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Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992). January 5, 2005.
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00421
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992). January 5, 2005.
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 05-30-2012
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00421

Full Text



Storm

Avengers.

Special


weekly I
by FPA
AMI Chamber of
Commerce Medium
Business of the Year


5Turtle
crawls.

Page 16


VOLUME 20, NO. 30


Kids

Day.

Page 28


MAY 30. 2012 FREE


E PREPARED. HAKE A PLAN. 3
.--.a- -- -, -".%
Astheworldterns
weather the storm.
Page 6

11 123


Anna Maria and Bra-
denton Beach election
news. Pages 2-3

Seats change on TDC.
Page 4




--- I

BB pier work moves
forward. Page 5

Coquina concession
opens. Page 8

Streetlife
Police Beat. Page 9

Islan t
happenings
Pages 10-11

HB stormwater proj-
ect delays. Page 12

HB does flip-flop on
pool rule. Page 14

HB code board stays
viable. Page 15

Turtles warm up.
Page 16

HB expresses FAR
concerns. Page 17

S h@el
Happenings at AME.
Pages 18-19

Basketball season
winds up to playoffs.
Page 20

Tarpon season heats
up. Page 21

Orchestra founder
Bartelsman dies in
Amsterdam. Page 22

slage 23Biz
S-Page 23


Holmes Beach takes neighbors to court


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
Two neighboring cities on Anna Maria
Island and the mobile home park that separates
them are now on a path to the courthouse over
rights to 27th Street.
The city of Holmes Beach filed an action
for declaratory relief May 24 against the city
of Bradenton Beach and Sandpiper Resort
Co-op Inc., 2601 Gulf Drive N., asking the
court to decide the ongoing border dispute.
Twelfth Judicial Circuit Court Judge Diane
Moreland was assigned to the case and issued
summonses to the defendants May 24.
In the action, Holmes Beach requests the
court void the 2008 quitclaim deed Bradenton
Beach used to transfer the 27th Street property
to Sandpiper, a nonprofit association of mobile
home owners in Bradenton Beach. It also asks
the court to declare the 27th street right of way
to be a public street.
The portion of the platted street in dis-
pute runs east of Gulf Drive to Sarasota Bay
along the northern border of the Sandpiper,
and mostly has been used for parking by the
mobile home park residents.
Among the allegations in the complaint,
signed May 22 by Mayor Rich Bohnenberger,


include the city's contention that Bradenton
Beach improperly relied on a state law that
allows municipalities to re-convey property
because the rights of way "were never conveyed
to Bradenton Beach."
In addition, the lawsuit states that when Bra-
denton Beach enacted its ordinance authorizing
the quitclaim, "there was evidence that portions
of the rights of way, specifically the north 30


The city of
Holmes Beach
is taking a path
to the court-
house over 27th
Street, which
lies north of
the Sandpiper
Resort driveway
pictured here,
at the border
with Bradenton
Beach and the
mobile home
park. Islander
Photo: Rick
Catlin


feet of 27th Street ... were improved and had
been used for right-of-way purposes, including
vehicular use, pedestrian use and utility use for
decades."
Before the city of Bradenton Beach authorized
the quitclaim to Sandpiper, Holmes Beach con-
tended the conveyance was improper in a Dec. 3,
2008, letter to the city of Bradenton Beach.
PLEASE SEE COURT, PAGE 2


Art league closure temporary, donations sought


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Island Art League president
Laura McGeary told artist Rob Reiber May 26
at the gallery, that "nothing is canceled."
She quickly corrected herself to say the
children's summer art camp has been can-
celed, but even that may be resurrected if she
can find volunteers to put it on.
The gallery and art league facilities at 5312
Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, were abruptly
closed May 19, when then-executive director
Christina Reginelli resigned, put notices on
the doors stating "closed until further notice,"
and locked the doors behind her.
McGeary was at the league facilities last
week to make arrangements with artists who
need to collect their artwork from a recent
show at the gallery.
McGeary said artists were scheduled to
collect work May 29-30.
She said artists also may contact her to
arrange picking up their work.
Last week, the signs posted on gallery
doors that first read "closed" were changed
to "on vacation." Also last week, the league's
website was updated, cancelling all classes
and workshops "until further notice," includ-
ing Kids Camp 2012.
While McGeary said she would not com-
ment further on why the league closed its
office and facilities or any plans to reopen the
art center, she stood by her previous comments
that the league closure is not permanent.
She sent a statement last week saying the
league is 'h u_',lini' financially and is need of
assistance.


Anna Maria Island Art League president
Laura McGeary waits May 26 in the doorway
to the gallery, 5312 Holmes Blvd., Holmes
Beach, which closed May 18. McGeary was
awaiting artists to collect work from the recent
show. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy

"Together," she said, "we can keep the art
league you've appreciated and helped by volun-
teering, open and growing."
She said donations $25, $50, $100, or
more "can help make this happen."
McGeary urged donations be made quickly,
setting a deadline of June 16. She asked checks


be mailed to the art league address, 5312 Holmes
Blvd., Holmes Beach FL 34217.
She also suggested that anyone wish-
ing to make a larger donation should call her
directly.
She said assistance is needed to "continue
providing the community visual arts educational
resources and numerous events."
The league has a 22-year history on Anna
Maria Island, showcasing local talent, offering
art classes, camps and workshops.
It also sponsors two art and craft festivals
each year at the Holmes Beach city field that
draw crowds of 10,000 or more eventgoers,
Winterfest and Springfest, which, according to
the league's website, provide funds for the art
center and its scholarship program.
McGeary said the two annual festivals put
on by the art league not only help sustain the
league and its scholarship programs, but also
benefit the participating artists and the commu-
nity.
The league's landlord, artist Richard
Thomas, also said he expected the closure to be
temporary. He declined further comment.
Reginelli recently told The Islander the
league board met May 16, and she believed there
were financial problems. She said she resigned
May 18 and posted the signs on the door.
Several board members also told the news-
paper they had resigned, but declined to com-
ment on the closure.
"When there needs to be an announcement,"
McGeary said of the league reopening, "it will
be made."
McGeary can be reached at 941-704-3708
or 4art4ever@gmail.com.





2 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER

AM election toss up: Mattick mom no, daughter maybe


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The announcement last week by Anna Maria Com-
missioner Jo Ann Mattick that she would not seek a fourth
term in office, coupled with Mayor Mike Selby's earlier
statement he would not run for another term, has left the
race wide open for one of the two commission seats and
the mayor's office in the November election.
And there appear to be a few people interested in run-
ning for either position, including Sandy Mattick, Com-
missioner Mattick's daughter, who was unsuccessful in
her 2010 bid for the mayor's office against Selby.
Janet Aubry, wife of former Com-
missioner Gene Aubry, who also has
.P- picked up an election packet, said Mat-
tick asked her to get two packets for
"1 "! her from city hall. Janet Aubry said she
did not know why Mattick wanted two
Jo Ann Mattick packets.
Efforts to reach Sandy Mattick for com-
ment on her possible bid for office were
unsuccessful before press time for The
Islander.
Incumbent Commissioner Chuck
Webb has picked up his qualifying
packet and said he will run for a third
Sandy Mattick term.
Environmental education and
enhancement chair Billy Malfese has
a packet, but efforts to reach him for
comment were unsuccessful.
Gene Aubry served as commis-
sioner from September 2010 to Novem-
ber 2011, but did not elect to run for
Aubry a second, full term last November.
Aubry was elected 363-333 over Com-
missioner Harry Stoltzfus in a special September 2010
election that also saw Stoltzfus recalled from office.
Aubry said he has not made up his mind to run for
commissioner as he must consider his workload as an
architect against commissioner duties.


On Friday, May 25, Commissioner SueLynn who
is not up for re-election picked up two packets.
Efforts to reach SueLynn to determine if she was
planning to give up her commission seat to run for the
office of mayor, or who she pulled packets for also were
unsuccessful before press deadline.
SueLynn was mayor of Anna Maria
from 2002-2006.
As a sitting commissioner, Sue-
Lynn could run for the office of mayor,
but would have to resign from the com-
Webb mission before seeking the office.
Another potential commission
S candidate is planning and zoning board
member Nancy Yetter, who said she is
Sc "seriously considering" running for the
office of mayor, but has not yet made a
decision or picked up a packet.
Yetter was unsuccessful in her 2011
SueLynn bid for a commission seat.
Anna Maria city clerk Alice Baird
said anyone could pick up a packet for
himself, herself, or someone else. What
counts is who has qualified for the elec-
tion by the deadline noon, Friday,
June 8.
S... | There are now seven election quali-
Yetter fying packets circulating in Anna Maria
for three positions up for election in the
November city vote.
Baird said she would get more election packets from
the Manatee County Supervisor of Elections after hand-
ing out four packets May 25.
"I started with eight and only have one left, so I better
get more right away," Baird said.


I Anna Maria city election qualifying
began May 29. Bradenton Beach and
Holmes Beach begin qualifying June 4.


When a candidate does qualify for the election in
Anna Maria or any county office, that person's name will
be posted on the supervisor of elections website at www.
votemanatee.org in the candidates section.

COURT CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
Holmes Beach commissioners dropped the matter
shortly after the letter was sent, but again addressed it
last summer when the Sandpiper erected a fence, installed
gates and posted "no trespass" signs along the border.
In October, Holmes Beach instituted a state pro-
cess required before one municipality sues one another,
attempting to settle the matter with Bradenton Beach.
However, the process stalled in February after the two
governmental entities could not resolve the deed to the
Sandpiper. Further frustrating officials was the fact the
Sandpiper was not compelled to participate.
During the conflict resolution process, Bradenton
Beach representatives alleged Holmes Beach had no
standing in the matter. Bradenton Beach Mayor John
Shaughnessy maintained that no part of the subject prop-
erty was within the jurisdiction of Holmes Beach.
Recent attempts by Holmes Beach Commission
Chair David Zaccagnino to resolve the matter with Sand-
piper officers were reportedly made and rejected. At a
March 27 city meeting, Holmes Beach commissioners
gave Sandpiper two weeks to notify its residents, hold a
meeting and make a decision as to whether it will pursue
a quitclaim of the property.
In April, the Sandpiper owner's association president
Doug LeFevre was waiting for Holmes Beach's formal
settlement offer to resolve the dispute, but, he said, the
association had never received such an offer in writing.
In addition to asking the court to declare 27th Street
a public street, the city of Holmes Beach also is asking
Sandpiper be ordered to remove the gates and "private
property" signs from the fence, and also remove a portion
of the fence to provide access from an adjoining alley to
27th Street.
At press time for The Islander, neither LeFevre nor
Shaughnessy returned calls to comment on the lawsuit.


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THE ISLANDER U MAY 30, 2012 E 3

1 of 2 BB commissioners ready for re-election bid


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
With time starting June 4 for candidates in Braden-
ton Beach to collect signatures and file papers with the
Manatee County Supervisor of Elections Office to qualify
for the Nov. 6 election, only incumbent Ward 4 Commis-
sioner Jan Vosburgh has filed.
Vosburgh and Ward 2 Commis-
sioner/Vice Mayor Ed Straight are up
for re-election in November, and while
Straight has not yet filed, his run is
"likely," he said.
"It's very likely, but I'll discuss
Vosburgh it with (wife) Gail first," said Straight,
who operates Wildlife Inc., a wildlife
i 1 rehabilitation center from his home in
Bradenton Beach.
"The only reason I wouldn't is
because we are so busy (at Wildlife),"
he said. "But I enjoy it very much. I
know controversial things come up
Straight and there are times when you make a
decision based on what the people you
serve want. There are also times you base a decision on
what you know is best, and you hope to God you know
the difference."
Straight was elected to office in 2010, but is no
stranger to public service. He was in public safety for 29
years, including serving as EMT chief for 13 years and
chief of the Manatee County 911-emergency center for
seven years.
Straight also was a reserve Manatee County Sheriff's
Office deputy for 27 years, retiring in 2010 to run for his
seat on the commission.
Vosburgh was first appointed to her Ward 4 com-
mission seat in June 2010 when former Mayor Michael
Pierce resigned. Bob Bartelt then vacated his Ward 2
seat to fill the mayor's slot, and Vosburgh served out the
remainder of Bartelt's term. She was elected to office in
November 2010, beating out mooring committee member
Michael Harrington.
Vosburgh refers to her residency in Bradenton Beach


as a blessing and her opportunity to serve the residents
of Ward 4 as "an honor and a privilege."
She is a successful businesswoman, who owned and
managed a furniture and appliance retail business for 28
years in Utah, and has served on two Bradenton Beach
committees and private condo boards.
She has lived in Bradenton Beach for 10 years and
has been a property owner in the city for 24 years. She has
many business and personal accolades, including being
named Utah Citizen of the Year.
She has posted a website at www.janvosburgh.com
and a slogan, "Taking Action, Getting Results."



RVf 4FRAI N


iF f ll


She lists lowering taxes, remaining fiscally respon-
sible, protecting property rights, streamlining city ordi-
nances, and maintaining the charm and uniqueness of
Bradenton Beach as her top priorities.
The last day for voter registration for the Nov. 6 elec-
tion is Oct. 9.


Meetags
Anna Maria City
June 13, 6:30 p.m., environmental enhancement
and education.
June 14, 6 p.m., city commission work session.
June 18, 2 p.m., Island Transportation Planning
Organization.
June 20, 2 p.m., Barrier Island Elected Officials.
June 28, 6 p.m., city commission.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, 941-708-
6130, www.cityofannamaria.com.

Bradenton Beach
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N., 941-
778-1005, www.cityofbradentonbeach.org.

Holmes Beach
June 12, 7 p.m., city commission.
June 26, 7 p.m., city commission.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive, 941-
708-5800, www.holmesbeachfl.org.

Manatee County
June 5, 9 a.m., county commission.
June 19, 9 a.m., county commission.
Administration building, 1112 Manatee Ave. W., Bra-
denton, 941-748-4501, www.mymanatee.org.


Sarasota master gardeners, trained in horticulture by West Manatee Fire Rescue
the University of Florida Extension Service, visit the June 21, 6 p.m., district commission.
Florida Maritime Museum May 22 for a picnic and Administrative office, 6417 Third Ave. W., Bradenton,
tour. Tours are free for schools, groups and organiza- 941-761-1555, www.wmfr.org.
tions. Islander Photo: Karen Riley-Love Send notices to news@ islander.org.


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4 E MAY 30, 2012 U THE ISLANDER

County names new TDC members


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
The Manatee County Board of Commissioners voted
to appoint Holmes Beach Commissioner Jean Peelen May
22 to the Tourist Development Council. Peelen will take
the seat June 1 from 12-year TDC member/Holmes Beach
Commissioner Sandy Haas-Martens.
The TDC is a county advisory board that makes
recommendations on how to spend the 5 percent tourist
development tax, also known as the bed tax, collected on
S1 short-term rental properties nearly
$7 million in revenues countywide last
J year.


Peelen


"I'm very excited," Peelen
said after her appointment. "I'm very
honored to be appointed, and look for-
ward to representing the islands and
the city."


Dick Motzer and wife Margie Motzer, left, and others
discuss local issues with Holmes Beach Commissioner
Jean Peelen, right, at a May 24 coffee. Peelen began
hosting gatherings to hear concerns from her constitu-
ents. She plans more coffee-with-the-commissioner
events 10 a.m.-noon June 7 and June 21. Islander
Photo: Kathy Prucnell

could provide a fresh perspective "to help us alleviate
the critical mass and keep the product we're all trying to
promote."
Since December, Zaccagnino has been lobbying the
TDC and county officials to address the impact of tourism
on Island infrastructure and city services.
He repeated his concerns last week, telling county
commissioners that while Holmes Beach received $1.9
million in property taxes, the city's rental property owners
paid "the same amount of money" in resort tax dollars to
the TDC.
In addition to the $1.9 from Holmes Beach,
approximately $2.34 million in resort tax was gen-
erated from unincorporated Manatee County, $1.12
million from Longboat Key, $728,000 from Braden-
ton Beach, $484,000 from Anna Maria and $303,000
and from the city of Bradenton, according to TDC
records.
After the meeting, at-large Commissioner Carol
Whitmore, who also serves as the TDC chair, said Zac-
cagnino's comments may have swayed the commission
to select Peelen.
Whitmore recommended Peelen to the county board,


Haas-Marten's four-year TDC
term expires June 1, and although she sought to retain her
seat, it drew competition from Peelen as well as Longboat
Key Commissioner Hal Lenobel.
While saying she was disappointed not to be return-
ing to the TDC, Haas-Martens, who first joined the
council in 2000, expressed pride in her TDC work and
affirmed her run for re-election as a city commissioner
in November.
Before the county board's 4-3 vote, the chair took
nominations for all three contenders from the floor and
public comment from Holmes Beach Commission Chair
David Zaccagnino.
With an influx of visitors this season on Anna Maria
Island, Zaccagnino said, tourism "is reaching critical
mass." He pointed to Manatee County Area Transit fig-
ures to support his claim.
Thirty-five percent of the MCAT riders are from
Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key since October, he
said, adding the transit system recorded 65,000 Island
trolley riders in the month of March.
In comparison, Anna Maria Island is approximately
3 square miles and Longboat Key is 4 square miles with
only 40 percent of the key in Manatee County, according
to the Sarasota/ Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organi-
zation. County and census records show Manatee County
has 741 square miles.
Zaccagnino said he supported Peelen for the TDC
because "it's time to make a change," and he said she


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saying she "wrote Title IX," and describing her as a
"smart woman."
Whitmore said, "As much as I love Sandy Sandy
helped me open my first bank account I never got a
report from her on what's going on at the TDC" during
her time on the TDC, which included some years when
Whitmore was mayor of Holmes Beach.
Haas-Martens received support from Commissioners
Joe McClash, also an at-large representative, John Chap-
pie of Bradenton Beach, District 3, and Larry Bustle,
District 1, who praised Haas-Martens service before the
4-3 vote.
In addition to Whitmore, Commissioners Robin
DiSabatino, District 4, Donna Hayes, District 5, and
Michael Gallen, District 2, voted for Peelen.
The county board also appointed Bradenton Mayor
Wayne Poston, replacing Bradenton Commissioner
Harold Byrd, to the city's seat on the nine-member TDC
board.
After the meeting, Whitmore said, "It was a very hard
decision for me. Jean lobbied us better."
She also noted that Peelen's efforts attending TDC
meetings and talking directly to county commissioners
likely contributed to her appointment. Peelen might
disagree with her on some issues, she said, but she may
also provide "a breath of fresh air" on the council.
Whitmore said while she didn't believe the TDC
could assist with city services and infrastructure as
requested by Zaccagnino, the TDC could help in other
ways.
The TDC received letters in support of Peelen for the
appointment from Zaccagnino, two Bradenton Beach city
commissioners, Bradenton Beach Mayor John Shaugh-
nessy and Anna Maria City Commissioner SueLynn,
according to Whitmore.
Whitmore said the TDC received a letter in support
of Haas-Martens from Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Boh-
nenberger.
In addition to beach renourishment for Anna
Maria Island and Longboat Key, the TDC supports
the Bradenton Area Convention and Visitors Bureau,
the Manatee Convention Civic Center, Crosley Estate,
McKechnie Field and a host of publicity and marketing
projects.
The next meeting of the TDC will be 9 a.m. Monday,
June 18, at the county administrative building, 1112 Man-
atee Ave. W., Bradenton.


Mi decor treasures kitsch & such


collectibles, antiques, furnishings,
local art and Island memorabil-
lia.... and a portion of proceeds
helps send relief to Haiti....
THe Islander
Find us! 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, 941 778.7978




THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 5 5

Engineering study approved for Bridge Street pier


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Bradenton Beach commissioners approved a $14,000
expenditure at the May 15 community redevelopment
agency meeting to begin the engineering study for the
Historic Bridge Street Pier reconstruction project.
Police Chief Sam Speciale, also the city pier team
facilitator, addressed the CRA to "finally open the gates
and get this thing going," he said.
The city pier team members have focused on the pier
project since March, and are spearheading the planning
phases of the project, which then must come through the
CRA, the agency funding the project.
The project will consist of replacing 151 pilings, as
well as the replacement of the pier's wood decking.
Commissioner Gay Breuler motioned to approve the
engineering study costs. Commissioner Ric Gatehouse
seconded the motion, which passed unanimously.
Following the CRA meeting, commissioners recon-
vened for their capital improvement projects meeting.
Bradenton Beach Police Lt. John Cosby announced
that most of the projects that led to CIP forming in Febru-
ary 2011 have been completed.
"I'm happy to tell you that every project on our list
is completed," said Cosby. "There were some projects
that have been our list since the late '90s."
Cosby also announced that plaques acknowledging
the work of Manatee Technical Institute students will be
placed on the two trolley shelters they built. The students
will be invited to an upcoming commission meeting to


be officially recognized for their contribution.
CIP continues to work on pending issues such as
where to place two new signs welcoming visitors to Bra-
denton Beach.
Cosby said CIP has been working for some time with
a private landowner for an easement to place a sign in a
preferred location, but have continued to run into snags
over legal language.
City attorney Ricinda Perry continues to work on the


~ v


i ._ +

. -, ,
_ 7-


language issues within the easement agreement, while
CIP explores other location options.
Cosby said there still are ongoing CIP matters to
address, but most of the CIP projects that "were dire"
have been completed.
"We had six ongoing projects when we started these
meetings," said Cosby. No\ unless there is something
earth-shattering, we probably don't even need to meet
next month."


