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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00366
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Uniform Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Publication Date: 06-01-2011
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00074389:00366

Full Text




- SPECIAL

storm

planner.


kML


Skimming
the news ...


SBlood drive

June 4-5.

Page 10


Kiddie

captains.

Page 14


46


Astheworld Terns Iro ' W o Ai sr"6 Martia Island Since 1992 ..
pack a hurricane kit.
Page6 .. Above-normal hurricane season predicted


BB seawall fix needed.
Page 2

Meetings
The government cal-
endar. Page 3


AM may review
telecom ordinance.
Page 4

$$$$$$$$
WMFR rates to rise.
Page 5

geions
The Islander editorial,
reader letters. Page 6
Islamn f1
happens
Community news,
announcements.
Page 10
O0G00000
000(3000;
Goings on around
AMLJ o ie


Island police I
Page 12
wra -- a


Expansion, lun
menu. Page 15
Terns and turti
Pages 16-17
Alm


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Government forecasters are predicting an
above-normal hurricane season for the Atlan-
tic basin.
The predication came in the seasonal
outlook produced by the Climate Prediction
Center of the National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration. The outlook ushered
in the six-month hurricane season that begins
June 1.
The CPC predicted:
* 12 to 18 named storms with winds of 39
mph or higher.
* Six to 10 of those storms could become
hurricanes, with winds of 74 mph or higher.
* Three to six of those hurricanes could
be category 3, 4 or 5, with winds of 111 mph
or higher.
Another group of forecasters, scientists
at Colorado State University, also predicts an
above-average season. CSU's forecast released
in April predicted 16 named storms, including
nine hurricanes, five of them major.
The seasonal average is for 11 named
storms, including six hurricanes, two of them
major hurricanes.
"The United States was fortunate last year.
Winds steered most of the season's tropical


.. ....

-- r
Hurricanes Karl, left, Igor and Julia were part of the onslaught of Atlantic storms that formed
in last year's hurricane season. Islander File Photo: NOAA


storms and all hurricanes away from our coast-
lines," NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco
stated with the release of the report. "However,
we can't count on luck to get us through this
season. We need to be prepared, especially with
this above-normal outlook."


The forecasters based their outlook on sev-
eral climate factors, including:
* An era of continued high activity. Since
1995, the NHC has charted more active hur-
ricane seasons.
PLEASE SEE HURRICANE, PAGE 3


Investigation continues at golf club


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
There's a rule of etiquette that conscien-
tious golfers follow: Always show consider-
ation for others on the course. Do not disturb
play with talking or making unnecessary
noise.


The same rule is being followed off the
Sfe course by members of the Key Royale Club,
the only golf course on Anna Maria Island.
potter. The private, members-only club is deal-
ing with financial issues that have prompted
BiZ a police investigation. But the board of direc-
tors, as well as many members contacted by
The Islander, are refrain-
ing from comment.
nch on 1 "I have no com-
5 E ment on that. Thank you,"
club president Craig Hum-
les. phreys said May 26 when
asked about Key Royale's
* Humphreys situation.


S h@1I
AME: Fond bye to
teacher, hello to prin-
cipal. Page 18



L;
Sports and fishing:
Hooke, tarpon run.
Page 21


On May 18, Hum-
phreys wrote a "Dear members" letter that
referred to an embezzlement of club funds, a
police investigation, court subpoenas of bank
video and, also, a drive to keep the club oper-
ating despite financial difficulty.
Meanwhile, the Holmes Beach Police
Department continues to investigate.
HBPD Chief Jay Romine was hesitant
to say much about the active investigation,
including how the matter reached HBPD,
where Detective Mike Leonard is in charge


of the case.
"It's a financial-based investigation,"
Romine said May 25.
He added, "We're basically just looking into
what happened up there. But we are not identify-
ing a suspect right now."
HBPD has been investigating for several
weeks, according to the chief.
Humphreys' letter to members characterized
the financial-based matter as "embezzlement"
and stated that the club filed claims "under our
$50,000 fidelity bond coverage for employee
dishonesty."
"The embezzlement is regrettable, but please
do know that we are pursuing every means of
prosecution and recovery, while we continue to
operate the club in the manner to which you are
accustomed," he wrote.
As a safeguard, the club hired a bookkeeper
last month and plans to share the office adminis-
trator duties between two employees "to achieve
the necessary checks and balances in the han-
dling of our finances," Humphreys stated.
He also stated that the club is shopping
around for an accounting firm.
In the short-term, the club, according to
Humphreys' letter, has put on hold a plan for
additional clubhouse renovations, requested a
bank increase its line of credit from $150,000
to $300,000 to deal with cash-flow issues and
outlined a campaign to ask members "to step up
and help restore financial stability to our club"
if necessary.
Club treasurer Tim Friesen declined to com-


ment on the matter. "I have nothing to tell you,"
he said May 26.
Many members said the same, though in
the brief interviews there was general agree-
ment that the club's day-to-day operation hasn't
changed and the golfing is good.


Diver dies

offshore of AMI
The U.S. Coast Guard on May 19 reported
the death of a 52-year-old male scuba diver who
was diving about 12 miles west of Anna Maria
Island.
Coast Guard officials in Cortez were noti-
fied around 6 p.m. that day that a diver from a
23-foot Carolina skiff anchored 12 miles west
of the Island had surfaced and became distressed
and unresponsive, according to a friend on the
boat.
A USCG motor launch was dispatched from
Cortez to the location of the boat, where the man
and the friend had been diving. Upon arrival,
Coast Guard crewmembers began CPR and took
the unresponsive diver and the other diver to the
Coquina Beach boat ramp in Bradenton Beach.
They were met at the ramp by EMS techni-
cians who joined the CPR effort, but without
success.
Coast Guard officials in Miami had not yet
responded to a request for the victim's name by
press deadline.





2 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER

Bradenton Beach mayor: seawall fix a must


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Bradenton Beach Mayor Bob Bartelt says a city
seawall on the bay side of Sixth Street South must be
rebuilt in the next year.
The capital improvement project could mean that
the city commission will consider raising the city's mill-
age rate, which has not increased since 2002. The city's
fiscal position won't be clear until later this month or
early July.
Bartelt, meeting with commissioners and city staff
May 25, stressed the urgency of the situation at Sixth
Street South. The seawall is close to a lift station, the
mayor said, "and we know what it's lifting."
Public works director Tom Woodard observed
that the existing seawall is "only one cinderblock in
width."
That prompted Bartelt to add, "I don't think it was
ever constructed to hold."
The meeting last week was held to discuss capital
improvement projects necessary in fiscal year 2011-12,
which begins Oct. 1. For this year, the commission bud-
geted a minimal amount for capital improvements and
spent an unexpected $350,000 for a Gulffront parcel
that settled a longstanding lawsuit.
"That was a good chunk of change," said city clerk
Nora Idso.
Before the meeting, Idso presented the elected offi-
cials with a memo outlining the city's financial position
and expectations for the next year.
The mayor summed up the situation - the city's
basic expenses are going up, but revenues continue to
drop with falling property values.
"The numbers are what they are," Idso said.
Quickly the focus turned to the seawall and then
taxes.
A report prepared last October by LTA Engineers of
Bradenton identified a number of problems with city-
owned seawalls on the bayside.
LTA's survey found that some seawalls need repair
and others need replacement. The priority, however, was


at Sixth Street South. The survey said there is no cap
on the seawall, which is in poor condition. A drainage
sheet flows down Sixth Street South to grass and then
over the top of the structure into the bay.
Woodard said the replacement cost was estimated
at $25,000.
"Last year we put very, very little money into capital
improvements," Bartelt said. "This year we are saying
we need to have some increase in capital improvement
just to mitigate the high dangers that we have."
Commissioner Janie Robertson said protecting the
city's perimeter, which includes the seawall work, must
be a priority in the next year.
"It's the most important thing we can do," she
said.
And, she added, "I have no qualms about raising
millage" if necessary.


III The Sixth
Street South
seawall in
Bradenton
Beach must
be rebuilt,
according to
city offi-
f � cials and an
S' engineering
consultant.
SThe project
could cost
S$25,000.
S,,Islander
V "Photo: Lisa
... Neff






But Commissioner Jan Vosburgh does. "I would be
absolutely against raising the village rate," she said.
"I don't think we should burden our citizens more....
Never increase taxes in a down economy."
Robertson and Bartelt, as well as Commissioner
Gay Breuler, emphasized that raising the rate would be
a last resort.
"If there is a way that we can come up with a budget
that doesn't raise taxes, that would always be the first
goal of all of us," Breuler said.
Commissioner Ed Straight added, "Raising the
millage rate doesn't necessarily mean more money out
of people's pockets. My taxes have dropped consider-
ably" because of declines in taxable value.
The city commission will begin taking a closer look
at budgeting for 2011-12 in July. A new budget must be
adopted in September.


Overlooking Tampa Bay and The Gulf of Mexico


Northern Tip Of Anna Maria Island Lunch: Every Day 11:30am-4:00pm;
Arsrm hCtPrin :g- u gg*
I I I So uthBy olvadFi -at A
A M I n 9 8 5tr s


Si







Watch for falling trees
Florida Power & Light Co. will have tree-trimming by "providing access to trees near power lines behind
crews on Anna Maria Island during the summer months, your property."
cutting and trimming tree branches and vegetation that If access to a property is necessary, FPL said it
might interfere with power lines, would contact the owner before performing any work.
A press release from FPL's vegetation management Additionally, FPL strongly advised property owners
division said the company is "committed to protecting against trimming trees or vegetation near power lines.
and maintaining our environment while providing safe An FPL spokesperson said property owners would
and reliable electric service." be advised several days in advance of any tree-trimming
Tree limbs and branches near power lines can operation in their area and a schedule for Anna Maria
cause "safety hazards and power outages" during windy Island trimming locations and times would be released
weather, FPL said. in the near future.
FPL is asking area property owners to assist them For more information, call FPL at 866-274-9098.
HURRICANE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


* WarmAtlantic Ocean water. Surface temperatures
where storms often develop and move across the Atlan-
tic are up to 2 degrees warmer-than-average.
* La Nifia, which continues to weaken in the equato-
rial Pacific Ocean, is expected to dissipate in the coming
weeks, but its impacts, such as reduced wind shear, are
expected to continue into the hurricane season.
"In addition ... seasonal climate models also indi-
cate an above-normal season is likely, and even 'L IPL.
we could see activity comparable to some of the active
seasons since 1995," said Gerry Bell, lead hurricane
forecaster at the CPC.
The forecasters' seasonal outlook does not predict
where or when storms might hit. For each storm, the
NHC forecasts how weather patterns affect a storm's
track, intensity and landfall potential.
"The tornadoes that devastated the South and the
large amount of flooding we've seen this spring should
serve as a reminder that disasters can happen anytime
and anywhere," FEMA administrator Craig Fugate said.
"Now is the time, if you haven't already, to get your
plan together for what you and your family would do
if disaster strikes."
In late May, Island officials - representatives
from local governments and first-responder agencies
- attended a state hurricane conference in preparation
for the new storm season.
They returned to remind citizens to get prepared by


completing disaster plans and stocking disaster kits.
Advice on such will be presented during a forum at
6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.
The event, presented by the center, American Red
Cross and Community Emergency Response Team, will
present a discussion of hurricane basics by emergency
management officials, disaster relief reps and a meteo-
rologist.

Plan re-entry after evacuation
With the arrival of the 2011 Atlantic hurricane
season, officials are reminding residents that they
need re-entry tags to return to Anna Maria Island
after an evacuation.
The hang-tags are distributed at city halls.
One hang-tag is issued per residence to applicants
with photo identification and proof of residency.
Residents who already have hang-tags do not
need a new tag. Nor do residents who have changed
vehicles since registering for a tag.
Anna Maria residents seeking additional infor-
mation can call city hall at 941-708-6130.
In Holmes Beach, call the police department at
941-708-5807.
In Bradenton Beach, call city hall at 941-778-
1005.


THE ISLANDER U June 1, 2011 E 3


Metngs
Anna Maria City
* June 1, 6:30 p.m., EEEC meeting.
* June 7, 9 a.m., LDR meeting.
* June 9, 6 p.m., city commission meeting.
* June 14, 9 a.m., LDR meeting.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, 941-708-
6130, www.cityofannamaria.com.

Bradenton Beach
* June 1, 3 p.m., joint city commission/planning
and zoning meeting.
* June 2, 1 p.m., pier team meeting.
* June 2, 1:30 p.m., web team meeting.
* June 2, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
* June 6, 3 p.m., ScenicWAVES meeting.
* June 8, 3 p.m., planning and zoning board meet-
ing.
* June 15, 1 p.m., CRA meeting.
* June 16, 1 p.m., city commission meeting.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
941-778-1005, www.cityofbradentonbeach.org.

Holmes Beach
* June 14, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
* June 16, 10 a.m., code enforcement meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive, 941-
708-5800, www.holmesbeachfl.org.

West Manatee Fire Rescue District
* June 16, 6 p.m., commission meeting.
WMFR administration building, 6417 Third Avenue
W., Bradenton, 941-741-3900.

Of Interest
* June 1, 1:30 p.m., Manatee County budget presen-
tation, administrative building, Bradenton. Budget work
meetings set for June 6, June 9, June 14, June 16.
* June 1, hurricane season begins.
* June 7,9 a.m., Manatee County commission meet-
ing, administrative building, Bradenton.
Send notices to Lisa Neffat lisaneff@islander.org.


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4 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria may review telecom ordinance


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria commissioners balked at hiring Rusty
Monroe and his company, the Center for Municipal
Solutions, to rewrite the city's cell tower ordinance,
even though the CMS agreement commissioners read
at their May 26 meeting said the first five hours of work
on a new ordinance would be at no cost to the city.
Commissioner John Quam said he understood the
city might use Monroe to review and process any cell
tower applications, not to write a new ordinance. He
pointed out that the city has a cell-tower ordinance and
accompanying master wireless-services plan adopted
in 2003 at a cost to the city of $60,000.
Since the 2003 ordinance was adopted, no cell
tower builder or cellular communications provider has
submitted an application to the city to build a tower,
although several have made informal presentations.
"I'm not so sure we need a new ordinance," Quam
said.
Based upon how long it took to write the 2003 ordi-
nance, Quam said a new ordinance is "not going to be
five hours" to write, but much longer.
Commissioner Dale Woodland agreed, but sug-
gested the current ordinance might need a professional
review.
"The first function is to find out if we need a new
ordinance, or need to revise this one," he said. With all
the changes in cell phone/tower tlh. Ih 11', 'lo.'\ since 2003,
Woodland said a good, professional review is needed.
Woodland said Monroe suggested a number of
"short-term" solutions when he made a presentation to
the commission at its May 9 work session. It might be
a good idea to get those in writing from Monroe and
distribute them to city residents, Woodland said.


This example of a cell tower-flag pole is the type
being considered for placement at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center.

Commission Chair Chuck Webb said the mayor
should contact Monroe to get a cost estimate of a pro-
fessional review of the city's ordinance. Commissioners
agreed, and Selby said he would contact Monroe for an


New beach
sign design
The Anna Maria Island
Beach Cafe, 4000 Gulf
i Drive, Holmes Beach,
plans to replace its sign
at the entrance to the
-iOP . lt I beach with a 9-foot tall
sign that includes a mes-
EAM sage board. United Park
. , Services Inc. first pro-
posed a design plan to
S . the Holmes Beach City
Commission in April
that featured a 19-foot
IN C KH sign. The commission
SF said then that the height
.ING requirement must meet
the non-conforming use
- 0784 of the beach cafe and
the city's zoning code
'* - restrictions. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan


answer prior to the June 9 commission work session.
The mayor apologized to commissioners for the
draft agreement presented.
He said he was in Fort Lauderdale for the annual
hurricane conference and telephoned Monroe to have
a basic contract sent to the city for distribution to com-
missioners by meeting time.
"Most of this is just boiler-plate information," he
said. Any agreement between the city and CMS would
be crafted to suit both parties, he acknowledged.
Bradenton Beach contracted with Monroe to write
its cell tower ordinance, and Webb suggested the mayor
get a copy of that for commissioners to review along
with Monroe's cost estimate.
In other business, commissioners unanimously
approved a request by Mike and Lizzie Vann Thrasher
to have an electric cable installed underground between
two properties they own on opposite sides of the south
side of the Pine Avenue-Tarpon Street intersection.
Aubry recused himself from voting and discussion,
stating he had prepared the design for the Thrashers.
City attorney Jim Dye said Aubry did not have to
recuse himself from discussion, just the vote, but Aubry
offered no comment on the proposal.
The approved agreement requires the Thrashers to
post notices on each side of the right of way informing
the public and any utility or construction company in the
area of the underground cable, and requires each party
to give a six-month notice if either intends to terminate
the agreement.
The underground cable would be encased in PVC
pipe and would pose no danger to the public or the city,
according to the application request.
"This is really just a request to use the right of way,"
city attorney Jim Dye said, which is something the com-
mission can approve without an ordinance or public
hearing. It's between a private entity and the city, not a
public entity, he said.
Commissioners and Selby also thanked the Thrash-
ers for moving the Angler's Lodge to their Anna Maria
Historic Green Village development on Pine Avenue,
thereby preserving the 1913-built structure.
To their embarrassment, the Thrashers were given a
round of applause by commissioners, Selby and mem-
bers of the gallery.
Commissioners also agreed to adopt Manatee
County's fertilizer ordinance that becomes effective in
June 2012. The ordinance prohibits the use of certain
fertilizers to treat lawns because the fertilizers drain
into area waters, including Tampa Bay and the Gulf of
Mexico.
Webb said he liked the ordinance, but understood
enforcement might be an issue as the county left that to
each municipality.

