in place during high tides
and heavy winds. As sand gathers at the base of the
vegetation, mini-dunes are created that will quickly
increase in height and diameter.


COMPETE JOIN THE FUN AT THE SANDBAR'S
O ENDLESS SUMMER BEACH GAMES
S O-- TO BENEFIT THE
THED "ANNA MARIA ISLAND
/ COMMUNITY CENTER
Sunday August 22, 1993
SRegistration at 10:30 a.m.
0 Games begin at 12:00 noon
STrophy and Prizes
FREE draft beer and soft drinks for team members.
Team registration fees are $75.


ANNA MARIA SANDBAR
ISLAND S 0 ---

COMMUNITY
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call Gary, Steve, Joe, Alan or Lynda ...
100 Spring Avenue Anna Maria Island 778-0444

r-----REGISTRATION FORM:-----
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PHONE:
I CONTACT:
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12. 1. 1Y
3. 2.
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6.
FEE: $75.00 PAID CASH CHECK
We, the undersigned, individually accept total responsibility for any personal injury in-
curred while participating in the Endless Summer Beach Games, and release the Sand-
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I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST:5, 1993 0 PAGE 11


Zoning board issues two yays, one nay


Fee study okayed;
no dumping in Gulf
for City of Anna
Maria
In near record time the Anna Maria City
Conunission last week dispatched its business,
then held brief discussions on forming an eq-
uity study commission and opposing proposed
dumping in the Gulf.
Commissioner George McKay said, that ac-
cording to new state legislation, the city must
form an equity study commission to review and
recommend changes to the city's occupational
license fees before 1995. He recommended the
city reconvene its annual ad hoc committee to
review occupational license fees, then establish
an equity study commission in November or
December.
Mayor Ray Simches asked commissioners
what their feelings were about an Environmen-
tal Protection Agency proposal to dump spoil
from the dredging of Tampa Bay shipping
channels into the Gulf. The proposed site is 21
miles from the north end of Anna Maria Island.
Commissioners agreed they would like to have
more information on the proposal and explore
alternatives to dumping spoil in the Gulf.
The commission approved a bid of $3,052
from Gator Asphalt for road striping. Striping will
take place on Gulf Drive from the Baptist Church
to Pine Avenue, on Pine Avenue from Gulf Drive
to the city pier, on South Bay Boulevard from
Pine Avenue to the end, on North Bay Boulevard
from Pine Avenue to North Shore Drive and the
length of North Shore Drive.
The commission approved a zoning board
recommendation on a home at 861 N. Shore Dr.,
resolution to establish a drug free workplace, the
Island Transportation Planning Organization's
(ITPO) interlocal agreement and the appointment
of Melody Kramer and Fred Haul to the citizen's
advisory, committee of the ITPO.


By Pat Copeland
Islander Bystander
The Anna Maria Board of Zoning Appeals gave the
nod to two property owners seeking setback variances, but
one resident hoping to build a dock at a vacant lot was left
high and dry in last week's meeting.
Mr. and Mrs. Ming Chow, represented by attorney
Sam Norton, asked the board for re-approval of a vari-
ance granted in August 1990 but since lapsed. The
variance was for relief from side and front yard set-
backs to construct a second story and a deck on an
existing non-conforming building at 781 N. Shore Dr.
Norton said the plans had not changed since the
original variance was granted, but construction was
delayed due to the lengthy exemption process of the
Florida Department of Natural Resources.
The board recommended approval of the request.
The second case concerned a dock to be con-
structed at 505 S. Bay Blvd. The property owner,
Arlene Krejcir, came before the board in February
seeking a variance for a 16-foot dock, which was de-
nied. The current request was for a 12-foot dock.
Krejcir was represented by attorney Donald Yetter
who explained, "It was an oddly designed lot, with
23.7 feet located on a seawall on one of the canals in
the Wells Bay Subdivision. There are specific require-
ments in the code which establish what size dock one
would be allowed to have based on lot size. This
doesn't fall within that because of the odd shape of the
lot. We are trying to get them some water usage."
According to Public Works Superintendent Frank
Tyndall, a dock cannot be located at the side setback
of a property, and can cover only 25 percent of the total
length of the lot line on the water.
The board received one objection in writing from
Krejcir's neighbor, Nigel Porter, who said the dock
would interfere with the use of his property and his
view. The board felt interference of the view was not
a valid point.
Board member Jimmy Nichols said it would not be
feasible to park a reasonable sized boat, 14-feet or
more, at such a dock because it would encroach on the
property of neighbors.


Board member Harlan Sunquist noted, "If I was a
land owner and had waterfront access, I feel I would
be entitled to that access. I don't know how you could
not allow, provided it came within the perimeters of
the code, something to be constructed when everybody
else around him has the same thing."
Board member Bunny Garst said she noticed a "For
Sale" sign on the lot and asked if the purpose of the dock
was to enhance resale value. Yetter said it was.
Anne Beck, building department assistant, said a
dock cannot be constructed until a house is built on the
lot, and if a variance is granted for the dock, it would
be valid for six months.
Sunquist asked if the request is denied would it
handicap a new owner. Nichols replied that the new
owner could apply for a variance.
The board recommended denial of the request.
The third request was from Peter Wallis and Laura
Gee for relief from a side yard setback at 502 S. Bay Blvd.
According to Wallis, there is a 10-foot beach access on the
side of the property. Sometime in the past, the city gave
five feet of that access to the adjoining property owner and
five feet to the past owner of his property.
However, his portion of the acquired access was not
properly recorded, making it invalid, and the city, by or-
dinance, cannot vacate a beach access. Therefore, he
needs a variance to construct an addition to his house.
He said if the five feet of access is considered, with
the addition there will still be 21 feet between the his
property and the next. City code requires a seven-foot
side yard setback, or 14 feet between properties.
Board member George Norwood asked why
Wallis did not build up instead of out. Wallis replied
it would not be aesthetically pleasing or in keeping
with the neighborhood.
Sunquist noted that the beach access in that spot
is not used by the public. Tyndall said the remaining
five feet is not functional as a walkway.
Nichols added that setbacks were created to create
privacy and this would meet that requirement. Tyndall
pointed out that setbacks are established for privacy
and safety.
The board recommended approval of the request.


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9 Sat Aug 7 Dan Crawford 2-6
Vandergriffe & Helm 8-12
8 Sun Aug 8 Dan Crawford 1-5
Vandergriffe & Helm 6-10
7 Mon Aug 9 "Unplugged" with Vandergriffe & Helm 7:30-11:30
6 Tue Aug 10 Vandergriffe & Helm 7:30-11:30
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4 Thur Aug 12 Dan Crawford 7:30-11:30
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Hours: 11:30 AM til? 200 Gulf Drive Bradenton Beach 778-4822







[I THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 12


WA 01:0=M Wk7


Ducks' golf tournament
coming soon
D. Coy Ducks Bar & Grille is sponsoring its first
annual D. Coy Golf Tournament on Saturday, August
14, at the Manatee County Golf Course in Bradenton.
The event starts at 8 a.m. shotgun. The format is 2
Man Scramble Gross & Callaway Division; men and
women's teams welcome. Trophies will be awarded for
first Gross; first, second and third place Callaway and
there will be tee-shirts and prizes for all. Contests include
Closest to Pin and Straightest Long Drive.
The entry fee is $40 person required at time of
registration. Deadline for registering is Wednesday,
August 11, at D. Coy Ducks, Island Shopping Center
in Holmes Beach.
Immediately following the tournament, D. Coy
Ducks will host an awards party including buffet and
two drinks.

T-shirt design contest for
centennial celebration
The Anna Maria Historical Society is sponsoring
a centennial T-shirt design contest to celebrate the
100th anniversary of the first settlement on the North
Point of the Island.
Specific rules must be adhered to. The centennial
T-shirt design should be simple a black ink line
drawing (no colors permitted) of the Island has been
suggested.
"Anna Maria Island Centennial 1894-1994," the
three island cities designated on the line drawing of the
Island and the dates of the celebration May 20, 21,
22, 1994 must be included.
All entries must be in by October 1, 1993, to the
Island Museum, 402 Pine Ave. in Anna Maria or
mailed to the Anna Maria Historical Society, P. O. Box
4315, Anna Maria, Fla 34216. The museum is open
Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Off Island happenings
The American Littoral Society has two exciting
programs coming up. It will offer an Environmental Li-
brary Lecture Series at 7 p.m. at Gulf Gate Library in
Sarasota on Wednesday, August 11, free of charge. Par-
ticipants will view a video to understand the dynamics of
barrier beaches. The society's second offering is a Turtle
Watch Program at Dania Beach at John U. Lloyd Park on
Friday, August 13, from 9 to 10:30 p.m. The purpose of
the program is to learn about the turtle watch program in
that area. Cost is $3.25 per car. All ages are welcome and
should bring mosquito repellent. Call the society at 951-
0884 for more information.
Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Bradenton is spon-
soring a fundraiser to help choir members go to Rome to
sing for the pope. Participants can take advantage of a
Benefit Pizza Buffet at Capalbos House of Pizza, 2615
26th St. W., Bradenton, redeemable from July 20 through
August 15, for $6 an adult and $4 for children three to
seven. The buffet includes all the pizza, homemade soup,
salad and desert you can eat, beverage included. For ad-
ditional information call 742-2150.
Single tickets for the Manatee Players' 1993-94
season will go on sale beginning Monday, August 16.
Single tickets will be available for all Five of the plays
in the mainstage season. Ticket prices are $14 for
adults and $7 for students (21 and under with valid ID)
for musicals, $12 for adults and $6 for students for
non-musicals. For tickets or information, visit the
Riverfront Theatre Box Office at 102 Old Main Street,
or call the box office at 748-5875. Box office hours are
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mondays through Fridays, and
one hour prior to curtain time of any performance. The
scheduled plays are: "Oliver!," Sept. 10 through Sept.
26; "Charley's Aunt," Nov. 5 through Nov. 21;
"Nunsense," Jan. 14 through Jan. 30; "To Kill a Mock-
ingbird," March 4 through 20 and "South Pacific,"
May 6 through 22.
Manatee Community College will host a volleyball


summer camp for boys and girls ages 12 through 18 in
August. Separate sessions will be held August 16 through
August 18 and August 19 through August 21. Players'
tuition is $75 per session and $130 for two sessions. For
more information, call 755-1511, ext. 4261..
The Manatee County Chapter of the American
Red Cross will offer a free course entitled Emergency
Assistance to Families at the Chapter office at 2905
59th St. W., Bradenton on Saturday, August 14, from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The purpose of the training is to en-
able students to meet the emergency needs of victims
immediately following a local disaster. For more infor-
mation or to register for the free course, call the Chap-
ter disaster Services office at 813-792-8686.
Island Players audition
for 'Bus Stop'
Auditions for the comedy "Bus Stop" by William
Inge will be held Sunday, August 15, at 7:30 p.m. at
the Island Players Theatre, Gulf Drive and Pine Av-
enue in Anna Maria City.
Dorothy McChesney, director, invites candidates
for a cast of three women and five men. Women's
roles are those of a nightclub entertainer, the owner of
a roadside diner and teenage waitress. Men's parts are
two cowboys, 21 to 40; a middle-aged bus driver, the
sheriff and a middle-aged scholar.