The Historic
Bridge Street
Pier will soon be
scrutinized for a
pending recon-
struction project.
An engineering
study will begin
to lay out the
extent of work
to be done, but
it is expected
to include the
replacement of
151 pilings and
the wood deck-
ing. Islander
Photo: Mark
Young


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6 E MAY 30, 2012 U THE ISLANDER



r )PIi01on


A port in the storm
With apologies to the Anna Maria Island Privateers,
The Islander StormAvengers have hijacked their iconic
boat/float, The Skullywag, for a high seas adventure -
and an all-important reminder to prepare for the Atlantic
Hurricane Season.
This week, no matter how you look at the calendar,
or how you reconcile the weather patterns on your own,
or who you believe of the TV broadcasters, you can't
deny this is one fast rush on hurricane season which
officially begins Friday, June 1.
The second tropical storm in a short week formed
in the Atlantic, and while TS Alberto had little conse-
quence, TS Beryl is another story.
The storm made landfall with near hurricane-
strength winds of winds of 70 mph (74 mph earns hur-
ricane status) at about midnight Memorial Day, May 28,
at Flagler Beach, and by sunrise some 24,000 people
in north Florida and southern Georgia were without
power.
Rain bands were reaching south to Tampa Bay, and
likely will dampen a picnic or two, but were not expected
to bring severe weather to Anna Maria Island.
But Beryl was expected to bring 4 to 8 inches of
rain and as much as 12 inches to some areas of northeast
Florida. The storm surge and high tide could result in 2
to 4 feet of additional water for coastal areas.
And high surf. So the safari to Cocoa Beach and
other spots on the eastern shore in search of the perfect
wave is a must for surfers.
For folks on Anna Maria Island, Beryl brings, at
most, some small waves and a strong message, that
you can't prepare early enough for the inevitable storm.
Maybe it will result in a power or water outage for a few
days. After all, we've seen power out for up to five days
after a strong storm passed in the Gulf of Mexico.
We could have an evacuation order and still escape
major damage. The most recent storm that comes to
mind was Charley in 2004. The Island followed evacu-
ation orders and returned to downed power lines, dam-
aged trees, and some minor flooding episodes.
But considering Charley was aimed for hours and
hours at the mouth of Tampa Bay and Anna Maria Island
before making landfall to our south in Port Charlotte,
Islanders were relieved and grateful to come home.
No matter how strongly you believe a storm won't
make a hit on Anna Maria Island, or that you and your
home can weather it, you must be prepared.
Please, check The Islander Storm Avenger Guide
in this week's newspaper and online.
Be a storm-ready avenger.


.. -/ . 1 i ; I. I .


:.V Publisher and Editor ..
V Bonner Joy, bonner@lslander.org
n,. Editoria ; : '
A Kevin Cassldy, kevlnOlslander.org
Rick Catlin, rick@iselander.org
Kathy Prucnell, kathyp Olslander.org
Mark Young, marky@islander.org
V Contribubors ..
Kar enRley -
Capt. Danny Stasny, fbishOiander.org
Edna'lemann
Mike QuInn I NewsManatee.corn
V Advertising Diector
Toni Lyon, tonlislander.org -
Accounting Services
accountingoislander.org
Producton Graphics
ade@ialander.org-
Lisa Williarns, manager, Ilsaw@islander.
Janice Dingman, pier plank coordinator
classlfledslslander.org
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Urbane Boh
Ros Robert
Sharl Urbhano .'

Single copies free. Qumntiles of five or more: nsech
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PHONE 941-778-7978 toll-free fax 1-86B-, 82


TERN HER

INTO THE WIND!


. ....-


.E. ... A ... ..- --


g )Ofpjifni
: -'0Lnl,


Impuned
In the May 23 edition of The Islander, a letter to
the editor appeared in the "Your Opinion" section from
Bob Connors, a resident of the Sandpiper Resort mobile
home park, assaulting my character with misleading
innuendo to which I feel a need to respond.
The decision to recuse myself regarding the issue of
the improper conveyance of 27th Street was in response
to the u t'I.'liOin that it would preclude any potential
questions regarding whether financial gain could be
construed.
The city record will show that I stated I failed to see
the connection financially as it relates to the improper
conveyance of a public street.
The reference to the Sandpiper being forced to have
police assist in having water hoses returned is preposter-
ously misleading. In 2010, when routinely inspecting
a rental home of mine next to the resort, I found hoses
being utilized to water newly sodded grass in the adja-
cent right-of-way. I disconnected them, took them to
the Holmes Beach Police Department and asked them
to return them to the proper owner. They did, along with
advice to the Sandpiper staff regarding theft of utility
services.
The letter next states that in August 2011, I agreed
to have a fence removed that was on Sandpiper prop-
erty. The entire issue of the improper conveyance
of 27th Street and adjacent right of way, precludes
me from agreeing that the fence was on Sandpiper
property.
I disagreed. None the less, a portion of the fence
was removed from my property without permission.
Roughly four months later, when the Sandpiper told
me they still had the dismantled fence, I was indiffer-
ent as to what they might do with it, as it clearly would
serve me no further purpose. Why they chose to have
a police escort to return it to my rental home escapes
me. Their decision would certainly not have been pre-
cipitated by any actions by me.
It seems like an attempt at character assassination,


much to my chagrin.
Indeed, a dispute exists between those residents
of Holmes Beach who wish to continue to use 27th
Street, just as they have during the past 60 years, and
the Sandpiper, which appears to have taken the street
as their own private property.
It is unfortunate that Mr. Connors, in his character
assassination of me, has chosen this route to try to seek
resolution in his favor.
Those people who I have spoken to with knowledge
of both my character and facts of the issue have told me
that often in a dispute, if the facts appear to favor one
side, it is common to attack an individual.
I do not know Mr. Connors, but as he is a former
Bradenton Beach city commissioner, I am disap-
pointed to see that he feels this may be his best
approach.
Holmes Beach Commissioner John A. Monetti

Many thanks
A big thank you from Moonracer No Kill Animal
Rescue Inc. goes to everyone who helped and all those
who participated in our May 19 pet photo fundraiser.
Donations amounted to $300 for the care of our pre-
cious dogs and cats, especially to help pay for flea and
heartworm prevention. Our foster pets, Sparky, Keila
and Pee Wee Buddy, had a great time meeting everyone
and having their pictures taken.
Many thanks to Lisa Neff, Toni Lyon, Kendra
Presswood, and Cindy Reno and to The Islander for
the space in the paper and at the office!
Lisa Williams, Moonracer No Kill Animal Rescue
and Islander office manager


SFind us on


Facebook
www.islander.org


..







BSM seeks to enhance Bridge Street


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Banners, landscaping, solidifying a golf cart shuttle
service and renewing the Thirsty Thursday environment
all were goals stated at the May 17 Bridge Street Mer-
chants Association meeting at the Banana Cabana Carib-
bean Grill, 103 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach.
Much discussion focused on the association's
efforts to improve landscaping on the two Bridge Street
roundabouts.
The merchants agreed to approach the city commis-
sion with a plan to split costs, donate labor, and a plan
to maintain the roundabouts to gain city approval and
agreement to match $1,000 toward landscaping costs.
Jake Spooner, owner of the Fish Hole, wanted a
consensus among merchants on how much the associa-
tion would be willing to put toward the project before
presenting the plan to the city.
Adam Ellis, owner of the Blue Marlin restaurant,
said he was already on the May 17 city commission
agenda to submit a landscaping plan for his business
and agreed to bring up the association's plans.
Building official Steve Gilbert received a consensus
from commissioners at the May 17 commission meet-
ing to work with the merchants to solidify a plan for
landscaping improvements.
The association also continues to finalize plans to
hang decorative banners on the street's light posts.
"The artwork is still being updated," said association
president Julie Kirkwood. "I also went to the city and they
said we could go a little bigger on the size, so I got a new
quote based on the larger size and a quantity of 10 to 20,
so we need a decision on how many banners we want."
There are a total of 20 light posts on Bridge Street
and the consensus from the merchants present was to
proceed with the maximum amount for approximately
$2,100.
Kirkwood said she would have an update on the
artwork by the association's June 21 meeting to finalize
the design options.
Also updated was the association's plan to launch


a golf cart shuttle service between Coquina Beach and
Bridge Street. Bridge Street Bistro and Island Time owner
Bill Herlihy said he spoke to his insurance agent, who
advised the merchants to determine whether the pickup/
drop off points were on city or county property.
"He said once we determined that, we should try
and get the city or county to add us on a rider, which
would be far more economical," said Herlihy.
Bridge Street Market manager Melissa Enders
brought forth new discussion on Thirsty Thursday, an
event on Bridge Street where businesses offered dis-
counts to customers.
"When we first started it, it was very popular, but
has died off lately," said Enders, who noted business
participation has dropped off significantly.
"People still come down on Thursdays thinking
there is something going on and there's not," she said.
The merchants expressed interest in renewing
Thirsty Thursday activity, but took no direct action.
The next BSM meeting will be at 8:30 a.m. Thurs-
day, June 21, at Banana Cabana.

I ', '


'-"-


~,4 ~ *-

1w Cr


The roundabout at Bridge Street and Gulf Drive is
somewhat bare these days, but the Bridge Street Mer-
chants Association wants to change that with land-
scaping and other plans to enhance the Bridge Street
experience. Islander Photo: Mark Young


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 E 7


T"E Islander


Headlines from the May 29,
2002, issue of The Islander
Anna Maria Island Turtlewatch director Suzi Fox
warned Island residents living on or near the beach that
she and her volunteers would be looking for homes
where people leave their lights on after dark. Ordinances
in all three Island cities require lights out during turtle
nesting season May 1 to Oct. 1 and Fox said
violators would be cited.
Several Anna Maria residents expressed disap-
proval at a commission meeting of the proposed Villa
Rosa subdivision off South Bay Boulevard. Georgia Van
Cleave questioned ownership of the submerged lands
in the adjacent canals adjacent and she opposed a gated
community. City attorney Jim Dye told commissioners
that because the city had no site-plan review procedures
or ordinance, they had little choice but to approve the
plans or face litigation.
The Florida Elections Commission rejected three
charges against Bradenton Beach Commissioner Ross
Benjamin brought by former Mayor Connie Drescher,
whom he defeated in the November 2001 city election
for commissioner. The FEC said it found "probable
cause" on one election complaint that Benjamin did
not put disclaimers on some political material.

'I'EMPS AND DROPS ON AMI
Date Low AHigh Rainfall
May 20 69-90 0
May 21 666 91 0
May 22f 864 \ 86| ,- 0
May 23- 66 9' 0 0
May 24 72 95 0.58
May25 7&3 94' 0
May 26 72 94 0
Average area Gulf water temperature 85.5
24-hour rainfall accumulation with reading at approximately 5 p.m. daily


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8 E MAY 30, 2012 U THE ISLANDER

Officials celebrate Coquina Beach concession reopening


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
"You should have seen it before the renovation" was
a common theme amongst speakers at the May 23 grand
reopening ceremony of the Coquina Beach concession
stand.
United Park Services Inc. took over concession oper-
ations in July 2010 and, after a short time working in
the old facility, moved concession operations to a trailer
while awaiting the building's renovation.
Mark Enoch of UPS said it was worth the wait.
"It's wonderful," said Enoch. "It was no fun working
out of a trailer for the last six to eight months, but it's
been worth the wait because the old building was pretty
rough."
The concession stand will offer beachgoers plenty of
food choices, but beer and wine is off the menu, unlike
Enoch's sister operation on Manatee Public Beach, in
Holmes Beach.
Earlier this year, Bradenton Beach commissioners
rejected an alcohol permit for the stand, despite an offi-
cial request from Manatee County Parks and Recreation
director Cindy Turner and support from Manatee County
Commissioner Carol Whitmore.
Enoch said he will continue to work with the county
to alleviate the city's concerns with selling beer and wine
at Coquina Beach.
"We'll work with the county and the city to address
their security concerns," he said. "We are happy with the
building, but are hoping we will eventually get to sell
beer and wine so we can start having entertainment here
and expand the menu."
Manatee County Commissioner John Chappie, a
38-year resident of Bradenton Beach, congratulated Turner
and her department for producing a good facility.
"It was a long time coming to do this concession-
aire," said Chappie. "Manatee Public Beach was recently
named as one of the state's top 10 beaches for families
and they got that designation because of the hard work
of (Turner) and her department."
Chappie said Coquina Beach is now worthy of that
level of recognition.


"(Coquina Beach) is number one in my book," he
said. "Not only in Florida, but in the country. This is not
the end of what we are doing here. It's only the begin-
ning."
Turner confirmed that statement with a list of projects
along the beach that have been completed, and more to
come. Turner said the Gulf-side rest rooms are scheduled
to be remodeled, paving and landscaping is planned for
the bus loop and a new ship-themed playground area is
two-thirds completed.


"Since 2006, we have worked hard to significantly
improve our beaches," said Turner. "But we have a par-
ticular focus on Coquina Beach."
More than $300,000 was invested by the county
for concession renovations, including a new roof, wood
deck, wiring, expanded gift shop, an ice cream station
and much more.
United Parks Service invested an additional $50,000
in the concession interior, which features new cooking
and serving equipment.


Manatee County commissioners and officials conduct the official
reopening of the Coquina Beach concession stand May 23 with
a ceremony that included County Commissioner John Chappie
cutting a nautical rope to signify the opening.


Manatee County Commissioner and Bradenton
Beach resident John Chappie addresses a crowd
of county officials at the May 23 grand reopening
of the Coquina Beach concession stand. Islander
Photos: Mark Young


Anna Maria issues remain on hold


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
With only three of five commissioners present at
Anna Maria's May 26 commission meeting, the consen-
sus among those in attendance was a lot of work that
could have been addressed now must wait.
Commissioner SueLynn presented a proposal to
meet weekly, noting numerous issues she hopes will be
addressed expeditiously by the commission.
"We need to work on these larger homes in the city,
vacation rentals and the fact that people are buying prop-
erties in the city and doing things with them we'd rather
they not do. It's frustrating for me to hear it at every
meeting and nothing is done. Once again, a decision is
not being made," she argued.
But vice-chair Dale Woodland said he needs a better
definition of the problems.
"Right now, I can't put my finger on one thing we
need to discuss with once-a-week work sessions," he
said.
Woodland said he had no problem with meeting
weekly if there is a problem defined by the commission.
"What is it we are trying to accomplish?" he said.
Additionally, Commissioner Jo Ann Mattick told city
clerk Alice Baird she would not be back from vacation
until July 23.
Both Mattick and Commission Chair Chuck Webb
were absent from the May 26 meeting.
As vice-chair of the commission, Woodland did open
the public hearing on the ordinance for boat docks and
amendments to Chapter 90 of the parking ordinance, but
immediately suggested the hearing be continued.
"Much of the input on changes came from Chuck,
and he's not here to discuss those," Woodland said.
SueLynn said she was opposed to allowing any boat
houses or shelters on canals, while Quam said requiring
a boat house meet hurricane requirements could be an
expensive proposition for boat owners.
Commissioners agreed that angle parking should be
allowed in Chapter 90, but that was only a u'IP'.lin..
as the hearing was continued to June 28.
Commissioners also agreed that Selby should form
a historic preservation committee to determine rules and


Anna Maria code enforcement officers Diane Sacca,
left, and Gerry Rathvon listen to Mayor Mike Selby
read a proclamation at the city commission's May 26
meeting in honor of national code enforcement offi-
cers' appreciation week 4-8 June. Islander Photo: Rick

regulations and how a property might attain such a des-
ignation.
SueLynn agreed to be commission liaison to the
committee, and building official Bob Welch suggested a
staff representative be on the committee. Welch was then
delegated the job by Woodland.
SueLynn will set the meeting dates and keep the com-
mission apprised of its progress. All meetings will be
open to the public, she said.
Woodland said he didn't really want to know about
discussions, just "decisions."
Welch said he was happy to be on the committee
as he had a lot of information on how a house could
be declared historic, as well as how to renovate without
elevating a structure.
"But it's a two-sided sword," he said. "There are
pitfalls with renovations and the Federal Emergency
Management Agency's 50-percent rule."
Welch said he will present a number of options to the
committee when it meets.


Holmes Beach Commissioner Jean Peelen gave a
brief presentation on what her city is doing to encourage
historic preservation.
Among those are city taxes remaining the same for
a number of years, Peelen said. She's also working with
the county historical society, which plans to propose that
if a house is designated an historic home, it does not
pay taxes for 10 years, as long as the house remains his-
toric.
"And it's all voluntary," Peelen said. "You could give
it up at any time."
SueLynn said if Holmes Beach adopts a historic pres-
ervation ordinance before Anna Maria, the city might use
that as a guideline.
The commission's next work session will be at 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 14.

HB commissioner seeks
citizen input
Your ideas about the city of Holmes Beach matter.
Commissioner Jean Peelen hopes to hear them at her
next Coffee with the Commissioner events 10 a.m.-
noon on Thursdays, June 7 and June 21, at Paradise
Cafe, 3210 East Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.
At previous coffee events residents have shared
their ideas and concerns about flooding, city docks,
the historic homes and the proliferation of large
short-term rental houses.
She welcomes everyone to join her over
coffee.
For more information, call Peelen at 941-896-
5827.


Island watch
To report information on a felony crime, call Mana-
tee County Crime Stoppers at 866-634-TIPS.
To report information on an Island crime, call the
Manatee County Sheriff's Office Anna Maria substa-
tion, 941-708-8899; Bradenton Beach police, 941-778-
6311; Holmes Beach police, 941-708-5807.
In emergencies, call 911.










Island police blotter
Anna Maria
May 13, 500 block of Bayview Place, noise. A
Manatee County Sheriff's Office deputy responded to a
noise complaint and arrived to hear loud music and talk-
ing from the pool area. The city's noise ordinance was
explained and a warning issued. The deputy reported the
occupants to be cooperative.
May 19, 200 block of Periwinkle Plaza, noise.
While responding to a noise complaint in the afternoon,
a MCSO deputy arrived to find a man working in his
yard with music playing. The man responded by telling
the deputy the complainant is harassing him and would
seek a decibel meter. He was issued a warning.
May 18,500 block of Loquat Drive, noise. A MSCO
deputy responded to a noise complaint and arrived to
hear music and talking. The deputy reported the residents
moved indoors.
May 20, 100 S. Bay Blvd., criminal mischief. While
checking on the Anna Maria Pier, a MCSO deputy was
approached by the pier restaurant manager, who reported
someone had kicked loose a pier bench. The bench was
found floating in the water. The manager also reported a
table had been damaged. The manager reported the dam-
ages were about $100.
Anna Maria is policed by the MCSO.
Bradenton Beach
May 20, 400 Gulf Drive S., resisting arrest. Bra-
denton Beach police officers responded to a report of a


strange, but the responses were incoherent and he became
increasingly aggressive toward the officers. Police went
to place the man in custody, at which time he allegedly
attempted to pull away and tried to kick one of the offi-
cers. He was arrested for misdemeanor resisting arrest
without violence.
May 20, 1600 Gulf Drive S., damaged property.
A man attempting to launch his brand new boat at the
Coquina Beach boat ramp forgot to engage his parking
brake. As he exited his vehicle, his jeep, boat and trailer
rolled into the Gulf of Mexico. A tow truck was called.
May 23, 100 block of 112th Street South, distur-
bance. Police responded to a disturbance call where the
officer made contact with, "an emotionally distraught
woman," according to the report. The woman had a
packed bag in her hand. The report states she was upset
with her boyfriend, who had announced he was going
to Orlando to attend motorcycle mechanic school and
intended on leaving her. Good Samaritans gave the
woman $60 to stay in a hotel for the night. The man
claimed the woman had pushed him during the argument,
but did not want to pursue charges.
Bradenton Beach is policed by the BBPD.
Cortez
April 27, 4500 block of 119th Street, petit theft. A
woman reported leaving her iPhone in a public rest room.
When she returned, it was gone. The phone was equipped
with a tracking device and the woman's husband located
it at 10004 Cortez Road. The couple confronted a man at
the location, who became confrontational. MSCO was con-
tacted, but the man left the area before deputies arrived.
May 23, 12000 block of 45th Avenue, theft. An


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 O 9
82-year-old man reported someone had entered his yard
and stole a 40-inch shrimp boat propeller. A witness
reported seeing the propeller in the back of a Ford truck
that left the area.
Cortez is policed by the MCSO
Holmes Beach
May 19, 5406 Marina Drive, criminal mischief. A
Holmes Beach police officer responded to the Feast res-
taurant and observed the front window had been shattered
and a table inside the restaurant was turned over. While
investigating, a man arrived with cuts to his arm and
head, who reported that he and another male had been in
a fight and the two had gone through the window during
the scuffle. The second man was located en route to the
hospital for lacerations. The two men said they would pay
the $800 in damages to the restaurant owner, who agreed
to not pursue criminal charges.
May 20, 4900 Second Ave., suspicious circum-
stances. While conducting a traffic stop, a police officer
observed a woman "making no sense," according to the
report. The woman was mad because construction work-
ers had "no place to pee or poop" and that residents were
"stealing power from her." Police made contact with the
woman's husband who said she likely needed medication.
He arrived to the scene to take his wife home.
May 21, 3400 block of Gulf Drive, theft. A woman
reported someone stole her light gray beach bike, valued
at $260, from the side of her residence during the night.
Holmes Beach is policed by the HBPD.
Streetlife is based on reports from the Bradenton
Beach and Holmes Beach police departments and Mana-
tee County Sih, irf's Office.


man wandering around aimlessly and making incoherent
statements. Upon seeing the patrol car, the man allegedly
tried to run, but officers were able to stop him. According
to the report, police asked the man why he was acting



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10 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER


ANNA MA



Call
941.779.6

rk 7


I U


RIA ISLAND





836

-3====^- 3


Is l


I Islander


named
tops in
Pinellas
district
schools




McIntosh
Lifelong Island resident Scott McIntosh has been
named "Media Specialist of the Year" for Pinellas County
Schools, the seventh largest public school district in the
state, at an awards ceremony May 17.
He has been a media specialist in Pinellas schools
since 1999 and presently works at Bayside High School,
14405 49th St. N., Clearwater, making the weekday com-
mute over the Sunshine Skyway Bridge to his job.
Scott and his wife of 18 years, Beth, also raised on
AMI, live in Holmes Beach. He graduated from Ringling
College of Art and Design, Sarasota, and then earned his
master's degree from Nova Southeastern University, Fort
Lauderdale.