Write, click, comment
The Islander welcomes photos and notices of the mile-
stones in readers' lives - weddings, anniversaries, travels
and other events. Comments on stories may be made to
news@islander.org or 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach
FL 34217, or online at www.islander.org


~IB1C��ji�;.� .r




THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 5 5

Fire district rates going up - again


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The West Manatee Fire Rescue District board voted
- reluctantly - at its May 19 meeting to approve an
increase in the annual assessment paid by district resi-
dents for fire service.
But the board rejected WMFR Chief Andy Price's
request for a 4.13 percent increase, the maximum
allowed by law. The board, 3-1, voted to increase the
assessment by 3.75 percent. Commissioner Scott Ricci
voted against the increase, saying he preferred a 3.5
percent increase or none at all.
Price said he was concerned how to meet the
annual operating budget requirements in a few years
time without the benefit of ad valorem taxes. District
voters have defeated that idea for WMFR revenues
three times since 2004.
Commissioner Jesse Davis said that during diffi-
cult economic times the fire district has to "live within
its means." He said he didn't know how WMFR was
"going to make it" but everything, especially fuel, is
increasing.
Commissioner Randy Cooper noted that WMFR
spent nearly $1.7 million on buying and remodel-
ing a new administrative headquarters and is spend-
ing $307,000 to remodel and enlarge Station No. 1 in
Holmes Beach.
"Is this a good time to go to the maximum
requested?" he asked.
Price said firefighters have not had a raise in two


years and salaries are now below the area average.
About 80 percent of the WMFR's $5.5 million annual
budget goes toward personnel costs, including salaries
and benefits.
With a 3.75 percent increase in the annual assess-
ment, Price said homeowners would likely pay about
$12 more annually, while business owners' costs might
go up $15 to $18. The assessment increase depends
upon the square footage.
The present base rate for residences, mobile homes
and condominiums is $159.22 for the first 1,000 square
feet, then 9.4 cents for each additional square foot. A
4.13 percent increase would have put the base assess-
ment at $165.80.
Commercial buildings pay $375.72 in base assess-
ment, while a vacant lot pays $21.
Davis said the district is up against issues it can't
control, such as annexation by Bradenton, few areas for
development and ever-increasing fuel and utility costs.
He agreed that Station No. 1 and No. 2 need repairs
and remodeling, but he didn't know where the money
would come from. "What are we to do?" Davis asked.
Price said revenues are not going to get any better
and meeting the budget will be harder in a few years.
"It's going to be a struggle."
Ricci said the district needs to talk with Bradenton
officials about coverage on Perico Island, which is in
Bradenton, although the closest fire station is in the
WMFR district.
WMFR gets nothing for being the first-responder


in that area, Ricci observed.
Perico Island and some areas in northwest Bra-
denton formerly were in the WMFR district, but were
annexed by Bradenton.
"The city of Bradenton has been ripping us off,"
said Davis. L\ .il) time they take from us, we lose and
we have no -i'1\\ilt area."
Holmes Beach City Commissioner Al Robinson
said WMFR has more than $3 million in its reserve
account, yet is raising the assessment. "It's insanity,"
he said.
Robinson also noted that Ross Built Construction
of Holmes Beach was awarded the $500,000 contract
to remodel the administration building on Third Avenue
West, and objected to the same company receiving the
$300,000 contract to remodel Station No. 1. He ques-
tioned why the station needs remodeling.
Ricci said a lot of the $307,000 remodeling of Sta-
tion No. 1 is a waste of money, especially a $33,000
sprinkler system.
Other board members disagreed and voted 3-1 to
award the contract to Ross Built, with Ricci voting no.

Did you know?
About 36.8 million people - about 12 percent of
the U.S. population - live in the coastal portions of
states most threatened by Atlantic hurricanes. In 1960,
the population of this area - the coasts from North
Carolina to Texas - was 14 million.


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6 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER




-p111o1011


Charley remembered
After Anna Maria Island was spared the brunt of
Hurricane Charley in 2004, we asked, "How do you
spell relief?"
While Islanders were contemplating their relief
from having had a major hurricane come so close,
bearing down so long and barely veering away before
making landfall in Charlotte County, that relief turned
out to be short-lived.
Folks here quickly turned their thoughts to relief
and aid for those folks less fortunate than us, those in
the path of Hurricane Charley.
Our sense of w . I1 I xini had become someone else's
heartache.
We quickly learned the path of Charley brought
devastation as near as Myakka City, Arcadia and Wau-
chula, and all the small towns, homes, farms and groves
in those areas.
Relief was needed and Islanders went right to work
providing all that they could.
The Chiles Group of restaurants collected dona-
tions of canned and dried foods, bottled water, baby
formula, toilet articles, etc. Harvey Memorial Commu-
nity Church was busy gathering items and sending them
to victims and their churches. The Anna Maria Island
Community Center's mounted a collection drive with
the American Red Cross.
Dozens of businesses and individuals on the Island
were galvanized by the suffering of neighbors to the
south and east.
Some businesses chipped in to provide "handymen"
services, while individuals loaded their pickup trucks
with water and ice and made two and three trips a day
to help strangers in need.
The Islander took collections for many weeks in a
vacant space in the Island Shopping Center and filled
many truck and van loads with aid for strangers.
We found Islanders who combined and doubled our
efforts to send aid to those who needed it most - and
Islanders who shared our sense of relief.
Overheard during the evacuation and relief effort:
It's just possessions, you can replace them.
That somebody in need is me. Somebody took my
place.
There's somebody down there that suffered instead
of us - and we should each find someone in our parallel
universe to help.
While we were spared, others were devastated.
So try to keep in mind three things this hurricane
season:
There's no place like home.
Be prepared.
Be safe.


. Ps -A .t.- ..... .....


V Publisher and Editor '"-" -
, Bonner Joy, bonnerOIslander.org
V Ediorial .
Joe Bird .'.*t
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Lia Martin, liarnartin@islander.org
Lisa Neff, copy editor, lisaneff@lslander.org
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adse@slander.org I % i
V Classfieds & 8 ubsclrptlan
Lisa Williams, classlfleds@lslander.org
subscriptions@islander.org
Disribudion I "

Lisa Wlliams
(All o u hert
SSingle copies free. Quantities of fve or more: 25 cents each
S@01992-2011 * Editorial, sles and production offices:
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marlina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 84217- 1WM
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PHONE 941-778-7978 tol-free fax 1-866-82


- - � _-- .... ,


DIDR WE PACH

EXTRA FEATHERS?

- . - ^ --is^


Sen


Right on with walkway
As a resident-owner at the Bayou condominiums
on Pine Avenue in Anna Maria, which is almost directly
fronting the Anna Maria City Pier and where a board-
walk is being constructed along the shore, I was some-
what apprehensive to read the term "boardwalk."
Back home, the world famous Jones Beach board-
walk built on pilings is relatively high, wide, long and
beautiful, serving the needs of many people.
However, Jones Beach and the shore of Anna Maria
are as different as night and day.
So when I attended the recent information meeting
at the Anna Maria Island Community Center and heard
Commissioner Jo Ann Mattick point out that the Island
boardwalk is more of a walkway, I was relieved.
Upon reviewing the Florida Department of Trans-
portation charts and the artist rendition, this is defi-
nitely going to be a win-win project, furthering the very
essence of making Anna Maria what it is - that is its
tranquility.
Judge "Mac" McCaffrey, Anna Maria

Lost Australian pines
I was horrified to find the trees on 81st Street cut
down.
We bought our house last year on Aqua Lane and
often sat under those beautiful cooling trees for a relief
from the sun.
I had always dreamed of having a house on the
beach with shade trees.
How was this permitted to happen?
In this time of climate change and vast pollution,
trees provide countless known benefits.
Joanne Taylor Brown, Holmes Beach

Socializing
The Islander has an active Facebook community
of more than 1,200 users, so we're sharing some of the
conversations we've been having with our fans. If you
would like to join the conversation, become a fan of
"The Islander" on Facebook. We provide a direct link


to our fan page from www.islander.org.
"If you are not an Island resident, how often do you
visit the Island?"
"At least twice a year, usually spring break and
summer. But sometimes extra visits are made. Momma
lives there." - Allison Fusaro
"Not nearly enough." - Thornapple River
"Not often enough, three to four times a year." -
Jerry Mullins
"As much as possible. I have an apartment there
and love it. It's paradise to me." - Denise Morgan
Howell
"Two to three times a year since 1986. I love my
little bit of heaven on Earth. I married my beautiful
Leesa Mary O'Guin at Roser Memorial Community
Church on June 12, 1992. We had our reception at the
Beach Bistro. Sadly Leesa passed away Aug. 20, 1999.
I feel her spirit every time I visit your beautiful Island."
- George Nicholas Selaty
"At least two weekends a month. My boat is there
and we love the Island." - Rae Ann Nolan
"A few times a year, but there has to be a need to
go out there." - Alison Stripling
"I visited every year until my grandparents died
in 1990. I haven't been back, but it will always be the
Florida of my dreams." - Paul Spencer
"I wish I could say everyday. It's the most beautiful
place I have ever been." -Martha Merril Reed
"I live in Chicago and try to get there every year,
but no longer than every two years." - Dan Tuttle
"Two to three times a year and I stay for five to 21
days each trip." - David Turiciano
\ Ny wife Patricia and I come down the first week
of May every year from Atlanta for the past 17 years.
We stay at the Lay-By in Holmes Beach. We love it
there." - Howard Allred Jr.
"If I don't get there once a year, I get very
depressed." - Molly Herby
"Between club meetings, events for beach days and
watching sunsets ... maybe five to 10 times a month."
- Roger Murphree









By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
David Forbes has been working for the betterment
of Holmes Beach since 2004 as a staff member in the
city's public works department.
In a job he likens to being the "trash man of the
city" Forbes worked up a daily sweat grading lots,
maintaining landscapes, trimming trees, and picking
up animals - both alive and dead - among other
tasks.
In his new position as the city's code enforcement
officer, Forbes will still be out on the streets, but his
focus will be helping residents and business owners
stay in tune with city rules.
"I'll miss driving the tractor and working with
heavy equipment, but I won't miss the sweat," he
said.
Forbes sometimes helped predecessor Nancy Hall
retrieve illegally posted signs on city rights of way
and, in speaking with her about the code enforcement
officer's role, took an interest in her work.
"That was two years ago," said Forbes. "I men-
tioned in passing the job sounded interesting and then
didn't think ani dinlg of it, until recently, when asked
if I was still interested.
"It's an opportunity to advance my career, it would
bring new challenges and I thought I had the personal-
ity to pull it off so I said 'yes."'
Forbes met with Mayor Rich Bohnenberger in
January to discuss taking the necessary courses and
cross-training with Hall. He completed the first of four
certification courses in March.
However, Forbes didn't get as much time as
expected to cross-train with Hall before being offered
the full-time code enforcement position.
"She jumped the gun on me," Forbes said of Hall,
who retired earlier than anticipated.
As he settles into the job, Forbes first will deal
with open cases. He hasn't had to present any cases to
the code enforcement board, and while he understands
that some cases progress to that point, he hopes to


resolves issues outside the boardroom if possible.
"I want to utilize communication and education
for the public more to give a positive view of my role
in our community and to bring about more positive
results.
"The city is willing to work with people toward
the end result - staying in compliance - and I think
my personality and way of talking to people will make
them comfortable," he said.
Forbes believes he is suited for the job because he
has a knack for working out issues with people, and also
because he enjoys researching and reading. He likes to
track baseball statistics and is finding his detail-oriented
hobby has some use in regards to researching city codes.
"I relish doing that kind of stuff."
Forbes said, "I came from a job to a career, and I
promise not to let anyone down."
Forbes has been on the Island off and on since
1990 and met his wife Kellie while working at the
now defunct Shells restaurant in Holmes Beach. They
have been together 17 years and a son, Tyler, 15, and
an older son from a previous relationship, Jessie, 19.

David
Forbes
is the
new code
enforce-
ment officer
for the city
of Holmes
Beach.
Islander
Photo.
Diana
Bogan


Forbes codes into career path


We'd love to mail


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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND - SINCE 1992
Island Shopping Center * 5404 Marina Drive * Holmes Beach FL 34217

CHARGE BY PHONE 941.778.7978
ONLINE (secure server) www.islander.org
E-MAIL subscriptions@islander.org


The Original Waterfront Restaurant( on the Historic Bridge Street Pier
Lunch * Dinner * Full Bar ri Breakfast Lunch Dinner *Beer/Wine
902 S. Bay Blvd * Anna Maria 200 Bridge St. * Bradenton Beach
778-3953 * Open Every Day Open every day * 778-1604
Free Wi-Fi , Live shrimp at the bait shop!


As always... Free Beer Tomorrow OW


THE ISLANDER U June 1, 2011 E 7


T e Islander



In the May 31, 2001, issue of
The Islander, headlines announced:
* A request by the Island Middle School to the
Holmes Beach City Commission to open the charter
school in a commercial zone on Manatee Avenue was
deferred after city attorney Jim Dye said it would take
two to three months to change zoning to allow the
school's operation. A school representative said it had
to be operational by Aug. 1 or it would lose funding.
* The first public hearing by the Holmes Beach City
Commission on a rezoning application from Tidemark
Lodge developer Nick Easterling was delayed two weeks
after Commissioner Don Maloney said the hearing was
scheduled to begin minutes after the commission's work
session on the application ended. He said he needed more
time than a few minutes to digest the work session infor-
mation, and other commissioners agreed.
* Holmes Beach Police Department Detective Nancy
Rogers said she believed the three masked men who
reportedly broke into the home of former City Commis-
sioner Luke Courtney, bound and gagged Courtney's
daughter and two of her friends and demanded drugs,
had the wrong house. The thieves ransacked the house
but found no drugs, Rogers said. Several suspects were
identified, she said.


TI'EIPS AND DROPS ON AMI
Date Low High Rainfall
May 22 69 87 0
May 23 70 87 0
May 24 69 '88 0
May 25\ 67 88 0
May 6 69- 87 0
May27, 71 87 trace
May 28 68 89 0
Average area Gulf water temperature 85.60
24-hour rainfall accumulation with reading at approximately 5 p.m. daily


CITY





8 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER


Holmes Beach moves forward with overdue pension fund


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach City Commission met May
24 resuming its discussion of the police pension fund
amendment that has been under review since November
2010. The second reading of the amendment had been
postponed for several months awaiting the results of a
senate review of plans to reform the state's employee
pension system.
City attorney Patricia Petruff advised the commis-
sion that Gov. Rick Scott had not yet approved the leg-
islative bills regarding the Florida Retirement System
and local pension plans.
"The expectation is that any benefits one had prior
to June 30 will stay in place," said Petruff. "The new
law would only affect benefits accrued after July 1."
Commissioner John Monetti said, "A lot of what we
have here is not incumbent upon what is being discussed


By Lia Martin
Islander Reporter
Since developer Robert Byrne abandoned his prop-
erty at 518 Key Royale Drive in Holmes Beach some
three to four years ago, it has become an eyesore and
an encumbrance to city staff and commissioners who
hope to find a solution to an inherited problem.
The property is in foreclosure, and Byme no longer
lives locally. Because the property hasn't been main-
tained, it has become the city's problem. Code enforce-
ment has fined the property $250 daily and the city lien
has reached $218,000 and continues to grow.
Scott Davis appealed at a May 24 commission
meeting for the city to lower the fine by $200,000 in
exchange for sprucing up the property. Cap Financial
CV 1 LLC was willing to shoulder that burden, he said.
Holmes construction has already been recruited to clean
up the property.
Davis asked if Holmes Beach would allow Cap
to only pay $18,000. In exchange, Cap was prepared
to make an immediate improvement to the property,
including a new irrigation system, front door and garage
door, so the property could be sold.
When Davis was asked by Commissioner John
Monetti if he was an employee of Cap Financial, he
said he was not. Davis said he is a private contractor.
His business is Real Estate Capital Solutions LLC, he
said.
Davis also said Cap Financial is not the owner,
although he Cap would buy the property at auction.
"I guess the owner is the bankruptcy court or Robert
Byrne," Davis said. "It is going to sell for $1.6 million
or $1.7 million. I don't see anyone joining us on the
courthouse steps."