Soccer season needs volunteers
The Anna Maria Island Soccer League needs vol-
unteers to help with the upcoming season.
Volunteers will meet at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center on Wednesday, August 4, at 7:30
p.m. to work out the details.
Parents can sign their children up for Soccer
Camp, August 16 to August 20, and soccer season
right now. Anyone signing up before Sept. 1 will save
$5.
Call the center at 778-1908 for more information.


ISLAND

SPEAFOOLTIES

SPECIALTIES'


0

00


NEW SUMMER HOURS!
WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 10-(


5704 Marina Drive Holmes Beach 778-0333


Saltwater
Cowboys
Wed and Thur 7pm til
"After the Beach Party"
Sun 4pm- til
350 Hot Dogs 500 Mini Burger
500 Drafts $1.00 Shooters
$1.50 Molson & Corona
EVERY TUESDAY :Luck of the Draw
Dart Tournament at 7:30 PM


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Leading to ... GRAND PRIZE Trip to the Bahamas!

LOOK Food Specials LOOK
Summer Sunday Brunch $4.90 including the following "Delicious Dishes"
Bacon Sausage Eggs Benedict Hash Browns Toast Scrambled Eggs
Baked Half Grapefruit with Cassis Watermelon Boat Fruit Bowl
Blueberry Waffles Stuffed French Toast Walnut Pineapple Crumb Cake
Beef Hash Florentine Cheese Grits Cantaloupe Kiwi Fruit
Wednesday Beef Ribs All-You-Can-Eat with FF and Slaw 7.95
Thursday Rock Shrimp All-You-Can-Eat Hot or Cold with FF and Slaw 8.95


Hot & Cold Food 'til Midnight Always Banquet Facilities Available
Anna Maria Island, Florida Open Daily Entertainment Nightly
5325 Marina Drive Holmes Beach* 778-2233


Free Delivery Full Service Low Prices
5904 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
778-2507



CAFE ON THE BEACH _
Patio and Inside Dining n herzlches wilkomme
Directly on the Gulf anansere freunde
at the Manatee Public Beach aus Deutschiandi
All You Can Eat Pancakes Including Sausage & Coffee.......... $3.25
Served Saturday,Sunday and Holidays til 1 p.m.
Eggs Benedict ............................................................... $4.50
Om elettes .................................................................. $2.95 to 4.95
Including Western, Spanish, Asparagus & "Thunder" or Create Your Own
French Toast......................................................................... $2.50
Corned Beef Hash, 2 Eggs & Toast ....................................$3.50
Creamed Beef on Toast .................................... $2.85 .
Biscuits and Sausage Gravy................................................$2.85
Burgers, Dogs, Grilled Sandwiches & Hoagies .........$1.25 to $3.75
Grouper Sandwich Platter .................................................$6.25
Rib-Eye Steak........................................................................ $6.95
M ahi-M ahi ............................................................................ $6.95 *
DINNER SPECIALTIES
SOUTHWESTERN Tuesdays, 4-8:30 pm........$6.95 to $8.95
PIG ROAST Wednesdays, 4-8:30 pm............................. $5.95
LASAGNE All You Can Eat Thursday, 4-8:30 pm...... $5.25
FISH FRY All You Can Eat Friday, 4-8:30 pm .............$5.25
PRIME RIB Saturday, 4-8:30 pm ...........................$8.50
BBQ SPECIALS Sunday, 4-8:30 pm ................. $5.95 to $6.95
Plus Chalkboard Specials TAKE.OUTAVAILABLE Prices Do Not Include Tax
Open 6 A.M. Serving Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week '
Live Entertainment Tues. thru Sun. Evening (Kenny Mullinix Wed., Fri., Sat.)
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"Try dining with the Sunset ... it's Great!"
4000 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-0784


Stop In to See Us for
the Freshest Fish Available
WATCH FOR SATURDAY
CLOSE OUT SPECIALS


ISLAND PACKAGE LIQUORS
FINE WINE SPIRITS BEER ICE


Formerly Pete Reynard'


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I






MM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I AUGUST 5, 1993 I PAGE 13

Spunk of Islander overshadows blindness


By Joy Courtney
Editor
Tragedy may have robbed Evelyn Telatnik of her
vision, but despair never wrecked her spirit.
Telatnik is a familiar sight around Holmes Beach,
the Island city she calls home. Pedaling her bicycle,
she is often spotted headed over to Linda's Sunny Side
Up Cafe for a bite to eat or to check on a condominium
she manages. Wherever Telatnik's destination, it's
hard to imagine this active women is legally blind -
and to this day she doesn't know exactly why.
Born in Fort Myers, Fla., 20-year-old Telatnik
followed through on a childhood interest and took
courses in clothing design. Her mother sewed her cre-
ations during "the early days." As demand increased,
Telatnik's designs were sewn in Hong Kong and dis-
tributed to fine stores around the nation, including
some in St. Armand's Circle, Sarasota, under the
"Monarch" label.
Telatnik married a chemical engineer who was re-
sponsible for setting up chemical plants overseas. After
the set-up was completed, he'd teach the locals how to run
them and then move on to another assignment.
In 1968, the Telatniks, including two young sons,
found themselves under attack by the communists in
India. Telatnik flew the plane that got her young fam-
ily out while her husband stayed behind. Eventually
the four of them found safety in Calcutta. It was after
this incident that Telatnik went blind for the first time.
"No one could tell me why I lost my vision for three
weeks, except to guess it was stress related," said Telatnik.
Reunited, the family was assigned to Australia, but
in late 1968 settled in Lakeland, Fla. On January 28,
1969, the Telatniks' 12-year-old son, Andrew, was
killed in an automobile accident. After that, Telatnik
became blind and again the doctors couldn't find a
physical reason.
A devastating handicap to some, sightlessness has
never gotten the best of Telatnik. With her nose to the
paper, she continued designing clothes and even worked
in radiology in a Lakeland hospital developing x-rays.
"My vision problem actually helped me to do that
job well," said Telatnik. "At that time, when develop-


Blind design Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
Evelyn Telatnik of Holmes Beach shows off one of
her big sellers, the "Genie Pop-on." Blind without a
medical reason since 1969, Telatnik pursues a
variety of interests including clothing design.
Currently she is looking forward to having a new
line of her women's casual clothing in our local
stores by the fall.
ing or copying film, there was a sharpness around the
edges that had to be set just right. I could see that bet-
ter than a sighted person."
As the years went by, Telatnik saw doctors from
around the world in an effort to find a cure for her
blindness. During her pursuit, one doctor gave her the


wrong medicine making her condition irreversible.
Undaunted, Telatnik came up with an invention to
ease her condition.
"Years ago, a doctor told me that glasses wouldn't
help to increase what limited vision I had," said Telatnik.
"Boy, did I get mad when he said that. I borrowed some
friends cataract glasses and experimented. I found that if
I put two pairs of the strongest glasses together I could
increase my vision. Now that cataract glasses are made of
plastic, it's easier for me to use them for a longer period
of time. The problem is finding them, because doctors
don't want to prescribe them for me."
With the same spunk she demonstrated over the eye
glasses, Telatnik attacks all her interests with a flourish.
She paints, manages condominiums for unit owners at the
Tiffany and Gulf Place condos in Holmes Beach, has just
started a real estate course, is finishing a book, and is de-
termined to have a new line of her designs in local shops
under the "Evelyn" label by the fall.
"The doctors don't understand how I do what I
do," said Telatnik with a cat-that-swallowed-the-ca-
nary grin.
"Probably, it's just plain, old stubbornness."


The Island Poet
So you say you have troubles and don't sleep well
at night,
If anyone says "good morning," you are ready for
a fight.
But first look around the corner at that gal that's
sitting there,
She can't move an inch unless someone pushes her
wheelchair.
Or perhaps it's that cripple walking with his cane,
With every step he takes he seems to be in pain.
Or glance at that poor soul with no legs, selling
pencils for a dime,
And I am sure you will find your troubles are get-
ting smaller all the time.
Bud Atteridge


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w K "Bradenton's Best
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fC Surprisingly affordable!
Dining Room: Tues thru Sat 4-10PM
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o b r Lounge: 4PM-2AM Tues thru Sat
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Scrambled eggs, Eggs Benedict, French Toast, Biscuits & Gravy, Potatoes,
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Bloody Marys Mimosas
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Lounge menu available 'til midnight
RESERVATIONS REQUESTED, NOT REQUIRED
204 PINE AVE ANNA MARIA 778-6969


L







M] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 14


Island police reports
City of Anna Maria
Unavailable

Bradenton Beach
July 26, 2400 block of Avenue C, grand theft of
bicycle.
July 26, 2400 block of Gulf Drive North, crimi-
nal mischief. A suspect cut the right front brake line
and spray painted a smiley face and a peace sing on the
window and side of the complainant's van. Two razor
blades were wedged under the tires.
July 26,2400 block of Gulf Drive, criminal mis-
chief. A suspect cut the complainant's right front tire
with a razor blade.
July 26, 1800 Gulf Drive North, LaCosta Condo-
minium, criminal mischief. A suspect dumped an un-
known, flammable liquid into the swimming pool.
July 27, 200 Gulf Drive North, Patio Oyster Bar,
S criminal mischief. The rear window of an automobile
was broken.


ISLANDER


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IN THE
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PAGES 22 & 23.