Saturday, June 2
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Island Blood Drive to benefit Anna Maria
Island Privateers, Wildlife Inc. and Anna Maria Island Community
Center, St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 941-753-1577.

Sunday, June 3
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Island Blood Drive to benefit Anna Maria
Island Privateers, Wildlife Inc. and Anna Maria Island Community
Center, St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 941-753-1577.

Off-Island:
11 a.m.-2 p.m. World Ocean Day family festival, "Oceans
of Inspiration," Mote Aquarium, 1600 Ken Thompson Parkway, Sara-
sota. Fee applies. Information: 941-388-4441.

Ongoing:
Through June 25, Cecy Richardson exhibit, Solo Gallery of
the Manatee County Cultural Alliance, 926 12th St. W., Bradenton.
Information: 941-746-2223.
Third Mondays, noon, through May, Anna Maria Island Demo-
cratic Club, BeachHouse Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton
Beach. Fee applies. Information: 941-779-0564.
Tuesday, noon, Rotary Club of Anna Maria Island meet-
ings at the BeachHouse Restaurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton
Beach. Information: 941-794-8044.
Tuesday, 12:30 p.m., duplicate bridge games at Episcopal
Church of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Infor-
mation: 941-778-3390.
Tuesday, 1-2 p.m., coffee and conversation for seniors at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna
Maria. Information: 941-778-1908.
First Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m., Pier Regulars, Rod & Reel Pier,
875 N. Shore Drive, Anna Maria.
Second Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., VFW Post No. 8199 meets
at the volunteer fire station, 201 Second St. N., Bradenton Beach.
Information: 941-778-4400.
Wednesday, 6-8 p.m., teens meet at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information:
941-778-1908.
Wednesday and Saturdays, 9a.m., players pitch horseshoes
in the pits at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
Information: 941-708-6130.
Thursday, 5-7 p.m., Thirsty Thursday hosted by Bridge
Street Merchants on Bridge Street, Bradenton Beach, Information:
215-906-0668.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m., Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island
meets at the Anna Maria Island Beach Cafe, Manatee Public Beach,
4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-761-8834.

Coming Up:
June 7, Mote Marine Science Cafe, dolphin and human nutri-


More Cortez Laundry by Cecy Richardson


Gallery opens Cortez
artist's one-woman show
Cecy Richardson, a printmaker and resident of
Cortez, is the featured artist at the Solo Gallery of
the Manatee County Cultural Alliance in the Village
of the Arts, 926 12th St. W., Bradenton.
Richardson's exhibit will be on display through
June 25.
A member of the Island Gallery West, Holmes
Beach, Richardson experiments with variety of tech-
niques and mixed media. Her favorite subjects are
lush vegetation and Florida wildlife.
Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday
through Friday, and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, and
during the Village of the Arts Artwalk. For more
information, call gallery director Carl Keeler at 941-
746-2223.

tion discussion, Half Shell Oyster House, 1991 Main St., Sarasota.
Information: 941-388-4441, ext. 172.
June 9, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Sun Coast, Cook-
ing for Kids/Summer Nights, Anna Maria Island Community Center,
407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Fee applies. Information: 941-488-
4009.
June 9, Scallopalooza, Sarasota Yacht Club, 1100 John Ring-
ling Blvd., Sarasota. Fee applies. Information: 941-953-5333.
June 17, To Inform Families First, Tampa Bay Rays Father's
Day Game fundraiser. Fee applies. Information: 941-795-1869.
June 21, Suncoast Surfrider Foundation, Summer Solstice
culinary fundraiser, Harry's Continental Kitchens, Harry's Gourmet
Deli and Take-Out, 5600 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key. Fee
applies. Information: 941-383-0777.

Save the Date:
July 4, Anna Maria Island Privateers, Fourth of July Parade
from Coquina Beach, Bradenton Beach, to Bayfront Park, Anna
Maria, and 2012 Scholarship Award Ceremony, Anna Maria Island
Beach Cafe, Manatee Public Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach. Information: 941-780-1668.
Send calendar announcements to news@islander.org. Please
include the time, date and location of the event, a brief description
and a contact via e-mail and phone.


ppeigs

Cerchio named to
dean's list
Andrew Cerchio of Holmes Beach has been
named to the dean's list at The Citadel, the Military
College of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C., for aca-
demic achievement for the 2012 spring semester.
Cerchio is a cadet seeking a bachelor's degree in
political science at the college.
Dean's list recognition is given to those students
whose grade point average is 3.2 or higher. Cerchio
and other dean's list students will be recognized in the
fall during a military dress parade.
The Citadel was founded in 1842. It is a public,
coeducational military college, focused on educating
and developing principled leaders for a strong military
and a global workforce.

Sky's the limit at VBS
With a theme of "Sky, Where Everything Is Pos-
sible with God," the Roser Memorial Community Church
summer vacation Bible school for area youth, will offer
PandaMania as part of this year's program.
The Bible school will be held 9 a.m.-noon Monday,
June 11, to Friday, June 15, at the church, 512 Pine Ave.,
Anna Maria. It will be offered to children ages 4 through
fifth-grade, while older youths are welcome to assist.
For registration and more information, call the 941-
778-0414.


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appemngs


Erin Kenney, left, a graduating
senior at Southeast High School
accepts the 2012 i'N,,/, O'Day
Memorial Scholarship from Mary
Chamber announces scholars Zion of the Artists' Guild of Anna
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce board members Mike Maria Island. Kenney plans to
Vejins, left, Karen LaPensee and Ellen Aquilina congratulate Brenda attend the Ringling College of Art
Rodriguez-Gallo, Michelle Donato and Monica "11-/.I) McDonough and Design in Sarasota. Islander
on their chamber scholarship awards. The award presentation was Courtesy Photo
made at a chamber mixer May 23 at the Village Cafe at Rosedale on
Pine Avenue in Anna Maria. Islander Photo: Toni Lyon


THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 11


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Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island members Sylvia
Price, left, Sandy Haas-Martens and Pat Whitesel
welcome Janene Witham, right, who spoke to club
members at their May 19 meeting at the Anna Maria
Beach Cafe, Holmes Beach, about the progress of the
Manatee Players in completing their new playhouse.
Islander Photo: Courtesy Dave Miner

Solstice celebration to
benefit surfriders
Harry's Continental Kitchens will celebrate the
summer solstice 6-9 p.m. Thursday, June 21, at Harry's
Gourmet Deli and Take-Out, 5600 Gulf of Mexico Drive,
Longboat Key.
Proceeds will benefit the Suncoast Surfrider Founda-
tion, a nonprofit with a mission to protect and enjoy the
world's oceans, beaches and waves with conservation,
activism, research and education.
The $25 event featuring a variety of wine from
Harry's, cocktails by Svedva Vodka and summer brews
from Budweiser will include hors d'oeuvres from
Harry's culinary team and entertainment by Anna Maria
Island musician Colton McKenna.
For more information, call 941-383-0777.

Scallopoolza will
feature speakers
The June 9 second annual "Scallopalooza-Repay the
Bay" has announced speakers for the event will be Char-
lie Hunsicker, director of the Manatee County Natural
Resources Department, and Ed Chiles, restaurateur.
Scallopalooza will be held at the Sarasota Yacht Club,
1100 John Ringling Blvd., Sarasota.
Tickets are $75 per person. A limited number of
10-person tables for $700 are available.
Proceeds will benefit the restoration of the Sara-
sota Bay scallop fishery, which has been in decline for a
number of years.
According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission, a project aimed at raising scallops
in shellfish hatcheries and releasing larvae into local sea-
grass beds as promoted by Scallopalooza may stem
the problem. Last year, Scallopalooza raised more than
$14,000.
For more information and sponsorship opportunities,
call Ronda Ryan at 941-232-2363.


Baby roots for home team
A young fan, 22-month-old Evelyn Pettigrew, daugh-
ter of Brett and Meaghan Pettigrew of St. Petersburg,
happily cheers after Tampa Bay Rays Matt Joyce grand
slam home run May 19 while attending her first home
game. The Rays went on to beat the Braves 5-2. Her
proud grandmother, Holmes Beach resident Joan Pet-
tigrew, reports Evelyn's still talking about how every-
one clapped at the ballpark that day. Islander Photo:
Courtesy Brett Pettigrew

TIFF announces Rays'
game fundraiser
Come root for the Rays on Father's Day, and help To
Inform Families First at the same time.
TIFF is a support organization that formed to partner
with the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles to pro-
mote a program that allows drivers to register their emer-
gency contact information with their driver's licence. The
information is then available to law enforcement agency
computers in an emergency.
The Tampa Bay Rays will donate $4 to help raise
awareness about this life-saving program from each $25
ticket sold for the 1:40 p.m. Sunday, June 17, game.
TIFF was the program responsible for notifying Anna
Maria Island resident Robyn Gibbons after her daughter,
Georgia Gibbons, was hit and severely injured by a car
while crossing a street in Tallahassee in April.
"Because Georgia was registered, her family was
notified much quicker than the average six hours it nor-
mally takes. This made it possible for the family to be
at their daughter's side" after the crash, TIFF founder
Christine Olson said.
For more information, call Olson at 941-795-1869,
e-mail her at christine@helptiff.org or go online to www.
toinformfamiliesfirst.org.

Click!
The Islander welcomes photographs and notices of
the milestones in readers' lives. Send notices and pho-
tographs to news@islander.org or 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach FL 34217.


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12 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER

Holmes Beach stormwater project delayed


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
"The whole town is ready for it to be over," public
works superintendent Joe Duennes said last week of the
$1.1 million stormwater project that began last year in
August.
The last major component has been installed a
replacement pipe under Marina Drive and now the
work switches to deepening swales as necessary to hold
water between Holmes Boulevard and Marina Drive,
according to Duennes.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said May 22 that the proj-
ect is expected to be complete in about three weeks, and
may come in under budget.
The project was initially expected to be finished in
March, and is a "couple months behind the target date"
due to underground conditions and utility problems,

Superintendent Steve


Konder of Woodruff
& Sons pauses to
explain the ongoing
drainage improve-
ments at Gulf Drive
near 62nd Street
in Holmes Beach.
He said he expects
the project, now in
its ninth month, to
be finished "in a
couple more weeks."
Islander Photo:
Kathy Prucnell


Duennes said.
More conflicts showed up than expected for contrac-
tor Woodruff & Sons of Bradenton, which resulted in
re-routing drainage to accommodate utilities, according
to Duennes.
Other problems encountered were dammed up and
crushed pipes and driveways that restricted stormwater
flow.
Several ruptured water lines also occurred during the
project, according to city officials and Manatee County
Utilities Department.
The stormwater project is hoped to bring relief to
flood-prone areas of the city, 59th to 64th streets between
Holmes Boulevard and Marina Drive, and also in neigh-
borhoods between 72nd and 77th streets.
It is being funded by the city's annual utility assess-
ment and the Southwest Florida Water Management


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Dog run
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24 at the new dog run amid
citizen improvements, includ-
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District. Swiftmud provides reimbursement for half the
project costs.
First phase work, mostly on 63rd and 64th streets,
was completed and paid partly from last year's budgeted
funds. Phase two is covered by $530,000 allocated in
the city's 2011-12 budget, and $530,000 from Swiftmud,
according to Duennes.


Privateers seek July 4
mates, student scholars
Consider this an early warning shot across the bow of
Skullywag, the Anna Maria Island Privateers boat/float.
The Privateer parade organizers are planning for their
Fourth of July parade and scholarship award ceremony,
and they are looking for participants.
The parade will begin at 10 a.m. in the Coquina
Beach parking lot and will traverse the Island northward
to Bayfront Park in Anna Maria. Floats and units must
be staged by 9:30 a.m. in the Coquina Beach lot.
Entry criteria also includes the following:
Applications available online identifying the
name and organization name and number of units and
participants must be submitted to the Privateers.
Floats and units are to be decorated in colors and
styles befitting Independence Day.
Signs or banners should identify the sponsor orga-
nizations.
Firing black smoke is prohibited.
Only motorized floats or units are allowed no
marching or walking.
There can be no fee charged to participate on floats
or units.
Participants must take responsibility for any damage
or injury caused by items thrown from units or floats.
Immediately following the Fourth of July Parade, the
Privateers and their ship Skullywag will make headway to
the Anna Maria Island Beach Cafe at the Manatee Public
Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach, where, starting
at noon, the Privateers will announce its 2012 scholarship
award winners at an Independence Day party.
Everyone is welcome to partake of the Privateers'
hospitality at the party.
Since 1992, the Privateer scholar program has dis-
tributed more than $196,000 in scholarships to 91 Mana-
tee County students.
To register for the parade or to obtain a scholarship
application, go online at www.amiprivateers.member-
lodge.org.
For more information, call Tim "Hammer" Thomp-
son at 941-780-1668.



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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 13

Win-win event for 3 local nonprofits, blood stock


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
Giving blood saves lives and it's especially needed
this time of year, when donors diminish with the snow-
birds and winter visitors. But from 9 a.m.-4p.m. Saturday
and Sunday, June 2-3, at St. Bernard Catholic Church,
248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach, donors also can
help save the lives of wildlife, enhance a student's edu-
cation, and help needy families get access to community
services.
An anonymous family foundation will donate $100
per donor during the 12th annual blood drive to benefit
the Anna Maria Island Privateers, the Anna Maria Island
Community Center and Wildlife Inc., a wildlife rehabili-
tation center in Bradenton Beach.
Started as a hobby in 1987 Ed and Gail Straight have
grown the center, located at their home, into one of the
area's last surviving wildlife rehabilitation centers.
Ed Straight said the economic collapse a few years
ago, combined with tightened licensing restrictions have
made it harder for new centers to open and for large cen-
ters to survive.
"Some of them were in big facilities with a lot of
overhead, so they just weren't able to make it anymore
once the grant money got cut," he said. "Fortunately, we
run this one out of our home, so we don't have that kind
of overhead, but we still have to rely on donations to
feed the animals and pay for medical care, and that gets
expensive."
Straight said he now receives calls from areas of
Florida that are much farther away than where they used
to come from, but the majority of animals in their care
still come from the Manatee/Sarasota area.
"We had more than 3,000 calls last year," said
Straight. "We've already had more than 1,000 calls this
year."
The Straights first started volunteering in 1986 at a
rehab center. A year later, Gail decided to pursue a license
and the rest is Bradenton Beach history.
rI I I


The Straights receive calls from citizens and orga-
nizations alike to help with critters that range in species
from African turtles and exotic birds and deer, to one of
their newest arrivals, a baby coyote.
Raccoons, owls, songbirds, seabirds, a red-tail fox,
baby otters and so many more injured or abandoned ani-
mals cohabitate in kennels at the facility. This time of
year is particularly busy at Wildlife Inc.
"It's baby season," said Straight. "This time of year
is when a lot of animals are having babies, so we see a
lot of cases where something happens to the mothers and
we get in the babies."
Thirty baby screech owls are currently residing at
Wildlife and not far away are a cage full of juvenile rac-
coons, two litters of opossums and three baby deer.
All around the babies are injured animals being
nursed back to health for release back into the wild,
including sandhill cranes and a variety of owl species.
Running a rehabilitation center out of their home
often brings up common questions. Ed Straight said he
is often asked what about the most unique animal they
have had at their center.
"We were asked to take care of a baby spotted leop-
ard for a couple of months and that was pretty interest-
ing," he said.
Fortunately, the Straights enjoy a good relationship
with his neighbors, which is another common curiosity.
"That's another question I often get asked," he said.
"To be truthful, our neighbors are great and they often
volunteer here. We've enjoyed a great relationship with
our community."
The AMI Privateers also benefit from the June 2-3 blood
drive with proceeds going toward the group's youth scholar-
ship fund, which helps send local students to college.
The center uses funds toward its scholarship pro-
gram, which helps reduce fees for local needy families

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who have children participating in youth sports.
When giving blood, donors will have four choices. They
can choose one of the three nonprofits and the full $100 will
be donated to that organization. Or a donor also can choose
to split the $100 donation among the nonprofit groups.

PICTURED ABOVE LEFT: Garfield, an adult screech
owl is one of Wildlife's permanent residents. He's a
favorite at school presentations because he likes to
fight with a leather glove. CENTER: Three fawns
undergo rehab at Wildlife Inc. RIGHT: Bradenton
Beach Vice Mayor and Wildlife Inc. owner Ed Straight
visit with a baby screech owl. Islander Photos: Mark
Young


90th birthday at a garden party
Bunny Lambert celebrates her 90th birthday May 16
at a summer luncheon of the Anna Maria Garden Club
at Fire & Stone Pizza in Cortez. She will celebrate
again in July at her summer home in Augusta, Maine.
Islander Photo: Courtesy Mary Manion

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
Pastor Rosemary W. Backer
Saturday 5 pm Song Service
Sunday 9:30 am Traditional Worship
Sunday Church School
., Fellowship follows Sunday Service


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i with us!
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fpOser Cmmuni Curc
Gary A. Batey, Pastor
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Celebrating 100 Years of Service in 2013
Sunday 10 AM ~ Traditional Worship
9 AM Adult Sunday School
10 AM Children and Youth Church School
941-778-0414
512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
www.roserchurch.com


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Holmes Beach 941.778.2253


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14 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER

HB commissioners flip-flop on pool rule


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
Prompted by threatening calls about its decision to
impose a one-pool-per-platted-lot limit including one
from a pool contractor who said he'd be bringing in 30
permit applications before the proposed June 1 start date
- the Holmes Beach city commission reversed its one-
pool rule at the city work session May 22.
Commission Chair David Zaccagnino said he didn't
want to see the city become the "pool police."
Contractors were looking for ways to get around
the proposed restriction, ,u,_'..,t tli n_' to him the use of an
underground connector for pools, he said. In addition, if
applications began to flood the city, Zaccagnino said he
feared the one-pool rule would place undue pressure on
the city's building department.
The pool rule was agreed to during a May 8 work
session where commissioners began sorting through
numerous focus group recommendations, looking for
ways to alleviate problems related to the city's influx of
multi-level, multi-unit rental properties.
Zaccagnino appointed commissioners to lead focus
groups earlier this year after more than 100 residents
turned out in December with complaints relating to
duplex construction and short-term rentals.
Zaccagnino said some of the callers also offered sug-
gestions to address the "noisy pool" problem without
limiting the number of pools on duplex lots.
Their suggestions included requiring fences with spe-
cial sound-inhibiting insulation, fencing pool equipment
and 6-foot-tall hedges to buffer pools. Commissioners
also discussed prohibiting pool accessories, such as water
slides and diving boards.
Zaccagnino led off the work session, following com-
ments from Kathy Morgan Johnson of 57th Street. John-
son said she believed she should have the right to develop

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her property with two pools.
But Commissioner Sandy Haas-Martens said she
understood the one-pool limit wasn't part of any focus
group recommendation.
Commissioner Jean Peelen agreed, saying it was dis-
cussed by her group, and she liked it as a possible method
to address the neighborhood-busting houses, but it was not
one of the group's recommendations to the commission.
Zaccagnino said he had summarized all focus group
recommendations for city attorney Patricia Petruff, but
the one-pool rule was "not one of them." He said he was
"blaming Patty for this one."
Peelen said, "I think this is one of Ms. Petruff's unin-
tended consequences, adding, "it's my recommendation
that we just bump it."
The commissioners agreed they should address the


Holmes Beach hires
By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger announced
last week the hiring of Lori Hill to begin training May 31
to replace city treasurer Rick Ashley.
Ashley has been city treasurer since June 1998. He
entered the Florida Retirement System Deferred Retire-
ment Option Plan September 2007 and is expected to
retire Aug. 31.
"It is hard to think of having to replace him due to
his extensive knowledge of the city's finances," Bohnen-
berger wrote about Ashley in a May 24 "City of Holmes
Beach Information Release."
"At the same time, we are very excited to have Lori
Hill joining us at the city as she comes to us with an
extensive background in cost accounting, budgeting,
accounts payable, payroll, cash analysis and banking
relations," he wrote.
A city memo regarding Hill authorizes her pay at
$30.73 hourly. According to the job description, the posi-
tion has a starting range of $56,761-63,907.
Hill has been employed as the chief financial man-
agement analyst with the city of Sarasota for the past
year and a half, according to her resume. Her resume also
includes prior stints as controller at Robinson Sports and


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underlying noise problems more directly. Commissioner
Pat Morton asked the city attorney whether the commis-
sion could "say no" to slides and diving boards.
Petruff replied that commissioners had the ability to
change regulations based on the commission's vision, but
they should have reasonable justification and address all
residential zoning districts with their proposed changes
to avoid legal challenges.
"If you have one lot, it is reasonable to have one
pool," she said, "or one pool per unit is OK."
Rules against water slides, "akin to Wet 'n Wild,"
could also be regulated, Petruff said. She also said the
city could include pools in its lot-coverage restrictions.
With respect to the one-pool rule, Zaccagnino said
he didn't want to see "one big pool with twice as many
people making twice as much noise."


treasurer-in-training
assistant controller for Centex Homes.
Hill holds a master of business administration degree
from National University, a bachelor of science in finance
from Temple University, Philadelphia, and an associate's
degree in business accounting from Middlesex County
College, Edison, N.J.
Bohnenberger, who did not return a phone call from
The Islander about the hiring last week, said in his release
Hill "will be a great addition to our staff."
Twenty-two applications were received for the posi-
tion. It was advertised in the Bradenton Herald and on
employment and government finance websites in March,
according to Bohnenberger's statement.
Four in-person interviews and several phone inter-
views were conducted, Ashley said.
According to Bohnenberger and Ashley, the hiring
decision came down to two "top candidates."
Ashley said, "I felt confident that either of these can-
didates would be great for the job."
The runner-up for the job was a certified public
accountant who held an administrative position in Con-
necticut.
Ashley said three months will be sufficient to train
Hill for the position before his last day with the city.
Ashley said earlier he entered DROP because,
"Number one, I'm eligible. Number two, I really, really
like my job and I'm not interested in retiring yet."