1I-


The Florida Department of Transportation is advis-
ing people that live near the boardwalk construction site
at the Anna Maria City Pier that the contractor will be
driving poles into the ground between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
from Tuesday, May 31, through Friday, June 3.
The DOT said this activity "might create noise from
time to time" and said residents in the area should not
be alarmed. There will be no nighttime construction.
Motorists in the area of the boardwalk project are
advised to exercise caution when driving on North
and South Bay boulevards near the construction and
to expect temporary intermittent lane closures with a


in Tallahassee. It doesn't behoove us to pass on \ i) hlli n[
It's a heavy subject, and I'd rather not put it off."
Petruff identified four outstanding issues for com-
missioners to address.
The commission discussed those points for more
than two hours with Holmes Beach Police Lt. Dale Ste-
phenson before coming to an agreement.
First, the amended ordinance includes a new retire-
ment option - the Deferred Retirement Option Plan.
If a police department employee elects to enter
DROP, he or she represents a cost savings by ending the
city's retirement contribution. However, the employee
may continue to work and draw a salary for up to five
years after entering DROP.
To avoid "double dipping," the ordinance requires
pension checks be deposited into a DROP account that
the employee is unable to access until he or she no
longer draws a salary.


Commissioner David Zaccagnino, talking to Com-
mission Chair Sandy Haas-Martens, said he remem-
bered a similar case before the city 18 months ago.
"You said then," Zaccagnino said, "let the buyer
beware."
Davis agreed to get the deed to the property before
returning to another workshop and asking for a reduc-
tion on the lien.
Haas-Martens told Davis the city would not settle
for $18,000. She said the city did not usually reduce
fines or penalties.
City attorney Patricia Petruff advised Davis it would
depend on how much money they would spend getting
the property back in shape, and if Cap would actually
be awarded the property.
"It would depend on whether you spend $40,000
or $200,000," Petruff said.
Zaccagnino told Davis it would be tough to make a
deal because Cap Financial did not own the property.
"Get the deed," Zaccagnino said to Davis, "and we
will strike a bargain on that day."
Cap Financial CV 1 LLC has a judgment against
Byme for more than $1.5 million for the property, which
was to go to auction June 1, 2011. The bidding was to
begin at 11 a.m.


Did you know?

Hurricane Katrina, which made landfall along
the Louisiana coast Aug. 29, 2005, killed 1,833
people in the United States and cost an estimated
$125 billion. Katrina was the costliest tropical
cyclone in U.S. history.



The Florida
Department
of Trans-
portation is
requesting
motorists
drive with
care on Bay
.... "Boulevard
near the Anna
Maria board-
Swalk project.
Islander
Photo: Cour-
.r . tesy David A.
Bouchard


fla .' iin' operation during the course of construction.
Access to the pier will be maintained during con-
struction, but pedestrians can expect to use alternate
paths to enter the pier during construction.
The project is expected to finish by October, the
DOT said.
The DOT also was scheduled to conduct nighttime
maintenance on the Cortez Bridge from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.
nightly this week until 5 a.m. Friday, June 3.
Motorists should expect intermittent east and west-
bound lane closures with a fla.-'ii' operation during the
maintenance hours.


HB commissioners says no to fine reduction


The commission agreed to the inclusion of DROP
for police employees.
Next the commission determined how unused sick
leave and vacation time would be calculated for police
officers entering DROP. Unused sick leave will be man-
aged in the same manner as employees who don't enter
DROP
Stephenson explained to the commission that when
an employee retires, half of the unused sick hours are
paid to the employee on retirement.
Officers entering into DROP would have to accrue
new sick time.
Third, the commission clarified that officers will
have 18 months from the time of eligibility to decide
whether to enter DROP. Any delayed months will be
deducted from the five-year DROP period.
The final resolved issue was to agree on the plan
interest rate. Commissioners agreed the rate should be
tied to some standard and initially it was proposed to
be the Florida Retirement System. However, Petruff
reported the proposed legislative changes could reduce
the FRS from 6.5 percent to 1.3 percent.
Commissioner David Zaccagnino proposed tying
the police fund to the FRS rate, but also providing mini-
mum and maximum rates.
Commissioners agreed to tie the percentage rate to
the FRS rate plus 2 percent, with a minimum rate of 3
percent and a maximum rate of 8 percent.
Adjustments to the ordinance were also made to
bring it into compliance with changes made to the Inter-
nal Revenue Service code, as well as state law.
Police pension board attorney Lee Dehner was
asked to prepare a final draft for a final reading at the
commission meeting set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 14.


Duncan appointed as

pension trustee
Darcie Duncan was appointed May 24 by Holmes
Beach commissioners to serve as a trustee of the Munic-
ipal Police Officers Pension Trust Fund Board until
April 20, 2012. She will finish out Ray Dalto's term on
the board.
Holmes Beach Police Lt. Dale Stephenson com-
mended Dalto for his service to the pension board,
saying he did a great job while serving as a trustee.
Duncan is a native of Anna Maria and owns Duncan
Real Estate with its office in Anna Maria. She was rec-
ognized as one of 100 area women making a significant
contribution in a special issue of Women on the Scene
publication in 2009.

Meet new Islander

reporter Lia Martin
This is how long I have been a journalist:
I remember trays of metal type hand-selected and
placed to create words on the page, and slanted boards
lined up for pasting up pages manually at the St. Peters-
burg Times and Independent where I was doing my
internship.
Even in those years, St. Pete Times was one of the
top papers nationally.
. 's^ In my career, I interviewed a
S. man who survived the Titanic disas-
ter as a young child; photographed
Quanell X of the New Black Pan-
thers as he marched into Baytown,
Texas, to protest a local police in-
custody death; covered a strike by
Martin 130,000 strawberry workers march-
ing against the union in Watsonville,
Calif; and wrote about and took photographs of migrant
workers in Arcadia, Fla., to name a few stories.
Nearby, I served as the government reporter on
Longboat Key for the Longboat Key News and in North
Port for the North Port Sun. I also was associate editor
for the DeSoto Sun (now the Arcadian) and later at two
other weekly newspapers.
Most recently, I was managing editor for three
newspapers in northern New Mexico: the Cibola County
Beacon, the Nucleus on Kirtland Air Force Base inAlbu-
querque and the Rio Rancho Observer in Rio Rancho,
N.M.
I now look forward to working for The Islander and
serving the community of people on Anna Maria Island.
Paradise is my new home.


FDOT road, noise, bridge advisories





THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 9


HBPD, ex-officer, face civil suit


By Lia Martin
Islander Reporter
After more than three years passed, James Edward
Perkins has filed a civil action suit against former
Holmes Beach Police Officer James Cumston, as the
result of a series of events that occurred April 4, 2007,
that landed Perkins in the Manatee County jail for more
than 13 months.
Perkins was jailed while waiting trial in connection
with the off-duty shooting of Cumston. Perkins faced
an attempted second-degree murder charge that could
have led to a 30-year sentence.
He was released May 2008, after Judge Debra
Johnes Riva and a six-member jury found him innocent
of the charge
Defense attorney Brett McIntosh at the time chal-
lenged the use of evidence associated with a possi-
bly illegal wiretap by the Manatee County Sheriff's
Office.
Perkins filed a handwritten civil suit with the U.S.
District Court in Tampa May 9, 2011, naming Cumston,
Michael Schue, Bobby Lewis, Manatee County Sheriff
Brad Steube, MCSO public information officer Dave
Bristow, the Holmes Beach Police Department and the
Manatee County Sheriff's Office.
Perkins alleges that excessive force was used when
he was falsely arrested April 5, 2007. He claims that on
that day, he drove his younger brother Michael Perkins
and a cousin to a friend's house. After several minutes,
he was contacted and asked to return to the house and

HB presents employee

service rewards
Each month the city offers a service recognition to
its employees, which consists of gift certificates pro-
vided by local businesses. The winners are determined
through a random drawing rather than by achieve-
ment.
The following awards were presented in May:
* Beach Bistro certificate to Joe Duennes, public
works.
* Beach Bistro certificate to Joyce Stadt, police
department.
* Eat Here certificate to Bonnie Lalos, police depart-
ment.
* Mote Marine Aquarium membership to Bonnie
Lalos, police department.
* Tortilla Bay certificate, Gary Blunden, public
works.

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pick up both his brother and cousin.
But after picking them up, he said a man later identi-
fied as Holmes Beach Officer James Cumston, who was
driving a red Chevy SUV, followed him. Perkins stated
that after her turned his vehicle around, a man jumped
out of his vehicle and pointed a gun at his vehicle.
Perkins also alleges in his statement to the federal
district court that at no time did the man identify himself
as a law enforcement officer. In fact, he said, the man
was yelling at him to pull over and stop the car. Perkins
said he continued to drive away to elude the man, think-
ing it could be a robbery, or that the man was crazed.
At that time, Perkins said the man, who he later
knew as Cumston, shot out the back window of his
vehicle. Perkins said his younger brother, Michael Per-


kins, then engaged Cumston in a "shoot out."
It was at this time that Cumston was shot as a result,
Perkins said.
Perkins is asking in his "prayer for relief," compen-
satory damages in the amount of $250,000 against each
defendant.
He also is asking for punitive damages of $500,000
against each defendant.
Cumston has since retired from the police force,
according to Holmes Beach Police Lt. Dale Stephenson.
"We have referred (the case) to the League of Cities
legal counsel for their response," Stephenson said.
He said the League of Cities will select an attorney
to defend the Holmes Beach Police Department in the
matter if the need should arise.


County approves trolley-chamber ad plan
By Lisa Neff or pre-approve advertising content, but will rely on the
Islander Reporter judgment of the chamber to ensure content is of a type
Manatee County commissioners approved an agree- and nature suitable for the trolley service," Windon
ment for the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce said.
to again sell ads on the Island Trolley to generate rev- The county agreement is for two years, with an
enue for the fare-free service, option to renew.
The trolley operates the north-south length of the
Anna Maria Island 365 days a year. There is no charge
to passengers, but in recent years, with diminished grant
funding and declines in tax receipts, local governments
have struggled with budgeting for the service.
A couple of years ago, the county and Island cham-
ber crafted a partnership to promote and finance the
trolley in part with advertising.
Island businesses bought into the campaign, but
the county suspended the advertising while it pursued
replacement vehicles for the mechanically troubled trol-
leys.
With replacement vehicles due this year, the cam-
paign is being reactivated, according deputy county -
administrator Karen Windon.
The agreement approved by commissioners during "
a regular meeting May 24 stated that the chamber will
pay the county $15,000 in ad revenues each quarter to *.
total $60,000 a year.
Any sales revenue above the $60,000 will be kept
by the chamber, according to a memo from Windon to
commissioners.
The new trolleys also will be equipped with dona-
tion boxes to help generate revenue for the service. An older Island Trolley awaits passengers at the Anna
Under the agreement, the county "will not review Maria City Pier. Islander Photo: Lisa Neff

I I


I


w I*,


ACCOMMODATIONS
Tortuga Inn Beach &
Tradewinds Resorts
90 well-appointed rooms, apts., suites
with kitchens, wi-fi, pools, beach, more!
www.tortugainn.com
941-778-6611
www.tradewinds-resort.com

Haley's Motel
An Island jewel with 1950s charm and
21st century amenities. Perfect for all
weddings and reunions.
941-778-5405 or 800-367-7824
www.haleysmotel.com

Bungalow Beach Resort
DIRECTLY ON THE BEACH!
Classic 1930s Island-style resort.
800-779-3601
bungalow@bungalowbeach.com
www.bungalowbeach.com

BEAUTY & WELLNESS
Acqua Aveda Salon Spa Store
Hair, nails, makeup, skin and massage
for the bride and the entire bridal party.
5311 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach
941-778-5400
www.acquaaveda.com


PHOTOGRAPHY
Jack Elka PhotoGraphics
The finest wedding photography since
1980. Studio at 315 58th St.,
Holmes Beach. Visit my website:
www.jackelka.com* 941-778-2711
MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT
Chuck Caudill Entertainment
Beach weddings and events. DJ service,
live guitar and more from an
experienced Island professional.
CATERING
Banana Cabana
Caribbean Grill & Restaurant
We'll cater your affair with
Caribbean flair! 941-779-1930
www.bananacabanaseafood.com
JEWELRY
Bridge Street Jewelers
The Island's full-service jewelry store.
129 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
941-896-7800


BRIDAL ATTIRE
The Beach Shop
11904 Cortez Rd W.
Pretty white dresses for a
casual Island wedding.
Dresses for moms, too!
Open daily.
941-792-3366

WEDDING/RECEPTIONS
Rotten Ralph's Restaurants
Now offering catering
and banquet facilities for
weddings and private parties.
941-778-3953.

Queens Gate Resort
Private beach weddings, reception
area, and guest accommodations
all in one location.
www.queensgateresort.com
islands58@aol.com
941-778-7153 or 800-310-7153


0i


(


Im�m - .a r rFIZ 2 1,- w,
HAIR' NAILS ' SKIN ' MASSAGE
3612 EAST BAY DRIVE, HOLMES BEACH
ANNAMARIASALON.COM 941.778.0400


'"
~i~r
�� �





10 0 June 1, 2011 0 THE ISLANDER


Is lariWlappenings


Charity blood drive dates near


Island Shopping Center* 5418 Marina Dr Holmes Beach
(intersection of gulf and marina) 941.778.2169


THE


4 BEACH


SHOP
www.thebeachshopboutique.com



HUBg SBLO!
LOTS OF BARGAINS!
HURRY IN TO SHOP!

Large Selection of Ladies Swimwear
for every age, shape and size.
Ds, DDs, Es and mastectomy.
SKIMBOARDS AND EVERYTHING FOR THE BEACH!
We moved to Cortez from the Manatee Public Beach!
h 10-8 Sun-Thu, 9-9 Fri-Sat
BEACH iSHOP 11904 Cortez Road W. * Cortez
BS 941-792-3366
|' tI Next to Tyler's Ice Cream


Anna MaTia Islan

Ocrong Company


A TASTE OF BALI
LARGEST SARONG SELECTION ON THE ISLAND
Balinese-Style Wedding Wear
GIFT SHOP AND BIKE RENTALS
2502 Gulf Drive N ~ Bradenton Beach ~ Under Dream Inn
Trolley stops 49 north, 26 south ~ Amisarongco.com ~ 941.778.4747


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Juice up and roll up a sleeve.
The annual Island Blood Drive is set for Saturday,
June 4, and Sunday, June 5, at St. Bernard Catholic
Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach. Hours
will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days.
Donors can schedule appointments at www.fbsdo-
nor.org, but walk-ins are welcome - even the norm.
The annual event serves two purposes - collecting
blood for the Florida Blood Services, the largest donor
testing service in the country, and generating income
for local charities. The five beneficiaries are the Anna
Maria Island Community Center, Anna Maria Island
Privateers, Rotary Club of Anna Maria Island, Wildlife
Education and Rehabilitation and West Manatee Fire
Rescue Auxiliary.
The charitable funding comes from an anonymous
family foundation, which pledges to contribute $100 for
each good unit of blood donated and $200 for each good
unit drawn through the Alyx system, which doubles the
number of red blood cells collected.
The blood donors designate their favorite charity
or charities from the five, all of which rely on the blood
drive as an important source of income. The 2010 drive
generated nearly $40,000 for the nonprofits, including
$16,615 for Wildlife Inc., $7,933 for the center, $7,482
for the fire auxiliary, $6,715 for the privateers, $1,750
for the rotary club.
The first 250 donors receive an Island Blood Drive
T-shirt.

Substitute donor sought
WANTED: Substitute blood donor. First-time
donors encouraged to step up, sit back and give.
Dave McKeever thought about placing such an ad
in a newspaper because for the first time in years he is
ineligible to donate in the Island Blood Drive scheduled
to take place June 4-5 at St. Bernard Catholic Church,
248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
"I had never missed one," McKeever said of donat-
ing in the Island drive, which in addition to stocking
Florida Blood Services supplies raises money for the



Q000�0OO



Wednesday, June 1
3 p.m. - After-Hours book club will discuss Barbara Kingsolver's
"The Poisonwood Bible" at the Tingley Memorial Library, 111 Second St.
N., Bradenton Beach. Information: 941-779-1208.

Saturday, June 4
9a.m. to 4p.m. -Annual Island Blood Drive at St. Bernard Catho-
lic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-
1908.

Sunday, June 5
9a.m. to 4p.m. -Annual Island Blood Drive at St. Bernard Catho-
lic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-
1908.