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Holmes Beach
July 24, 100 block 31st Street, suspicious per-
son. The occupant heard someone walking on his deck,
open the screen door and try the rear door knob.
July 24, 500 block 72nd Street, burglary of ste-
reo.
July 25, 7100 block of Gulf Drive on the beach,
warrant arrest. While on patrol, the officer observed
the defendant near vehicles at Bali Hai Resort. The
officer located the defendant on the beach and ob-
served that his clothing was unusually bulky. Fearing
a weapon, the officer asked the defendant to pull up his
shirt. The defendant was wearing a women's bathing
suit under his clothes. While the officer was perform-
ing a warrant check, the defendant ran. The officer
gave chase and was able to locate the defendant.
July 25, 3007 Gulf Dr., Anchor Inn, vandalism.
An automobile windshield was broken.
July 25, 5400 Marina Dr., laundromat, burglary.
The rear door was pried open and $120 in wrapped
rolls of quarters was taken.
July 26, 3007 Gulf Dr., Anchor Inn, disturbance.
An intoxicated patron was bothering others.
July 26,700 Gulf Dr., Tiffany Place, vandalism.
Covers were peeled off night lights on the west side of
the pool and a gate was kicked open.
July 26, 200 block of 85th Street, traffic. A tan,
older model, four-door automobile with four juveniles

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An elegant resort on the Gulf of Mexico
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OF THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER
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inside was traveling backwards at 50 mph. The officer
was unable to locate the vehicle.
July 27, 5406 Marina Dr., Chez Andre, petty lar-
ceny of four clay pots and plants from the sidewalk.
July 27, 6504 Gulf Dr., White Sands, suspicious
person standing outside one of the rooms.
July 27, 6800 block of Palm Avenue, burglary.
Entry to the residence was gained through an open rear
sliding door and $3,000 worth of stereo equipment was
taken. Chad Linke, 18, and Michael Gregov, 18, of
Holmes Beach were arrested and charged with bur-
glary. A juvenile was also arrested in the case.
July 28, 2900 block of Avenue C, attempted mur-
der. According to the police reports, Terry Doak, 43, of
Holmes Beach met Martin Clifford, 57, of Bradenton
Beach at the Anchor Inn. The two were drinking with two
women. Doak invited Clifford to his residence, and the
pair was accompanied by one of the women.
When they arrived at the residence, another room-
mate, Daren Robertson, 37, was asleep on the couch.
According to the police report, Doak, Clifford and the
woman went into the bedroom and were engaging in
sexual acts when Doak produced a knife and stabbed
Clifford in the leg, abdomen and throat-neck area.
Clifford drove himself to the hospital.
The officer interviewed Clifford in the hospital.
PLEASE SEE STREETLIFE, NEXT PAGE


Make a trip to
France on
Longboat Key
North End of L. B. K.
7003 Gulf of Mexico Dr.


Enjoy dining in the comfortable atmosphere of a
French Country Inn, where all dinners are personally
prepared by the chef owners, Francis and Michel.
Reservations suggested 383-2421
Mon. thru Sat. 5:00 -10:00 PM


Boiled Ham ..............................................1.89 Ib.
Sliced Turkey ............................................2.99 lb.
OVER 50 SANDWICH SELECTIONS


BEER
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DAILY L --- ---- J
OPEN 7 DAYS For Fast Service ...
7AM-9:30PM Call 778-4656
Dell Closes at 9PM Call 778-465
307 Pine Avenue Anna Maria


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SUMMER 4
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IPECIALS*


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I


r






THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 15


Tropicats make hot music at Sandbar


By Kay Pruden
Islander Correspondent
The silver-tongued sounds, the shimmering water,
a superb sunset and the shivering sails of small boats
make it a night to remember when the Tropicats add
their music to the sight and sounds of the Sandbar res-
taurant in Anna Maria City.
Island residents Chuck Caudill and Lloyd Harper,
the Tropicats, are back at the Sandbar for the entire

STREETLIFE
CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE
Clifford said he was in the bedroom of Doak's residence,
and Doak was having sex with him when Doak stabbed
him for no reason, according to the police report.
The officer went to Doak's residence and observed a
trail of blood from the outside to the foot of the bed.
Roberston told the officer he was asleep on the couch and
awoke to Doak standing over him with a knife and yell-
ing for him to get Clifford out of the house before Doak
killed Clifford.
The officer found Doak hiding behind the house.
Doak told the officer he was having sex with the woman
when Clifford tried to sodomize him. Doak said he be-
came angry, grabbed a knife under the bed and stabbed
Clifford, according to the report.



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219 Gulf Drive South Bradenton Beach
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month of August playing from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
Well-known to locals and repeat visitors, they've been
regular entertainers on the Island since 1974.
Both men are clad in tee-shirts and shorts with the
ever-necessary sun glasses. Against the beautiful Gulf
background on the patio, Chuck sings and plays piano and
guitar. Blonde, tall and lean, Lloyd plays bass and sings.
"Our main goal," says Chuck, with a soft laugh, "is
to become successful at writing our own songs and record-
ing the originals." Leaning forward, he remarked, "Right
now we play a lot of reggae, contemporary and rock 'n'
roll music, not to mention honoring all requests."
The music ranged from reggae to Jimmy Buffet,
Roy Orbison's "Pretty Woman," the Allman Brothers'
"Sweet Melissa" and even Louie Armstrong. From
watching the audience, the variety of music produced
a lot of toe-tapping and shoulder-shaking.
The Sandbar was crowded, and I noticed an improved
patio menu with more selections and a good variety, all
reasonably priced. The moored boats and multi-colored
sails added to the tropical ambiance and the chance to win
a bottle of champagne by betting on the time the sun set
appealed to many of the fun-loving patrons.
All this and fine music, too.

A The Island Spirit is at...


WATERFRONT DINING
FULL MENU FULL BAR
British-Style
Fish & Chips
ALL YOU CAN EAT $6.95
MONDAY-THURSDAY ONLY
OPEN 7 DAYS 11AM to 10PM
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Anna Maria Yacht Basin
778-3953


Chuck Caudill and Lloyd Harper are the Tropicats.
The duo will perform at the Sandbar this month.

PREMIUM
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irdl 6" fc Cemm shepp"
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Surfing World Village 11904 Cortez Road West
Noon 10PM 7 Days a Week 794-5333





ANCHlOR INN
BEER WINE LIQUOR
7AM to 2:30AM
3007 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach 778-3085
Customer
Appreciation Night
Wednesday Aug 5 10PM-1AM
$1 Well $1 Beers 500 Drafts Free Pool

Chandler Bros.

REUNION PARTY
Friday, Saturday & Sunday
August 6, 7 & 8 9:30 pm-1:30 am
***
"Z" Kitchen is now open
Late night menu available



K 4th AnniversQar


Cliez Andrir
Sunday, August 15 5-9 p.m.
Enjoy a Complimentary
S Glass of Champagne with Dinner
Crawfish Bisque
Salade du Jardin avec
Raspberry Vinaigrette Dressing
Choice of 3 Entrees:
Homard (Lobster), Boeuf ou
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Dessert: Souffl6 Grand Marnier
with Raspberry Sauce
Caf6
Entertainment by Annie
Breakfast and Lunch Dining in France
8am 2:30pm Tues.-Sat. 6pm 9pm
Sunday 8:00am-l:30pm Thurs., Fr. & Sat.


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4:30 to 6:00 pm
Lunch & Dinner Daily
British Style Fish & Chips
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5350 Gulf of Mexico Dr.
Longboat Key
Located in the Centre Shops
383-0543


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4000 Gulf Dr., Manatee Public Beach
Holmes Beach 778-5442
OPEN 9 TO 5 SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

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Something for Everyone Beachi Toys
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FRESH BAGELS
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EVERYTHING HOMEMADE!
Mon-Sat 10AM-9PM Sun 1-9PM
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Island Shopping Center 5318 Marina Drive Holmes Beach
(813) 778-7386


,*.*






[j THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 16


PAWS & CO.
4 A pet sitting service. .!ir
4W Providing tender
4 loving care for
S your pet while
you're away!
BENEFITS:
* Pet is in a safe familiar environment
* Will remove pet in case of emergency
* Can pick up mail and newspapers
* Check air conditioner
* Reset timer in case of power failure
* Water inside and/or outside plants
Reasonable Rates
Call... 778-1427


Family Owned and Millwork
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OPEN:
7:30 to 5 AND
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We specialize in custom cabinet making:
formica tops entertainment centers
vanities kitchens
213 54th Street, Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just West of the Island Shopping Center


BE A

GOOD

SPORT!
Send the
Islander Bystander
to your
distant friends
and relatives.
They'll love.
hearing all of
the news from
Anna Maria Island.
See page 5 for
details.


UNDER
NEW
MANAGEMENT
Village

Barber

Shop

$ Haircuts
792-5020
*Appointments Available
*Walk-Ins Welcome
*Convenient to Anna Maria
Island & Shopping!
*Located in
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directly behind
the new Video Library
Duke & Bob
j Village reen Plaza
1 r


One busy scallop and

780 scampering turtles


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HOLMES BEACH
State Cert. #RF0049191
Stale Backllow Tech A09-89-1399


r-


By Bob Ardren
Outdoor Perspectives
That was surely one busy scallop in
Tampa Bay last weekend. Did you hear
the story?
Seems that about 100 snorkelers
showed up last Saturday to help the
Tampa Bay National Estuary Program
do a census of the blue-eyed little mol-
lusks in Tampa Bay. The tasty critters
were once the basis of a large commer-
cial fishery in the Bay, but pollution
helped kill it off back in the 1950s.
Notice please that the fishers didn't
kill it pollution killed the scallops
and commercial fishery.
As water quality dropped, the
seagrasses needed by scallops for repro-
duction and habitat simply died off,
leaving no place for the scallops to go.
So they disappeared. Actually, they
died off, to be more exact.
Eventually, after about 80 percent
of the seagrasses had been wiped out,
things hit bottom and action was taken.
The result, I'm happy to report, is that
the grasses are coming back. So hope-
fully the scallop should follow.
But it looks as though we may be
getting optimistic too soon.
A batch of scallops were released
into the Bay last year in hopes they
could now reproduce. And The Great
Scallop Search this past weekend hoped
to find the descendants of those released
last year. Find them and count them.
But alas, four different teams of
divers reported seeing a grand total of
one scallop each. So optimists will say
they found four scallops. Others believe
that there was one busy scallop running
around looking for company.
Ah well, maybe things will be bet-
ter next year.
Something that's already better
this year is the loggerhead turtle hatch
oh the Island. Turtle savior Chuck
Schumand tells me he's released 780
baby loggerheads already this summer,
and "We'll be doing releases most ev-
ery night in the near future."
Schumand is looking forward to
helping 10,000 loggerheads leave Anna
Maria beaches between now and Octo-
ber a real miracle in a time when
even so-called conservation groups
spend most of their time and money try-
ing to grab "what's ours," if you believe
their propaganda.
Since 1986, Schumand and crew
have helped some 40,000 baby logger-
heads find their way to the Gulf, and
yet, when I spoke with him early in the
week, he was mostly concerned about
one little turtle. You see, he was afraid
it might not make it because its back
flippers aren't fully developed.
"It's hard sometimes," he said with
a choked voice.
It is hard sometimes. But with fine
people like Chuck Schumand trying to
help, this Island, and the whole world


Island
Jane Carolan DVM Animal Clinic
5343 Gulf Drive Suite 900 Holmes Beach, Florida 34217 778-2445
14 YEARS SERVICE TO THE
ISLANDS AND WEST
BRADENTON -.. 4
* Diagnostics
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Boarding
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Gentle, Compassionate, Care
_J i 0 24 Hour Emergency
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Animal Clinic William V. Bystrom DVM
6116 Manatee Avenue West* Bradenton, Florida 34209 794-3275


Problem with


Insurance?