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 15

HB code enforcement board remains a force


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach code violators will continue to go
before local residents serving on a code enforcement
board rather than a special magistrate if the commission
stays on course.
Holmes Beach commissioners May 22 went against
a prior consensus to move forward with an ordinance to
implement a special magistrate system of hearings for
code violations.
Had the commission stayed the course, the new
system would have replaced the current seven-member
board of community members with a paid professional,
such as an attorney or retired judge as its magistrate.
But after hearing from code board members Chair
Don Schroder, Tom Creed and John Wize and alternates
Marvin Grossman and Renee Ferguson who opposed
the change, commissioners voted 2-3 to deny the special
magistrate ordinance.
Commission Chair David Zaccagnino joined com-
missioners Jean Peelen and John Monetti voting against
the magistrate ordinance. Commissioners Pat Morton and
Sandy Haas-Martens voted for the change.
Zaccagnino introduced the proposed special master
ordinance, saying it may be a way to "avoid the uneasy,
uncivil and awkward" situation of one community
member sitting in judgment of another, and Peelen
agreed.
However, after hearing from the code board mem-
bers, Zaccagnino and Peelen joined Monetti in opposing
the motion.
"I am extremely impressed," Ferguson said about the
code board she has served on since January.
Addressing previous comments about an April code
board hearing that Morton said was "not a pretty sight,"
Ferguson said, "It was not pleasant because certain things
ran amok, not because of the code enforcement board."
The April code board heard a stop work violation,
and Schroder had criticized the city for not having the
proper official at the hearing to testify.
"It's not broken," Ferguson added. "It seems to be
working very, very well."
Appointed to the code board at the same time as
Ferguson, Grossman said, "When I first heard about
going to a special magistrate, I definitely thought it was
a good idea." But after sitting on the board, he said,
"I was amazed." The board is "so concerned with the


truth." And, he said, members had no problem recus-
ing themselves when a conflict arose. He said they were
"not uncomfortable" with the notion the violator might
be their neighbor, he said.
Recently reappointed, Creed objected to the city
paying a special master when a competent code board
of citizens serves without compensation.
He said he "seriously doubted" that bringing in a spe-
cial magistrate who "doesn't know the Island that well"
could serve "nearly as well" as the current board. Creed
complimented Schroder's recent handling of a violator
who was brought into compliance.
Schroder also asked the commission to reconsider its
position, and noted the special magistrate was rejected
about five years ago.
"I was dismayed to read in the newspaper that once
again" the city was looking to disband the code board,
and "doubly shocked" because it was not based on facts,
but perception.
Never in his 14 years on the code board, Schroder
said, had there been a problem getting a quorum.
"I see both sides of that coin," Monetti said. "It
seems like the city has been more contentious than in the
past," and code board members more "likely to get beat
up by their neighbor, but it seems they're happy to take
that on."
Morton said his recommendation for the special
magistrate system was "not about our local citizenry"
and their ability to serve on the code enforcement board.
They're doing "a great job," he said, but rather it is about


a desire to protect citizens as lling, are changing."
In other business, at the recommendation of Zaccag-
nino, Petruff and Mayor Rich Bohnenberger were asked
to jump-start a resolution to flooding issues near Gulf
Drive in the southeast area of the city. Zaccagnino said
he lives in the area, and a heavy rainfall "last Tuesday
was a horror show," at 31st Street near Gulf Drive.
Joseph Snow, a resident of 31 st Street on the west
side of Gulf Drive, also told commissioners the water was
so high he was unable to park in his driveway without
having water flood into his car.
To alleviate the problem, swales need to be improved,
but first an exemption is needed from the Southwest Flor-
ida Water Management District to allow for mangrove
removal, according to Bohnenberger. He also reported
funds for the work may be available if an ongoing storm-
water project comes in under budget.
Commissioners next voted 3-2 to approve an ordi-
nance eliminating the current practice of requiring citi-
zens to swear to the truth before speaking at work ses-
sions. Monetti and Haas-Martens dissented.
The commission unanimously approved:
A mutual release of all claims in the William Sorg,
3707 Gulf Drive, fourplex code enforcement matter.
A contract between the city and Wood Dock & Sea-
wall of Bradenton to install 28 docks in three T-end canals
on Marina Drive for $58,760.
Two-year reappointments of Darcie Duncan to the
police officers' pension board of trustees and Jim Dunne
to the parks and beautification committee.


Dock it
Holmes Beach
plans to spend
$58,760 to install
and/or replace 28
city-owned docks in
three T-end canals
along Marina
Drive. The city con-
tracted with Wood
Dock & Seawall
of Bradenton for
the work. Islander
Photo: Kathy
Prucnell


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with kitchens, wi-fi, pools, beach, more!
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An Island jewel with 1950s charm and
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weddings and reunions.
941-778-5405 or 800-367-7824
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Bungalow Beach Resort
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BEAUTY & WELLNESS
Acqua Aveda Salon Spa Store
Hair, nails, makeup, skin and massage
for the bride and the entire bridal party.
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The finest wedding photography, since
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MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT
Chuck Caudill Entertainment
Beach weddings and events. DJ service,
live guitar and more from an
experienced Island professional.
CATERING
Banana Cabana
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We'll cater your affair with
Caribbean flair! 941-779-1930
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JEWELRY
Bridge Street Jewelers
The Island's full-service jewelry store.
129 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach
941-896-7800
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BRIDAL ATTIRE
The Beach Shop
11904 Cortez Rd W.
Pretty white dresses for a
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Dresses for moms, too!
Open daily.
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WEDDING/RECEPTIONS
Rotten Ralph's Restaurants
Now offering catering
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for weddings and private parties.
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16 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER

Sea turtle nesting season, weather warm up


By Mark Young
Islander Reporter
The rising sun cast long shadows onto the shores
of the Gulf of Mexico, already caressed by a calm surf
on what was a perfect May 22 morning on Anna Maria
Island.
It also was apparently a perfect night for logger-
head sea turtle nesting.
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and Shorebird Mon-
itoring executive director Suzi Fox said May 24 resulted
in 10 nests and false crawls, "a phenomenal number for
any day in May."
The Islander joined up with three-year AMITW vol-
unteer Diane McCausey, as she strolled her 1-mile section
of beach stretching from the 27th Street beach access to
near the Cortez Road-Gulf Drive intersection in Braden-
ton Beach.
McCausey moved to the Island four years ago and
almost immediately began pursuing her interest as an
AMITW volunteer.
"I followed Suzi around from festival to festival for
about a year," McCausey said with a smile. "I was pretty
determined. I've always loved nature and have been a
save-the-Earth kind of a person."
McCausey said she and other AMITW volunteers
were ready for an early nesting season, predicted and
realized after a warm winter on the Gulf Coast.
"It started pretty busy, but then kind of settled down
a bit," she said. "I think we are about back to average
after the busy start."


Sea turtle
nesting by
the numbers
As of May 19, Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch
and Shorebird Monitoring was reporting:
Documented turtle nests: 35
Number of false crawls: 33
Number of hatchlings to the sea: 0


A mother loggerhead sea turtle left tracks May 22 near
the beach access at Cortez Road and Gulf Drive. An
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch volunteer marked the
nest, which was one of four nests found on the day.
Islander Photos: Mark Young

Walking the beach in search of nests and crawls is
always unpredictable. McCausey's stretch of beach was
empty of any signs of nesting sea turtles, but just across
her section border, near the intersection of Cortez Road
and Gulf Drive, Lee and Marvin Zerkel were busy mark-
ing the first confirmed nest of the morning.
Fox soon called and reported another, and another,
and yet another confirmed nest on Coquina Beach. Walk-
ers also began reporting several false crawls, including
one of the strangest crawls Fox said she had ever seen.
On the beach near the Linger Longer resort, 302 Gulf
Drive S., Bradenton Beach, evidence of a crawl sprawled
across the white sands, directly between two canopies left
up overnight, a practice that Fox said was illegal during


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nesting season.
The crawl was several dozen yards long and led
directly up a 4-foot high dune that had eroded into an
island formation in the sand. The mother turtle circled
the dune, climbed it, and then slid down before heading
back to the Gulf.
Fox and other volunteers studied the crawl for some
time, trying to figure out why the turtle did what she
did.
"She went through a lot not to nest," said Fox, who
was upset over the two canopies which could easily have
discouraged a nesting turtle. "We'll have to come back
tonight and see what she saw to see what may have hap-
pened."
Fox and her volunteers will look from the water's
edge up to the dune from the turtle's perspective to see if
lighting or some other problem interfered with the nesting
process.
Four nests were confirmed and marked May 22. The
Coquina Beach nests get more attention than other nests
on the Island. Fox said each nest on Coquina Beach and
south of the area gets a metal cage placed over the nest.
"It's to keep predators out," she said. "The year
before last, we had a real predation problem and lost
about 50 percent of our nests to raccoons and other preda-
tors on this stretch of the Island. One of our volunteers
designed this cage, which has slots big enough for the
hatchlings to get out. We started using them last year and
we didn't lose a single nest to predation."
S- Lee Zerkel, a
section coordi-
nator for Anna
Maria Island
Turtle Watch
and li .. hnJ
Monitoring
confirms a
S loggerhead sea
turtle nesting
site by locat-
ing a pinkish,
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THE ISLANDER U MAY 30, 2012 0 17

HB commissioners air FAR concerns


By Kathy Prucnell
Islander Reporter
While more discussion is expected on focus group
recommendations, the concept of floor-area ratio to stem
the proliferation of mega-homes and duplexes in Holmes
Beach appears to be coming under the most scrutiny by
city commissioners.
Commission Chair David Zaccagnino tasked the
commissioners at the end of a work session May 22 to
"think about your FAR number and do the research"
before any future meetings.
First, though, commissioners aired their opinions on
the concept of FAR.
"There's nothing to prevent the Island from becom-
ing an Island of big houses and big rentals," said Com-
missioner Jean Peelen, who chaired the building focus
committee recommending FAR, which sets square foot-
age for a home in relation to lot size.
Zaccagnino appointed commissioners to lead focus
groups to address the short-term rental issues after resi-
dents made complaints about problems relating to duplex
parking, garbage and noise.
Commissioner Sandy Haas-Martens said incorporat-
ing FAR as part of the building code will be opposed by
those planning to develop or sell property. She used an
example of people who might inherit property, saying
if FARs are imposed, people may discover they can't
develop according to their expectations because of
changes in marketability.
Peelen countered that investors have been "busting
neighborhoods" with the duplexes.
Commissioner John Monetti said he didn't think
the answer was "slapping a blanket on all of Holmes
Beach," when the party houses are small in number. "If
we enforce our codes, you'll get rid of 95 percent of the
problem," he said.
"I don't believe it's an issue of our tourists," Peelen
said.


property rights. It's not just for developers, but also for
people who've lived in the neighborhoods."
But the R-2 area is the city's rental district, Zaccag-
nino said.
"There's another issue," Peelen said. "It's called huge
houses," and the city's comprehensive plan and commu-
nity vision plan say "we do not want that."
City attorney Patricia Petruff said FAR could be ripe
for unintended consequences, including nonconformi-
ties.
While her previous advice was that new regulations
should be imposed citywide to avoid legal challenges,
she said the city could apply different FARs per zoning
classification.
Haas-Martens asked if a house gets damaged, can it
be rebuilt without a non-conformity arising?
Petruff said "if it's an act of God" involving "a non-
conforming structure on a nonconforming lot," a FEMA
provision allows rebuilding within the same footprint "if
more than 50 percent is destroyed."
Peelen suggested commissioners first agree on the
concept of FAR, but commissioners next delved into a
database of some 758 properties, representing 80-85 per-
cent of R-2 properties.
Zaccagnino and Haas-Martens pointed to several
examples in the 21-page database that appeared mis-
takenly entered, but Terry Parker, building focus group
member responsible for creating the database said, "by
and far these are pretty accurate numbers."
Monetti next led the commission through the permit-
ting recommendations from his focus group committee,
including changes to improve procedures for posting
inspections cards on job sites and inspection boxes that
are more visible and closer to the property line.
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said the posting is already
regulated by city code.
Monetti said "our public asked for it" and "builders


are on board" with putting inspection cards in accessible
window boxes for the public to view.
Monetti also reported he was dropping a recom-
mendation on demolition or performance bonds, saying
research showed they usually don't apply to residential,
and it's an unnecessary cost.
Petruff was opposed to Monetti's group recommen-
dation for an outside engineering firm to review plans
and inspection.
"I don't believe our department made any errors,"
she said. "I don't know why you would want this unless
there's an issue. I believe (public works superintendent)
Joe (Duennes) has more certifications and licenses than
anyone on the Island."
She also said the building department has recently
adopted a policy change, and now the public works super-
intendent goes to all construction sites. She said building
inspector Bob Shaffer does the initial inspection, Duennes
does the second and both do a third.
The next work session when short-term rental recom-
mendations will be on the agenda is following the regular
commission meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 5, at city
hall, 5801 Marina Drive.

Community notices, events
Attention community Islanders: The Islander wel-
comes notices of your club and organization events,
happenings and projects on Anna Maria Island and
encourages you to submit photographs.
Wedding and engagement announcements are
welcome, as are photos and announcements for mile-
stones in the lives of Islanders. Graduation photos are
welcome.
Send news and photos with detailed captions to
news@islander.org or 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach FL 34217.


Commissioner Pat Morton agreed. i-
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18 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER

AME third-graders star in historic presidential roles


ABOVE, FROM LEFT: Roman Langley portrays the
portly 27th U.S. President William Howard Taft May
24 in the Hall of Presidents presentation in the audi-
torium at Anna Maria Elementary School, 4700 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. Cierra Buff dresses the part as
the proper Betty Ford. Mary Gracy Cucci, enjoys jelly
beans made famous by President Ronald Reagan. Sam
Howells and Rain Cooper pose as George and Martha
Washington. Third-graders each chose a president or
first lady from names in a hat, wrote a paper, created a
three-dimensional project, prepared a costume and gave
a presentation highlighting their historical figure.

LEFT: Third-graders take the stage as the Hall of Presi-
dents May 24 in the auditorium at Anna Maria Elemen-
tary School. Islander Photos: Karen Riley-Love


See u ext year


S @l e.


ids!


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Choose one from each of the following:


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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 19

K-kids take center stage in 'Jungle Book Tonight'


May 30
May 3
June 1,
June 4,
June 5,
rant.
June 7,
Have a g


AM E Calendar CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Peacock si,i, ,1,
0, Battle of the Books contest. Gollamudi performs in "Jungle Book Tonight," the
1, third- and fourth-grade awards. kindergarten class play staged May 22 at Anna Maria
fifth-grade awards, early release 1:15. Elementary School, 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
Field Day Blake Copeman welcomes the audience. Juliet Greene
Fifth-grade luncheon, BeachHouse Restau- delights in a butterfly transformation. Butterflies dance
around caterpillars in the kindergarten play. The kin-
Students last day, early release 1:15. dergartner class cast poses with staff on stage May 22
great summer kids! following the play. Islander Photos: Karen Riley-Love


AME is at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. For more
information, call 941-708-5525.


See u ext year ids!



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20 E MAY 30, 2012 U THE ISLANDER

Youth basketball seeds set for playoffs


By Kevin P. Cassidy
Islander Reporter
The regular season of the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center's youth basketball season has come to an
end, but the games are not over. Opening-round playoff
contests are set in two of the center league divisions, the
8-10 and 11-13 age groups.
The championship game match up is set in the 14-17
division with top seed, undefeated Dips Ice Cream taking
on No. 2 seed Anna Maria Oyster Bar at noon, Saturday,
June 9.
Oyster Bar got there on the strength of a 45-42 play-
off victory over Integrity Sound May 21. Ryan Gilman
led the Oyster Bar with 16 points, while Max Miller fin-
ished with 13 points and 13 rebounds. Neahmiah Goode
added 14 points, including a pair of 3-pointers in the
victory.
Burke McCampbell-Hill scored 19 points and Joey
Carder added 11 points to lead Integrity Sound. Pierce
Hogan scored 8 points and grabbed a team-high 13
rebounds in the loss.
Beach Bistro grabbed the top spot in the 8-10 divi-
sion with a 7-1 record and will play fourth-seed Walter
& Associates at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6. Second-seed
Gettel Toyota will take on third seed Island Real Estate
in the following game with the winners meeting for the
championship game 10 a.m. Saturday, June 9.
Top seed in the 11-13 division is Walter & Asso-
ciates, which gets a bye into the semifinals along with
second-seed Holy Cow Ice Cream. No. 4 seed Eat Here
faces fifth-seed Sandbar Restaurant at 6 p.m., Tuesday,
June 5, while No. 3 seed Ross Built takes on sixth-seed
Southern Greens at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 6
Eat Here tuned up for the 11-13 division playoffs
with an easy 48-17 victory over Southern Greens May
23. Jordan Cooly scored 14 points and Adam Clark added
12 points and grabbed 15 rebounds to lead the Eat Here
scoring effort. Michael Latimer chipped in with 10 points,
while Brooke Capparelli finished with 7 points and five
rebounds in the victory.
Andrew Zink paced Southern Greens with 10 points
and nine rebounds, while George Lardas added 4 points
and 12 rebounds in the loss.
Walter & Associates defeated Sandbar 50-34 in the
second 11-13 division game of the evening behind 18
points and 10 rebounds from Seth Walter and 16 points
and 12 rebounds from Jack Walter. Mark Fields added 14
points and 20 rebounds to round out the Walter victory.
Corey Jacques led Sandbar with 20 points, while

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Dayton Modderman finished with 8 points and 11
rebounds in the loss.
Holy Cow Ice Cream defeated Ross Built 43-26
to complete 11-13 division action for the evening.
Moriah Goode and Trent Boring both scored 12 points
and grabbed 11 rebounds to lead Holy Cow, which also
received 8 points from Rory Houston in the victory.
Jake Ross scored 11 points and Matthew Manger
added 9 points and grabbed five rebound to lead Ross
Built, which also received 6 points from Andrew Ross
in the loss.
Walter & Associates earned its first victory on the
season when they edged Island Real Estate 8-6 during
8-10 division action May 21. Joey Theil led Walter &
Associates with 4 points and five rebounds, while Anni
Walter and Tori Walter both scored 2 points. Tori Walter
also grabbed a team-high 10 rebounds.
Daniel Sentman, Thomas Heckler and Shelby
Morrow each scored 2 points in the loss.
Beach Bistro defeated Gettel Toyota 12-7 in the
second 11-13 game of the evening. Jack Groves scored
6 points and Luke Marvin finished with 4 points to lead
Beach Bistro, which also received 2 points from Franklin
Valdez in the victory.
Anna Pears led Gettel Toyota with 3 points, while
Andrew Austin and Hannah McCracken each finished
with 2 points in the loss.



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Beach Bistro
guard, Jack
Groves after
coming up with
a steal out
races Gettel
Toyota player
David Daigle
to the basket
during May 21
8-10 division
basketball
action at the
Anna Maria
Island Com-
munity Center.
Islander Photo:
Kevin Cassidy


Island Pest holds 'Slim' lead in adult soccer
Island Pest Control's 2-0 victory over Pink & Navy
May 21 propelled them to the top of the standings by a
point over Slim's Place.
Island Pest sits at 6-1-2 for 20 points, while idle
Slim's Place has a 6-1-1 record and 19 points. Don
Meilner & Son Construction is 5-2-2, one point ahead
of Florida Discount Signs, which is alone in fourth place
at 5-3-1. Best Buy, Pink & Navy, Wash Family Construc-
tion and Agnelli Pool & Spas follow in the standings.
In its 2-0 victory, Island Pest Control's Adam Bujar-
ski's goal and assist, and a goal from Greg Ross led the
way. Brent Laudicina made seven saves in goal.
Meilner Construction edged Best Buy 6-5 behind
four goals from Matt Plummer and two goals and three
assists from Tim Tedesco. Pedro Gonzalez made six saves
for Don Meilner in the victory.
Wash Family Construction rolled to a 9-3 victory
over Agnelli in the evening's first game. Kris Yavalar and
Norman Fleet each scored four goals, while Kip Lalosh
added a goal and an assist.