Ongoing:
* Wednesday, two hours before sunset, the city of Bradenton Beach
hosts a sunset picnic with entertainer Mike Sales at Katie Pierola Sunset
Park, 2200 block of Gulf Drive North, Bradenton Beach. Information: 941-
448-5798.
* Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m., teens meet at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 941-
778-1908.
* Wednesday and Saturdays, 9 a.m., players pitch horseshoes in
the pits at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. Informa-
tion: 941-708-6130.
* Friday, Senior Adventures Group meets for outings to various
locations. Information: 941-962-8835.
* Friday, 5:30 to 10 p.m., Mike Sales sunset drum circle at Manatee
Public Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-526-
6789.
* Saturday, 8:30 a.m., Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island meets
at the Anna Maria Island Beach Cafe, Manatee Public Beach, 4000 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach.

Off-Island:
Friday, June 3
6p.m. - Creature Feature Film Series: "Them!" atthe South Florida
Museum, 201 10th St. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-746-4131. Fee


Anna Maria Island Community Center, Anna Maria
Island Privateers, Wildlife Education and Rehabilita-
tion, Rotary Club of Anna Maria Island and West Mana-
tee Fire Rescue Auxiliary.
But McKeever is nearing the completion of an
intense round of chemotherapy as he battles cancer.
He had thought he suffered something less serious,
diverticulitis, until doctors discovered a tumor on his
abdomen.
"It was quite large and pressing on a lot of organs,"
McKeever said. "When I first found I had cancer, I
thought, I can't donate to the Island Blood Drive any-
more.
He confirmed his ineligibility with his medical care-
takers. "It kind of hurts after all these years, but they
told me, 'Your blood donor days are over.'"
Until he participated in the drive, McKeever had
never donated blood.
Along with his wife, he first decided to donate the
June after his father died of cancer. "I thought of it as a
tribute," McKeever said.
He also believed in the dual causes - the medical
and charitable aid.
"This is certainly a way to support your commu-
nity," he said. "A simple way to do that."
The five nonprofits collect money from the Island
drive through an anonymous family foundation, which
pledges $100 for each unit of good blood collected.
Blood donors select the nonprofit or nonprofits they
want to support.
McKeever is a self-described wildlife enthusiast
who has volunteered to care for injured animals for
Wildlife Inc., which has a shelter in Bradenton Beach.
"\ly personal cause is Wildlife Inc.," McKeever
said.
But as he encourages a substitute to donate June
4-5 because he cannot, McKeever said, "I would never
ever tell anyone who to make a donation to.... I'm just
looking for somebody to take my place because I can't
do it. You know, it's so simple but so rewarding."
Holmes Beach resi-
dent Dave McK-
eever hopes to find
someone to donate
blood in his name
during the Island
Blood Drive June
4-5 at St. Bernard
Catholic Church,
248 S. Harbor
Drive, Holmes
Beach.

Who can donate?
Flood Blood Services donors must be at least 16
years old, 110 pounds and in generally good health.
"Generally good health" means no cold or flu symp-
toms and an adequate iron level.
Women who are pregnant or were pregnant in
the past six weeks cannot donate. Nor can those who
have had major surgery within the past year, had
hepatitis since age 10 or participated in activities
that could have resulted in exposure to HIV.
U.S. regulations allow people to donate one unit
of whole blood every 56 days.

applies.
6 to 9 p.m. - Artist reception at the Dancing Crane Gallery, 1019
10th Ave. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-744-1333.

Saturday, June 4
4 to 7p.m. -ARTifacts family night atArtCenter Manatee, 209 Ninth
St. W., Bradenton. Information: 941-746-2862. Fee applies.

Wednesday, June 8
7 to 9 p.m. - "The Naked Universe: Time" science discussion with
Jeff Rodgers at the South Florida Museum, 201 10th St. W., Bradenton.
Information: 941-746-4131.

Coming Up:
* June 10, Creature Feature Film Series: "Gojira," South Florida
Museum.

Send calendar announcements to diana@islander.org. Please
include the time, date and location of the event, a brief description and a
contact via e-mail and phone.


FBu appointment: 9+1.74+.5.35O


the store!





THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 11


Theater extends 'Tenor'
The Island Players, with rave reviews and a rush for
tickets for "Lend Me a Tenor," has extended the play's
run at the theater, 10009 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
The last play of the season is a tour-de-farce writ-
ten by Ken Ludwig, directed by James Thaggard and
featuring a stellar cast that can hit the play's comedic
marks and high notes.
"Tenor" was set to end in May but, said IP president
Dolores Harrell, "Rave reviews ... prompted a run at the
box office, and we just had to turn away many potential
audience members."
Two extra 8 p.m. performances were added to the
schedule - Friday, June 10, and Saturday, June 11.
The cast "jumped at the opportunity to do the show
again," Thaggard said. "I think they've become addicted
to standing ovations."
Tickets are $15 and available at the box office from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning Monday, June 6, and an hour
before performances.
For more information, call the box office at 941-
778-5755.


Kiwanis tor the cause
Sandy Haas-Martens of the Kiwanis Club of Anna
Maria Island presents Diane Dill of Take Stock of
Children with a $1,500 check during a recent club
meeting. The group meets Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. at
the Anna Maria Island Beach Cafe at Manatee Public
Roec- dAnnn r,,i f0;,,, Diri l c Ro l-^


Fifth-anniversary celebration
Jackie and Ron Pepka celebrate their fifth wedding
anniversary April 30 at the Beach Bistro restaurant in
Holmes Beach with friends Evelyne Guillou and Delia
Ayala. Pictured are, from left, Guillou, Ayala, and the
Pepkas. Islander Photo: Courtesy Jackie Pepka


Lppenings


Library offers teens

summer fun
The Island Branch Library will host a series of spe-
cial events for teens throughout the summer months
beginning June 22.
All events are free, but seating is on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
* June 22, 5:30 p.m., worst-case scenario trivia con-
test.
* June 29, 5:30 p.m., T-shirt surgery.
* July 2, 2 p.m., Hoola Monsters Hoola Hoop
Troupe presentation.
* July 6, 5:30 p.m., Origami.
* July 13, 5:30 p.m., A guide to navigating college
applications presentation.
* July 20, 5:30 p.m., "Your Dolphin Neighbors"
presentation by Mote Marine Laboratory staff.
* July 23, 2 p.m., Anime - Japanese style graphic
animation and drawing - basics with artist Hihoshi.
Advance registration is required to attend the Hoola
Monsters Hoola Hoop presentation and the anime basics
workshop.
The library is at 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach. For more information, call the library at 941-
778-6341.

DeSoto to host ranger camp
DeSoto National Memorial will host its first Junior
Ranger Summer Camp at the west Bradenton park.
The camp is an educational and fun way for your
kids to learn about Florida's native and Spanish his-
tory and experience the outdoors," according to a news
release from National Park Service. "Kids will be
instructed by park rangers about what it means to be a
junior ranger and discover the importance of America's
National Parks.
Enrollment is open for children ages 6-12 and atten-
dance is free.
Campers chose to enroll to attend camp on Thurs-
days or Fridays from June 23-Aug. 12. A graduation
ceremony is scheduled for Aug. 13.
For more information or to register, go to www.nps.
gov/deso or complete a registration form at the DeSoto
visitor center, 8300 De Soto Memorial Highway, Bra-
denton.

Teacher
certified
After five years of
enjoying a workout
in Zumba classes
on the Island,
SHolmes Beach

Connelly earned
her Zumba teaching
certificate. Zumba
is a group fitness
class set to international dance rhythms. Connelly
hopes to teach in the near future and continues to
participate in Zumba six days a week. Islander Photo:
Courtesy Wendy Connelly


Roser tales
Carolyne Norwood,
third from left, pres-
ents her books, the
newly released "Tales
of Three Cities: From
Bean Point to Bridge
Street" and "The
Early Years," to the
Rev. Gary Batey, left,
Cathy Meehan and
Roger Roark of Roser
Memorial Community
Church. Norwood
moved to Anna Maria
in 1956 and has been
a member of Roser
Churchfor 55 years.
Islander Photo: Cour-
tesy Ron Vandeman


A local artists' cooperative with original affordable art
5368 Gulf Dr.,Holmes Beach (West of the P.O.& Minnies)
941-778-6648, Mon -Sat 10-5, www.islandgallerywest.com





. . .
0
Richardson and Cropper featured artists for June



nd OfOA june 19)

We're hosting new works by
popular painter Robert Johnson.
Plus one-of-a-kind, handmade
jewelry, art, pottery and more.
NEW: Fabulous indoor-outdoor rugs!




l^Q ebs le^/ ct~hi ss5t, s
FEATURING MORE THAN 80 ISLAND-AREA ARTISTS
ISLAND SHOPPING CENTER * 5314 MARINA DRIVE * 941.779.2624


the
Sterling
anvil
5508 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, FL, 34217
941.778.3636


acqua
salon spa store AVE DA
on the beach
hair - skin � nails - massage
5311 gulf drive holmes beach
941.778.5400 * acquaaveda.com





12 0 June 1, 2011 0 THE ISLANDER

Traffic stop leads t
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
A routine traffic stop in Holmes Beach May 18
resulted in the arrest of a 33-year-old woman on a drug
paraphernalia charge.
The incident occurred at about 7 p.m. when a patrol
officer identified a red Chevy SUV with an expired tag
in the 3500 block of East Bay Drive.
The officer approached the driver after she parked
behind the Citgo service station in the 3000 block of
Gulf Drive. "She began telling stories about her registra-
tion that didn't make sense," an HBPD report stated.
The driver also could not provide proof of motor
vehicle insurance, which is required under state law,
and had her license suspended in July 2010, according
to police.
After writing a citation, the officer asked the woman


StreeVtife

Island police blotter
Anna Maria
* May 25, 200 block of Gladiolus, damaged prop-
erty. A woman reported to the Manatee County Sher-
iff's Office that when she arrived home, she found her
skylight broken. The possible cause was a falling fish.
Anna Maria is policed by the MCSO.
Bradenton Beach
* May 20, intersection of Gulf Drive and Cortez Road,
DUI. A Bradenton Beach woman, Julie Lombardo, was
arrested for alleged driving under the influence following
a two-vehicle crash at the intersection. A Bradenton Beach
police report stated that a vehicle was stopped at a red light
while in the left-turn lane on Cortez Road. The vehicle was
hit from behind by another vehicle, which Lombardo was
driving. BBPD said she admitted to having had two vodka
tonics about 20 minutes prior.
* May 22, 200 block of Gulf Drive South, stolen
tag. A man reported to BBPD that someone removed the
license plate from his motorcycle while it was parked


o drug.related arrest
to step out of her vehicle, and then, "due to her having
some sort of beach shorts on" gave her an opportunity
to put on a pair of jeans.
When the driver reached into the vehicle, she
reached for her cell phone and began talking to a pas-
senger. The officer asked her to leave the cell phone,
and that's when he "looked down and noticed a needle
and syringe on the driver's side floor board."
With the driver in custody in the patrol car, police
searched the vehicle and found a plastic box containing
burnt Brillo pad pieces, a purse containing some pills, a
suitcase containing a cigarette pack holding additional
pills and "what looked to be a crack pipe."
The driver faces a traffic citation and two misde-
meanor charges - driving on a suspended license and
possession of drug paraphernalia.
She was released from the Manatee County jail on
$240 bond.

at the Moose Lodge.
Bradenton Beach is policed by the BBPD.
Cortez
* No new reports.
Cortez is policed by the MCSO.
Holmes Beach
* May 18, 600 block of Crestwood, burglary. A resi-
dent reported that her vehicle was burglarized, with some-
one taking her Louis Vitton purse and wallet. She valued
the purse at $1,300 and the wallet at $500. She said she
later saw the strap to her purse in a nearby storm drain.
* May 18, 3500 block of East Bay Drive, expired
registration, possession of drug paraphernalia. A Holmes
Beach Police Department officer made a routine stop
after identifying a vehicle with an expired license tag.
After the driver stepped out of the vehicle, the officer
saw a needle and syringe. Additional paraphernalia was
found and the driver was arrested.
* May 21, 200 block of North Harbor Drive, past
theft. HBPD responded to a resident's report that some-
one stole her daughter's Green Machine Big Wheel
from outside the home.


BBeach man returns to jail
A Bradenton Beach man accused of stabbing
another man and escaping from police custody is back
in jail for allegedly violating bond conditions.
Jacob Gennell returned to Manatee County jail in
May after a judge issued an order to revoke bond, which
was requested by the state attorney's office.
Bradenton Beach police arrested Gennell for alleg-
edly stabbing a man Dec. 8, 2010, in the 2500 block of
Avenue B.
The police report stated that a man told officers he
was lured outside a home, hit with a bat and stabbed five
times. The man suffered broken ribs and a punctured
lung.
Gennell was taken to BBPD, where, according to
police, he escaped. He was captured soon after with the
assistance of a Manatee County Sheriff's Office deputy.
Gennell, who has pleaded not guilty to the charges,
was released on $35,000 bond - $25,000 for the
aggravated battery charge and $10,000 for the escape
charge.
There were two conditions associated with bond -
that the defendant refrain from any criminal activity and
he stay away from the alleged stabbing victim.
In April, Gennell again was arrested, this time for
possession of a firearm while under a court-ordered
domestic violence injunction.
In preparation for the stabbing case to go trial,
prosecutors have released a potential witness list, which
includes two doctors at Bayfront Medical Center in St.
Petersburg.

Island watch
To report information on a felony crime, call
Manatee County Crime Stoppers at 866-634-TIPS.
To report information on an Island crime, call the
Manatee County Sheriff's Office Anna Maria substa-
tion, 941-708-8899; Bradenton Beach police, 941-
778-6311; Holmes Beach police, 941-708-5807.
In emergencies, call 911.


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ay Ist - June 30th, 207 1. Must present
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City of Holmes Beach
5801 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
1RARIA I

PLEASE REPORT ANY
SUSPECTED ILLICIT
DISCHARGE CONNECTIONS
THE CITY OF HOLMES BEACH is asking residents to call as soon as
possible if they suspect an illicit connection or discharge in the community.
Do you see anything unusual or out of the ordinary discharging into the
storm sewer?
Residents are strong ly urged to report these problems to the Holmes Beach
Public Works Department by calling 941-708-5833. The superintendent
of public works will in turn order the cessation of such activity based on
the city's illicit discharge ordinance 03-12.
STOP RUNOFF POLLUTANTS BEFORE
THEY GET INTO OUR WATERWAYS!


I




THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 13


Child neglect
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Prosecutors have dropped a felony charge against
a Bradenton man arrested last November in Bradenton
Beach for alleged child neglect.
Lance Aaron Blaylock was arrested Nov. 6, 2010,
after a neighbor called the Bradenton Beach Police
Department to report a crying child wandering in the
street.
Blaylock had pleaded not guilty and demanded a
jury trial. He also sent the court a letter asking that a
"no contact" order be lifted so he could visit his son.
In the one-page letter, Blaylock wrote, "There was no
violence involved in this matter, nor was it intentional.
This was a very avoidable accident which will never
happen again."
A police report stated that when BBPD officers
arrived to a residence in the 300 block of Second Street
North, they found the child walking in circles around
Blaylock, who was lying unconscious in the back yard
beside a puddle of vomit.
The report stated that food burning on the stovetop
was the cause of a sounding smoke alarm.
However, Blaylock in a court letter said he and the
child's mother, Phaedra Brace, who also was arrested,
did not fight and "there was absolutely no drinking on
my behalf at the house with my son. I simply came
home from a party that way, making the bil,'I mistake

Falling fish shatters skylight
A friend stopped by Elaine and Gary Deffenbaugh's
home May 25 to find a fish on the dining room table,
but not a fish being served for dinner.
The Deffenbaughs, who lives in the 200 block of
Gladiolus in Anna Maria, told the Manatee County
Sheriff's Office that while they were out of town they
asked a friend to check on their home.
The friend stopped over on May 25 and found a
fish on the table, along with a broken skylight above
the table.
An MCSO report said it was unclear how the fish
fell through the skylight into the dining room.
Elaine Deffenbaugh speculated to the MCSO that
perhaps a bird dropped the fish.


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www.annamariabeachmassage.com


case dropped
of my life (being) unable to awaken."
Blaylock still faces two misdemeanor charges in
Manatee County court - one for alleged domestic bat-
tery that was filed in May and another for trespass to an
unoccupied structure that was filed in March.