Call 778-2253

Jim Mixon Insurance, Inc.,
representing the
Florida Residential Property and
Casualty Joint Underwriting
Association. (State Pool Insurance)


Jim Mixon

Insurance Co. Inc.

5412 Marina Dr., Island Shopping Center **..w
Holmes Beach, FL 34217 778-2253 .......
UII I II } I II


really, is a better place.
If you'd like to witness a logger-
head hatch some night, call Schumand
at 778-1156 for details. This is your
chance to watch a real miracle.
What with all the ongoing flap
about homeowners insurance follow-
ing our recent Big Storms, I thought I'd
take a look at boat insurance for you.
And as you might have guessed, things
are tough out there.
For comparison sake, I dreamed up
and got insurance quotes on a 16-foot,
center-console with a 100 horsepower
outboard kept on a trailer, a 24-foot sail-
boat kept on a mooring and a 38-foot
trawler in a private slip. And there were
a few surprises.
First of all, some companies such as
Prudential have simply stopped writing
new boat policies in Florida.
Pamela Rose of Tampa Bay Under-
writers in St. Petersburg says that his-
torically boat insurance prices have ac-
tually dropped nearly 20 percent during
the past 10 years. But she then adds that
some carriers are pulling out of Florida
because of the big losses this year.
Betsy W. Glasure Insurance of Sa-
rasota represents Nationwide and says
requirements, especially for any older
boats, have really tightened up. For ex-
ample, she requires a complete survey
of any boat over 11 years old and won't
insure anything over 20 years old. Inter-
estingly, she also says the number one
determination of boat insurance cost is
horsepower. "We won't insure anything
capable of exceeding 50 miles an hour,"
she said.
Ann Hutchins of Boat/US, that
AAA of the water, also worked up some
quotes, warning that while they may be
off by as much as $50 or more, they are
in the ballpark.
So how much does it cost?
The 16-foot runabout ranges were
from $234 at Glasure to $325 at Boat/
US. The sailboat ranged from $200 at
Boat/US to $235-$250 at Tampa Bay
Underwriters and the trawler ranged
from $750 at Boat/US to $995 at
Glasure.
So shop around, make sure you take
some courses in safe boating as they
will get you discounts most places, and
make sure you buy an "agreed value"
policy to avoid unpleasant surprises
come claim time. All the agents agreed
on that point.
Get out there and enjoy them
while you can the white ibis and
black skimmers, that is. Both birds were
listed as "species.of special concern"
last week by the Game and Fresh Water
Fish Commission.
Two of my personal favorite shore
birds, the number of nesting white ibis
in Florida has declined by about half
from its 1960s levels. Black skimmers
have dropped by a third.
To give you some idea of the scale
here, that means there are now only 25
nesting colonies of black skimmers left
in all of Florida. Walk the beaches, en-
joy them while you can.
See you next week.


**N









Rare catch
Ed Scafiti shows off a
permit he caught while
fishing on Captain
Todd Romaine's
"Oscar II." Just
catching a permit is
usually a rare feat
.-- because there are not
many around, says
Captain Mike
Heistand. "This year is
unusual," said
Heistand. "For some
-: unexplainable reason,
there's a lot around."

Photo courtesy Perico
Bait & Tackle





Reds hot, but tarpon


cooling down


By Captain Mike Heistand
Though tarpon seem to be running down, the va-
riety of fish reported caught last week made for some
exciting fishing.
Fran from the Anna Maria City Pier told me the
pier's customers caught legal-size mangrove snapper,
a few mackerel, and a few pompano. Redfish were
caught and released because they were over size lim-
its. Fran also said one of the pier's anglers caught a
three-and-a-half-foot black tip shark last Saturday
night. That's one fight I'm sorry I missed.
Redfish, redfish, redfish! Captain Tom Chaya
reported limit catches on almost every charter last
week. His clients also caught some trout and a few
snook when the reds were taking a breather.
Chris from Galati Yacht Basin said that black
grouper were caught offshore, 40 to 50 miles west of
the Island. He also had reports of dolphin being caught
less than 30 miles out in the Gulf and redfish seemed
to be the fish of choice in the bays and bayous.
Big drum, a lot of nice trout and mangrove snap-
per were favorites of the fishermen on the Bradenton
Beach Pier, according to Arkee. He also mentioned
one of the pier's clients caught a 23-inch flounder.
Nice going.
Captain Phil Shields reported lane, yellowtail and
mangrove snapper along with amberjack, barracuda and
red grouper had all came aboard his boat last week.
Ray from the Rod & Reel Pier told me pier anglers
were catching mackerel, mangrove snapper, angel fish
and a few shark. He also said they were catching and re-
leasing snook at night and redfish during the day.
Captain Rick Gross said his boat was in for
maintenance last week, so no report, but he'd be back
in business this week.


I -I i -.-1 I. I
Islander Photo: Joy Courtney
Notes for notes
Andy Toombs (left), president of the Anna Maria
Island Privateers, awards Bradenton Beach student
Kelly Hoyer a scholarship for $500. Hoyer will use
her scholarship to attend Manatee Community
College and pursue a degree in music.


Clyde from Annie's Bait & Tackle said Captain
Zack on the "Dee Jay" reported redfish schooling up
and one of his customers caught two, 30 -pounders on
a fly. Zack also reported snook on the beaches at
Longboat Pass and Bean Pass. Zack added that man-
grove snapper and Spanish mackerel were hitting
well on small white bait.
Redfish and trout seemed to be the best bet right
now because of the full moon tides, said Captain
Todd Romaine. He also said he thought the fishing
would be even better next week because of this.
Bill from Island Discount Tackle said he had
reports of redfish being caught with most of them
being over the 27-inch limit. Bill said he heard that
plenty of trout were being caught on the grass flats
using both live and artificial bait and offshore there'd
been reports of both red and black grouper and am-
berjack in 100-plus feet of water.
Captain Mark Bradow said tarpon were getting
harder to get by the day and that he felt this year's run
was almost over. Mark's clients still brought in trout
and their limit of redfish.
Libby from Perico Harbor Bait & Tackle re-
ported the shop's customers were catching trout and
redfish in the flats. She also said some of their cus-
tomers were catching mangrove snapper.
I had a very good week on my charter boat,
"Magic." Islander Bonnie Charles and her son,
Wayne, along with her nephew, Jacob, from Tennes-
see caught their limit of redfish on one trip last week.
Bonnie and her husband Bob own Island Auto Body
in Holmes Beach. The rest of my trips last week were
just as successful. Keeping score, my clients caught
over 100 redfish.
Great week, great catches!


Privateers help future biologist
Scott Straight (right) of Bradenton Beach accepts a
$500 scholarship from Anna Maria Island Priva-
teers President Andy Toombs. Straight will use the
money towards earning his degree in marine
biology. Straight received the group's scholarship
last year. Because of the fine return on their
investment, the Privateers decided to continue
Straight's scholarship.


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER E AUGUST 5, 1993 E PAGE17

OTEY &
ASSOCIATES
COMPLETE COMPUTERIZED rlI
ACCOUNTING, BOOKKEEPING
AND YEAR ROUND TAX SERVICE
Individuals, Corporations, Partnerships & Estates _
503 Manatee Ave. W., Suite C, Holmes Beach
SILy Oy Enoff d-s t 778-6118
Licensed by the U.S. Government to represent taxpayers before the IRS.







Bulk Oil-In your container o
Fuel ive O'Clock Mane



412 Pine Ave Anna Maria
778-5577..,
AUTHORIZED SERVICE Johnson, Evlnrude, OMC
Sea Drive & OMC Cobra Stern Drive


ANNA MARIA
DAY AMHIGH
Thu 8/5 2:40 1.8ft
Fri 8/6 2:58 1.9ft
Sat 8/7 3:23 2.0ft
Sun 8/8 3:59 2.1ft
Mon 8/9 4:31 2.2ft
Tue 8/10 5:17 2.3ft
Wed 8/11 6:13 2.3ft


ISLAND TIDE TABLES
AMLOW PMHIGH PMLOW
7:31 1.0ft 2:15 2.4ft 8:34 0.7ft
8:18 0.9ft 2:58 2.2ft 8:56 0.8ft
9:08 0.8ft 3:47 2.0ft 9:20 1.0ft
10:040.8ft 4:40 1.8ft 9:45 1.1ft
11:130.8ft 5:50 1.6ft 10:08 1.2ft
10:32p1.4ft 7:35 1.5ft 12:36 0.7ft
-- 2:05 0.6ft


Cortez High Tides 7 minutes later lows 1:06 later.

BEWARE OF TELEPHONE SOLICITORS
BEARING OFFERS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE -
THEY USUALLY ARE!
BE SURE YOU KNOW WHO YOU'RE
DEALING WITH BEFORE YOU ALLOW
THEM INTO YOUR HOME.
These days, you can't be too careful
about offers at your door or over the phone. If you
have to decide right now, or the offer isn't good
after today, the offer probably wasn't good to
begin with.
Any reputable company wants you to
shop around and make a decision at your conve-
nience, not theirs.
BE CAREFUL!


REFRIGERATION

AIR CONDM iIT


778-9622 CA C044365
5347 GULF DRIVE #4 HOLMES BEACH, FL 34217-1748
Your fishing photos and news are always welcome
at the Islander Bystander.
We're in the Island Shopping Center, near D.Coy
Ducks and Chez Andre on the corner.