Key Royale golf news
The women of the Key Royale Club played a nine-
hole, low-net-in-flight golf match May 22. Nancy King
carded a 4-under-par 28 to take first place in Flight A.
Helen Pollock's 1-under 31 gave her second place, one
shot ahead of third-place finisher Penny Williams.
PLEASE SEE SPORTS, PAGE 22





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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 21


Silver king, tarpon, sabalo name game


By Capt. Danny Stasny
Islander Reporter
No matter the name, silver king, tarpon or sabalo,
it's the name of the game every year as we head into
hurricane season.
As we settle what is shaping up to be a success-
ful tarpon season for Anna Maria Island and Tampa Bay
waters, it's a good time to learn more about these fasci-
nating fish.
There are two varieties of tarpon. Megalops atlanti-
cus, the species caught here, and Megalops cyprinoides,
an Indo-Pacific species. Megalops atlanticus is known to
inhabit waters on the western Atlantic coast, ranging from
Virginia to Brazil, throughout the Gulf of Mexico and the
Caribbean. On the eastern side of the Atlantic, these fish
also are caught around the middle to the southern tip of
Africa.
The other variety, Megalops cyprinoides is found
along the eastern African coast, throughout southeast
Asia, Japan and Australia.
Both species will inhabit fresh and saltwater espe-
cially around the mouths of rivers and marshes. What
enables tarpon to do this is their use of a swim bladder.
The swim bladder allows tarpon to rise to the surface and
take gulps of air, making it possible for them to survive
in water with relatively low oxygen content.
When tarpon are in the larval stage, they inhabit salt
marshes, tidal pools, creeks and rivers. In these areas, the
water quality is not tolerable for most other fish, which in
turn aids in the survival of juvenile tarpon. As these fish
grow toward adulthood, they move to the Gulf of Mexico
or the ocean to spawn.
Tarpon can grow to a length of 5-8 feet. Most have
a greenish to bluish back with bright silver sides. Often,
when these fish breech the surface to take air, you see
a bright silver flash as they reflect the sun. The aver-
age weight of a full-grown tarpon is 100-120 pounds,
although fish up to 280 pounds have been reported.
There are a variety of names attributed to the Mega-
lops atlanticus. Mostly they are referred to as tarpon,
although another common name is the silver king. If you
are in the Miami area, you might hear them referred to as
sabalo, their Spanish name. No matter what you choose to
call them, the tarpon remain one of the most sought-after
game fish in the world.
Are we not lucky to live in an area with such an
abundance of this grand fighting fish?
Capt. Warren Girle is fishing tarpon morning, noon
and night around the beaches of Longboat Key and Anna
Maria Island. He is averaging up to eight hookups per
trip on fish of 100 pounds and bigger. Girle is using
live shiners or live crabs to get the silver kings to bite.
-JU ( {a,- .,- 7,


AM HIIm H PM HIGH AM LOW PM LOW M.:..:.
1 I.n In S 8s 2 1 9 i 2 1 5 1 28 ft6 2 1 11 5
lip 11 -8:4 2.3 1 iJ I. ..i I ,.. S. 1 .- .
.Hle 1ni 2 In 121 2 I 3 324 II ?:4" -11.4
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i,.e 3114 14 12 I1 2') 1 1s 13 8"1" -IlI.
Illll11 3. 53 I n4114 2 8 114 I 1 9.04 -11.4





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Jerry Allen of Wyoming fishes all over the world and,
in the past week, while fishing Anna Maria Island
waters with Capt. Warren Girle, he caught two species
still on his bucket list this 110-pound tarpon and a
28-pound permit, pictured below right.

When i i,'.,_'inii' for tarpon, Girle uses a 5/0 hook tied to
50- or 60-pound fluorocarbon leader with a main line of
50-pound Power Pro braided line.
Moving offshore, Girle is fishing just inside 30 miles
in search of mangrove snapper. Using live shiners for
bait, Girle's charters are reeling in mangoes up to 22
inches. Also in these same areas, Girle is encountering
"chicken" dolphin up to 6 pounds and amberjack up to
30 pounds.
Finally, Girle is fishing offshore wrecks with small
pass crabs to hook up with some elusive permit. Although
permit have been scarce this year, Girle managed to boat
one that weighed 28 pounds.
Capt. Mark Johnston of Just Reel fishing charters is
targeting gator trout in north Sarasota Bay. By fishing
the shallow grass flats in the early morning, Johnston is
leading his clients to spotted seatrout up to 25 inches. For
bait, Johnston is using live shiners free-lined behind the
boat.
In the same areas as the trout, Johnston is reeling up
keeper-size flounder. Most fish are in the 12- to 15-inch
range, although larger fish are being caught, too, he
said.
Finally, Johnston is encouraging his clients to target


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tarpon in the early morning and then catch some trout and
flounder on the flats afterwards to bring something home
for dinner. "It's always fun to spend a couple of hours
trying to hook a tarpon," says Johnston, and "afterwards
we fish the flats for something to eat."
Capt. Mark Howard of SumoTime fishing charters
says his recent charters have been all about tarpon. Tarpon
are thick all over the beach, passes, bridges, and even the
flats, Howard says. His success with tarpon is attributed
to an ample supply of chum dead shiners thrown
out at the back of the boat. Howard's clients have been
able to observe the tarpon chewing his chummers, as well
as feeding on their baits.
Howard reports, due to the weak tides, an OK inshore
bite. One of his recent charters landed some nice spotted
seatrout and took home a nice bag of fish for the dinner
table.
Howard suggests fishing close to the passes and
mouths of bays for some action on snook and redfish.
Shiners and small pinfish will work for bait.
Capt. Rick Gross of Fishy Business charters is target-
ing tarpon around Bean Point as well as off the beaches of
Anna Maria Island and Longboat Key. The bite is varying
from day to day, but Gross is managing to consistently
hook fish every charter. For bait, Gross is carrying a
variety of options, including pinfish, crabs, shiners and
threadfin herring. Most hookups are in the 80- to 100-
pound class, although bigger fish are mixed in.
In the backcountry, Gross is seeing action on catch-
and-release snook. Chumming with live shiners gets
the snook in a feeding mood, he says, which clients
follow with a cast into the feeding-frenzy to hook up.
Most fish being caught are in the 20- to 24-inch range,
although Gross is managing to catch some whoppers of
36 inches.
For the cooler, Gross' clients are boating limits of
spotted seatrout and a few redfish.
PLEASE SEE FISHING, PAGE 22


1995



U

*s 0 0 1 e *I
C H A RT E RS

Pr fe si n lG uide 9 1 7 .1 0





22 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER


Obituary

Willem Bartelsman
Willem Bartelsman, founder of the Anna Maria
Island Concert Chorus and Orchestra, died May 25 in
Amsterdam.
He was born in Den Haag, Denmark, April 1, 1924,
the son of conductor and composer Jan Christopher Bar-
telsman, and within a talented musical family.
Bartelsman first came to the United States in 1958
and was in marketing most of his life, but his passion
was classical music. An oboe player, Bartelsman was
frequently welcomed into orchestras all over the world
during his travels for both work and pleasure.
After his retirement in the Netherlands, Barteslman
spent two years in Spain before coming to Anna Maria
Island in 1987, and commuted often to play in the Venice,
Fla., orchestra.
That is where Bartelsman met Alfred Gershfeld, who
became the first conductor of the AMICCO. Gershfeld
had recently arrived from Russia and was living in Bra-
denton.
The two men became friends and began the difficult
process of organizing a local orchestra, which was real-
ized in 1992.
His wife of more than 60 years, Mathilda, often
tried to slow her husband down in his retirement years,
encouraging the AMICCO venture, but gently prodding
her husband to take it easy. Bartelsman's response was
to sign his wife up as a chorus singer.
He often would skip family events if a call from the
orchestra was expected.
AMICCO's first performance was in 1993 with 41
chorus members and 24 orchestra members. Selections
included Bach's Cantata No. 84, Handel's Organ Con-
certo, Opus IV No. 4 and Mass in G Major, No. 2, D 167
by Schubert.
AMICCO has been entertaining Islanders ever
since.
Bartelsman is survived by his wife Mathilda and four
children.
A celebration of life will be held at noon, Saturday,
June 2, Dienstencetrum Maarten Luther, Oeverpad 300,
Amsterdam.

Willem
Bartels-
man with a
reward he


Islander
I File Photo


SPORTS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20
Joyce Brown's 1-under par-31 gave her a one-shot
victory in Flight B over Sue Christianson, who finished
at even-par 32.

Horseshoe news
Three teams advanced to the knockout round during
May 26 horseshoe action at the Anna Maria City Hall
horseshoe pits. The team of Sam Samuels and Jerry Dis-
brow drew the bye and watched as Jay Disbrow walker
- slipped past Tom Rhodes and George McKay 23-20.
The finals saw Jerry Disbrow-Samuels roll over Jay
Disbrow 23-11 to earn the day's bi-in,- rights.
Two teams advanced to the knockout stage during
May 23 horseshoe action. The team of John Johnson and
Tim Sofran slipped past George McKay and Jay Disbrow
21-20.
Play gets under way at 9 a.m. every Wednesday and
Saturday at the Anna Maria City Hall pits. Warmups
begin at 8:45 a.m. followed by random team selection.
There is no charge to play and everyone is wel-
come.


Beach Bistro guard Luke Marvin brings the ball
upcourt against the defense of Gettel Toyota guard
Andrew Austin during last week's basketball game at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Islander
Photo: Kevin Cassidy


For this week's AMICC
sports schedules, visit
sports online at www.
islander.org.


Island real estate sales
By Jesse Brisson
Special to The Islander
118 Maple Ave., Anna Maria, a 1,990 sfla / 2,420 sfur
3bed/3bath/lcar duplex built in 1946 on a 79x100 lot was
sold 04/26/12, Kerr to Hasler for $605,000; list $678,000.
521 Loquat Drive, Anna Maria, a 3,246 sfla / 4,260 sfur
3bed/312bath/2car canalfront pool home built in 1981 on a
75x102 lot was sold 05/07/12, Bon Apart Real Estate Inc.
to Clausen fro $550,000; list $599,000.
405 Pine Ave., Anna Maria, a 1,930 sfla 3bed/2bath
home built in 1983 on a 52x145 lot was sold 05/09/12,
Travetto to Lyerly for $550,000; list $597,500.
524 69th St., Holmes Beach, a 1,803 sfla / 2,570 sfur
3bed/2bath/ car canalfront pool home built in 1969 on a
80x113 lot was sold 05/08/12, Durlach to Cayo for $540,000;
list $565,000.
1007 Gulf Drive N., Unit 103, Summer Sands, Braden-
ton Beach, a 1,536 sfur / 2,045 sfur 2bed/2bath condo with
shared pool built in 1982 was sold (15 14 12, Calabrese to
Martie for $440,000; list $495,000.
614 Rose St., Anna Maria, a 1,552 sfla / 2,416 sfur
3bed/2bath/2car home built in 1995 on a 50x100 lot was sold
05/09/12, Moser to Sandt for $435,000; list $479,000.
314 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria, a 2,120 sfla / 3,522
sfur 4bed/3bath pool home built in 1981 on a 52x145 lot
was sold 05/07/12, Townsend to Miller for $375,000.
6500 Flotilla Drive, Unit 185, Westbay Point & Moor-
ings, Holmes Beach, a 1,185 sfla / 1,377 sfur 2bed/2bath
condo with shared pool built in 1979 was sold 05/09/12,
Ris to McPhail for $325,000; list $349,900.
1603 Gulf Drive N., Unit 35, Tradewinds, Bradenton
Beach, a 742 sfla ibed/ bath condo with shared pool built in
1971 was sold 04/27/12, Anna Maria LLC to MPT Proper-
ties LLC for $265,000.
249 Gladiolus St.,Anna Maria, a 1,107 sfla 1,511 sfur
2bed/ bath/ car canalfront home built in 1963 on a 77x100
lot was sold 05/07/12, Mcfail to Patel for $245,000. This is
believed to not be an arm's length transaction.
2306 Avenue C, Bradenton Beach, a 1,674 sfla / 2,841
sfur 2bed/2bath duplex built in 1982 on a 50x100 lot
was sold 04/27/12, Gallagher to Baxter Credit Union for
$216,200.
Jesse Brisson, broker/associate at Gulf-Bay Realty of
Anna Maria, can be reached at 941-778-7244.


FISHING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21
For the trout, Gross is free-lining live shiners on
deeper grass flats just outside of Terra Ceia Bay. Most
fish are in the 16- to 18-inch range perfect for the fry
pan.
For the reds, Gross is fishing shallower water around
mangroves. Again, he's free-lining baits behind the boat,
but for the reds, he's working up against the mangrove
edges. This past week, the reds were averaging 18 to 22
inches with a few larger "bull" reds in the mix.
Send fishing reports to fish@islander.org.


h-a-k-oti-for your support in making our family
lo. 1 in sales in Manatee and Sarasota counties!


Charles Buky
Cell: 941-228-6086



www.teambukyrealestate.com
201 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Suite 1
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THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 23


sla dBiz

By Rick Catlin







WAMi set to go live
Radio station WAMi was scheduled to begin live
broadcasting at 7 a.m. Monday, May 28, with a three-
hour talk show hosted by Anna Maria Island Privateer
Tim "Hammer" Thompson. The show is scheduled for 7
a.m.-10 a.m. Monday through Friday.
Thompson will present news of local interest, Island
happenings and events, interviews with local musicians
and a daily fishing report, according to WAMi co-owner
Casey Herman.
His plans include relocating the studio from his home
in Holmes Beach to a storefront at 105 Bridge St., Bra-
denton Beach. The station antenna or broadcast tower is
in a yet-unknown location.
Other WAMi plans include a talk show, "Gray Mat-
ters," hosted by Holmes Beach Commissioner Jean
Peelen and a feature show with local musician Koko Ray
Hansen.
The station, which broadcasts at 1700 AM, is likely
more accessible to listeners on the Internet at www.wami.
com. Currently, the station content consists of local musi-
cians playing original music, and the broadcast range is
limited to about 2 miles.
Co-owner Robert Herman began WAMi broadcast-
ing Dec. 31 with a low-watt system, but says he plans to
upgrade the broadcast range and the station format in the
future.


Radio station WAMi plans to relocate its studio from
Holmes Beach to 105 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
The low-wattage station has been broadcasting since
January at 1700-AM radio and on the Internet at www.
wamiradio.com, using only local artists and original
materials. Islander Photo: Rick Catlin


FOR EXPERT ADVI(E ON ISLAND PROPERTIES
CALL THE ISLANDERS
(941) 778-6066
,y iv.CALLTHE ISLNDERS.(0OI .
SJOHN.-C, (A THEISLNODERS.(OM '

I ISLAN D
R I U ISIAIL
-. \ i \


PAR builds 'last' project
Pine Avenue Restoration LLC is currently in the
midst of building its last of five retail-office-residential
buildings on Anna Maria's Pine Avenue.
The finale at 210 Pine Ave. is PAR's fifth ROR con-
struction project.
The company was formed in 2006 when principals
Ed Chiles and Mike Coleman visualized improvements
on Pine Avenue with a Florida look and architecture.
Coleman said the initiative to build ROR structures
came after city commissioners added wording to the
comprehensive plan encouraging ROR construction on
Pine Avenue. The comprehensive plan was adopted in
2007.
PAR previously planned a ROR structure at the
corner of Pine Avenue and Bay Boulevard, but did not
complete the land acquisition. The property was eventu-
ally sold to the city for $2.8 million.
"We have no more property in the city to develop,"
Coleman said. "This is our last ROR project."
Other ROR complexes built by PAR are at 216 and
218 Pine Ave., 306 and 308 Pine Ave., 303 and 305 Pine
Ave., and 307 and 309 Pine Ave.


Chamber 'drives' for
new members
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce will
conduct a new member recruitment drive 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Thursday, May 31, and Friday, June 1, at its office at 5313
Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
As an incentive to join during the two-day period,
businesses that sign up will receive a waiver of the $25
new member administrative fee, among other incentives
and offers, chamber vice president Deb Wing said.
For more information, call Wing at the chamber.
The monthly networking luncheon of the Anna Maria
Island Chamber of Commerce is set for 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.


Pine Avenue
Restora-
tion LLC is
constructing
the last of
its planned
J.u ', retail-office-
residential
buildings on
Anna Maria's
Pine Avenue.
-- .--- The site at
H210 Pine Ave.
is the fifth
,ROR project
for the comn-
pany. Islander
Photo: Rick
Catlin



Wednesday, June 6, at Eat Here, 5315 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.
Cost of the luncheon is $15 and members are encour-
aged to bring a guest. Reservations are required for the
event.
To make a reservation, call 941-778-1541.
Got a new business opening on Anna Maria Island
or Longboat Key, in Cortez, Palma Sola, or west Bra-
denton? How about a new owners, anniversary, new hire,
or an award-winning staff member? Call Island Biz at
941-778-7978 or e-mail news@islander.org.


Heartful welcome
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce held
a ribbon-cutting ceremony May 17 for its newest
member: Heartland Title Services, 1111 Third Ave. W.,
Bradenton. Taking part in the event are Jackie Sim-
mons, from left, Karen LaPensee, Jim Day of Heart-
land, Heartland owner and president Joann Clark,
Wende Webb, Jamie Kane and chamber president Mary
Ann Brockman. Islander Photo: Courtesy Deb Wing







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24 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 THE ISLANDER

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.cl Kmi,_ ,iccii Fll & Twin,
,'p5271 c. ,' II..i'i '0 new/used.
,4 I1 "S -,' I


ADMIRAL TOWNCAR
PROFESSIONAL CHAUFFEUR AT TAXI PRICES
AIRPORTS WE GO ANYWHERE
CALL PHIL
941.320.1120
P DOLLI'YAHOO COM ADI1RALTC COm1
LICENSED'INSURED CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

Design Carl V. Johnson Jr. Inc.
Custom Building Contractor
& Build New Homes, Decks, Porches
License #RR0066450 Additions and Renovations
Call Office 941-795-1947 Cell 941-462-2792


MOTION SENSOR SECURITY lights. Battery
powered. No wiring. Bright LEDs. $12-$50. Power
failure three-unit kit, $75. New, weatherproof. Call
for demo. Jeff's Security Lights, 941-794-1469.
LIKE NEW IKEA white contemporary armoire,
glass and chrome entertainment table, $100 each.
Home, 941-778-1989, cell, 941-773-9829.
RECLINING CHAIR: TAN color, like new, $93, wet
surf suit, $65, tan ottoman, $35. 941-779-9781.
MARY KAY COSMETICS: Full line at discounted
prices. Jenifer, 941-224-1760, 941-739-0792.
ANTIQUE COPPER POTS and bowls, collection
$350. Burl-wood rocker, oak office chairs, col-
lectibles. View at The Islander store, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
ORIGINAL, LOCAL ART for sale. View at The
Islander store, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.
AERIAL PHOTOS of Anna Maria Island. View and
purchase online: www.jackelka.com


Individuals may place one free ad with up to
three items, each priced $100 or less, 15 words
or less. FREE, one week, must be submitted
online. E-mail classifieds@islander.org, fax toll-
free 1-866-362-9821. (limited time offer)


GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN Church: All are wel-
come to come and worship with us! Please call
941-778-1813 or visit us at: www.gloriadeilu-
theran.com for worship times. 6608 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
OUR DAILY BREAD: Volunteer servers needed. 9
a.m.-noon. Call 941-745-2992, ask for Penny.
NEW ADVANCED TEACHING series starting
Thursday, May 10. Continuing series Thursday
evenings at Palmetto retreat center, 4310 61 st St.
E., Palmetto. E-mail: info@meditationsarasota.
com. Call 941-323-3372.
HAITI $$$ DONATIONS to the Ministry of Pres-
ence Inc., www.ministryofpresence.org, urgently
needed for local representatives to aid homeless
children. Info: The Islander, 941-778-7978.
TERRY HAYES, REALTOR. Premier Sothebys.
941-302-3100. Terry.hayes@sothebysrealty.com.
Discoverannamaria.com.
MICHAEL NORTHFIELD: BROKER, Anna Maria
Island Realty, 941-713-0284. www.annamariais-
landrealty.com. E-mail: Michael@annamariaislan-
drealty.com. Your personal broker.
WANTED: YOUR OLD cell phone for recycling.
Deliver to The Islander, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.
FISHING GEAR WANTED: The Privateers and
The Islander are collecting new or used, repair-
able fishing poles and reels, nets, tackle, buck-
ets, etc. to give to children. Donate your gear
at The Islander newspaper office, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
FREE GUN LOCK courtesy of Project Childsafe,
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission and Holmes Beach Police Department.
Pick up at The Islander office, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Don't be sorry, be safe.