Michael J. Diemer
Michael J. Diemer, 54, of Bradenton, died May 21.
He was bor in West Palm Beach and moved to Manatee
County in 1979.
He was a photo journalist for 25 years and then
took up teaching. He was employed at Buffalo Creek
Middle School for the past five years. Mr. Diemer was
a member of the Anna Maria Island Moose Lodge No.
2188 in Bradenton Beach. He was an Episcopalian.
A memorial Mass was celebrated May 26 at Our
Lady Queen of Martyrs Church in Sarasota. Brown &
Sons Funeral Homes & Crematory-43rd Street Chapel,
Bradenton, was in charge of arrangements. Online con-
dolences may be made at www.brownandsonsfuneral.
com.
Memorial donations may be made to Our Lady
Queen of Martyrs Church, 6600 Pennsylvania Ave.,
Sarasota FL 34243-1142, or Senior Friendship Centers
Inc., 1888 Brother Geenen Way, Sarasota FL 34236.
Mr. Diemer is survived by wife Francine; son Jef-
frey; and daughter Paige, all of Bradenton; and mother
Florence and brother Thomas, both of Palm Beach Gar-
dens, Fla.
J.C. Ellis
J.C. Ellis, 82, of Holmes Beach and formerly of
Clinton, Tenn., died May 28. He was bor May 3, 1929,
in Scott County, Tenn.
Mr. Ellis served in the U.S. Army in 1946-47 and
was stationed in Japan. He began work in 1950 as a
special agent in law enforcement for Norfolk Southern
Railway. He served 37 years and achieved the rank of
lieutenant in 1987 at the rail company. He moved to


KAY THIBAUT
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941-713-7223
*may be more for long hair





Back by popular demand!

LEND ME A TENOR
Only two 8 p.m. performances:
Friday and Saturday, June 10-11

Box office opens 9-1 starting June 6
and one hour before performances
Visa, Mastercard & Discover
941-778-5755
10009 Gulf Drive & Pine Avenue


IL_____________


Community notices, events
Attention community organization representa-
tives: The Islander welcomes notices of your club
and organization events, happenings and projects
on Anna Maria Island and encourages you to submit
photographs.
Wedding and engagement announcements are
welcome, as are photos and announcements for mile-
stones in the lives of Islanders. Graduation photos
are welcome.
We welcome opinion letters, and comments
also may be made on The Islander website as well
as Facebook and Twitter. Visit www.islander.org ot
hook up and sign up as a "fan."
Send press releases and photos with detailed
captions to news@islander.org or 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach FL 34217. Remember to
include complete contact information.

Anna Maria Island in 1987 to manage the railroad's
Lay-By resort in Holmes Beach for 14 years.
A celebration of life and visitation will be held at
CrossPointe Fellowship in Anna Maria from 11 a.m. to
noon with a funeral service to follow at noon Friday,
June 3.
Memorial donations may be made to Suncoast Hos-
pice Foundation, 5771 Roosevelt Road, Clearwater FL
33760-9962, or CrossPointe Fellowship, P.O. Box 458,
Anna Maria FL 34216.
Mr. Ellis is survived by his wife of 60 years, Velma;
daughters Dr. Sandra Ellis of Little Rock, Ark., and
Linda Ellis of Largo; stepmother Hazel Woods of
Kingston, Tenn.; sisters Joyce Woody of Kingston and
Martha Harmon of Lebanon, Tenn.; brothers Dr. Roy
Frazier of Sharps Chapel, Tenn., and David of Clarks
Hill, S.C.; and two poodles, Max and Tiger.

Note: Obituaries are provided as a free service in The
Islander newspaper to residents and family of resi-
dents, both past and present. Content is edited as to
style and length. Photos are welcome. Paid obituaries
are available by calling 941-778-7978.





G.. 1 + il -,,I1:


G$AND OrNING! I


rjeose


jolv ULS OV)


TtOLsDPAI JlANE


2ND


AT oL04 NEW LOCATION

108 bridle Street


We wvfr to tj�\vk ever-ome for be|Mi
So SLAftorctiVe \( nejIfLA iV ) our vioVe.
It his beeV i .jcr ;.L I,- two yJeVr-s,

lotS of view ffrijev.s cAne AVi o|l
frienvs*iS retMieit.. The v lsic , 0ft
brivOIv YjoM'A 4o a ol ftoetier.


We (re look|ij forwCr o to �kiki) this


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need a good laugh? visit the emerson quillin signature store. humor, art, gifts
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14 0 June 1, 2011 0 THE ISLANDER


Children search for loot during the Privateers' Snooks Adams Kids Day
May 28 in Anna Maria. The event also featured sack races, balloon
tosses and a costume contest.


Kiddie captains, student swashbucklers
Children listen to Brian "Marco" Olsen tell a story during Snooks Adams Kids Day, held May
28 at Bayfront Park in Anna Maria. The Anna Maria Island Privateers hosted the annual event,
which celebrates the end of the school year and marks the start of summer break.



Emma Jasko, 10
months, and Isabel
Stasny, 9 months, .
are declared the two /
winners in the "min-
nows" category of
the Snooks Adams .%
Kids Day pirate -
contest.


Islander Photos: 2
Lisa Neff


Enied Ben-
itec, right,
and Joshua
Martinez,
both 11,
decorate
pirate hats
at Snooks
Adams Kids
Day.



Pirate
Pippa
"Smee"
Neff 2,
gets a
tattoo from
MaryAnn
"Maz"
Zyla-Smith.


MIXON



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5412 Marina Drive * Island Shopping Center
Holmes Beach * 941.778.2253



HOW TO RELAX
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Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
Pastor Rosemary W. Backer
Saturday 5 pm - Celebrate!
Sunday 9:30 am - Traditional Worship
Youth Sunday School
-- Fellowship follows
- Sunday 9:30 service
Celebrate
______ _ with us!
778-1813 * 6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach * www.gloriadeilutheran.org



















AN INTERDENOMINATIONAL COMMUNITY CHURCH
HARVEY MEMORIAL

PASTOR
STEPHEN KING
: .issS Sunday 9:30am

PO Box 243, Bradenton Beach, 34217
300 CHURCH AVE. * BRADENTON BEACH
2 BLOCKS NORTH OF BRIDGE ST. CLOCK TOWER





THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 15


dBiz


SBy Rick Catlin






Eat Here expands
to Sarasota
Capitalizing on the success of his Eat Here restau-
rant that opened in Holmes Beach in late 2010, restau-
rateur Sean Murphy announced plans last week to open
a new restaurant in downtown Sarasota that will be a
combination of Eat Here and his Beach Bistro, also in
Holmes Beach.
Murphy, who has owned the Beach Bistro for more
than 25 years, said the new restaurant, located in the
Links Plaza, 1888 Main St., would be called Eat Here
- Island Bistro and the atmosphere, ambiance and pric-
ing would be a combination of the casual dining of Eat
Here and the award-winning fare at Beach Bistro.
"The concept is tuned to the times," he said. The Eat
Here - Island Bistro will "feature smaller portions at
a less expensive price in a casual dining atmosphere."
A number of restaurants have occupied the Main
Street site since 2000, including Gastronomia Ris-
torante, Esca, and more recently, the Urban Reef,


if


French onion soup at Eat Here in Holmes Beach.

Murphy said.
Plans call for 150 seats and between 30 and 40 staff.
Hiring and training of staff for the new eatery is ongoing
at the Beach Bistro in Holmes Beach.
The Eat Here - Island Bistro is expected to open
November, Murphy said.
For more information, call 941-778-6444.

Don't forget Jose on TV
Jose's Real Cuban Food, 8700 Cortez Road W.,
Bradenton, will be featured on television at 9 p.m. June
6 as part of the Food Channel Network show "Diners,


�'~B
h
�T~i.~F*J~c i~-~S~mn~E~; -"..~i)i~�~-~;cprtS~"rr�~i
'i -; Z~IP'SSa~C ~5


New home for
old lodge
Angler's Lodge awaits
a new foundation at the
Anna Maria Historic
Green Village, 503 Pine
Ave., Anna Maria. The
lodge was moved across
Lake LaVista inlet on a
temporary steel bridge
and then towed up Pine
Avenue last week from
North Bay Boulevard.
Islander Photo: Rick
Catlin


I i I ,

I .i I 1 ,h I
I I r I I , I [ 1 1' , - ,


WWW.ISLANDEH.ORG


I I I


Trevor Bystrom entertains a bevy of guests at a
well-attended grand opening and Anna Maria Island
Chamber of Commerce ribbon-cutting May 26 at 12th
& East Home at the Beach in the Island i,'. 'ppj"'
Center, 5618 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


Ppyser Communi& Church

A non-denominational, traditional church
Celebrating 100 Years of Service in 2013
Sunday 10 AM ~ Traditional Worship
9 AM Adult Sunday School & Book Study
10 AM Children and Youth Church School
941-778-0414
512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria
www.roserchurch.com


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Drive-ins and Dives."
In the Bradenton and Anna Maria Island area, the
Food Network is channel 56 on BrightHouse and chan-
nel 164 on Verizon.
For more information on Jose's, call 941-795-
4898.

Back Alley hosts grand re-opening
The popular Back Alley boutique and cafe will hold
a grand re-opening from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, June
2, at 108 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
The celebration follows a move from a location
across the street. The new Back Alley now has a wine
and coffee bar along with local arts and crafts.
For more information, go to www.backalleygifts.
com.

Chamber hosts lunch
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
will hold its monthly networking luncheon from 11:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, at Paradise Cafe and
Bagels, 3220 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.
Cost of the lunch is $15 and reservations are
required.
For more information on the luncheon or any cham-
ber event, call 941-778-1541.





16 0 June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch and Shorebird
Monitoring has been tracking this season's nesting birds
since April.
While AMITW's team had observed snowy plovers
and black skimmers scratching at the sand and, in a few
cases, laying eggs, one species seemed to be missing.
Where, wondered AMITW's bird enthusiasts, were
the least terns?
Turns out the terns found a quiet mainland site to
nest this season where people are unlikely to disturb
them. A colony of about 100 is on the roof of a building
that formerly was a Publix Super Market at 4651 Cortez
Road W., Bradenton.
On May 26, AMITW executive director Suzi Fox
and Audubon of Florida staffer Marianne Korosy sur-
veyed the super market colony and then spoke with an
enthusiastic store manager about safeguarding the birds,
their eggs and their hatchlings.
Korosy, Audubon's important bird area coordinator
for the state, said she could not say for certain whether
the terns in the Bradenton colony nested on the Island
last year. "But," she said, "it is very close to the same
number."


. -I A

--S

*.W
...A -- .-.-. i.

A least tern. Islander Photo: Courtesy USDA

While some species had a successful nesting season
on the Island in 2010, the least terns did not, Korosy
noted.
"The gulls depredated so many of their nests," she
said.
At the Publix, there is a gravel rooftop for nesting
and a rim around the roof to keep chicks for tumbling,
Fox said.
Campaign
kickoff
Manatee County
. Commissioner John
Chappie, back center,
welcomes guests to the
kick-off party for his
2012 re-election bid.
Terry Hanna and Sue-
Lynn register guests
at the event. The party
." andfundraiser was
Held May 25 at the
BeachHouse Restau-
rant and hosted by
Islanders David Teit-
'q elbaum and Ed Chiles.
Islander Photo: Lisa
-. Neff



THE REAL GERMAN RESTAURANT
ON FLORIDA'S WEST COAST
DRAFT , - ,"


Terns take mainland turn


i


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I Ii

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Mon: f;IsIIICh I p Seiall





Tr 7b 12012 CozBo Rogie WB .

792-4822


REAL BnlTlsb Fish & Chips


.i


of Anna Maria Island
LINK TO Mike Sales CONGA and
"Island Talkin'"on YouTube at
www.MikeSalesSings.com


Tuesday - Feeling Swell, 7-10 pm
Wednesday - Sunset Picnic Katie
Pierola Park, BB, (BYOB) 7-sunset
Thursday - BeachHouse Restaurant 6 pm
Friday - AMI Beach Cafe Beach Party
& Sunset Drum Circle, 5:30-10 pm
Reserve for Kathleen D Sunset Music Cruise,
941-870-4349

-- www.MikeSalesSings.com
Scall for availability: 941.448.5798
Look for me on iTunes!


ENJOY ...
DINE IN STYLE THIS SUMMER













"There is no love sincreer than
the love of food." - G.B. Shaw
Dine In * Carry Out * Open 7 Days 11 30-9 * Fri-Sat delivery 4 30-9
5406 Marina Drive * Island Shopping Center I Corner of Gulf & Marina
Reservations appreciated 941.778.5092


County adopts

diluted fertilizer ban
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Manatee County commissioners, in a divided
vote, diluted an ordinance that restricts certain fertil-
izer use in the summer months.
The ordinance is slightly stronger than the state
law intended to curb nitrogen-runoff and contains a
restriction on fertilizer application. But in addition
to restricting the application of fertilizer, county staff
and a long procession of environmentalists, includ-
ing some representatives from the lawn-care indus-
try, had advocated a limit on the sale of fertilizer,
which was not approved.
The ordinance presented to commissioners was
modeled on one in Pinellas County, which bans the
sale of fertilizers juiced with nitrogen or phospho-
rous in the wet summer months, as well as prohibits
the application of such fertilizers June 1-Sept. 30.
Promoting the proposed ordinance, county senior
environmental administrator Rob Brown said the
measure provided for good environmental practices
and made financial sense.
"The public costs for nitrogen removal projects
are substantial," he said. "It really is more cost-
effective to keep pollutants out of the water than to
remove them later on."
Islander Barbara Hines, representing the envi-
ronmental group ManaSota 88, said of the proposed
ordinance, "ManaSota 88 strongly endorses this."
But there also was opposition to both restrictions
on sales and on application.
State Rep. Greg Steube called the sales ban an
"unfunded mandate" that would make it more diffi-
cult to buy fertilizer than a gun. "I have seen no signs
and no facts that banning a lawful product ... does
an II ing1i to improve water quality," Steube said.
After a kn i�lli comment period and an exten-
sive debate, the commission removed the sales ban
from the proposed ordinance. The vote to adopt the
ordinance was 4-3. Larry Bustle, Robin DiSabatino,
Donna Hayes and Carol Whitmore voted yes. Com-
missioners John Chappie, Michael Gallen and Joe
McClash voted no.


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Schnitzelhaus








DINNER HOURS: TUES-SAT 5-9PM * 778-1320
Anna Maria Island Centre * 3246 E. Bay Drive * Holmes Beach




THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 17

Beach serves as classroom in nesting season


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Marianne Korosy and Suzi Fox watched the crow
swoop down to the sand, grab something small and fly
off.
The something, they first feared and then quickly
confirmed, was a black skimmer egg off the beach north
of the Sandbar Restaurant in Anna Maria.
They were heartsick about the swiped egg, but
Korosy, with Audubon of Florida, and Fox, with Anna
Maria Island Turtle Watch and Shorebird Monitoring,
at least left the beach with some new information the
morning of May 26. They confirmation the skimmers
are laying their eggs.
The beach can be an outdoor classroom for profes-
sionals such as Korosy and Fox, who, along with their
organizations' teams of volunteers, teach others.
Over Memorial Day weekend, Audubon and
AMITW partnered to place stewards on the beach in
Anna Maria to talk with visitors about nesting shore-
birds, as well as show people the birds through scopes
and binoculars.
"We need each other," Fox said of the partner-
ship.
AMITW volunteers assisted with logistics such as
parking and tents and schedules, while Manatee County
Audubon volunteers, stationed outside a staked off nest-
ing area of the beach that held more than 300 skimmers,
provided the bird basics to beachgoers.
"This is the largest black skimmer colony in the
region," Korosy said. "So it is important to keep an eye
on this.... Manatee County is a friendly community to
the birds."
Stewards also reminded people to remove any food
or trash that could draw predatory crows, gulls, rac-
coons or other wildlife; and to not disturb groups of
birds, which could prompt nesters to leave their eggs.
A single disturbance can cause an entire colony of birds
to abandon a nesting site.
Another educational program on the Island, one
focused on nesting sea turtles, is set to begin June 8 and


CHECK

US OUT!
www.
islander.org C
Useful tools and
links, fun stuff, /ea
and important info... ea:


I/1 /e


4'


continue through the summer.
On Wednesday at 7 a.m., AMITW coordinators
Claudia and Glenn Wiseman will lead visits to turtle
nests. Last year, some tour groups contained more than
50 people, many of them vacationers learning for the
first time about loggerheads.
The tours will depart from the Manatee Public
Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive W., Holmes Beach, to wherever
a turtle has nested overnight.
The loggerhead nesting is ahead of last year's pace,
Fox said. By May 26, AMITW had documented 25 nests
on the Island. For the same period in 2010, AMITW had
documented two nests.
Mote Marine Laboratory, which monitors nesting
activity in Sarasota County, also will host turtle tours
at 6:45 a.m. Saturday beginning June 4 and continuing


,od /on he ,,/�ad...


6;i'5 -o5s

Side~C


5315 gulf drive =holmes beach
941-778-0411 _
www.eathere-ami.com I


Audubon's
Marianne
Korosy and
AMITW's Suzi
Fox survey
the beach in
Anna Maria,
where the two
nonprofits
partnered
to educate
Memorial Day
beachgoers
about nesting
shorebirds.
Inset: A black
skimmer
spotted on the
beach in Anna
Maria.
Islander
Photos: Lisa
Neff


through July.
The Mote tours begin at the Hilton Longboat Key
Beachfront Resort and involve a 1.5-mile walk.