There's never been a
a / TACKLE SHOP LIKE THIS

k ON THE ISLANDS!
"The Best Net You Can Buy"
FRANKthe NET!
Handmade Bait Cast Nets
i/ \. 8 FOOT ............. $180.00
S 10 FOOT.............. $225.00
12 FOOT.............. $270.00
GUY HARVEY T-SHIRTS
(17 NEW DESIGNS IN STOCK)
FRONT DESIGN .....................$11.95
BACK DESIGN ................... $13.95
FRONT & BACK .................. $15.95
XXL ... PLUS $2.00

GREAT PRICES
... RIGHT HERE
ON THE
ISLAND ISLANDS!
DISCOUNT TACKLE
ANNA MARIA 778-7688
OPEN DAILY ISLAND CENTER 7787688
7 to 7 3240 EAST BAY DR.
WEEKENDS HOLMES BEACH VISA
6 to 7 (Between Walgreens & Shells)







jj] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER I AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 18
m - &-. V- --- 'M-.SMW,--


Finally they're together Islanaer mor: Joy Courmey
Sharon Smith (left) of Anna Maria City waited a long time to enjoy a special family reunion. "This is
the first time I've had all my grandchildren together at once," remarked Smith about this remarkable
event. "It's been crazy and hectic around the house, but worth it," she added. Kneeling are Smith's
grandchildren from Columbia, SC., Misty, Scott, Melisa and Mindi Nelson. Their father, Scott, who is
Sharon's son, and mother, Deborah, are not pictured. Standing left to right are Smith, her son Jason
Rowland with his wife, Lorie, who is holding their son Nicholas. All these Rowlands are from Braden-
ton. Standing center is granddaughter Lana Rowland. Behind Lana is her father Eric holding her sister
Kelly. These members of the Rowland family tree are from Muncie, Ind. Last-but not least is Sharon's
daughter Mandy Shockley with her husband, John, who holding their daughter, Victoria. The Shockleys
are from Bradenton.


SI W -
STEPHEN G. SCOTT L.
PELHAM, M.D. KOSFELD, M.D.
Family Practice
Accepting Medicare Assignment
Now Open on WEDNESDAY
Accepting New Patients
3909 East Bay Drive (Suite 100) Holmes Beach
778-1007 Day/Night 9 to 5: 778-6631


Gy Yatros, D.M.D.
FAMILY DENTISTRY


Dr. Yatros and staff wish you a great summer! This is a
good time for a Dental Check Up for you and your
children. Call our office for an appointment.
3909 East Bay Drive
(Suite 205) Holmes Beach
778-2204
OPEN: MONDAY thru THURSDAY 8:30 to 5:30
FRIDAYS BY APPOINTMENT


Island
Baptist
Church -
James M. Melts, Jr. Pstor
9:45................................................SUNDAY SCHOOL
10:55 .........................SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP
7 PM........................... SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP
7 PM.....................WEDNESDAY PRAYER MEETING
Nursery for all Services
"A Loving People, On a Lovely Island, Preaching Christl'
8605 Gulf Drive Anna Maria, Florida 778-0719

Christian Science Services
First Church of Christ, Scientist
6300 MARINA DRIVE HOLMES BEACH
SUNDAY SERVICE & SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 AM
WEDNESDAY 7:30 EVENING SERVICES

READING ROOM
5314 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
Monday thru Friday
10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


Stephen J. Alex
Stephen J. Alex, 98, of Palm Harbor and Braden-
ton, died July 20 in Helen Ellis Hospital, Tarpon
Springs.
Born in Lublau, Austria-Hungary, Mr. Alex lived
in the Bradenton area most of his life. He was a ma-
chinist with Edison Electric, N.J. He was a member of
Palma Sola Presbyterian Church. He was a member of
Palm View Golf Club. He played professional baseball
with Spartanburg, S.C., Oneonto, N.Y., Glens Falls,
N.Y., and Petersburg, Va., teams.
He is survived by his wife, Caroline; a daughter,
Elaine Kloss of Holmes Beach; a son, Leonard, of
Roseland, N.J.; and seven grandchildren.
No local visitation was held. Services were held at
Mansion Memorial Park in Ellenton with the Rev. Jack
Wolfe officiating. Burial was in Mansion Memorial Park.
Bradenton Funeral Homes was in charge of arrangements.

Robert Hennessey
Robert Hennessey, 67, of Holmes Beach, died July
28 at home.
Born in Riverton, N.J., Mr. Hennessey came to
Holmes Beach from West Chester, Pa., in 1988. He was
an industrial specialist for the Department of Defense. He
was a member of St. Bernard Catholic Church.
He is survived by his wife, Margaret; a daughter,
Robin Logue of West Grove, Pa.; three sons, Mark and
David, both of West Chester, and Neil, of Holmes Beach;
two sisters, Jean Kelly and Theresa Cell, both of Pennsyl-
vania; a brother, Richard, of Florida and 11 grandchildren.
No local visitation was held. Memorial Mass was
held at St. Bernard Catholic Church in Holmes Beach with
Rev. John Barry officiating. Memorials may be made to
Parkinson's Disease, Happiness House, Parkinson's Dis-
ease, 401 Braden Ave., Sarasota, Fla. 33580. Griffith-
Cline Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.

closer Remorial QTmununity fjTurrc
The Rev. An Interdenominational Christian Church
Frank W. Serving the Community Since 1913
Hutchison, Seaside Worship
Resumes Sunday Aug 7 at 7 PM
Vacation Bible School
Picnic Friday, Aug 6 11:30 AM
Sunday Worship 10 AM
S Children's Church 10 AM
512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
S Transportation & Nursery Available
Come, Celebrate Christ 778-0414




FUNERAL HOMES
KEITH L. GRUENDL
General Manager
BRADENTON HOLMES BEACH
720 Manatee Avenue W. 6000 Marina Drive
3904 Cortez Road West (813) 778-4480
(813)748-1011 FAX 746-6459


ISLANDERIP ISIN I CLASSIFIED
really get results from 9,500 newspapers
delivered on Anna Maria Island
and to the surrounding area.


IF IT'S NEWS TO YOU

... it's probably news to us too. If you see news happening,
please, give us a call right away. We depend on our fellow is-
landers Tor news tips. And we welcome your story ideas about
fishing, people and events ... anything to do with Anna Maria
Island and Islanders. If you have a story to tell or you know what
may be an interesting news item for other Islanders, please, you
are welcome to give us a call.



ISLANDER 01I]

ANNA MARIA ISLAND'S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
NEWS HAPPENINGS DINING FISHING SPORTS REAL ESTATE
Island Shopping Center 5400A Marina Drive Holmes Beach
Between D. Coy Ducks and the Laundromat
778-7978






g] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 19

WCIND looks at habitat restoration projects


The West Coast Inland Navigation District may be
getting into the habitat restoration business.
Officials from the four-county organization
charged with maintaining the Intracoastal Waterway
from Ft. Myers to Bradenton agreed in principle to
further investigate creation of habitats for fish and
birds on the islands once used as sediment depositories
during the creation of the channel in the late 1950s.
The habitat creation would coincide with channel
maintenance dredging. As WCIND Director Jim
Armstrong envisions it, the "spoil" islands in the estuar-
ies would be altered to a height suitable for mangroves and
marsh grasses. Exotic vegetation such as Australian pine
and Brazilian pepper would be removed as well.
Funding for the habitat projects could come from
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the WCIND.
Habitat creation has proven successful in other


n- eaL & nea
CHARMING CITY OF ANNA MARIA ...
Imagine living so close to bay & beach!
Maintained in immaculate condition!
A 2 bedroom 2 bath with over 2000 s.f.
Gorgeous white tile floors keep you cool!
Imagine 2 large family rooms with many uses!
Neighborhood designated boat basin!
Enticing location you'll never want to leave!
Imagine this could be yours ... A great
investment at $166,300.
Call Patty Lance.
Office 383-3708 or Evenings 778-5295


PATTY LANCE
Want excellent results?
Hire an exceptional
REALTOR with a
proven track record of
success. I will go the
extra mile for you!
Specializing in Long-
boat Key and Anna
Maria Island's finest
IR ML5 LS


parts of Sarasota and Tampa Bays.
In conjunction with the Sarasota Bay National Es-
tuary Program, three sites in Sarasota Bay have been
altered to produce a more pristine marine environment.
The Sarasota BayWalk, the first of the so-called
habitat restoration projects, is on City Island at the
south end of Longboat Key. Sarasota Bay Program of-
ficials took a 4.5 acre tract of land, lowered the level
of the property, created six intertidal pools, and added
more than 20,000 native plants, mostly marsh grass.
The site also features a boardwalk and interpretive
signs.
In the three years since BayWalk was created, scal-
lops, shellfish, crustaceans and small mullet, redfish, black
drum and other native fish have been found in the pools.
Similar projects have been undertaken by the Sa-
rasota Bay Program at Leffis Key in Bradenton Beach


MARILYN
knows best!
ANTIGUA ...
Reduced $89,900
940 Sandpiper Circle
GRAND CAYMAN ...
New Listing $153,000
1272 Spoonbill Landings

CALL TODAY! !


Marilyn Trevethan
Evenings 792-8477
neaLsneaL REALTORS
(813) 778-2261
Toll Free 800-422-6325
m~w~w ~ .^S d3


CALL 778-7978 FOR FREE HOME DELIVERY OF
THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND!


neaLtneaLt


Commercial Building 4,800 s.f. on three lots
with building zoned Residential/Office/Retail.
Building is divided into offices & storage/ware-
house area. Use for retail shops, professional of-
fices, restaurant, beauty/barber shop, day nurs-
ery, marina or artist studios. Call Tom for your
brochure & land code use information! $219,900.
Tom Nelson
REALTOR/Associate
Office 778-2261
Evenings 778-1382 -
605C Manatee Ave. West l.
Holmes Beach

M MLS 0
^ ^_


and at Quick Point on Longboat Key.
Scientists have termed the habitat restoration
projects a biological success, creating a more produc-
tive marine environment than previously existed.
And it is this type of project that WCIND officials
hope to begin. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers repre-
sentatives said full funding for such habitat restoration
projects could take place in conjunction with any
maintenance dredging of the Intracoastal Waterway,
pending state and local permits.
To help facilitate permitting, the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection has created an En-
vironmental Restoration Project division.
"The cleanest, clearest water in the Intracoastal
Waterway is bordered on each side by mangrove for-
ests," Armstrong said, "and there isn't any need for
any dredging in those areas. "

FneaL sneaL-


LOCATION!
LOCATION!
LOCATION!