ESTATE SALE: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, June
2. 533 68th St., Holmes Beach. Curio, recliner,
dinette and china cabinet, dinette with chairs on
casters, patio set and lounges, neutral sofa bed,
desk, walnut drop leaf table, sewing machine,
lamps, linens, ladies clothes and accessories,
ladders, old tools, 2000 white Cadillac Deville,
111,469 miles. Sale by Julie McClure. Pictures:
www.appraisals4u.biz and www.estatesales.net.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. on
Tuesday and Thursdays, 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays.
Donation drop-off, 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Wednesday.
511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 941-779-2733.
GARAGE SALE: 8 a.m.-noon Saturday, June 2.
Women's clothing, purses, shoes, men's suits,
books, DVDs, glassware, cameras, holiday deco-
rations and much more at 538 68th St., Holmes
Beach.
NEW LOCATION: STEFF'S Stuff Antiques has
moved to The Centre Shops on Longboat Key.
5380 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Unit 101. 941-383-
1901.


LOST NECKLACE AT beach or Fern Street, Anna
Maria. Gift from my kids. Call Karen 941-778-
4321.


Anderson Q Associates Insurance
Your Island Insurance Specialist
Working to save you money
941-778-8303



Windows & Doors

941-730-5045



We Come To You Full Warranty
* Antennas Mirrors
*Power *Locks
Trunks Door Handles 941-780-1735
POWERUPAUTO.COM* SINCE 1995 FREE ESTIMATES FL MV-46219

ArlTTN: AREA BUSINESSES:
Need computer help? If I don't have your
answers, I know someone who will. Start
to finish, network setup, printer help, and
continuing support... Give me a call.

-$SOKS11I lut11I S business network / computer solutions
Socko Pearson, 941-799-1169, sockopearson@aol.com
ISLAND REFERENCES AVAILABLE


C* ic
S.e. andBu


Look for the blue
button to order
photos and
full-page
reprints

e Islander


shop photos online at www.islander.org


ANSWERS TO MAY 30 PUZZLE
CHEF SCRAPE WOMAN TOG
ALONE LA ICAL H YDRA 0D0o
T R E ATO FVE R SA I LL E S LOO P

U M A ISK OSANS
D A CRON ASTUDINSCARLE T
G OO DANDREAD BEER BELL

PARTANIMAL BILLTHE K ID
LEA ODEDON TRUSTME
RATED RED R YAN O-PT
FA I RTALE L I VERITABLE
AI T ADAL E OEU F CIE ES

RLODGERLS LO GIN BDR IT TERS
IRS THESOUNDAN THE F U R
S T U TE P I D A L OU T sODA
TSP EATMEA LILY TIRES


359-1904
"Movers Who Care"
TWO MEN AND A TRUCK.


ADOPT-A-PET
I.ill ildhcli d I I l m '.t il h1,i pc ,Il t i lin,1l' hl>' i litlti |1 l-
I I I >jo\ n. inrln lon. i \\ilk, I1)' \ l[:in I.\. l I ,ni.d
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.Po.,rETDoe, T e1 Islander


JIL DE C A SIFIED.











LOST CAT: DARK grey tabby, lost in area of
Holmes Beach Business Center. Has a chip,
responds to whistling. Call 941-778-3360.


ISLAND DOGS GROOMING Salon: Julie Keyes,
certified groomer. Hydro bath, hand dry, (no cage
drying). Personal service for you and your loved
ones. Free pick up and delivery. Call anytime for
appointments, 941-778-1202. Holmes Beach.
TERRIFIC DOG FOR adoption! 1.5 year old lab/
pit mix. Gorgeous brindle, sweet disposition,
excellent companion. Neutered, up to date on
shots, chipped. 941-896-6701.
PARENTS NEEDED for loving homes to foster
puppies and kittens until they are old enough for
adoption. All food and medical provided. Julie,
941-720-1411.


BIMINI BAY SAILING: Small sailboat rentals and
instruction. Day. Week. Month. Sunfish, Laser,
Windrider 17 and Precision 15. Call Brian at 941 -
685-1400.
DOCKSIDE PONTOON RENTAL: Professional
boat-sitting. 'Always be water-ready.' Call Dan,
over 40 years in the boat business. 941-518-
3868.
SEADUCED WATERCRAFT ADVENTURES: Pon-
toon and deck boat rentals from $99, sunset sail-
Ing, $39/person. Tours, n..ature, Passage Key,
Egmont Key. Yacht tours, Egmont Key and off-
shore. Yacht rentals, 28-foot Carver available for
overnights. 941-779-5889.
POWER NOLES CUSTOM 11.5-foot fiberglass
Itnneil Iull with bass seats. Very stable! Great
for fishing-stand on the side without tipping,
go in really shallow waters. Very fun boat for
anyone who wants to get on the water! 2001
25-hp Mercury 2-stroke, plus a trolling motor
with battery. Must see! $2,150 obo. Call Toni,
941-928-8735.


NAIL TECH NEEDED at new Island spa and bou-
tique on Bridge Street. Turning appointments
down daily. Call Amanda, 941-779-6836.
SALES ASSOCIATE: MOTIVATED, experienced
real estate licensee for busy Island office. Please
call Jesse or Robin at 941-778-7244.
BONUS! CLASSIFIED ADS are posted early
online at www.islander.org.


SUBSTITUTE CUSTODIAN FOR Roser Church.
512 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Hours: 8 a.m-12: 30
p.m. Sunday mornings. May drive church van,
open/lock doors to buildings, check for clean-
liness of rest rooms/buildings, hours may vary
Monday-Friday to work with custodian on proj-
ects, substitute for custodian when on vacation/
leave. Will train. $15/hour. Mail resumes to: Sub-
stitute custodian, Roser Church, P.O. Box 247,
Anna Maria FL 34216 or e-mail resume to: info@
roserchurch.com.


BABIES, PETS, PLANTS: Responsible, trustwor-
thy, fun and reliable 17-year old. Own transporta-
tion. 941-447-9658.
KIDS FOR HIRE ads are FREE for up to three
weeks for Island youths under 16 looking for work.
Ads must be placed in person at The Islander
office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


LPNS NEEDED FOR active quadriplegic using
Hoyer lift. Full or part-time. Morning shifts are 4-5
hours starting at 7 a.m. Overnight shifts are 9:30
p.m.-7 a.m. Travel opportunity. 941-383-9637.


LET US DRIVE YOU! Airports, cruise ports. Flat
rates. Anna Maria Sunshine Car Service. 941-
778-5476.

TOASTED COMPUTER SERVICES. Your home
and business specialist. On-site service, virus/
spyware, cleanup, system setup, upgrades, diag-
nosis and repair, internet/wireless networking,
custom system design. 941-224-1069.

I DON'T CUT corners, I clean corners. Profes-
sional, friendly cleaning service since 1999. 941 -
779-6638. Leave message.
WILDLIFE REMOVAL and relocation: Problem
solving for all animals, big and small. Call Joe,
Westcoast Nuisance Wildlife Service. 941-720-
4152.
TRANSPORT SERVICE: LET me drive you to the
airport or anywhere in Florida. Flat rates. Reason-
able. Call Mike, 941-567-6634.
ISLAND COMPUTER GUY, 37 years experience.
On-site PC repairs, upgrades, buying assistance
and training. Call Bill, 941-778-2535.
TURN THE PAGE for more Islander classified
service ads ...


CLASSI--------------------------------FIED AD ORDER----------------
CLASSIFIED AD ORDER


CLASSIFIED RATES: Minimum $12 for up to 15 WORDS. 16-30 words: $20. 31-45 words: $40.
BOX ad: additional $4. (Phone number is a "word.")
The deadline is NOON Monday for the following week's paper.


Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd


Date


Ck. No.


or TFN start date:
Cash -


II.SO A N ER C ASSIF IED.S


Jane Tinsworth ,


RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE
CELL (941) 920-0282
Jane@JaneTinsworth.com
4009 Manatee Ave. W.


mm I .


CALL THE ISLAND'S FINEST...
MORE THAN 2,500 LARGE AND SMALL
PROJECTS ON AMI SINCE 1988!
We provide design plans-You preview 3-D drawings

WASH FAMILY CONSTRUCTION

941.725.0073
Darrin J. Wash State Lic. CBC1258250
LOCALLY OWNED AND FAMILY OPERATED SINCE 1988





ma~isI *r

I I


Credit card payment: 1 1 No.
Name shown on card:
House no. or P.O. box no. on cc bill
Your e-mail for renewal reminder:


_card exp. date
-Billing address zip code


Web site: www.islander.org
5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 3421 7


ThIe Islander


E-mail: classifieds@islander.org
Fax toll free: 1-866-362-9821
Phone: 941-778-7978


--------------------------------------------------


THE ISLANDER MAY 30, 2012 E 25

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Residential
& Commercial
Family Owned and Operated since 1975
New Construction Remodeling
All Phases of Plumbing Repair & Service
778-3924 or 778-4461 5508 Marina Drive, Holvrrl:. 1-.:I I. pi Sat.

BOAT, RV & TRAILER STORAGE
Wash Down Easy Access Clean* Security Cameras
941-232-9208 Rates starting at $40
Centrally located off Cortez Road 4523 30th St. W.
Warehouse/Workshops also available


N'S RESCREEN IN0
:*-L *:-,GES, LANAIS, PORCHES, WINDOWS, C1*P
rj: 1:b TOO BIG or Too SMALL. Free Estima: ,
Call Dan, 941-713-3108


AMI TAXI
professional, metered, on-call, gps, cards accepted
www.amitaxi.com amitaxi4u@gmail.com
holmes beach, bradenton beach, anna maria
800.301.4816
airports shops dining

Junior's Landscape & Maintenance
Lawn care PLUS native plants,
mulch, trip, hauling and cleanup y
Call Junior, 807-1015 Z"

S HONEY DO HOME REPAIR
Handyman Service
Let us put our 35 years of experience to work for you!
Joesph LaBrecque *Carpentry *Drywall *Flooring *Painting *Siding *Tile
941.896.5256-office Free Estimates Licensed
941.807.5256-cell Ask about our 10% guarantee & Insured





[[ ]1..





26 S MAY 30, 2012 S THE ISLANDER


ISLANDER HANDYMAN SERVICE: 23-year Island
resident, references. The Flying Dutchman LLC.
We do all repair, interior and exterior, carpentry
and more. Peter, 941-447-6747.

CLEANING BY LAURA offers everything on your
list from kitchen and bath cleaning to dusting and
emptying wastebaskets. 941-539-6891.

ISLAND PRESSURE WASHERS: Professional,
reasonable and reliable. Call Bill or Clint for free
estimate, 941-896-6788.

RETIRED CHICAGO POLICE officer will drive
your car north or south. 941-746-5651.

HOUSE BEAUTIFUL: RESIDENTIAL cleaning.
Insured. References. Hourly rates. Call Gayle,
941-301-5851.

BONUS! CLASSIFIED ADS are posted early
online at www.islander.org.


ANNA MARIA
ISLAND,
BRADENTON
and LONGBOAT KEY


UZB


p a-ssoc ates*-Ir .
Real Estate Professionals
301 Manatee Ave W Holmes Beach FL 34217
Cell: 941-780-8000
Cindyi'islandannamaria.com
www.IslandAnnaMaria.com


DIRECT
GULFFRONT
Spectacular views
from this beautifully
turnkey furnished
3Br/ 2.5Ba home.
$1,400,000


HISTORIC CORTEZ VILLAGE. Adorable
2BR/1.5 BA home located less than a mile to the
beach. Walk to fish markets and restaurants in this
quaint village. $155,000.


CANALFRONT. Totally renovated 3BR/2BA home
located on a mangrove canal. Renovations include tile
floors, new kitchen with granite counters, stainless
appliances. $499,000.

Mike 800-367-1617
Norman- 941-778-6696
3101 GULF DR
Realty INC HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com
h sales@mikenormanrealty.com


TUTORING SERVICES: Specializing in algebra,
geometry, calculus, trigonometry and science.
Special needs students welcome. Grades 3-12.
Rick, 941-224-4977.

BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS JD's Window Clean-
ing looking for storefront jobs in Holmes Beach.
I make dirty windows sparkling clean. 941-920-
3840.

ISLAND MERMAIDS CLEANING and Co.: 36
years of happy customers. Organizing, laundry,
ironing, pet-watch, storm-check, etc. Rentals our
specialty. 941-778-3046.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrig-
eration. Commercial and residential service,
repair and/or replacement. Serving Manatee
County and the Island since 1987. For depend-
able, honest and personalized service, call Wil-
liam Eller, 941-795-7411. CAC184228.

ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 941-778-2711.

RELAXING MASSAGE IN the convenience of
your home or hotel. Massage by Nadia, more
than 19 years on Anna Maria Island. Call today for
an appointment, 941-518-8301. MA#0017550.
MA#0017550.


BIG FISH
REAL ESTATE


B ,.i F-t1I-i R eal Es:1, 1 pro, rl.,,'l;
anon.nes J,: si.a3 u P,-ihll P,-ale r

ha:3, ,n An,. In Arll J,:s Iirs hin 11
C3allinqil e islanJ Is Ii: n e He
brings i: Ihe lirn, a degree in
Interpersonal Communications from Western Michigan
University and is experienced in resort sales as a
licensed Realtor in Michigan. He is results driven with a
keen eye for detail and is ready to put his skills to work
for you. Call Josh anytime at 231-330-2083.


GULF-FRONT COMPLEX
Pretty Gulf views from light,
bright, updated 2BR/2BA
condo. Turnkey furnished,
priced to sell at $289,000.
Call Nicole Skaggs, Broker,
941-773-3966
1 - - -


1__^
WILDEWOOD SPRINGS
Ground floor with no one
above. Updated and spacious
2BR/2BA villa. Easy to see.
$109,000 Call Nicole Skaggs,
Broker 941-773-3966


PERICO ISLAND ISLAND CREAM-PUFF
Bayfront 3/2 with beautiful Updated duplex on rare
updates. Easy to see. oversized lot. $559,000. Call
$317,000. Call Josh Petitt, Nicole Skaggs, Broker, 941-
Realtor, 231-330-2083. 773-3966.
5351 Gulf Drive No. 4, Holmes Beach
www.gobigfishrealty.com 941-779-2289


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING INC. Residential and
commercial. Full-service lawn maintenance, land-
scaping, cleanup, hauling and more! Insured.
941-778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair.
Your complete irrigation repair company. Call
941-778-2581.

TIM'S TOTAL LAWN Care and handyman. Light
hauling, most lawns, $25. Also pressure washing.
Call 941-807-2537.

JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, haul-
ing, cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 941 -
807-1015.


STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE. Shell installed
$45/yard at true specifications. Free appliance
pick up. Call Shark Mark. 941-301-6067.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. $45/yard. Haul-
ing all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free
estimates. Call Larry at 941-795-7775, "shell
phone" 941-720-0770.

NATURE'S DESIGN LANDSCAPING. Design and
installation. Tropical landscape specialist. Resi-
dential and commercial. 30 years experience.
941-729-9381, 941-448-6336.

TOP NOTCH LAWN Care: Residential and com-
mercial. For all your landscaping needs. 941-
932-6600.

ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can place
classified ads and subscribe online? Check it out
at www.islander.org.

(1 ~EXPERIENCE
REPUTATION
SREALTOR. RESULTS
37 Years of Professional Service
to Anna Maria Island and Bradenton
Heron Harbour 2/2 Condo, Htd Pool, tennis,furnished. $125,000.
RENTALS
GULFFRONT Vacation/Seasonal 5/4 Home.
GULFFRONT Luxury Villas 2/2 and 1/1.5 Vacation/Seasonal
CHARMING 1 BR Cottage. Steps to beach. $1,200/month
BOOKING NOW FOR 2013 SEASONAL/VACATION RENTALS
HOLMES BEACH- 941-778-0807
tdollyl@yahoo.com www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com







HUGE REAL ESTATE OPPORTUNITY
50% 70% off"2004-2006" PRICES
Top rated #1 & #2 hotels (TripAdvisor)
+ Outstanding occupancy histories
All apartments cash-flow positive
SUnlimited owner usage
SBank financing available


Lurioum2/2 Apirnmai

1,400 d/rffom $375,000


Charmling Apartment
372 /f 1/1 from $125,000

727 ,/f2/1 (om S295,000


Call David Teitelbaum, Realtor 941-812-4226 or
Liz Codola, Realtor 941-812-3455


I


-~Y*r~C~pr#l


M^IKE' NOR'MAN RELT
^^^tB~gaEST. 1978^


I I





THE ISLANDER 0 MAY 30, 2012 0 27


ISA N DERA SIDS


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Bill, 941-795-5100. www.vangopaint-
ing.net.

TILE -TILE -TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 941-726-3077.

CUSTOM REMODELING EXPERT. All phases of
carpentry, repairs and painting. Insured. Meticu-
lous, clean, sober and prompt. Paul Beauregard,
941-730-7479.

GRIFFIN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS Inc. Handy-
man, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets and
shutters. Insured and licensed, 941-748-4711.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR: Carpentry, handyman,
light hauling, pressure washing. Jack of all trades.
Call 941-778-6170 or 941-447-2198.

SOUTHBAY HOME REPAIRS: If it's broken, stuck,
loose, leaks, needs paint, etc. I'll fix it. Affordable
quality work. 941-720-2906.

FOREMOST FENCE: Commercial, Residential.
Chain link, vinyl, aluminum, wood, access con-
trol. Contractors you can depend on. Call 941-
748-2700.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN LLC: Professional
tile roof restoration. Call Peter for free estimate.
23-year Island resident, references, insured. 941 -
447-6747.

CUSTOM KITCHENS AND baths, additions, win-
dows and door replacement. Call Matt at Pin-
nacle Group, 941-685-6132. Lic#CGC1506518.



WEEKLY/MONTHLY/ANNUAL rentals: wide
variety, changes daily. SunCoast Real Estate,
941-779-0202, or 1-800-732-6434. www.sun-
coastinc.com.

WANTED: RETAIL STOREFRONT in Bradenton
Beach, 500 sf and up. Bridge street area. 941-
447-1506.


HOLMES BEACH BUSINESS Center. Rental units
available for office/commercial spaces from 750-
2,000 sf. Humidity-controlled mini-storage units
and garage units, 11 x 22 feet. 5347 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach. 941-778-2924.

HOLIDAY/VACATION RENTALS: 3BR/2BA private
pool home in northwest Bradenton, 3BR/3BA pri-
vate pool home in Palma Sola, west Bradenton.
No annuals. Call 941-794-1515.

VACATION RENTALS ONLY: Private pool homes,
3BR/2BA and 3BR/3BA. Condo, 1 BR/1 BA over-
looking golf course. Call 941-794-1515 or www.
coastalpropertiesrealty.com.

2BR/2BA ANNUAL RENTALS starting at $850/
month. Call Mike Norman Realty, 941-778-6696
or 800-367-1617.

WATERFRONT TWO BEDROOM townhouse
with boat slip on Palma Sola Bay. Heated pool,
patio, cable, washer and dryer. Lease six months
plus. $925/month plus utilities. No pets. Call 941 -
538-8622.

ANNUAL RENTAL NEEDED: Small apartment,
efficiency or room with private bath, entrance,
north end Anna Maria. Single, quiet, no smoking,
drinking or pets. 941-685-0797.

1 BR/1 BA FURNISHED TOP-floor unit. 180-degree
Gulffront view, large 10x24-foot deck. Excellent
credit only, no pets. $1,500/month plus security
deposit. 717-324-6695.

TWO 1BR/1BA ANNUAL rentals in Holmes
Beach. Available now. No pets. Call Jessica, 941-
778-7500. Dolores M. Baker Real Estate.

HOLMES BEACH SEASONAL rental. Adorable
efficiency available monthly, January-April 2013.
$1,200/month. 908-850-6086. Photos available.

WATERFRONT 1BR/1BA: OWNER pays Inter-
net, cable, utilities. $1,200/month. Call 941-779-
9074 or 703-587-4675. E-mail: Bayrest@hotmail.
com.

HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX: Annual 2BR/1.5BA,
unfurnished. Available June 21. $925/month.
941-778-4498.


PERICO ISLAND: MONTHLY rental. 3BR/3BA,
private pool, beautifully furnished. Call 941-795-
3778. www.pericoholidayvilla.co.uk.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1 BR/1 BA or 1 BR/1 BA with loft with pool. Walk
to beach, shops or dining! 941-778-3426. Web
site: www.spinnakerscottages.com.


DIRECT GULFFRONT: 146 feet on the beach.
3BR/4.5BA, office recreation room, spa, pool,
outdoor kitchen and theater, elevator, turnkey
furnished. $3,750,000. Suncoast Real Estate,
941-779-0202 or 941-720-0288.

FOR SALE BY owner: 1BR/1BA mobile com-
pletely remodeled with share, beach and bay
access. Call 941-224-1652 for more informa-
tion.

FOR SALE BY owner: Mobile home, 1BR/1 BA,
extra bonus room. Across the street from Bra-
denton Beach private fishing pier. Beach and bay
access, adjacent parking. Call 813-458-3875.

OPEN HOUSE: 1-3 p.m. Saturday. 644 Key
Royale Drive, Holmes Beach. Gorgeous water-
front 2BR/2BA, pool. James Adkins, 713-0635.

2008 HOLIDAY RAMBLER Imperial 44-foot motor
home. Loaded, with only 5,000 miles. Would con-
sider trade towards home on Anna Maria Island.
jim kunkel@verizon.net. 410-937-2106.