Nesting by
the numbers
As of May 27, Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch
and Shorebird Monitoring was reporting:
Number of turtle nests: 25
Number of false crawls: 26
Number of turtle hatchlings: 0
Read The Islander each week to follow devel-
opments during nesting season.


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18 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER

'Extravaganza Annie' taught AME to laugh, dance, sing


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
WhenAnne Kinnan was a new teacher, she received
some words of wisdom from an older, more experienced
colleague. Questioning her abilities she was advised not
to worry, "The children will learn in spite of you!"
For more than three decades, students have learned
from Kinnan's hands-on, creative, high-spirited style of
teaching.
"I come to school excited, open-minded and want-
ing to kiimn In\ thing, myself," said Kinnan. "So we've
explored together."
Kinnan said she used to be known as "extravaganza
Annie" because of her out-of-the-box class projects.
"Nothing I did was little."
One year, she turned her entire classroom into
the solar system. Another year it became the Roman
Empire.
She hosted a "biographer's tea" with students
dressing up as their reading subject for the day. She
held grandparent days, apple-polishing parties to honor
school staff and staged the full-length play \ . I\ t.t. n
Rabbit" in the school garden.
"I will miss the joy and laughter," she said. "How
often can you get paid to be creative and make a positive
difference? We definitely laughed a lot.
"I feel truly blessed to have two families," Kinnan
continued. "The one I was born into and the one I was
hired into.
"I march to the beat of my own drum. I'm a free
spirit," she said. "And, they've embraced and allowed
me to be that here at AME."
Just because Kinnan is retiring from teaching, by
no means does that mean her excitement and desire to
keep learning new things will end.
"I've been told to think of it as the end of a chapter
and not the end of my book," said Kinnan.
And, it seems Kinnan has plenty of chapters planned
to keep her free spirit soaring.
"I want travel. I'd love to go to Italy, ride in a gon-
dola and be kissed under a bridge," she said. "I'm a bit
of a romantic."
She loves theater, and before becoming a teacher
worked as an actress, so getting involved with local
theater is something she might do between seeking

AME calendar
Save the date for the following Anna Maria Ele-
mentary School happenings:
* June 2, 9 a.m., third- and fourth-grade award
assembly, auditorium.
* June 3, 9 a.m., fifth-grade award assembly, audi-
torium.
* June 3, 1:15 p.m., early release.
* June 7, 11:30 a.m., fifth-grade graduation lunch,
BeachHouse Restaurant.
* June 7, 6 p.m., retirement party for principal Tom
Levengood, Anna Maria Island Community Center, 407
Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
* June 9, 1:15 p.m, last day of school, early
release.
* Aug. 22, 8:30 a.m., first day of 2011-12 school
year.
AME is at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
For more information, call 941-708-5525.





Monday June 6
Breakfast French Toast Sticks, Cinnamon Roll
Cereal Toast
Lunch riachos with Meat and Cheese Spanish Rice
Corn, Sliced Pears
Tuesday, June 7
Breakfast Cinnamon Roll, Cereal Toast
Lunch Turkey Gravy Breadstick Mashed Potatoes
Peas, Sliced Peaches
Wednesday June 8
Breakfast Bagel Cereal Toast
Lunch Hot Dog Baked Beans, Applesauce Chortles
Thursday, June 9
Breakfast Yogurt Cereal Toast
Lunch Chicken INuggets, Green Beans
Sliced Peaches
Summer break begins June 10 ! See you in August.
Jutce and mill are served mit th every meal


e Final Kinnan class
SK eAnne Kinnan, back row,
with her last class of
Sli l.. e fifth-graders at Anna
Maria Elementary
School. Kinnan, who
for has taught at the Island
School for 31 years,
retires at the end of this
-school year. "I came in
pregnant, and I'm leav-
ing on Social Security.
* More than half my life
has been at this school, "
she said. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan






certification to teach Zumba fitness classes, fixing up maybe a few murder mysteries.
her 1920s urban cottage and tending to the butterfly Kinnan's retirement surely will be an ongoing
garden she has grown in memory of her mom - Mar- voyage of discovery, just as her days were for her stu-
jorie Kinnan. dents at the little school by the bay.
She also is planning to write a few books - one "Sort of like being one of my fifth-graders moving
about her mom - a longtime educator and Manatee on, it's bittersweet. But I'm excited about what the
County School board member, another about her search future might hold," Kinnan said. "I'll continue to laugh,
for independence and growing up at age 60, and then dance and sing, even if it is slightly off-key."


Marshall looks forward to AME leadership role


By Diana Bogan
Islander Reporter
David Marshall is excited to be the next principal
for Anna Maria Elementary School and sees it as a great
opportunity.
"Each school presents a different leadership style
to meet its needs and I'm looking forward to that chal-
lenge," said Marshall. "Looking at the decision to
move to a new school from a professional standpoint I
spoke with my family and my staff about it. We want
to always be moving forward. I talked about being a
lifelong learner at the parent forum. I strive to be a better
administrator."
Marshall attended
Manatee County schools from third-
through 12th grade. He received his
S bachelor's degree from the University
of South Florida and a master's degree
from Nova Southeastern University.
From 1983 to 2000, he taught
Marshall upper elementary classes at Miller
Elementary School.
"I was happy teaching at Miller, but Ray Larson,
the principal, asked me why I wasn't in the assistant
principal pool," said Marshall. "He told me I was a
leader at the school and able to relate with parents."
Marshall recalls Larson telling him, "People listen
to you. You have an ability to do bigger things outside
of a classroom of 20 students. As an administrator you
impact an entire school."
Marshall said he doesn't know when the light
would have gone on to lead him toward an administra-
tive career had it not been for Larson.
In 2002 he became the assistant principal at Abel


Elementary School and two years later moved to Palma
Sola Elementary School as assistant principal. He spent
seven years there.
He currently is the principal at Blackburn Elemen-
tary School. To help him transition into the AME com-
munity, principal Tom Levengood welcomed Marshall
to attend a Parent-Teacher Organization dinner and
fifth-grade presentation in the auditorium Tuesday, May
31.
Marshall said he is planning to also spend time with
Levengood visiting classrooms and meeting students.
"While the students love Tom Levengood, change is
a natural part of life and going to see them and visiting
with them will help me adjust. Kids do tend to adjust
to change pretty well and once the teachers close the
door to the classroom, their attention is focused on their
teacher, not me."
Marshall's wife, Beth, has been a Manatee County
schoolteacher for 19 years. She currently works at
Kinnan Elementary School as the media specialist.
The Marshall's have three children. Melanie is
working toward a master's degree at the University of
Indiana. Nolan is a senior at Dunedin High School and
Matthew is a freshman at Manatee High School.
In his spare time, Marshall enjoys time with family
watching and participating in sports. He and his sons
play on their church softball team. Marshall also enjoys
golfing.
"I have always enjoyed being outdoors and taking
care of the lawn," he said. "But recently I've begun to
garden and enjoy watching our flowers bloom."
Marshall lives in northwest Bradenton, in the same
house where his daughter was bor, and won't have too
far to commute to the Island school.

AME-mosquito
Si "landing
S- ""' John Gardner, chief pilot
of Manatee County's
. mosquito control helicop-
Mil ters, tells students how to
- identify mosquito larvae,
about the capabilities of
4- 4 the helicopter and how
the county works to con-
trol mosquito populations.
Gardner landed on the
athletic field behind Anna
Maria Elementary School
May 20for a second-
grade science lesson.
Islander Photo: Diana
Bogan





THE ISLANDER U June 1, 2011 U 19


Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce scholarship award recipients Shanvi
Patel and Kyle Scheiderman are introduced to members at a recent business mixer
at Wagner Real Estate in Bradenton Beach. Chamber members pictured are, left
to right, Mike Veijns, Lynn Zemmer, Patel, Ellen Aquilina, Karen LaPensee and
Scheiderman. Scholarship winner Jessica Amaya is not pictured. Islander Photo:
Courtesy Deb Wing


Pop tops
Anna Maria Elemen-
tary school second-
graders from Karen
Newhall's class work
with members of Elks
Lodge No. 1511 of Bra-
denton to collect alu-
minum pop tops from
soda cans for Manatee
Children's Services.
Prior to sending the
tops off for recycling,
students weigh, chart
and graph their results
- 71 pounds of pop
tops. Paisley Smelt,
Brooke Capparelli and
Luke Bisio are pic-
tured with Elk's Lodge
member Andy ?li r,,i .
Islander Photo: Cour-
tesy Karen Newhall


a w *ffuj' 6TaBber

i p eaals.."

1-b1.antOU burg adhers od est-s!
m.gs of beer.this side of Heaven.

MON-SAT 11-8*SUN 12-8*CLOSED TUESDAY
* , i'' ;


The Island Players theater group presented three college scholarships to area
students, including, , left to right, Anthony Primiano from Braden River High
School, Matthew Quick from Manatee Schoolfor the Arts and Gabriella Bobelis
from Southeast High School, Island Players president Dolores Harrell and Bobbi
Cupcakes,
goodies for a
cause
Piper Hansen, 9, sells
cupcakes and baked
goods May 21 at the
Anna Maria Island
Community Center for
SI ._'Ih,'t Our Strength, an
C 0" i organization commit-
ted to ending childhood
hunger. She raised $300,
and although she hasn't
-: reached her $500 goal,
. . :s , the amount raised is
.t enough to buy grocer-
, . - ies for 50families and
S; provide 25 children with
some healthy snacks for
their backpacks. Islander
Photo: Diana Bogan


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Xl er s 26
Homemade YEARS!
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20 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER


Run, dribble, toss, kick, tag in summer sports


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Reporter
The May/June issue of Florida Running & Triath-
lon magazine reports Galati Yachts employee Mickey
Hooke, 50, of Bradenton, has posted the top 5K perfor-
mance statewide for the Florida Male 50-54 age group
in 2010.
The third-annual Cobbs Corner 5K was Hooke's
Grandmaster age class debut. He ran it in 17 minutes 26
seconds, placing first in his division and third overall.
The challenging certified race was held at Highbridge
Park in Ormond Beach Nov. 20.
Training on his own Grassroots Running System,
Hooke set three course records in his final three races
at age 49 leading to this effort.
Racing with an injury, Hooke was able to establish a
new master record as well as a new grandmaster record
for the course. This performance is an achievement
for Hooke to go with his No. 1 performance in the 5K
Florida Male 40-44 in 2001.

Basketball playoffs approach
With only a handful of games left to play in the
Anna Maria Island Community Center's youth basket-
ball league, there isn't much drama to unfold in the
regular season. All of the first-place teams in each divi-
sion are comfortably in front with the exception of Ross
Built in Division II, which has Beach Bistro on their
heels. Ross takes on last-place Southern Greens June 1
and a win will clinch the division for them.
Cortez Kat Charters in Division III is 6-1 and, while
Anna Maria Oyster Bar recently scored a victory over
Cortez Kat Charters, they won't catch them in the stand-
ings.
Walter & Associates is undefeated and three games
up on second-runner A-Paradise Realty in Division I
and that staging also is unlikely to change in the last
week of regular-season action. The Premier Division is
in the same boat with LaPensee Plumbing comfortably
on top with an 8-0 record and no team close enough to
take the top seed.
That means any Cinderella stories will have to occur
in the playoffs, which get started Monday, June 6.
The games of the week were happening May 25,
starting with Ross Built's 12-11 victory over Sandbar in
Division II. Jake Ross led the way with 8 points, while
Aiden Grumley and Luke Valadie chipped in with 2
points apiece in the victory.
Joe Rogers led Sandbar with 4 points, while Gavin
Sentman and Jean-Paul Russo each chipped in with 3
points. Truman Carlson rounded out the scoring for the
Sandbar with 1 point in the loss.
Walter & Associates remained undefeated in Divi-
sion I with a 26-20 win over third-place Holy Cow Ice
Cream behind 12 points from Nehimiah Goode. Moriah
Goode and Seth Walter both chipped in with 5 points,
while Jack Walter added 4 points in the victory.
Preston Home led Holy Cow with 8 points, while


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Mickey Hooke, 50, ofBradenton, runs to a top 5K
performance statewide for the Florida male 50-54
age group. Islander Photo: Courtesy Mickey Hooke

Mikayla Kane and Zach Stewart each added 4 points.
George Lardas and Austin Morrow completed the Holy
Cow scoring with 2 points apiece in the loss.
Adam Bujarski poured in 27 points to lead
undefeated LaPensee Plumbing past third-running
Dips Ice Cream 46-40 in the final game May 25.
J.T. Goode chipped in with 6 points and Pearce
Hogan added 5 points for LaPensee Plumbing,
which also received 4 points from Ryan Gillman
and 2 points apiece from Thomas Pears and Josh
Zawistoski in the victory.
Justin Gargett scored 19 points and Jerry Mayer
added 8 points to lead Dips, which also received 4
points from Patrick Edwards and 2 points from Phillip
Dudevoire in the loss.
The Division III game of the week saw Cortez Kat
Charters sail 16-8 over Agnelli Pool Service May 26.
Zach Fernandes again led Cortez Kat Charters with 8
points, while Joey Thiel scored 7. Anna Pears completed
the scoring for Cortez Kat Charters with 1 point in the
victory.
Franklin Valdez and Shelby Morrow scored 4 points
apiece to lead Agnelli Pool Service in the loss.
League awards will be presented at center court in
the center gym at 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 6.
For a game schedule, visit www.islander.org.

Signups start up for adult football
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is
once again offering five-on-five adult coed flag foot-

Make one stop to shop for the Dock!

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ball for players age 20 and up. Games will be played
at the center, mostly on Thursday nights, starting
June 16.
Cost per player is $75, including a reversible NFL
team jersey and flag set. Participants may register as
pairs or couples. Registration ends Monday, June 6.
Team captains will be chosen and will draft a team
immediately following tryouts, which will take place at
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 7.
Players can register online at www.islandcommu-
nitycenter.com or in person at the center.
For more information, contact Tyler Bekkerus at
941-778-1908 ext. 9205.

Indoor soccer registration continues
The Anna Maria Island Community Center is still
taking players for its summer indoor soccer league,
which starts June 27 and runs through most of the
summer.
Games will be played weekday evenings in two age
divisions and competitive levels.
Coaches and team sponsors also are needed.

Magic tryouts June 6-11
Manatee Magic competitive soccer tryouts are set
for June 6-11 for boys and girls ages 8-17 at G.T. Bray
Park, Bradenton. The Magic player fee is $350 there's
a $50 discount for additional players from the same
family.
For the complete schedule and to download the
tryout information form, go to mayso.org. For more
information, e-mail Guy Virgilio at director@mayso.
org or Islander reporter Kevin Cassidy at sportspg@
tampabay.rr.com.

Key Royale golf news
The women of the Key Royale Club played a nine-
hole, individual-low-net game May 24 that saw Liz
Lang and Kris Landkammer both card a 6-under-par
26 to tie for first place. Christiana Mason was two shots
back in second place.
Landkammer and Mason's scores were helped
by chip-ins on hole number three while Sue Wheeler
chipped in on number five.

Horseshoe news
Only two teams emerged from pool play during
May 28 horseshoe action at the Anna Maria City Hall
horseshoe pits and were left to battle for the day's
bal.-ini rights. Ron Pepka and Jay Disbrow defeated
George McKay and Sam Samuels 21-14.
At the May 25 horseshoe meet, only John Johnson
and Norm Good earned the required three wins in pool
play and were the day's outright champions. Ron and
PJ. Pepka took second place with a 2-1 record.
Play gets under way at 9 a.m. every Wednesday and
Saturday at the Anna Maria City Hall pits. Warmups
begin at 8:45 a.m. followed by random team selec-
tion.
There is no charge to play and everyone is wel-
come.