Fantastic Beach Cottage. 209 Coconut, Anna
Maria. Totally updated. A must see, not a drive by.
Fireplace, beautiful dining area. Best of all, next to
world class beach. $169,600.
Call Richard 778-2261
After Hours 778-2284
VRichard Freeman, Realtor Associate 0.A. MLS .




Gulf Bay Realty
ofAnna Maria Inc.










Custom Designed Duplex with over 2,400 s.f.
living area. Features two 2 bedroom, 2 bath resi-
dences, one with marble fireplace, bay windows,
screened decks and much more.
Asking $225,000. Owner financing.
Call Robin Kollar
778-7244 or 778-2151

nr eaL neaL-
MLS[









GULF SHORES Unobstructed, direct Guffront con-
dominium with 3 bedrooms (2 bedrooms and possible
den). Furished beautifully, ready for occupancy. Low
maintenance; no pool, no tennis court. JUST SITU-
ATED ON THE NEW WIDE WHITE SANDY WALK-
ING BEACH ALONG THE AZURE BLUE WATERS
OFTHE GULF OF MEXICO. Call Rose for a tour of
this fine home. 778-2261 or after hours 778-7780.

ROSE
SCHNOERR
Realtor@
GRI, LTG, RRC
N eal & Neal Top
Company-Wide Sales-
person of the Year
#1 in Sales and
] Listings on Anna
Maria Island


(813) 778-2291 EVENINGS 778-2632
FAX (813) 778-2294 P. O. Box 2150
419 Pine Avenue Anna Maria FL 34216
Associates After Hours
Barbara A. Sato ....778-3509 Christine T. Shaw ....778-2847
Marcella Cornett ...778-5919 Nancy Guillford......... 778-2158
U7L J aiEJ e d ealaltate PoPfellionoals
SPEcisaizl inz Jimntes. opicaLL'iLfesltyLea.
Call or Stop by our office to schedule a complete
"Drive-By Preview" of current listings through the
use ofprofessional videotape.
W Ecluafr. i
vded.o ColtocUon AL ...


INTRACOASTAL Enjoy the lifestyle that offers
expansive and ever-changing views of the Intracoastal
waterway from the large pool deck and living areas of
this luxurious 3BR/2.5BA exquisite waterfront home.
Twelve years experience
specializing in Creative
Transactions.
S Make your dreams and
Goals a reality with

: Paul Collins
REALTOR-ASSOCIATE
After Hours (813) 778-4330

Michael Saunders & Company
Licensed Real Estate Broker
3224 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach, FL 34217 (813) 778-6654


I


I


~t5;3~






II THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 20


ISLAND SPECIALISTS

zzA_


IMMACULATE well-maintained pool home.
White ceramic tile and mauve carpet. Huge
family room with great water view. Central
vac, security system, 2 plus garage plus car-
port. Lots more! $223,000. # 11712. Rose
Schnoerr OFC: 778-2261 EVES: 778-7780.
DEFINITELY NOT A DRIVE BY!!! Light and
bright 2BR/2.5BA home on canal. White tile
and Terrazzo floors, and many nice touches.
Convenient to areas nice restaurants.
$179,000 #11714. Rose Schnoerr OFC: 778-
2261 EVES: 778-7780.
GULF SHORES Lovely 3BR/2BA
GULFFRONT condo. Light and bright unit lo-
cated on beautiful renourished beaches.
$199,000 #11725. Rose Schnoerr OFC: 778-
2261 EVES: 778-7780.
ELEGANCE AND PRACTICALITY can
only describe this beautiful 3BR/4BA home.
Too many extras to mention. Definitely not a
drive by. Only a little over a block from Gulf
beaches. $189,700. Bill Bowman OFC: 778-
2261 EVES: 778-4619.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Great
2BR/2BA downstairs end unit with nice
open views. Furnished for immediate oc-
cupancy. Tennis, heated pools and
Jacuzzi. $135,500 #11216. Dick Maher
OFC: 778-2261 EVES: 778-6791.
SUNBOW BAY TOWNHOUSE King size
condo/townhouse for the family. Tennis,
pools, boat docks, water view, shows like
a model. 4 bedrooms/2.5 baths! $139,900
#10632. John Green OFC: 778-2261
EVES: 778-3167.
SUN PLAZA WEST GULF FRONT luxury
condo. 2BR/2BA fully and tastefully furnished.
Never used as a rental. New beach
renourishment in place. Lighted tennis
court, heated pool and sauna. $149,000
#10523. Rose Schnoerr OFC: 778-2261
EVES: 778-7780.
BEACH FRONT HOME Lovely 3BR/2BA
home located directly Gulffront in quiet area of
Holmes beach. $319,500 #10759. Dick Maher
or Nick Patsios OFC: 778-2261.


FREE! Home delivery of the Islander Bystander
on Anna Maria Island. Just call 778-7978.


A. PARADISE, INC.
REALTOR
3001 Gulf Dr., Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-4800 Toll Free 800-327-2522
Beautifully Furnished 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath unit is
a Gulffront complex. Overlooks a pool and Jacuzzi
with views of the new beach. Complex features ten-
nis courts and elevator. $175,000.
Coquina Beach Club- Efficiency unit in a
Gulffront complex. Beautifully furnished with
heated pool. Asking $72,000.
Island Duplex 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath each side. One
block from the beach. Currently producing $950 per
month income. Asking $142,000.
Questions concerning buyer's broker??
Call Dennis McClung at 778-4800


ISLAND

Ss) REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA ISLAND
Maureen Dowd, Lic. Real Estate Broker
PRIME HOLMES BEACH LOCATION
AT NORTH BEACH VILLAGE
This pristine
l2 bedroom, 2.5 bath
pr unit is all you could
ask for! Centrally
'" located near
Beaches, shopping
. .K mi and restaurants.
I Hi Quiet area with


NJ.


lovely trees. This
home is perfect for a
vacation or a lifetime!
Asking $142,500.


(813) 778-6066
6101 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach 34217
Sales & Rentals 0 Property Management


The Islander Bystander is the the BEST news on the Islands!


LA PLAYITA 2BR 2BA townhouse, close to beach TIP OF THE ISLAND
and shopping. Large pool and recreation area, ga- 2BR-2BA fully furnished Island residence with short
rage and storage for $79,900. Call Dave Moynihan. walk to prime beach. Offered at $124,900. Call
Dave Moynihan for details.


BEACHES, SUNSETS AND AMBIANCE Direct
Gulffront 2BR 2BA unit that is turnkey furnished.
Great walking beach. A proven money maker for
rentals. Protected parking. All for $164,900. Call
Stan Williams.


GULFFRONT MOTEL Six units directly on new
wide beach. A mix of efficiencies, 1 BR and house-
keeping apartments. Steady increase in income
since beach renourishment and 1994 is already
booked. Now priced at $549,900. Call Stan Will-


... I
SPECTACULAR BAYFRONT Fully furnished 2BR- UNDER $60,0001
2BA top floor, end unit with fabulous view of the This 2BR-1BA is fully furnished. Amenities include
Bay. Deep water boat dock one block to prime pool, private patio and cook-out area. Convenient
beach. Offered at $125,000. Owner financing. Call to Anna Maria Island Centre shopping. Priced at
Dave Moynihan. $55,900. Call Tom Eatman.


The Prudential __. Florida Realty e Are Frida

5340 Gulf Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217 (813) 778-0766
PRICE REDUCED
#51587 $169,900 ...
Very nice duplex and
only half block from the
Gulf. Larger side is
turnkey furnished.
SUNBOW BAY UNITI
#51783 $81,500 ... Enjoy Island living in this large one
bedroom overlooking the lagoon.
Are you looking for a Real Estate Agent with International
Contacts? Call one of the Top Sales Associates of the
PRUDENTIAL FLORIDA REALTY for Sarasota Manatee
Counties. KARIN B. STEPHAN 778-0766 or 388-1267


The Prudential __
Florida Realty _

CAROL HEINZE. CRS
REALTOR-ASSOCIATE'
Million Dollar Club
5340-1 Gull Drive
Holmes Beach, FL 34217
(813) 778-0766
Fax (813) 778-3035
Alfer Hours (813) 792-5721 .,

ANNA MARIA! #51824 $129,900 ... Duplex
on Island! Remodeled kitchens, close to
beach! Call Roni McCuddin now or 778-5585.
FLAMINGO CAY! #51832 $154,900 ... 3
bedroom split plan opens to a spectacular
view. Call June Gilley 792-0758 anytime!


ANNUAL & SEASONAL RENTALS available.
Call Jack Bachman 778-0769 or 778-5368.


Proud corporate sponsors of Mote Marine Laboratory, Call us for a brochure and discount coupon.


ISLAND

HISTORY

BUFFS!
June Alder's
column highlights the
heritage of Anna Maria
Island this week
and every
week in the
ISLANDER
BYSTANDER.
Don't miss
an issue.
You can
even mail
it to friends
up north!
See the form on
page 5 to subscribe.


U'


CORDOVA VILLAS! #99922 $54,900 ... 2 bedroom, 2 bath end unit.
Professionally decorated. Call T. Dolly Young. 778-5427.
WHITFIELD! #52324 $99,900 ... 3 bedroom, 2 bath Spanish style with
fireplace, French doors & more. Call Donald Pampuch now or 778-3111 eves.


DICK
WAGNER
REALTY INC.
Ng .







DI


REAL A A AE SAL


CITY
Bradenton Beach

Holmes Beach


ADDRESS/lot
106 3rd St N
50x103


STYLE/rooms
ground home
2bed/lbath/ car


524 Key Royale Dr ground home
100x112 canal 2bed/2bath/2car


AGE/size SELLER/BUYER/date SALE$/LIST$


1946 Carter/Carden
1072 sfla 7/12/93
1959 Walker/Mariotti
1336 sfla 7/12/93


$69,000
list uk
$178,000
list uk


Compiled by Doug Dowling, Lic Real Estate Broker, 778-1222


" SALE OF WEEK
by Doug Dowling
Islander Contributor
538 Key Royale Drive is a beautifully
redecorated canal home with a caged pool on
an extra deep, 184-foot lot. The three bed-
room, two-and-a-half bath home with a one-
car garage was marketed by Dick Maher
of Neal & Neal Realtors for $245,000.