WARM, INVITING NORTHWEST Bradenton
home. 3BR/2BA split-plan. Spacious, cathedral
ceilings, tile throughout. Updated kitchen, new
stainless-steel appliances. Master suite has large
bath with garden tub, shower, dual sinks. Air-con-
ditioned lanai includes built-in spa. Large open
patio overlooks waterway. Greatly reduced for
quick sale. $250,000. Call 941-761-3614.


SOUTHEAST TENNESSEE MOUNTAIN home:
Beautiful views, 3BR/2BA, furnished. Priced to
sell, by owner, $149,500. 941-782-8231.


ON DESIRABLE NORTH END
Elevated 3BR/3BA home, only 4 lots from
the beach. Open floor plan,screened-in covered
porch across front of house. Wheelchair
accessible. $575,000.
Adjacent lot available for $450,000.

Visit us on Pine Avenue or online for many more listings and rental info.
ISLAND FACES...SELLING ISLAND PLACES






28 E MAY 30, 2012 U THE ISLANDER






The Anna Maria Island Privateers 58th annual first took a jeep full of kids in 1954 to the beach for a
Snooks Adams Kids Day May 26 at Bayfront Park, 316 cookout. Snooks' outing grew and, in 1980, he partnered
N. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, was a big hit for young and with the Privateers. He continued raising money and
old. supporting the event until his death in May 2010.


In the time honored tradition, pirates and kids took
part in water fight, face-painting, treasure hunt and tours
aboard Skullywag, the Privateer boat/float, and much
more.
Folks feasted on hot dogs and pizza and refresh-
ments free for kids while adults were pirated for
a donation.
The Privateers matched a kitty of $250 dollars for
the family of a young boy who recently had a medical
emergency while at pre-school.
It was a high-seas adventure in the park.
W. H. "Snooks" Adams' name and legacy live on
at Kids Day and in the hearts of many young pirates.
Adams, a law enforcement officer most of his life,


As a local nonprofit organization, the Privateers


sponsor community and local youth events throughout
the year, and offer a scholarship award program for local
students heading to college. Scholars are announced at
yet another party at the Manatee Public Beach, follow-
ing the Privateers Fourth of July Parade.




LEFT: Kids take aim
in a squirt-gunfight
Sat the Privateers'
Snooks Adams Kids
Day event May 26 at
S Bayfront Park, Anna

. Maria. BELOW:
Privateer Tim
"Hammer" Thomp-
.." son is besieged by
'BRV kids with squirt guns
S*.* following the dousing
S he gave children and
adults alike at Snooks
Adams Kids Day at
Bayfront Park, Anna
Maria.


AME Students Maggie Carter and Jade Ortv ,n
have fun in the Privateer photo station durin-
Privateers' Snooks Adams Kids Day May 26 ot
Bayfront Park, Anna Maria.


Isabel Stasny, age 21 months, of Holmes Ben I h.
checks out a fake rat held by mom Bekka Sto wn\
on their visit aboard the Privateer /i. ,t fl. or..
the Skullywag, during Snooks Adams Kids Doi.
Islander Photos: Karen Riley I. ,i


S-.-. -


WISECRACKS By Alan Arbesfeld / Edited by Will Shortz


Across
I Course preparer
5 Close shave
11 John Lennon song
that ends "I love
you, yeah, yeah,
now and forever"
16 Deck (out)
19 Tops
20 Like some church
matters
21 Monster slain by
Hercules
22 Lead-in to meter
23 Chocolat, say?
26 Shorten, with "off"
27 In the limelight
28 HBO competitor
29 Emphatic denial
31 Home to the
Minutemen,
informally
33 When repeated, an
old New Orleans
tune
35 Word repeated four
times in the last
line of
Shakespeare's "All
the world's a
stage" speech
36 Polyester fabric
39 Macho drag queen?
46 Shield border
47 Make, as a copy of a
CD
48 Stop on a line


Answers:
page 29.


49 Dockworkers' org
50 Like literary
classics?
54 Call to the bar?
56 Weirdo
57 Earth goddess
58 Bobby who sang
"Take Good Care
of My Baby"
60 Hall-of-Fame
pitcher Joss
61 Unsurprisingly
63 Skinny?
65 Discreet signal
68 Like a centaur?
70 "Don't let that
youngster get off
without payingl?
75 Rural setting
76 Had way too much
of
78 Words from a con
man
79 Given a number,
maybe
83 Flushed
84 Baseball's strikeout
king
85 Go (for)
86 Unbiased account?
89 Announcement made
by a transplant
surgeon, perhaps?
92 British isle
93 Allan-___ (figure in
the Robin Hood
legend)
95 Omelette ingredient
96 Middling grades
97 Stigmatize a "great"
king?
100 Hankering


102 Salon selection
103 Twin killings, on a
diamond Abbr
104 Went off course
106 Part of the inn
crowd?
110 Access
requirement,
maybe
114 Old-fashioned
ingredient
118 Big collection
agcy
119 Two reasons to
avoid a dog
kennel?
122 Apt name for a 1-
Across?
123 Unenthusiastic
124 Maximum
125 Bar mixer
126 Rx amt
127 Wonderland
message
128 "Are you kidding
me?"
129 Ocho minus cinco


Down
1 Roman censor
2 Game ender, at times
3 Chemical endings
4 Given prominence
5 "A diamond is
forever," e g
6 Saint-Germain-des-
Pr6s sights
7 Ohio or Colorado
Abbr
8 Some tennis winners
9 Head line?


10 Lanchester on the
screen
11 Little genius
12 Olive
13 Mid 16th-century
year
14 God with a shield
15 Launch party?
16 Was duplicitous
17 Former co-host of
"The View"
18 Lose it
24 -shanter
25 Of no interest
30 See 32-Down Abbr
32 Native of 30-Down
34 It's solid yellow
36 Take a peke?
37 Excitement
38 Debate ender
40 Do more than
threaten, say
41 Pilgrim
42 Anesthetized
43 Tore
44 Like some dorms
45 Title town of a
Longfellow poem
51 Chihuahua drink
52 Tandoor-baked
bread
53 Where heroes are
made
55 Elaine of "Seinfeld"
59 Represented
62 Outlaw Belle who is
said to have
harbored Jesse
James
63 Many a Little
League coach


64 River to the Rhone
66 When many German
steins are lifted
67 They get bigger
when you smile
69 Hit the runway
71 Astronomical
distance Abbr
72 Refrain syllables
73 Easter activity
74 Abhor
77 Actor Alain


80 Barely
81 "I did itl"
82 It's grounded every
Saturday
84 Prepare, as some
Mexican-style
beans
86 Aesop, notably
87 Places for gates
88 "That makes sense"
90 Saturn S U V
91 Conclusive trial


94 Lose it
98 Holiday quaff
99 Not worth
100 Singer of the 1958
#1 hit "It's Only
Make Believe"
101 The first "H" in
Hanukkah
105 Former TV judge
107 Suffix with cigar
108 Cousin of an
ostrich


109 Back-to-sch time
111 Growl
112 Sitting on one's
hands
113 Simba's mate
115 effort
116 Tactless
117 Mines over the
border
120 Actor Alastair
121 Cambodia's Lon


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2-B 1 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER

Get ready, get set, get gone


Now, before the first storm forms out there:
Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batter-
ies, non-perishable foods and other equipment you' 11
need to secure your property.
Prepare or update your survival kit, including
medicines, special dietary foods, blankets, pillows,
sleeping bags, flashlight, lots of batteries, a portable
radio, clothing, lightweight folding chairs, cots, per-
sonal items, quiet games and toys, important papers
and snacks. If you have a pet, include its needs as
well.
Develop a plan for where you'll go if you need
to leave home. Friends on the mainland or hurricane
shelter locations should be identified and a route to
the safe shelter plotted.
If advisories list Southwest Florida as a threat-
ened region, pay attention to local weather broadcasts
for updates, and:
Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
Collect your hurricane survival kit.
Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe
mooring.
Be prepared to board windows or protect them
with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to
small windows is mostly caused by wind-driven
debris; damage to larger windows may come from
debris, as well as wind pressure.
Bring indoors patio furniture, potted plants,
lawn ornaments and anything that can be moved.
Secure outdoor objects that can't be moved.
Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
Remember, water service may be disrupted for days
or weeks after a hurricane. You should have one
gallon of water per person per day, and you should
have at least a seven-day supply.
Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember
that electricity may be off for days or weeks, so make
plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten
cold. Check to make sure you have a manual can
opener.
Check all battery-powered equipment. Hurri-
cane experts caution against candles due to the threat
of fire.
Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buckets,
towels, cleansers and the like.
Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Pet-
friendly shelters will open in Manatee County, but the
animal must have all its shots and paperwork and be
in a carrier.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as
a possible landfall for a hurricane:
Board all windows.
Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving
the Island will be worse than you can imagine. Hur-


I-I
.. m a.
B^Kte^B^^^ 4 ^^


ricane authorities predict it will take 12-17 hours to
evacuate the Island.
Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for
shelter openings.
If officials order an evacuation:
Leave.
Leave your swimming pool filled and super
chlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise
cover the pool.
Turn off electricity and water to the property.
Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
Let your friends and relatives know where


you' re going.
Check with neighbors to make sure they have
a safe, timely ride out of the area.
After the hurricane passes:
Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
limited and you may not be able to return to your
home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
and live power lines, and emergency crews will need
time to make the area safe.
Expect security checkpoints, so make sure you
have valid identification showing your proper local
address.
Do not drive unless you must, and don't sight-
see. Roads should remain clear for emergency vehi-
cles.
Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may
have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
Re-enter your home with caution. Open win-
dows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the
house.
Be cautious with fire until you have checked
the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
Assess and photograph damage to structures
and contents to hasten insurance claims.
As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.

Islanders may not rec-
ognize the Sandbar Res-
taurant, which boarded
S windows for storms in
.- "1- the past and, sometimes,
after a storm passed by,
shoveled sand from its
deck. Most storms take
sand from the beach and
uncover rock revet-
ments.


.-4



it.. i- ,i. from Anna Maria
,.,.. ,, .l,,I. flyingng area in
1. l. ,. . ,,,, av near Arcadia,
/..,..a, i.... ... ..'re what remains of
I,. 'i. 11.- ,iiag the destruction
,, ti,.. p..,Il, Hurricane Charley.
I ,../.I .. o,.... ,ated when Charley
S., %i.../,, ... .) make landfall at
Si. igi. tl,i. i, ti- ofAnna Maria
P/..'..I, Ii,, ,,,i.. ad came ashore at
Sqphti It.. ..mnd Port Charlotte.


Stocking up for storms


Is that rust around the rim of the Spam can?
Are those batteries leaking?
With a new storm season comes reason to
review, repack and replenish supplies in the disas-
ter kit.
And don't fi Wg_.t iKh city-issued tag that allows
your return after an evacuation.
Emergency management experts recommend
storm kits contain five days worth of supplies,
including:
Water bottled H20 for drinking and gallon
containers of water for cleaning up.
Beverages.
Non-perishable foods, especially ready-to-eat
items.
Disposable utensils and plates.
Toiletries.
Cash, including a roll of quarters and small
bills for vending machines. Many vendors may
not be able to accept credit or ATM cards after a
storm.
Important papers, such as birth certificates,
passports, wills, address books, insurance docu-


ments, prescription.
Cooking pan.
Grill.
Medication.
First-aid kit.
Small tools.








Disaster kits sh. i.I
include cash, b .. ,..
systems to proc ...
credit cards or i..
dispense cash r/i.i\
be inoperable during
and after a storm,
particularly if there
is a prolonged power
outage.


Pocket knife. W
Flashlights. |
Candles. ..i
Matches. .4-, _1 IIIIII
Clothing.
Bedding.
Trash bags.
Lawn chairs.
Games and toys.
Battery-powered radio and earphones.
Batteries.
Cleaning supplies.
Rubber gloves.
Florida road map.
Reading materials, including The Islander
storm planning guide.



20 2 o- x- Sm

N .1ge-gapls
Joe Bi.0


& -


A.-RED




THE ISLANDER 0 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 B-3

Evacuating from home to shelter


County emergency management officials encour-
age residents to consider options other than public
shelter, including hotels or other lodging or stays
with family or friends out of the evacuation zone.
Turn to local media for public shelter openings,
including which shelter will serve as a pet-friendly
location and which shelter will serve people with
special needs. The designated special needs shelter
opens in advance of other shelters, but the location
changes depending on storm predictions.
Manatee County's shelter roster:
Bashaw Elementary School, 3515 Morgan
Johnson Road, Bradenton.
Bayshore Elementary School, 6120 26th St.
W., Bradenton.
Braden River Middle School, 6215 River Club
Blvd., Bradenton.
Braden River High School, 6545 State Road
70 E., Bradenton.
Buffalo Creek Middle School, 7320 69th St.
E., Palmetto.
Daughtrey Elementary School, 515 63rd Ave.
E., Bradenton.
Freedom Elementary School, 9515 State Road
64 E., Bradenton.
Gullett Elementary School, 12125 44th Ave.
E., Bradenton.
Haile Middle School, 9501 State Road 64 E.,
Bradenton.
Johnson Middle School, 2121 26th Ave. E.,
Bradenton.
Kinnan Elementary School, 3415 Tallevast
Road, Sarasota.
Lee Middle School, 4000 53rd Ave. W., Bra-
denton.
Lincoln Middle School, 305 17th St. E., Pal-
metto.
Manatee High School, 1000 32nd St. W., Bra-
denton.


In an evacuation, emergency management officials encourage people to seek shelter with friends or family,
but public shelters also are available. Islander File Photo


McNeal Elementary School, 6325 Lorraine
Road, Bradenton.
Miller Elementary School, 4201 Manatee Ave.
West, Bradenton.
Mills Elementary School, 7200 69th St. E.,
Palmetto.
Myakka City Elementary School, 37205 Man-
atee Ave., Myakka City.
Oneco Elementary School, 5214 22nd St.
Court E., Bradenton.
Prine Elementary School, 3801 Southern Park-
way, Bradenton.
Rodgers Garden Elementary School, 515 13th


Ave. W., Bradenton.
Rowlett Elementary School, 3500 Ninth St.
E., Bradenton.
Seabreeze Elementary School, 3601 71st St.
W., Bradenton.
Tillman Elementary School, 1415 29th St. E.,
Palmetto.
Williams Elementary School, 3404 Fort Hamer
Road, Parrish.
Willis Elementary School, 14705 The Masters
Ave., Bradenton.
Witt Elementary School, 200 Rye Road, Bra-
denton.


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4-B U 2012 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER

Stormy weather


Tropical cyclones are low-pressure systems that
have thunderstorm activity and rotate counterclock-
wise.
A tropical cyclone that has winds of 38 mph or
less is termed a tropical depression.
When the tropical cyclone's winds reach 39-73
mph, it is upgraded to a tropical storm.
When winds exceed 74 mph, the storm is con-
sidered a hurricane. The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane
Scale defines hurricane strength by categories, but
the category of the storm does not necessarily relate
directly to the damage it can inflict.
Lower category storms and even tropical storms
can cause substantial damage depending on what
other weather features they interact with, where they
strike and how slow they move.
Typical hurricanes are about 300 miles wide,
although they can vary considerably in size. The eye
at a hurricane's center is a relatively calm, clear area
about 20-40 miles across.
The eyewall surrounding the eye is composed
of dense clouds that contain the highest winds in the
storm.
The storm's outer rain bands often with hur-
ricane or tropical storm-force winds are made
up of dense bands of thunderstorms ranging from a
few miles to 10s of miles wide and 50 to 300 miles
long.
Hurricane-force winds can extend outward to
about 25 miles in a small hurricane and to more than
150 miles for a large one. Tropical storm-force winds


W 5 SW 45 a 30- 25s 20' s1- 10' PWest Ean 1I


|._, ,r* l iiuir

'40'



, .. *..
-0 4


.. -.. 1
..3 .,' . "'
"


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.. -a
.-- -. L.
- A u
.'
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9 as a a s' s7r S s r W w s 4 W 4 35 W 3


can stretch out as far as 300 miles from the center of
a large hurricane.
Frequently, the right side of a hurricane is the
most dangerous in terms of storm surge, winds and
tornadoes.
A hurricane's speed and path depend on com-
plex ocean and atmospheric interactions, including


This spaghetti
map shows
the path of the
2011 hur-
ricanes. The
first named
storm of 2012
was Alberto,
a weak tropi-
cal storm that
formed May
19 and never
made land-
fall. Islander
Graphic:
Courtesy
National Hur-
ricane Center


the presence or absence of other weather patterns.
Do not focus on the eye or the track hur-
ricanes are immense systems that can move in
complex patterns that are difficult to predict. Be
prepared for changes in size, intensity, speed and
direction.
Think of it as a huge tornado.


Boaters: brace against wind, waves


Some tips and cautions for boaters in hurricane
season:
If an anchorage/mooring plan calls for moving
vessels and there is sufficient notice, a boater should
relocate at least 48-72 hours before a storm is forecast
to strike.
Make sure fuel tanks are full, fuel filters are
clean, batteries are charged, bilges are clean, cockpit
drains are clear, fire-fighting equipment is working
and lifesaving equipment is in good condition.
Remove or secure deck gear, portable gear,
radio antennas, outriggers, fighting chairs, deck
boxes, tops and side canvas/curtains, sails, boom,
extra halyards, canister rafts and dinghies. Make sure
hatches, ports, doors, lazarettes and sailboat rudder
are secure.
If a vessel is moored at a dock or a canal, in a
river or in a marina near the ocean, it is possible that
with an additional 5-10 feet or greater storm surge,
the vessel could take a beating against the dock or
even crash into pilings.
The best offshore mooring for a vessel to ride
out a storm is in the center of a canal or narrow river
where at least doubled mooring lines can be secured
to both shores, port and starboard, fore and aft.
Do not raft vessels together at moorings or
docks, especially if larger and smaller vessels are


involved. The probability of damage to the vessels is
greater than if they are moored singly.
If the vessel must remain dockside at a private
dock or marina, heavy-duty fender boards should be
used on a bare-wood center piling. Lines should be
doubled and even tripled in length where necessary to


*, V. Key West resi-
dents try to get
a boat stranded
by Hurricane
Wilma back
into the water
by attaching a
rope. Islander
File Photo: Joc-
elyn Augustino/
FEMA









hold a vessel in the center of a berth or off seawall
or dock pilings.
Do not stay aboard a vessel during a storm.
Sources: National Hurricane Center, Florida
Division of Emergency Management, American
Boating Association.


Be safe,

be smart,

be ready ... When you

need to

TDIGIT .ee most, no

SAFETNET one can
Remember
Everything.



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Home and Small Business Inventories
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THE ISLANDER 0 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 B-5


Storm names: Short, distinctive


The first named storm
of 2012 was Tropical Storm
Alberto. The storm formed
around May 19 off the coast
of the Carolinas ahead of the
traditional June 1 start of hur-
ricane season.
The second named storm
for 2012, Beryl, was expected
Memorial Day weekend.
Tropical storm warnings
were issued for the coast of
north Florida to South Caro-
lina as a cluster of storms was


Hurricane
Irene tracked
up the Eastern
Shoreboard
and became
one of the
most costly
storms in
U.S. his-
tory, causing
widespread
damage and
disaster as far
north as Ver-
mont. Islander
Photo: Cour-
tesy National
Hurricane
Center


expected to become Tropical
Storm Beryl over the Memo-
rial Day weekend.
The first named storm of
2013 will be Andrea.
The use of short, distinc-
tive, assigned names is quicker
and less subject to error than
use of latitude-longitude iden-
tification methods for storms.
These advantages are
especially important in
exchanging detailed storm
information between hundreds


of widely scattered stations,
coastal bases and ships at sea,
according to the National Hur-
ricane Center.
Since 1953, Atlantic tropi-
cal storms have been named
from lists originated by the
NHC.
The first lists featured
only women's names. Then,
in 1979, men's names were
introduced. They alternate
on the list with the women's
names.


The only time there is a
change in the pre-set list is if
a storm is so deadly or costly
that the future use of its name
would be inappropriate and
insensitive.
In the event the number
of named tropical cyclones
occurring in the Atlantic basin
in a season exceeds 21 storms,
additional storm names will be
taken from the Greek alpha-
bet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma,
Delta, and so on.


The storm names for
the 2012
Atlantic hurricane
season are:
Alberto



Berylon








Ledie
Michael

OSCMI



Tony

Valerie
Micli.I




Ni.11.a(m


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6-B 1 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER


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Proof of vaccinations Carrier or cage
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Food/water bowls/can-opener
* Medications Cat litter and pan Trash bags
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941-730-5045
LIC# CBC 1253145


See us for all your storm needs...
ANP 1DE REAPY!