- Captain Mark Howard
941-704-6763
sumotimefishing.com

Snook * Trout * Redfish
Tarpon * Grouper * Shark


CG Licensed Captain Don Meilner
Prices start at just $15/hour per person!
941.778.3875* www.gnarlymangrove.com


r-





THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 21

Tarpon junkies flock to Anna Maria Island waters


Capt. Danny Stasny
Islander Reporter
"What are all those boats doing out there?"
When you see a big cluster of boats on the waters
near Anna Maria Island in May, that's a sure sign it's
tarpon season.
Good numbers of fish are schooling off the beaches
of Anna Maria Island and chomping crabs in the Gulf-
bay passes, both north and south. Egmont Key is show-
ing potential, but the true test will be the strong outgoing
tides occurring this week in the afternoons.
Targeting tarpon at the Sunshine Skyway Bridge
also is proving prosperous. Try working the slower tides
if you're going to bridge fish. It can be hard to keep your
bait in the strike zone when the tide is ripping.
With their aerial displays, drag-screaming runs and
overall size up to 200 pounds, the tarpon is one of the
most-popular game fish in the world for light-tackle
sport fishing. Picture a stainless-steel torpedo, 6 feet
long, weighing 150 pounds, hitting your helpless little
blue crab at warp speed. Zoom. The fish jumps 10 feet in
the air, doing flips and head shakes, gills rattling, before
exploding back in the emerald green water, thii>\\ inlg
foam and spray.
Do you see how this can become an obsession.
As Frank Sergeant, award-winning writer and editor
for many of America's outdoor magazines, said, "It's
an addictive business, one that has led men to spend
fortunes, marriages and lifetimes in the pursuit."
The tarpon, titled Magalops atlanticus and known
as silver king or sabalo, can grow to exceed 200 pounds.
The all-tackle world-record tarpon was caught in
Rubane, Guinee Bissau, Africa, by Capt. Patrick Sebile
in 2003. It weighed 286 pounds 9 ounces, the length
was 7 feet 6 inches to the fork, and it had a girth of 50
inches. The Florida all-tackle record tarpon was set by
Gus Bell of Key West in 1975. His fish weighed in at
243 pounds. Fish bigger than this have been caught,
and will be caught again. But most tarpon fishers don't
document record fish due to the fact they don't want to
kill them. For all their might, tarpon are delicate out of
the water and seldom survive the rigor of measuring and
weighing for record requirements, thus making it hard
to determine how big they really get.
With the numbers of fish we are seeing, June looks
to be an exceptional month. With big afternoon outgo-
ing tides this week and again during the week of June
12, the tarpon fishing should be as good as it gets. If you
haven't gotten your dose of tarpon this year, it's time to
get out there and hook up. And if it gets crowded in the
passes, be courteous and patient. We all have the same
goal, to test our strength against the silver king.
Capt. Rick Gross of Fishy Business Charters is
taking his charters to the tarpon on the beaches and
in the passes. I was lucky to fish with Gross this past
week along with Gross' second-cousin Donald Gross
and Donald's grandson Nick. We fished for three
hours; hooked five fish and landed three. Not bad. Nick
landed the bi '. 'I fish with an estimated weight of 130
pounds.
For tarpon gear, Gross uses Penn Spinfisher 850s on
an 8-foot Star Delux rod spooled with 50-pound Power-
Pro, 6 feet of 60-pound fluorocarbon leader and a 6/0
Owner circle hook. This combo is ready to do battle


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George Kyd of Anna Maria and St. Louis caught
this 150-pound tarpon while fishing with Capt. Mac
Gregory and brother Tom Kyd of San Diego two days
after the full moon.

with even the bi px.I tarpon. Gross drifts the passes
and, on seeing a pod of fish, pulls up-current and drifts
back to the school before llii>\\ ing a bait. The baits of
choice for Gross are blue crabs, pass crabs and thread-
fins.
Gross is fishing the backwater with good results.
Spotted sea trout are responding to live shiners on the
flats in 4-8 feet of water. Along with the trout, Gross
is catching bluefish, Spanish mackerel and ladyfish in
the same areas. Once the "toothy" fish show up, Gross
uses a 4/0 Aberdeen hook to prevent getting cut off.
"It doesn't seem to bother the trout," Gross says. "And
it keeps you from getting your line cut by the mack-
erel."
Capt. Mark Howard of SumoTime Fishing Char-
ters agrees that June is prime tarpon time and a variety
of baits is the key to catching them. Howard suggests
mullet, pinfish, pass crabs, blue crabs, threadfin herring
and greenbacks. And he recommends using stout tackle
to reel these leviathans to the boat in a timely matter.
On the backwater scene, Howard says speckled
trout are still biting and continue to be the go-to fish
for fun action and a good dinner. "Fish the drop-offs
along grassy areas, and in 5-8 feet of water. Use shiners
to entice these beautiful fish," Howard says.
Howard says shark fishing is in high gear. Black
tips, lemons, spinners, bonnethead and bull sharks are
coming to the tarpon-feeding party.
"Use a couple of chum blocks hung over the side to
draw these apex predators to your lines. Use wire lead-
ers or 120-pound cable rigged with a 8/0 circle hook,
baited with cut ladyfish or mullet to get these fish to
chew," Howard says. "Be careful when landing these
bruisers and use a long-handle release tool to keep your




CAP HHE55
CHARTERS^^^

GuIFGaj is6'mj Mi �c Bc


fingers and hands safe."
Capt. Josh Peurifoy of Capt. Josh's Charters is tar-
geting tarpon in the Island passes and around Egmont
Key. Peurifoy is using blue crabs, pinfish or threadfin
herring to target tarpon. Cobia also have arrived on the
menu for Peurifoy. "I like to sight-cast to them with Cal
jigs and small swim bait," Peurifoy says. "You have to
sneak up on them and then present a bait."
With grouper season on its way out, Peurifoy has
been taking advantage in southern Tampa Bay. His char-
ters have been coming back to the docks with limits of
gag grouper in the 22-30 inch range.
Peurifoy also is working the abundance of sharks in
local waters. On a recent trip by Egmont Key, Peurifoy
caught and released two bull sharks in the 8-foot range
using live jack crevalles for bait. He is catching and
releasing hammerheads in the 8-10 foot range on the
same baits.
Jonny Keyes at Island Discount Tackle says tarpon
is on the top of the list this week for inshore action.
Schools of fish are being reported in all the passes as
well as on the beach. Baits vary on the "mood" of the
tarpon, so Keyes says to carry a little bit of \ . ) thilln
Threadfin herring and shiners are working great on the
schools on the beach, while crabs are working in the
passes. If you're having trouble hooking up, Keyes sug-
gests a longer leader and, if need be, scale down the
pound test of the leader, too.
Moving onto the flats, Keyes says the trout bite
remains solid. "Try using some top-water plugs early
in the morning for trout on the shallower flats," Keyes
suggests. "There's been some big trout caught in Anna
Maria Sound." Other applications also are producing
fish in the slot size. Live shrimp under a popping cork is
a sure way to increase your chances of being successful
with trout.
Along the beaches, ladyfish, bluefish and jacks are
being caught on live bait, such as shrimp or shiners,
but also on spoons and jigs. Sharks are patrolling the
beaches, so while you're catching jacks, ti) 1thiio ingi a
piece of one out on a big rod. Wire leader connected to
a 7/0 circle hook works well for catching sharks on cut
bait. Species you might catch vary. Most catches have
been black tip and bonnethead, but don't be surprised
to see bull, hammerhead and lemon sharks.
PLEASE SEE FISHING, NEXT PAGE
,,. -." ( ^m '- ^. ... 1


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- . . , I:,,n,-: H ,iI, Ij - I - j, I .- .I. - i.. ,, . ,ii, 1,-I, -


We have CRABS!

- and everything else

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*.*/ (major credit cards accepted)





22 0 June 1, 2011 0 THE ISLANDER


FISHING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 21


Island power squadron offers
boating courses
The Anna Maria Island Sail and Power Squad-
ron is offering a boating-safety education course.
America's Boating Course is a two-part boating-
safety course held from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on con-
secutive Saturdays - June 4 and June 11. Participants
must attend both dates.
The fee for materials is $35 per individual or $50
per couple.
The course provides an overview of boating safety,
including Florida boating rules, weather, rules of the
water, boat handling and distress signals. The course
qualifies participants for a Florida boating-education
certificate.
A charting seminar will be held from 6:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 14. The fee is $10.
A GPS seminar will be held from 6:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 21. The fee is $10.
Classes are held at the squadron building, 1200 71st
St. N.W., Bradenton. Pre-registration is required.
For more information or to register, call
Gloria Potter or Walter Haug at 941-795-0482.




Custom Homes
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P.O. Box 1608
Anna Maria, FL
34216
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FOR THE SEASON:
First have your a/c system serviced. Make sure the filters
and the drain lines are clean. Open closet doors and drawers
to allow air to circulate to avoid mildew. Set your refrigerator
to "vacation" but do not turn it off. Set your dehumidistat to
60% and the thermostat to 80 degrees in the COOL/AUTO
position.
Have your home checked by a trusted friend. A weekly
check avoids your coming home to find damages which could
have been minimized if caught quickly.
When you return, simply reverse the above.
The best part of any trip is coming home!

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE NO. 1 WITH US!

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Loop fishing success
The Old Salt Loop fishing tourna-
ment hosted at Galati Marine in
Anna Maria over Memorial Day
weekend saw fishers in search of
billfish in the Loop Current of the
Gulf of Mexico. Pictured is Team
Galati with a 25.08-pound mahi
at the weigh-in. Team Twisted
Bills with captains Matt Douglas
and Dan Munyon brought home
the top tournament trophy, land-
ing a blue marlin, sailfish and
two swordfish while fishing 100-
120 miles west of Anna Maria
Island. Douglas estimated the
blue marlin to weigh about 350
pounds.


USCGA offers safe boating
program
The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotillas 81 and 85
are offering a boating-safety program at 8 a.m. Saturday,
June 4 and June 11.
All materials are included with the $35 course
fee.
Classes are held at the flotilla training center at G.T.
Bray Park, 5801 33rd Ave. Drive W., Bradenton.
For more information or to register, call 941-758-
5500 or 941-723-7344.


Island
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Beach


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37

15

05

93

10

95
tte
17


been black tip and bonnethead, but don't be surprised
to see bull, hammerhead and lemon sharks.
James Followell at the south bait shop on the Sun-
shine Skyway Bridge Fishing Piers says pier fishers
are encountering gag grouper in the keeper-size range,
but most are around 15-inches. Spanish mackerel are
arriving in schools, chomping up schools of threadfin
herring and white bait. Followell suggests using silver
spoons and crappie jigs to hook into these bait-busters.
"They' re catching them on smaller greenies, too," Fol-
lowell says. Small black tip and bonnethead sharks are
being caught by soaking chunk baits on the bottom.
Ladyfish, mullet and mackerel work great for this type
of fishing. Pompano are still being caught in decent
numbers using Love's lures pompano jigs. "Generally,
the pompano bite has been in the shallower water," says
Followell.
Sightings of cobia are coming in daily, although
none have been caught. Stout gear is recommended to
target cobia at the piers. Getting them to take a bait can
be easy; it's the battle that ensues afterward that tests the
angler's big-fish skills. Fishing around structure such
as bridges and piers requires stout tackle to control the
fish. Big threadfins and pinfish make a good offering.
Tarpon are being caught on both Skyway piers and
around the bridge. Again stout gear is recommended for
a chance at landing a silver king. Best baits are pinfish,
crabs, and threadfin herring.
Tournament fishers were out Memorial Day week-
end competing in the all-release billfish Old Salt Loop
Tournament hosted by Galati Yachts.
The Loop has been called the "iron man" of billfish
tournaments and is sanctioned by both the International
Game Fish Association and World Billfish Series. This
tournament brought fishers and boats from all over to
Galati Marine in Anna Maria to see who can win the
prestigious LOOP Cup.
Send fishing reports to fish@islander.org.

Bull wrestling
David White caught this estimated 8-foot-long, 300-
pound bull shark while night fishing May 24 at the
Rod & Reel Pier. He used cut bonitafor bait and said
it took about 45 minutes to bring it to the pier. White
and a friend "wrestled the shark to the beach" for
this photo op before releasing it live.







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THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 23


COMPUTER: 1.7 GHz with newly loaded Win-
dows XP-PRO, $50. 941-756-6728.
ANTIQUE COPPER POTS and bowls, collection
$300, or $50-75 each. Antique burl-wood rocker
and more. View at The Islander store, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.

ORIGINAL, LOCAL ART for sale. View at The
Islander store, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.

AERIAL PHOTOS of Anna Maria Island. View and
purchase online: www.jackelka.com


Individuals may advertise up to three items, each
priced $100 or less, 15 words or less. FREE, one
week, must be submitted online. E-mail classi-
fieds@ islander.org, fax toll-free 1-866-362-9821.
(limited time offer)


GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN Church: All are wel-
come to come and worship with us! Please call
941-778-1813 or visit us at: www.gloriadeilu-
theran.com for worship times. 6608 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach.


FOR EXPERT ADVICE ON ISLAND PROPERTIES
CALL THE ISLANDERS
(941) 778-6066
~vviv (CLLTHE lLANDER:s.(Or 't
ljo HN. CALLTHElIsLANDER.(OM


i . ." ..... .I % . i.. -


MICHAEL NORTHFIELD: BROKER, Anna Maria
Island Realty, 941-713-0284. www.annamariais-
landrealty.com. E-mail: Michael@annamariais-
landrealty.com. Your personal broker.
HAITI $$$ DONATIONS to the Ministry of Pres-
ence Inc., www.ministryofpresence.org, urgently
needed for local representatives to aid homeless
children. Info: The Islander, 941-778-7978.

TERRY HAYES, REALTOR. Signature Sothebys
International. 941-302-3100. Terry.hayes @ sothe-
bysrealty.com. Discoverannamaria.com.
BRADENTON ROTARY CLUB meets at noon
Monday at Mattison's Riverside, 1200 First Ave.
W., Bradenton. Club members enjoy fellowship
with like-minded professionals. Club projects offer
opportunities to benefit the community locally and
worldwide. To attend a meeting as our guest, call
Trish, 941-747-1871. More information: www.bra-
dentonrotary.org.

WANTED: YOUR OLD cell phone for recycling.
We make remarkably good use of old phones and
chargers in Haiti. Deliver to The Islander, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.





HAQOLD SMALL REALTOR�
Office: (941) 778-2246 * (941) 792- 8628 - -
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealty.com



WAGNER ) REALTY
Bnri.i Peple Homre Sie 1939
2217 GULF DRIVE NORTH * BRADENTON BEACH, FL


EXPERIENCE
/^^'^- REPUTATION
IREALTOR. RESULTS
36 Years of Professional Service
to Anna Maria Island and Bradenton
FOR SALE: Heron Harbour 2/2 condo 12 min. to beaches. Heated
pool, tennis, upgrades, furnished. Auto negotiable. $125,000.
SEASONAL & VACATION RENTALS:
LUXURY GULF-FRONT VILLAS. Anna Maria. Weekly & monthly. -
RIVER OAKS 2BR/2BA seasonal, tennis, pool, clubhouse. $1,700/mo.
CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA, family room, garage. Seasonal.
CANALFRONT 3BR/2BA bayview, pool, boatdock, $2,900/mo. Seasonal.
GULFFRONT 5BR/4.5BA, Wedding/reunions, seasonal/vacations.
2BR 1.5 BA, 2nd story $2,200 per month. Weekly rates.
CHARMING 1/1 + sun porch w/bed. Steps to beach. Red tidewater
cypress interior. Great for artists, single, couple. sm. pet.
HOLMES BEACH* 941-778-0807
tdollyl@yahoo.com � www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com



CaLL THe FLiP-FLOP

COMPaNY FiRST..
TO FiND THe PeRFeCT VaCaTiON ReNTaLI
Lf More than 200 beautiful
hand-selected properties
to choose from.

Stop by our offices or visit
our web-site to book your
next vacation in paradise!
Antra Maria Isldao



315 Pine Avenue * Anna Maria
5604-B Marina Drive * Holmes Beach * 941-779-0733
www.annamariaparadise.com


[ IS L ANDER CLASSIFIED *


SAILOR'S DELIGHT
3BR/2BAcanal home. Light
and bright. Updated. No
bridges to bay. $478,000.
Call Wendy or Nicole
today. 941-779-2289.


,AnnnALrn n I urnA
2BR/2BA contemporary
home with fabulous bay
views. Lots of privacy.
$463,000. Call Wendy or
Nicole. 941-779-2289.


5386 Gulf Drive, Ste. 102, Holmes Beach
www.gobigfishrealty.com * 941-779-2289


www.Edgewatervacationhomes.com * www.Edgewaterrealestateami.com
941-778-8104 * Toll Free 877-778-0099


Island real estate sales
By Jesse Brisson
Special to The Islander
838 South Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, a 3,422 sfla
4,330 sfur4k tl. 3b,.I i'2car bayfront pool home built
in 1956 on a 110x140 lot was sold 05/09/11, Kinerk
to Butler for $1,050,000.
303 N. Bay Blvd., Anna Maria, a 1,392 sfla
2,270 sfur 3bed/2bath/2car home built in 1985 on a
52x110 was sold 05/10/11, Stone to 303 North Bay
Blvd LLC for $525,000; list $629,000.
207 73rd St., Holmes Beach, a 1,426 sfla / 1,917
sfur 2bed/2bath home built in 1967 on a 75x105 lot
was sold 05/09/11, Molyneux to Carroll for $379,000;
list $399,000.
1800 Gulf Drive N., Unit 205, La Costa, Braden-
ton Beach, a 952 sfla / 1,088 sfur 2bed/2bath condo
with shared pool built in 1979 was sold 05/04/11,
Cann to LK&T Properties LLC for $375,000; list
$395,000.
2703 Avenue B, Bradenton Beach, a 1,253 sfla
S1,813 sfur 2bed/lbath home built in 1958 on a
75x120 lot was sold 05/12/11, Liebermanto Gallant
for $206,000; list $247,500.
315 58th St., Unit A, Palms, Holmes Beach, a
840 sfla / 1,140 sfur 2bed/lbath condo built in 1978
was sold 05/06/11, Uden to Price for $125,000; list
$125,000.
Jesse Brisson, broker/associate at Gulf-Bay Realty
of Anna Maria, can be reached at 941-778-7244.