KEY ROYALE'S FINEST: View the open water in
this beautifully refurbished 2 bedroom, 2 bath Key
Royale waterfront home. Decorator touches
throughout, including ceramic tile, marble and pick-
led oak flooring, skylight, sunken tub and much
more. Truly an entertaining home. The 14 x 28
heated caged pool and convenient boat dock with
electric boat lift offer additional entertaining and
relaxing value. Priced at $405,000. Debbie Walther
778-0777 or 794-6295 eves.
'.WS4 MK-7


COZY AND CONVENIENT: Attractive 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Holmes Beach home. Corner lot with cir-
cular driveway. Many new updates. Homeowner's
Warranty. $119,000. To see this home call Zee
Catanese, 794-8991 eves.


OWN-W
NEW LISTING: You can end your search Com-
pletely renovated in 1990, this 3 bedroom, 2 bath Is-
land home oozing with charm is located 2 minutes
from beach, shopping, etc. Don't miss this once-in-a
lifetime chance to enjoy ambiance on Anna Maria Is-
land for only $125.000. Marion Ragni, 778-1504 eves.


REALTORS


5203 Gulf Dr. Holmes Beach, FL 34217
Call (813) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
1-800-741-3772Ext.55 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK MLS 9 .


Cul-De-Sac Canalfront Spacious, open 2 bed-
room, 2 full baths. 511 65th Street. $165,000.
BRAND NEW 3/2 Holmes Beach. Over
2,100 sq. ft. of living area with glimpses of the
Gulf. $182,000.
Island Living At It's Best New 2 bedroom, 2
full baths, close to the Gulf at the low price of
$125,000.
LOT WITH VIEW Good Gulf views from
this second lot in from the water. 2803 Ave. E.
Asking $72,000.
Dolores M. Baker
Licensed Real Estate Broker 778-7500 ....,.


Michael Saunders & Co.
of Anna Maria Island, Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Broker
FEATURE OF THE WEEK_



A-------- ..




EXPERIENCE FLAMINGO CAY
Beautifully remodeled 2BR/2B split plan home with great
room that opens to solar-heated, caged pool and patio. Davits
and dock. $229,600. Don and Karen Schroder, 778-2200.
a* *
GREAT VIEWS FROM LA COSTA Totally refurbished
corner unit in complex that includes pool, tennis court and
lots of beach. New appliances, furniture and tile. Best price
in complex! 119,900. Paul Collins, 778-4330.
BEACHWALKERS DREAM Exquisite 3BR/2B remod-
eled beach home steps from the Gulf. Sunrise to sunset, the
combination of low maintenance, modem convenience and
old Florida charm will entice and enthrall. $269,000.
LUXURY LIVING IN MARINERS COVE Unique com-
munity features boat slips, wide, deep canals, 2 pools, lighted
tennis court and expansive views. 2BR/2B unit gives you
luxury for only $215,000. Wendy Foldes, 755-0826.
FOR THE PERSON WHO WANTS IT ALL One of
Anna Maria's finest homes. Canal front 4BR/3B home, re-
modeled to include fireplace, Jenn Aire kitchen and heated
pool. One block to beach. $350,000. Ken Rickett, 778-3026.
Anna Maria Island Centre (813) 778-6654
3224 East Bay Drive Holmes Beach, FL 34217


THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 0 PAGE 21

"1- .,CALL A PROFESSIONALS
S ; 'a READY TO HELP YOU!
-:. -SANDY GREINER REALTOR.Associate
S Alt rs 778-3794 Pager: 333-1864
REALTORS-
', 5203 Gulf Dr.Holmes Beach
ML CS C31 (B13) 778-0777 or Rentals 778-0770
"W M 15 ,' 1 41-3772 EX155 OPEN SEVEN DAYS WEEK


(813) 778-1999
Condos, homes, duplexes for rent and for sale.
We can help you find the home YOU want.
Call Today!



i'^ ; ,, r










Key Royale, 631 Foxworth Lane. $525,000
Doug Dowling Realty. 778-1222

neaL nea L-
IMLS


DICK MAHER
REALTORASSOCIATE r
Evenings: 778-6791
Toll-free 1-800-732-6434

BEACH HOUSE Holmes Beach. Directly on
the Gulf. 3 bedroom 2 bath. Nicely furnished.
$319,500.
CANALFRONT HOME Anna Maria. Open
kitchen, great room with dock and davits.
$198,500.
SAILORS DREAM Anna Maria. Updated
home on deep water canal. Lots of storage.
$204,900.
WESTBAY POINT & MOORINGS Holmes
Beach. 2 and 3 bedroom units featuring pools,
tennis and boating in a park like setting.
$132,000 and up.
SPACIOUS ISLAND HOME Anna Maria. 4
bedroom 2 bath, canalfront with large caged
pool. Great family neighborhood. $239,000.
LOCATION LOCATION Walk one block to
the beach from this 3 bedroom 2 bath.
$179,500.
GREAT RENTAL PROPERTY! Anna Maria.
Four units located on natural waterway and one
block from north end beaches. $239,000.
Call Dick 778-6791
neaL.nea. Realtors (813)778-2261
^^a^ ^ ^^1 _.j^^ -- ---- -- --- --^---^ ---^^ ^ B ^ ^


- MEMBERS ISLAND
Z CO-LISTING SERVICE


SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Planning to SELL or RENT your property? Please call an ISLAND
,REALTY GROUP OFFICE Four ISLAND Real Estate Offices
working together to provide personal & professional services.
Over 75 combined years of ISLAND business experience
shows we are long established ISLAND -fflcesl


-in_ -,- -. ___ 4&______
A REAL CHARMER ANNA MARIA GULFFRONT UNIQUE CANAL FRONT HOME ANNA MARIA CITY
This lovely 2 bedroom, 2 bath elevated home on Lake Great opportunity, attractive duplex on gor-
Marcia is a wonderful primary home or great retreat geous beach. Well maintained turnkey units in- Spectacular entrance. Pool, fireplace, GULFFRONT HOME
house. Many new amenes such as a new dishwasher, cludea privacy wall. Recent renovations added 50' dock, lush landscaping. Best of Now on the market.
roof (2 years old), extra insulation, thermo-pane sliding
glass doors and windows, dock, cedar siding. Privacy brand new washers & dryers and carport im- everything! 3 Bedroom/2Bath 326 Tar- 3 Bedroom, 2 bath
abounds In this peaceful setting. Walking distance to provements. Ideal partnership investment. treet. $39 .
the Gull. New listing $159,000. Asking $408,500. pon Street. $395,000. $469,000
FRAN MAXON REAL ESTATE ANNA MARIA REALTY, INC. HORIZON REALTY DOUG DOWLING REALTY
Licensed Real Estate Broker LIC. REAL ESTATE BROKER OF ANNA MARIA, INC. Lic Real Estate Brokers of Anna Maria Island
9701 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 717 "We are on the Island!" ... since 1957 420 Pine Ave P 0 Box 155 P.O. BOX 1667 409 Pine Ave.
Anna Maria, FL 34216 9805 Gulf Drive P 0 Box 835 Anna Maria, FL 34216 Anna Maria, FL 34216
(813) 778-1450 or 778-2307 Anna Maria, FL 34216 (813) 778-2259 (813) 778-0426 FAX 778-1849 (813) 778-1222


SALES &

RENTALS


L I


YVONNE

IGGINS
IHREAL ESTATE


C-r!^Hl






h] THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 0 AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 22


Island Typing Service
Computer Operated
"I FAX Service: Send & Receive
FAX #: 778-8390
310 Pine Avenue Anna Maria 778-8390

Commercial Residential Free Estimates
Sandy' Lawn Mowing Trimming Edging
Lawn Hauing By the cut or by the month.
SService 12 YEARS EXPERIENCE INSURED
S778i1345 GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES
SAND SATISFACTION







Finishing Touches Wallpapering
YOUR PAPER HUNG WITH PRIDE & CARE
FREE ESTIMATES 778-2152



Carpentry, Concrete, Aluminum and Screening Service
Rotted Wood Repair Specialist
High in Quality Not in Price Will Beat Any Written Estimate
30 Years Exp. Call Frank 753-7757


NORTHWEST GARAGE
SPECIALIZING IN
VOLKSWAGEN AUDI SUBARU

Hours: Tues to Sat 7:30 to 5:30


Owner: Ed Panzarella
795-7772


6906 Manatee Ave. W.
Bradenton, FL 34209
(Behind Discount Auto Parts)


STATE REGISTERED CONTRACTOR State Reg. RC0043740
RESIDENTIAL ROOFING CONTRACTOR
ALL NEW WORK GUARANTEED
LICENSED INSURED
COMPLETED OPERATIONS INCLUDED
FIBERGLASS SHINGLES
MILDEW RESISTANT MATERIALS
SINGLE PLY ROOFING SYSTEMS
Free Estimates 748-3558




(tifl&



details
PERSONALIZED AUTO DETAILING








$85
CAR
CLEANING
SPECIAL *
Full car detailing including ...
WASH WAX SHAMPOO
SEngine & Underbody Cleaning & Protection
All Leather & Vinyl Conditioned
STires & Trim Dressed & MUCH MORE!
We welcome you to enjoy full auto and boat
detail service at your home or business,
by appointment completely at your convenience.
We use absolutely the finest products for
your car and for the environment. Since 1985.
For a cleaner car, call today.
We do Boats too!
CALL MOBILE SERVICE NUMBER: 356-4649
(or leave a message for Damon at 778-9392)
*$85 includes most car models.


USED BERBER CARPET (cream) 3 large rooms.
$60 each/$150 all. 778-0794 or 407-846-8741.
GREAT BEACH FURNITURE Excellent nautical
blue, striped couch/loveseat/chair. $350. Large
white pine/tile dinette set. $350. 778-1635.
MICROSOFT WORD for DOS 5.5 Never regis-
tered or used (includes Grammatik IV). Retails for
$370. $150 or make an offer. 778-9392.
BUY IT AND SELL IT! Right here in the pages of
the Islander Bystander the best news on the
island appears here every week!
WANNA SKATE? Island Rollers In Line Skates. A
relentless rush! For skating information and sales
call 778-3880.
FLATBED TRAILER Heavy duty (8' X 16'). Tan-
dem axle, surge brakes and stake pockets. Used
only once. $2600 new, asking $1300. Call daytime
749-5051/evenings 778-3880.