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213 54th Street Holmes Beach 778-3082
We are located just west of the Island Shopping Center


Coyrgh 02
The Ilande


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SRhutter'Vue
S Florida Living Without The Worries
Hurricane Protection Designed Solutions w7 0 eI a

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~-


HURRICANE & SECURITY PRODUCTS
V Roll Shutters V Accordions V Storm Panels
V Impact Windows V Impact Films V/Windscreen
Bradenton: 745-2363
Showroom: 8799 Cortez Rd. W. Bradenton
www Shutter Vue con CGC 1514957 CGC 061513 CGC 1517676


NF ? Anit |Ma ri
N PE The Islander





Storm name Date formed
Alberto May 19
Beryl ---- May 25
Chris o
Debby AZORES i.
Ernesto
Florence ____ ______
Gordon
Helene
BERMUDA Isaac
Joyce
Kirk _
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty -N
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Sean 20-N
Valerie
B.V .I. -
ANGUILLA W illiam
.ST. MARTIN
V.'. ST. KIS ATIGUA Source: National Hurricane Center
and NEVIS GUADE DUPE
DOMIF ICA A
MA TINIQUE
ST. LUCIA 0
SBARBADOS
GRENADA 0

N TRI NDAD __0N


LELA
651W 60-W 551W 50W 45-W 4O-W 35-W 30-W
___S/-TiN___________,


We've experienced many hurricane seasons.
Personal advice from three Island natives ... prepare
... don't panic. Possessions are replaceable.




SINCE 1957
"We ARE the Island!"
Marie Franklin, Lic. Real Estate Broker
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
E-mail amrealty@verizon.net
Web site www.annamariareal.com


THE ISLANDER 0 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 B-7

During any emergency
we are there for you!



WEST COAST
Air Conditioning-[Heating Inc

The Island Experts Since 1972
5347 Gulf Drive #4
Holmes Beach Business Center
778-9622
CELEBRATING 40 YEARS!
Serving the Islands since 1972 u




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& CARPET CILEANIiNG |

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Like it never even happened.





HARDWARDWARSTORES


" Lanterns & Fuel
" Flashlights
" Batteries
" Candles
" Tapes
" Plastic Bags
" Nails


CHECK LIST
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:
J Hand Tools
J Can Openers
J Portable Radios
J Coolers
J Sandbags
J Propane Cylinders
for Stoves & Grills


We'll help you with all the supplies you
need to be "storm ready."
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
Open Daily


Rains, High Winds & Powerful Storms
Be prepared to protect your
most important assets.
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8-B U 2012 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER


PET-FRIENDLY PLANNER


Any disaster that threatens humans, threatens
animals as well. So making arrangements for pets
- among the most vulnerable in a storm must be
part of any household disaster planning.
Some recommendations:
Make sure your pet has current immuniza-
tions.
If you plan to go to a motel, determine in
advance whether pets are welcome and what rules
apply. A good resource is www.petswelcome.com.
If you plan to board your pet, check whether
your veterinarian will be boarding in an emergency.
There's a chance the local vet's office will be evacuat-
ing as well.
Friends or relatives in a safe area are the best
choice for sheltering you and your pet.
Pack a pet survival kit that includes an ID collar
and rabies license tag, leashes, water and food bowls,
medications, food supply to last about two weeks,
newspapers/plastic bags for waste disposal, toys and
comfort items.
All pets should have secure carriers or collaps-
ible cages. Carriers should be large enough for the
pets to stand comfortably and turn around. Famil-
iarize your pets with the carrier ahead of time. The
carrier should be a comforting refuge if the animal
is required to live in it for days or weeks after the
storm.
Pets evacuated to the designated county pet-
friendly shelter are required to remain in the owner's
kennel.
Throughout the evacuation, your pet will need
calm and reassurance from you. Keep as close to its
normal routine as possible and speak to it regularly
in a calm, reassuring voice.


Lesson
learned?
Prepare
ahead r ,
Storm damage '
to boats can be a A" -
severe problem.
Not only are boats 4
damaged, but sea-
walls and docks
can suffer
the effect of the -
vessel crashing
and pushing at
its mooring. For
information about
securing a vessel
before a storm, go
to www.boatsafe.
com. Islander
File Photo


Baby Bird, a cairn terrier, gets familiar with her
kennel. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy

After the storm passes, take precautions if allow-
ing your pet outdoors. Familiar scents and sights may
be altered or gone, disorienting the animal. Addition-
ally, debris, insects, wildlife and water may present
hazards.

ON THE WEB
For more information about disaster planning
for a household with pets, go to www.humane-
society.org.


Tweeting in

the wind

NASA is a twitter. So are the National Hurricane
Center, NOAA and the National Weather Service.
The 2012 storm season has arrived, and govern-
ment agencies are using social media tools to keep
populations informed.
NASA Hurricane is sending regular tweets, as is
the NHC.
NOAA is getting "likes" on Facebook, as is the
Federal Emergency Management Agency and the
popular Weather Underground.

Additional Web resources for the storm season:
Manatee County Emergency Management:
www.mymanatee.org.
Florida Division of Emergency Management:
www.floridadisaster.org.
NOAA hurricane hunters: www.aoc.noaa.gov.
National Climatic Data Center: www.ncdc.noaa.
gov/oa/climate/severeweather/hurricanes.html.
FEMA: www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/.
National Flood Insurance Program: www.floods-
mart.gov.
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.
gov/.
U.S. Coast Guard storm center: www.uscg.mil/
news/stormcenter/.
Tropical Meteorological Project: tropical.atmos.
colostate.edu/Forecasts/.
Weather Underground: www.wunderground.com/
tropical/.
The Islander: www.islander.org.

Print resources
The Islander has contingency plans to continue
publishing through a storm, as do local daily news-
papers, including the Bradenton Herald and Sarasota
Herald-Tribune.
Especially in the event of widespread and lengthy
power outages, these resources may be the most reli-
able form of communicating information.

Television resources
Local television will report breaking news and
updates in the event of a storm, and Bay News 9 pro-
vides 24-hour news.


STORMIV FACTOID
The greatest threat to coastal communities
during a storm is storm surge, which is credited
with more deaths than any other storm element.
Hurricane Katrina in 2005 killed 1,836 people,
and the majority of those deaths are attributed to
storm surge. Storm surge is particularly danger-
ous if a storm makes landfall during high tide.





THE ISLANDER 0 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 B-9


Categorizing 'canes


The United States measures hurricanes using
the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, which provides
examples of the type of damage and impacts asso-
ciated with winds of certain intensities. In general,
damage rises by a factor of four for every category
increase.

Category 1
Wind: 74-95 mph.
Surge: 4-5 feet.
Effects: No real damage to building structures.
Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes,
shrubbery and trees. Also, some coastal flooding and
minor pier damage.

Category 2
Wind: 96-110 mph.
Surge: 6-8 feet.
Effects: Some roofing material, door and window
damage. Considerable damage to vegetation, mobile
homes, etc. Flooding damages piers and small craft
in unprotected moorings may break its moorings.


Category 3
Wind: 111-130 mph.
Surge: 9-12 feet.
Effects: Some structural damage to small resi-
dences and utility buildings, with a minor amount of
curtain-wall failures. Mobile homes are destroyed.
Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures
with larger structures damaged by floating debris.
Terrain may be flooded well inland.

Category 4
Wind: 131-155 mph.
Surge: 13-18 feet.
Effects: More extensive curtain-wall failures with


some complete roof-structure failure on small resi-
dences. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may
be flooded well inland.

Category 5
Wind: 155 mph and more.
Surge: 18 feet and more.
Effects: Complete roof failure on many resi-
dences and industrial buildings. Some complete
building failures with small utility buildings blown
over or away. Flooding causes major damage to lower
floors of all structures near the shoreline. Massive
evacuation of residential areas may be required.
Source: National Hurricane Center


Storm avengers caution that all coastal residents
should have a hurricane kit. What's in your kit?


Hurricane
survivor Katelin
Burkey looks
at damage
around her Port
Charlotte home
following Hur-
ricane Charley.
Charley was a
Category 4 hur-
ricane that was
forecast to make
a direct hit at
Anna Maria
Island, but
made landfall to
the south near
Port Charlotte.
Islander File
Photo: FEMA/
Andrea Booher





10-B U 2012 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER

Trying to reason with hurricane season


You might know an Islander or two or three who
knows lots about predicting the weather, especially as
it applies to fishing conditions, or how many inches
of rain it takes to flood Island streets, and they might
say they know just by feeling it in their bones.
But predicting hurricanes has become better with
t 1.'1, l11, .' V .
U.S. forecasters predicted last week that this
year's Atlantic hurricane season would produce about
nine to 15 tropical storms, with as many as four to
eight of those becoming hurricanes.
Keep in mind, they base predictions on science,
but they can not predict before the storm forms where
it will go.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin-
istration released its outlook for the June 1 start of
hurricane season, saying one to three storms could
become major hurricanes with top winds of 111 mph
or greater.
Though this season isn't expected to be as pro-
ductive last year was above-average officials
are again warning coastal residents to start stocking
up on hurricane supplies and forming evacuation
plans.
A near normal season doesn't mean anybody's
off the hook, according to one NOAA forecaster.
NOAA predicts atmospheric and marine condi-
tions indicate an era of high-activity that began in
1995 for Atlantic hurricanes will continue.
However, NOAA also expects the weather phe-
nomenon known as El Nino, which warms Pacific
waters near the equator and increases wind shear over
the Atlantic, may develop by late summer or early fall
and, if so, will suppress tropical storm development.
NOAA forecasters are indicating the expected
storms will cover a wider range this year due to
uncertainty of whether the El Nino pattern will con-
tribute or not.
This season got an early start May 19 when
Tropical Storm Alberto formed off the coast of the


'.S & .. .

Carolinas. Alberto dissipated in the Atlantic.
Tropical storm warnings were again issued for
the north Florida coast northward May 26 as Tropical
Storm Beryl formed over the Memorial Day week-
end, sending bands of rain across the area and causing
high surf and beach erosion on the eastern shores.
Forecasters name tropical storms when top winds
reach 39 mph; hurricanes have maximum winds of at
least 74 mph.
No major hurricane has made a U.S. landfall
in the last six years, since Hurricane Wilma cut
across South Florida in 2005. August will mark the
20th anniversary of the 1992 catastrophic Hurricane
Andrew landfall in South Florida as a Category 5
storm, a hurricane season that started late and pro-
duced a total of just six named storms.
The yearly hurricane season average is 11 named
storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. The
2011 hurricane season, one of the busiest on record


h 19 nd..,a .."'= Hur-
ricanes
Karl, left,

Julia were
part of the
onslaught
ofAtlantic

the 2010
hurricane
season.
Islander
File
Photo:
NOAA





with 19 named storms, produced Irene, one of the
costliest storms in U.S. history.
Irene killed at least 47 people in the United
States and at least eight people in the Caribbean and
Canada as it followed a rare path up the Eastern sea-
board from North Carolina.
Flooding from the storm was the most destruc-
tive event to hit Vermont in nearly a century, kill-
ing six people and leaving hundreds homeless, and
damaging or destroying hundreds of miles of roads,
scores of bridges, numerous schools and government
buildings and hundreds of homes.
Many New Englanders were caught by surprise
and unprepared for the hurricane, but Floridians get
a great deal of warning and pleas to be prepared.
That time is now.
Hurricane season ends Nov. 30, and the peak
period for hurricane activity runs from August
through October.


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THE ISLANDER U 2012 STORM PLANNER U B-11

Hurricane fierceness dims with time


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Most Floridians today clearly recall
the destruction of Hurricane Katrina in
2005. The Category 5 storm wandered
in the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall
near New Orleans, and its devastation
and power were visible day and night,
thanks to the plethora of television news
channels that covered the storm and its
aftermath.
Many Floridians remember Hur-
ricane Andrew in 1992, which bore
through south Miami like a hot knife
through butter. That hurricane left thou-
sands homeless and without electricity
or drinking water for weeks, and resulted
in major changes to the Florida's build-
ing codes.
Yet, even today, there are probably
many on Anna Maria Island and in west
Bradenton who believe it won't happen
here.
But weatherman Dan Noah of the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration's Ruskin office said,
"It's not a question of if, but when."
In 2005, there were about 17 mil-
lion people living in Florida. Back
in 1960, when Category 4 Hurricane
Donna ripped through central Florida,
only around 3 million people lived in
the state.
There was no cable TV then, no
instant news, and no daily coverage. In
fact, there was very little national cov-
erage. The Tampa television network
stations there were only three at
that time carried limited news and
showed some of the destruction. Even
that was limited to a few black-and-
white images.
Time makes us forget that Hur-
ricane Donna still holds the record for
the longest period nine days a hur-
ricane was at Category 3 or higher on
the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane scale, or
that it did $3.3 billion in 1960 dollars in
damages.
Even those Islanders who lived
through Donna have difficulty remem-
bering the events of Aug. 29-Sept. 16,
1960, the life-span of the storm.


- - -" "
Dale Woodland of Anna Maria was
about 10 years old that early September
when his parents began talking about
a major hurricane that was apparently
headed toward Florida.
"I was only 10. I didn't worry about
a hurricane. We just figured it would
be rainy for a day or two," Woodland
recalls. "But I remember my parents
started to worry, so the hurricane must
have been pretty powerful."
With hurricane path predictions not
as accurate in 1960 as they are now, the
course of the hurricane then a Cat-
egory 4 storm, which made landfall near
Marathon on Sept. 10 was an uncer-
tain course.
Weather forecasters predicted the
storm would likely parallel the west
coast of Florida, making another land-
fall anywhere from Naples to Tampa
Bay. With sustained winds of 140 mph
reaching out some 60-80 miles from
the center, there was sure to be serious
damage.
"We lived on Mangrove then,"
Woodland recalled. "I remember mom
and dad and the Frank Vaders family
decided to go to Al Robson's house. He
was an architect and had built a pretty
strong house, my parents said."
Robson's house, which was recently
torn down, was at 60 N. Shore Drive,
Anna Maria.


Remem-
ber
Katrina?
The
"p storm
name
was
recalled. His parents appearetired,
and Woodland began to th in 2005.
Islanders
Photo:
National'
Hur-
reven think about," he recalled. "I cane
Center




Woodland said he and his sib-
lings were just looking to have fun, he
recalled. His moviparents appeared worried,
and Woodlbegand began to think there might
be more to this hurricane than he thought
when the adults began stocking up on
canned goods, candles and lanterns.
"That's something u80 miles kids didn't
even think about," he recalled. "I don't
remember much, but we were told then
storm was moving slow and it would be
a 10-hour event."
It began raining mid-afternoon Sept.
10, according to the NOAA file on Hur-
ricane Donna. The rain became stron-
ger through the night as the hurricane
passed, although recall is how there was near
Lakeland, nearly 80 miles from Annae
Maria Island, the NOAA report states.
Hurricane Donna made landfall
between Naples and Fort Myers, then
made a movement to the east. It went upa
the cer hofm the state, and then moved
back into the Atlantic Ocean near Day-
tona Beach, according to NOAA.
"What I do recall is how the wind
howled," Woodland said. "I had never
experienced anything like that."
Woodland said he can't remember
if there was a mandatory evacuation or
not, but he believes most people stayed
in their homes that night.
In the morning, following the pas-
sage of Donna, Woodland remembers


the sun was shining and the waters were
calm.
"But the palm fronds were every-
where. I'd never seen so many. The palm
trees were stripped. There were a lot of
vacant lots in the city then and they were
all flooded, as were the streets."
Woodland said it was only when
he grew older that he realized what an
impact a Category 4 hurricane would
have on Anna Maria Island.
Noah said computer models run by
the National Hurricane Center show that
a Category 4 hurricane not a Category
5 making landfall on Anna Maria
Island would create a storm surge 15
feet high that would move inland about
10 miles to Interstate 75. Anna Maria
Island would be covered with 5-10 feet
of mud and also could be split into two
parts in Holmes Beach.
"And don't think it's not ever going
to happen," Noah said. It could be this
year, it could be in 100 years, but sooner
or later, a major hurricane will strike the
Island area.
"Nature has been creating hurricanes
for thousands of years. We've only got
data from 1850," he said.
NOAA computers show, since 1850,
19 hurricanes of Category 3 strength or
greater have passed within 60 miles of
Anna Maria Island.
"But our hurricane forecast for this
season is down," Noah said. The NHC
prediction is for 10 named storms this
season, with only four becoming hur-
ricanes and just two of Category III or
higher.
"Remember, though," Noah said,
"that in 1992, we only predicted seven
hurricanes and one of them became
Andrew."
Andrew was, until Katrina, the
costliest hurricane in U.S. history, caus-
ing more than $33 billion in damages,
according to NOAA.
Noah, however, is not being an
alarmist, he said, just a realist. He's
asking people to be prepared for every
hurricane season, and don't wait until a
hurricane is predicted to make landfall
nearby before starting preparations.


Tracking apps


Caution: No wake


Yes, there is an app for that.
More than a dozen apps exist for
tracking hurricanes and other severe
weather for iPhones, Androids, Black-
berries and other mobile devices.
A number of apps, at least for the
iPhone, can be downloaded for free,
including:
The Weather Channel, which fea-
tures radar maps and severe weather
alerts.
Hurricane Track, which offers
eight radar animations, projected paths
and tropical weather summaries.
iHurricane, the most popular hur-
ricane tracking app with alert PUSH
notifications and interactive maps.
Hurricane Hub, with eyewit-
ness reports, breaking news, volunteer
opportunities and storm histories.
Hurricane Tracker, which can
be downloaded for a specific state
and offers alerts, satellite maps and
radar.
Hurricane Forecaster, which
offers current storm locations, poten-
tial paths and 48-hour forecasts.
Top-ranked for-sale apps include


Kitty Code's Hurricane and EZ Apps
Hurricane Tracker.


Hl W.. .-.,e of
.0 ""t'im er
, ,I I'* ... ,
II"!", tor
Ili,. torm
,%.- .


Island


connection

To get storm updates directly
related to Anna Maria Island, sign up
for the newspaper's breaking news
posts and alerts at www.islander.org.
Links to connect to The Islander's
Facebook page and Twitter feed also
can be found at www.islander.org.


Islanders are fond of telling new-
comers and vacationers that for what-
ever reason karma, geography or luck
- Anna Maria Island has not suffered a
direct hurricane strike.
Islanders cannot say the same of
flooding. On a barrier island, flooded
streets and sometimes flooded homes,
can come with a simple occurrence of
a fast, hard rain event at high tide.
Driving through flooded streets can
damage vehicles, as well as threaten
health and safety of people.
Some cautions:
Floods are the most common haz-
ards in the United States.
Floods can be local, impacting
a neighborhood or community, as can
be the case of thunderstorm-associated
floods, or impacting an entire region, as
can be the case in a hurricane.
Most cars will float and can be
swept away in 18-24 inches of moving
water.
Trucks and SUVs do not fare
much better, with only 6-12 more
inches of clearance.
Flooded road bottoms can wash


away, making the water much deeper
than it appears.
If you drive through high water,
you should quickly wash the car and its
undercarriage.
Some precautions:
Keep any vehicle well-maintained
and supplied with emergency supplies.
In a ground-level home on the
Island, consider raising some items,
including expensive furniture pieces,
appliances and television as well as
both the AC air handler indoors and the
condenser outside the home.
Look around your property to keep
drains clear and remove any vegetation
that might clog the stormwater drainage
system.


Did you Iknovaw?
Hurricane Katrina, which made
landfall along the Louisiana coast
Aug. 29, 2005, killed 1,833 people
in the United States and cost an esti-
mated $125 billion. Katrina was the
costliest tropical cyclone in U.S. his-
tory.








Wistoty1 Iemo: Tmages


after Huw i MaaeN a


L~1na~L


KATRINA'S STRIKE
Hurricane Katrina was the sixth strongest hurricane ever recorded
and the third strongest hurricane ever recorded to make landfall
in the U.S.
In New Orleans, the evacuation plan was particularly crucial
because it is in the Storm Surge Zone, below sea level (up to six
feet in some places). Its levees were only designed for a Category
3 and Katrina was forecast as a Category 4 with gusts topping
140 mph.
The storm surge from Katrina was 20-feet high.
The failure of the levees was due to system design flaws for
the most part, combined with the lack of adequate maintenance.
Apparently, the designers, builders and maintenance people did
not devote enough time or attention to the levees in the region.
More than one million Gulf Coast residents have been displaced
and many of the refugees were living below the poverty line
before the storm struck.
The final death toll was at 1,836, primarily from Louisiana
(1,577) and Mississippi (238). It's very difficult to determine the
exact cause of the deaths but they were all caused either directly
or indirectly by the hurricane.
An estimated 80 percent of New Orleans was under water,
up to 20 feet deep in places.
Hurricane Katrina caused $75 billion in estimated physical
damages, the most costly hurricane in history, but it is estimated
that the total economic impact in Louisiana and Mississippi may
exceed $150 billion.
About 90,000 square miles were affected by Katrina.
Before the hurricane, the region supported approximately one
million non-farm jobs, with 600,000 of them in New Orleans, but
hundreds of thousands of local residents were left unemployed
by the hurricane.
More than 70 countries pledged monetary donations or other
assistance. Kuwait made the largest single pledge of $500 mil-
lion, but Qatar, India, China, Pakistan and Bangladesh also made
very large donations.
Source: National Geographic


These Katrina images were taken by Islander office manager Lisa Williams as
she made her way through Gulfport, Miss., in the aftermath of Katrina to join a
camp of volunteers who lived and worked in tents and collected, fed and cared
for more than 100 homeless pets for many weeks. Williams eventually adopted
one of the homeless dogs one that took a liking to her and was unclaimed.
"Barry Manilow," part greyhound and possibly part German shepherd, had a
good life on Anna Maria Island after the storm.


Lisa Williams with
"Barry Manilow,"
bottom left, and some
of the dogs rescued by
Williams from Manatee
County Animal Services
that she later found
homes for through her
no-kill rescue group,
MoonRacer.


12-B 0 2012 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER


~d~P~~