4 X 8 ENCLOSED UTILITY trailer. New tires and
axle. Strong I-beam construction. Great condition.
Call mobile # 356-4649 or 778-9392.

LARGE ASSORTMENT of mini blinds, verticals,
drapes and drape rods. From $2 to $25. Furniture,
wall hangings, cabinets, plants, misc. Call 778-
2656 for information.


LOOKING FOR ARTISTS and craftsmen for Oct 2
show. Entry fee $20.778-2099. Sponsored by AMI
Art League.

ART LEAGUE HAPPENINGS
Children's Multi-media Art Adventure
Aug 9-13, 10 a.m. Noon
Do Architecture, Photography, Clay, Tie-Dyeing
Call for other classes
ARTFULLY DONE GROUPER FISH FRY
Aug 28,5 p.m.-9 p.m..
All You Can Eat Live Entertainment
$7 in advance, $8 at the door; children $5
Anna Maria Island Art league: 778-2099.



MOVING SALE Washer/dryer, piano, sleep sofa,
rocker/recliner, queen bed, workbench, lamps,
clothes, etc! Everything goes! Sat, Aug 7th. 8-2.
6321 Gulf Drive, North Beach Village.


HONDA PRELUDE 1981 with 140,000 miles and
still ticking. Rusty from the beach but excellent me-
chanically. $850 firm. 778-9392.


1~I S LA N




FISHING ABOARD the "FISH HOEK" with Captain
Mitch Cockrell on 17' boat. 1/2,3/4 & full day char-
ters. Snook, tarpon, trout & redfish. 745-1361.
BAY CRUISES, Egmont Key or Sunset. Custom-
ized to you. Economical. Shaded and open deck.
Very comfortable for up to 6 persons. Call 794-
5605


SALES CLERK part-time. Apply at Anna Maria Is-
land Liquors and Party Shop in the Island Shopping
Cener. 5400 Marina Drive. 778-2023.
HOUSEKEEPER Full time. Apply in person at the
Coconuts Beach Resort. 100 73rd St, Holmes
Beach. 778-2277.
HOUSEKEEPER WANTED Reliable, non-smoker.
Harrington House Beachfront Bed & Breakfast.
778-6335.


MATURE COMPANION Do you need a mature
companion in your home? Non-smoker, island resi-
dent, cook, drive, etc. Part-time, not live-in. 778-
8216.
LOOKING FOR A JOB on the Island? Then look
right here in the Islander Bystander the best
news on the Island is here every week!



A-CLEANING SERVICE Generic pricing, quality
cleaning. Medical Attorney Commercial Resi-
dential. Bonded, Insured. 778-7231.

ISLAND GARDENER will turn your boring land-
scape into a yard bursting with blooming flowers
and color. For beautiful ornamentals, perfect for the
beach environment all summer, call 778-2260.
AUTO & BOAT DETAILING at your home, office,
or dock-at your convenience. Complete detailing
includes wash, wax, shampoo, engine & underbelly
cleaning, leather & vinyl conditioned, tires & trim
dressed and much more. Protect your investment.
Call Damon on mobile number 356-4649.

VAN-GO PAINTING 15 yrs experience. Residen-
tial/Commercial, Interior/Exterior, Pressure Clean-
ing, Wallpaper hanging. Island resident with Island
references. Call Bill Chamberlin at 778-5455.

PINE-SOL PATTY & CO We do everything! Light
cleaning, spring cleaning, WINDOWS, moving
help, organizing, whatever! Rental property our
specialty for 18 1/2 years on this island! (20% dis-
count to Tom Selleck). 778-9217.


7-
A"


I


ISLANDER I I

IF YOU SEE NEWS HAPPENING ...

PLEASE, GIVE US A CALL AT 778-7978.
If you know something that would be of interest to Islanders, don't hesitate to
call. We're interested in stories about people and events that have to do with
Anna Maria Island. Kids, adults, grandparents. From anniversary parties to
garden club meetings ... there's always something happening and there will
always be someone who wants to know about it.

Call or write:
Islander Bystander
Island Shopping Center
5400A Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
(813) 778-7978






[fl THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER 2 AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 23


JOE UNGVARSKY CONSTRUCTION. Remodel-
ing specialist. State licensed and insured. Many
island references. 778-2993.
ON THE ROCKS Bartending Services. Private par-
ties or any occasion. 794-5947.
FAT CAT HOME WATCH Will care for your home
or condo while your are away. Call Jon Kent mo-
bile #745-4723 for information.

MONTGOMERY'S CERAMIC TILE SERVICE.
Professional repairs & installation. Fully insured
and a Manatee County resident for 25 years. Call
Ken Montgomery for your free estimate today at
792-9252.

ALUMINUM VINYL INSTALLATION. Remodel-
ing & repairs. Screen rooms, soffit & fascia, roof-
overs, carports, etc. LIC #RX0051318. Insured, ref-
erences, reasonable prices. Rex Roberts 795-
3757.
PRIVATE MUSIC INSTRUCTION Piano or key-
board. Youth to adult. Enroll now. Call 778-3788 for
interview.


YES! We have yearly and seasonal rentals avail-
able. Yvonne Higgins Real Estate 778-1999.
ANNA MARIA Furnished 1 and 2BR apartment,
gulf/bay view, pool, patio. $550/$650 month in-
cludes utilities. 211 S Bay Blvd. 778-2896.

RENTALS RENTALS RENTALS
Efficiencies-1 bedrooms-2 bedrooms. Furnished
or unfurnished. Annual or seasonal. Call James W
Green Real Estate. 778-0438.

GULF VIEW 7th St S, Bradenton Beach. 2/1, fur-
nished with washer/dryer. 778-5458.

UNFURNISHED ISLAND RENTALS
Bayfront Executive Home-Key Royale
3/2, pool, dock, $1600-$1800.
Large family home
4/3, pool, deep water, $1500.
307 57th St, 3/2.
Island in the Sun 1 Months rent FREE,
2/2, pool, $600.
Gulf Gardens-2/2, $525.
604 North Shore 1/1 $425.
Neal & Neal Rentals, Inc.
813-778-9477 or 1-800-422-6325.

CUTE 1BR apartment, fully furnished, utilities in-
cluded. $450 month. Also available 93'-94' season.
Evenings 778-4715.


$56,000 Great deal on a 1BR condo with garage,
tile floors, newer appliances, neat and clean.
Owner may finance. Yvonne Higgins Real Estate
778-1999.
BEAUTIFUL GULF VIEW condo with lots of ameni-
ties that make it an ideal year round home. Excel-
lent investment for $125,000. Yvonne Higgins Real
Estate 778-1999.
MOBILE HOME with cover over roof and add on.
2 Florida rooms and large front porch. View of bay.
One block to beach on island. ONLY $8,500. Must
be 45 years of age. 778-6330.
ANNUAL UNFURNISHED, over 1200 sq. ft. w/2
decks & garage. 2/2, 1 blk. from beach. $700 mo.
Gulf-Bay Realty. 778-7244 or 778-2151.
RIVER FRONT LOT 100 x 200 ft. 10 minutes to
Downtown Bradenton. $45,000. Call 778-7980.
BY OWNER Perico Bay Club, 2 bedroom, 2 bath
townhouse with loft. Ceramic tile throughout lower
level. Asking $112,000. 792-2841.
CANAL FRONT LOT for sale by owner. Corner of
Tern & Gladiolus, Anna Maria. $99,000. Nego-
tiable. 778-4084.


LOW COST health insurance. $10,000,000. On the
job coverage, small groups, prescriptions included.
Preferred provider hospitals. Over 10 years expe-
rience. Call 778-2324.


FROM PRIVATE jets around the world and 3 day
gambling sprees to cruises to exotic ports. We al-
ways aim to please! Call your Great Escape Artist
- Dolores today 778-6177.


WATCH FOUND in Anna Maria laundromat.
Owner call T. H. Cole at 778-2422.


DEADLINE: MONDAY for Wed. publication. Up to
3 line minimum includes approximately 21 words
- $3. Additional lines $1 each. Place in person at
the office, 5400A Marina Drive, between D. Coy
Ducks and the laundromat. More information: 778-
7978.
ISLANDER BYSTANDER ADS really get results!
You can buy it, sell it, rent it, and even book a char-
ter cruise for just $3.00 a week. Ask Montgomery
Tile about the great results from their service ad. Is-
landers read their local news and call for service
from advertisers in the paper they can trust.


p U


6^tNNtSSY A~l,

"The Professional, Full-Time Wedding and Party Specialist"
MEET OR BEAT PRICE (813) 758-7276







Anna Maria Pest Control

CALL (813) 778-1630
LIe. No. 4467

CAnMna Maria Laundromlat
9906 GULF DRIVE ANNA MARIA
In the Anna Maria Post Office Plaza
OPEN 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK


Elaine is still here ...

Painting by
Elaine Defenbaugh
"Professional Excellence"
INTERIOR & EXTERIOR
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
Serving the Islands Since 1969
Licensed and Insured
778-5594 778-3468


Bringman Roofing, Inc.
1111 29th Ave. W., Bradenton 34205
Genstar, Elk and GAF Shingles


778-3924 or 778-4461
"Remember, it pays and saves to get a second estimate."
5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach (RF0038118)


.O1 KWi GLASS

S EVERYTHING IN GLASS!
Mirrors Tabletops
Windows & Screens
/ Boat Windows
Residential & Commercial
Sales & Repairs

5347 GULF DRIVE NORTH HOLMES BEACH
(813) 778-7808


J.R.

Painting

* Interior/Exterior
20 Years
Experience
Husband/Wife
Team
* Free Estimates


778-2139


Improve

your

business

weekly!
This ad in the
Islander Bystander
costs as low as
$12.11
weekly
... and you will really
get results.


IISLANDERD I


HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

THE DEADLINE IS NOON ON MONDAY FOR WEDNESDAY'S PAPER
Classifieds need to be placed in person at our office after all, who can afford to
invoice for our low fee of $3.00? Our office is located at 5400A Marina Drive, in the
Island Shopping Center, Holmes Beach. We're on the corner between D. Coy
Ducks and the laundromat. Hours 8 to 5, Monday thu Friday, Saturday 9 to 2.

CLASSIFIED RATES:
Minimum $3.00 for up to 3 lines.
Additional lines: $1 each, Boxes $1,
Headlines 100 per word.
For more information, call 778-7978.


- .._....






IM THE ISLANDER BYSTANDER M AUGUST 5, 1993 M PAGE 24