* BI0G FISH
Z REAL ESTATE


Big Fish Real Estate
Welcomes Broker-Associate
William 'Bill' Allen
i B,,, r, wi.: * ,, ,u J ; ria t e
I .lanJr.:, I :r 1lleen year,. He hra.:
teen a real e:.laie br,:ker *.irne 1,i c.,
an, r ii, riBL B'r.L B 1 I,' hni rid n ',, ii ,',r,
r,,:., b a. r . wiri g prorp.':ri,, r,,.:E a,, ..r:
way...from the water. Bill graduated from USF and has
had several professional incarnations including, police
officer, division manager at Florida Steel, licensed
contractor and more. Bill's unique skills and experience
are a huge asset to Big Fish Real Estate Inc., and we
are very excited to welcome him aboard. Have a chat
with Bill directly, he is ready to help you with all your real
estate needs. 941-779-7934.
r:la q~~~~





24 0 June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER

Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
Sands Established in 1983
Lawn Residential and Commercial
SFull service lawn maintenance
Service Landscaping - Clean-up
7781345 Hauling tree trimming
11Licensed & Insured

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
-- Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza - Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured * Island References
Lic#CBC056755

RDI CONSTRUCTION INC.
' Residential & Condo Renovations
Kitchens * Bath * Design Service
o Carpentry * Flooring * Painting
Commercial & Residential
* ' References available * 941-720-7519


PLANET STONE
Marble & Granite Inc,
Counter tops, vanity tops,
bar tops and more.
e z Road W., Bradenton 941-580-9236

- HONEY DO HOME REPAIR
Handyman Service
Let us put our 35 years of experience to work for you!
Joesph LaBrecque *Carpentry *Drywall *Flooring *Painting *Siding *Tile
941.896.5256-office Free Estimates Licensed
941.807.5256-cell Ask about our 10% guarantee & Insured


-" Bed: A bargain!
.'I K "!!!- (.I ..!ii Fill & Twin,
. ,-i; Ic-, l Ilc.1 IIni, "m,0 new/used.
i ' '.'.. I. l pl' ..! - !| I


359-1904
0 0 "Movers Who Core�"
STWO MEN AND A TRUCK,


Junior's Landscape & Maintenance
Lawn care PLUS native plants, l7;p
mulch, trip, hauling and cleanup.
Call Junior, 807-1015

Marianne CorrellREALTOR
The Big Picture...It's all about Real Estate.
It's a GREAT TIME to buy!
, ISLAND
SI D I
_.* REAL ESTATE
OF ANNA MARIA ISLAND, INC.
941-725-7799 * 941-778-6066 * mariannebc@aol.com


FISHING GEAR WANTED: The Privateers and
The Islander are collecting new or used, repair-
able fishing poles and reels, nets, tackle, buckets,
etc. to give to children. Donate your gear at The
Islander newspaper office, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. In turn, the Privateers donate
the gear to kids.
FREE GUN LOCK courtesy of Project Childsafe,
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission and Holmes Beach Police Department.
Pick up at The Islander office, 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach. Don't be sorry, be safe.


ROSER THRIFT SHOP open 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.
511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 941-779 -2733.
GARAGE SALE: 8 a.m. Saturday, June 4. 7120
Longboat Drive E., Longboat Key, north end in
Village.


FOUND: KAYAK FLOATING in Anna Maria Bay.
To claim, e-mail description to: TnBCribbs@com-
cast.net including make/model or length, color,
any other distinguishing characteristics, and
where it was lost. After July 1 we will claim it as
salvage.
FOUND CAT: WHITE-and-gray, very friendly cat.
Also: white-and-brown cat, beautiful blue eyes.
Near 75th Street and Holmes Boulevard, Holmes
Beach. Please, call 941-345-2441.
LOST: FAVORITE SUN hat. Ladies red, white and
blue, wide brim. Lost May 14 riding to Anna Maria
festival. Please, call 941-779-9562.
PINK SWAROVSKI ANKLET lost during festival
in park near Holmes Beach city hall. Sentimental.
Please, call 941-792-7807.


PARENTS NEEDED for loving homes to foster
puppies and kittens until they are old enough for
adoption. All food and medical provided. Call Julie
at Royal Rescue, 941-720-1411.
CONTACT MOONRACER No-Kill pet rescue to
save a pet's life. Help Moon Racer adopt or foster
from Manatee County Animal Services, where an
average of 200 pets are killed every month. Call
941-345-2441.


BOAT RENTALS AND more! $99 fishing boat, $99
deck boat ! Low deposits! Call 941-465-5985.
BOAT SLIP FOR rent in Holmes Beach up to
23-foot. $140/month, three-month minimum. 941-
962-6238.
SAILBOAT: 1983, 27-FOOT, 15-hp diesel, three
sails, 9-foot dinghy, two-burner stove, ice chest,
full cabin. About $10,000. Call Pat, 941-794-
0411.

FISHING FOR a good deal? Always look first in
The Islander ads, where ads work for you.


CHURCH CUSTODIAN/MAINTENANCE person,
approximately 25 hours per week. Contact the
Longboat Island Chapel, 941-383-6491.
FRONT-DESK POSITION at AMI Community
Center. Need vivacious, friendly person at front
desk with excellent customer service! Great com-
puter and phone skills a must! Monday-Friday,
4:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.,
additional hours as needed. Start at $10/hour.
Potential to develop into full-time position. E-mail
resume to: sandee@myamicc.com.
DELIVERY/WAREHOUSE JOB on Island. Handy
with tools. Part-time or full-time. E-mail only:
annamariaisland@ hotmail.com.

ITALIAN RESTAURANT: LAKE George, N.Y.,
needs experienced saute cook for busy season.
Must be hard working, able to help create nightly
specials! Good pay for right person! Season ends
Oct.15. Information, 518-796-0902.
SALES ASSOCIATE: MOTIVATED, experienced
real estate licensee for busy Island office. Please
call Jesse or Robin at 941-778-7244.


LOCAL ISLAND STUDENT babysitter available.
CPR and first aid-certified, early childhood devel-
opment major. Emily, 941-567-9276.
KIDS FOR HIRE ads are FREE for up to three
weeks for Island youths under 16 looking for work.
Ads must be placed in person at The Islander
office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


14961-1-1 D911 C 096 CU OM1 1
A natural and oi1 ,anic approach to pet care ,.
FREE PUPPY BATH AND BRUSH .
PUPS UNDER 6 MONTHS OLD OFFER EXPIRES JUNE30,2011 ,
For an appointment, call 941-795-0303

Anderson Q Associates Insurance
Your Island Insurance Specialist
Working to save you money
941-778-8303




















ANSWERS TO JUNE 1 PUZZLE
ACTU P D E R B Y BOSOM I CCBM
SAUN A SNN AR E 0ONC U E T R0OU
S U BT ITL E DA PAR IOT IC SONG
FA INERIG C GNEY ME SSY
ORO DIRA Y OHSO EBB
AESOP HAYDN EAR S E RRA


AHANDWR I TTENBEERREC I PE
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LEN T I UP CUBE SOD
SATINY DER K ELLY LIDOS
READER SD I G ST MIA GA I N E

F A T HA B E PS STEW JOSH
APRONS NOTE NOR KRNUR L
THE PAW FH I D ECEA SEDCAT
WSI NE DREAM MAKES AGENT
ADDS K NEAN E SLOTH TESTY


ISLANDER ADOPT-A-PET

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JILA DE LA SII.S











HEALTH FOOD AND deli business. 3228 E. Bay
Drive, Holmes Beach. 941-580-0626.


LET US DRIVE YOU! Airports, cruise ports. Flat
rates. Anna Maria Sunshine Car Service. 941-
778-5476.

PROFESSIONAL I.T SERVICES: Complete com-
puter solutions for business and home. Installa-
tion, repair, upgrade, networking, Web services,
wireless services. Richard Ardabell, network engi-
neer, 941-778-5708, or cell 216-509-1945.

TOASTED COMPUTER SERVICES. Your home
and business specialist. On-site service, virus/
spyware, cleanup, system setup, upgrades, diag-
nosis and repair, internet/wireless networking,
custom system design. 941-224-1069.

I DON'T CUT corners, I clean corners. Profes-
sional, friendly cleaning service since 1999. 941-
778-7770. Leave message.
HOUSE CLEANING BY Laura. Excellent refer-
ences. One house, 2BR/2BA, $50. 941-539-
6891.
WILDLIFE REMOVAL and relocation: Problem
solving for all animals, big and small. Call Joe,
Westcoast Nuisance Wildlife Service. 941-720-
4152.

PRESSURE WASHING: $18/hour, $45/minimum.
Call for a free quote. Reasonable and profes-
sional. Bill, 941-896-6788.

HELPING HAND: HOLMES Beach resident offer-
ing help with home care, errands, appointments.
Rhonda, 941-405-6322.
FREE BOOKKEEPING: FREE bookkeeping to
new clients. Get your first month (or two) free,
then convert to a simple contract. Quickbooks
accounting used. Call lan, 941-730-1745. www.
investment-moves.com.

DIRTY SOFFITS? CALL for a free quote. Reason-
able and professional. Bill, 941-896-6788.

TUTORING SERVICES: Specializing in algebra,
geometry, calculus, trigonometry and science.
Special needs students welcome. Grades 3-12.
Jenifer, 941-224-1760.
BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS JD's Window Clean-
ing looking for storefront jobs in Holmes Beach.
Free estimates, references. 941-920-3840.


ISLAND MERMAIDS CLEANING and Co.: Gift
certificates! 36 years of happy customers. Orga-
nizing, pet-watch, storm-check, etc. Rentals our
specialty. 941-778-3046.
BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refriger-
ation. Commercial and residential service, repair
and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County and
the Island since 1987. For dependable, honest
and personalized service, call William Eller, 941-
795-7411. CAC184228.
ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding!
www.jackelka.com. 941-778-2711.
RELAXING MASSAGE IN the convenience of
your home or hotel. Massage by Nadia, more
than 19 years on Anna Maria Island. Call today
for an appointment, 941-518-8301. MA#0017550.
MA#0017550.
GUITAR TROUBLE? KOKO RAY'S ISLAND
studio. Instruction in flute, saxophone, guitar,
piano and voice. 315 58th St., Holmes Beach,
941-524-7426.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING INC. Residential and
commercial. Full-service lawn maintenance, land-
scaping, cleanup, hauling and more! Insured.
941-778-5294.
ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and repair.
Your complete irrigation repair company. Call 941-
778-2581.
TREES BY BREEZE Inc.: Custom landscapes,
tree trimming, property maintenance. Insured.
Since 1988. Chris, 941-778-2837.
LMK LAWN CARE: Average prices, treat your
home like mine. Free estimates. Call Kenny, 941-
812-1397.
JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming, haul-
ing, cleanup. Island resident 25 years. Call 941 -
807-1015.


STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE. For all your
landscape needs. Shell $45/yard. Call Shark
Mark. 941-301-6067.
KARAZ LANDSCAPE LAWN service. Mulch,
clean ups, power washing, tree trimming and
more. 941-448-3857 or 941-448-5207.
BONUS! CLASSIFIED ADS are posted early
online at www.islander.org.


PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
* Print and online classified ad submission:


CLASSIFIED RATES business or individual: Minimum $12 for up to 15 WORDS. 16-30 words: $20.
31-45 words: $40. Box: $4. (Phone number is a "word." Spell out all words.)
The deadline is NOON Monday for the following week's paper.


JISLA DER LASSIIE.S


JUST VISITING
PARADISE?
Don't leave the Island without
taking time to subscribe.
You'll getALL the best news,
delivered bythe mailman every
week. Visit us at 5404 Marina
Drive, Island Shopping Center,
Holmes Beach - orcall
941-778-7978.
Online edition: www.islanderorg
Tie Islander


m m1920368


CALL THE ISLAND'S FINEST...
MORE THAN 2,500 LARGE AND SMALL
PROJECTS ON AMI SINCE 1988!
We provide design plans-You preview 3-D drawings

WASH FAMILY CONSTRUCTION

941.725.0073
Darrin J. Wash * State Lic. CRC 1329024
LOCALLY OWNED AND FAMILY OPERATED SINCE 1988

mvIi vi r i i 1 u,,i r


Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd


Date


Credit card payment: ' 1 No.
Name shown on card:
House no. or P.O. box no. on cc bill


Your e-mail for renewal reminder:


Web site: www.islander.org
5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217


Ck. No.


or TFN start date:
Cash -


_ _card exp. date
Billing address zip code


A.. E-mail: classifieds@islander.org
T ei Islanderl l Fax toll free: 1-866-362-9821
Phone: 941-778-7978


--------------------------------------------------


Click
Seeand uy

Pos.


Look for the blue
button to order
photos and
full-page
reprints

-e Islander


shop photos online at www.islander.org


3I 311 IILnnhIIf'.UlII U


THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 25

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Residential
& Commercial
Family Owned and Operated since 1975
New Construction * Remodeling
All Phases of Plumbing Repair & Service
778-3924 or 778-4461 * 5508 Marina Drive, Holrn-:, 1 .i":l i Sat.

BOAT, RV & TRAILER STORAGE
Wash Down * Easy Access * Clean * Security Cameras
941-232-9208 * Rates starting at $40
Centrally located off Cortez Road * 4523 30th St. W.
Warehouse/Workshops also available

lAN'S RESCREEN IN I
---:-L :-.GES, LANAIS, PORCHES, WINDOWS, C.:-:4R
rJ: .:b TOO BIG or Too SMALL. Free Estima.:
Call Dan, 941-713-3108


AMI TAXKI
professional, metered, on-call, gps, cards accepted
www.amitaxi.com * amitaxi4u@gmail.com
holmes beach, bradenton beach, anna maria
800.301.4816
airports * shops * dining







I, Carl V. Johnson Jr. Inc.
SCustom Building Contractor
New Homes, Decks, Porches
Licee #RR0066450 Additions and Renovations
Call Office 941-795-1947 * Cell 941-462-2792

ADMIRAL TOWNCAR
PROFESSIONAL CHAUFFEUR AT TAXI PRICES
AIRPORTS * WE GO ANYWHERE
CALL PHIL
941.320.1120
P DOLL1CYAHOO COM1 * ADMIRALTC COM'
it LICENSEDIINSURED * CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

A I.PIIA RENOVATION CONSULTING
Helping you get it done right.
786.318.8585


I WMENIIIIIIIIII ME MENEME I
1-1, 1 1 1 a i's I I A im





26 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER

E l 1 1 1 l,

L S I C 9 nueHO M IMP O VEENTHO ME IMPRO VEMENT Continued


SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. Premium
grade-A, $45/yard B-grade, $30-$40/yard. Haul-
ing all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free
estimates. Call Larry at 941-795-7775, "shell
phone" 941-720-0770.

NATURE'S DESIGN LANDSCAPING. Design
and installation. Tropical landscape specialist.
Residential and commercial. 30 years experience.
941-729-9381, 941-448-6336.

FREE SNOW REMOVAL is back hauling and
installing crushed, washed shell, dirt, mulch and
anything else. Please, call David at 941-504-
7045.

NURSERY QUALITY GARDEN Care and main-
tenance. Hand weeding, trimming, cleanup, plant
installation. Certified horticultural professional.
Call Joan, 941-704-9025.

ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can place
classified ads and subscribe online with our secure
server? Check it out at www.islander.org.
MORE ADS = more readers in The Islander.



Sug (Bay safy ofb fAnnam wia Inc
laS Jesse (-Bisson - (MkSrAssocate, 4I'
941-713-4755 800-771-6043
Sailor's Paradise!
3BR/2BA, split plan,
S huge lot, 70-ft dock
with lift. House opens
out to pool and 200
feet of canal. Sail-
boat water, extra
wide canal. One of a
kind! Successful vacation rental that does $30,000
per year. $699,000.




^^ssssss^\


BEACHFRONT HOME WITH GUEST COTTAGE:
Beautiful 3BR2.5BA Gulffront home located on quiet side
street. Tastefully furnished, open-beam cathedral ceilings and
tile floors. Granite counters in kitchen amd top-of-the-line
amenities. $1,650,000.


WATERFRONT WITH FABULOUS VIEW of the bay.
Meticulously cared for inside and out. Open design with
cathedral ceilings and fireplace 2BR/2BA. Boat davits and
700-sf hobby shop and two-car garage. $585,000.

Mike ***s9-"-^
Mike 800-367-1617
Nor n 941-778-6696
Norman 3101 GULF DR
Realty INC HOLMES BEACH
www.mikenormanrealty.com
Ssales@mikenormanrealty.com


VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, inte-
rior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island
references. Bill, 941-795-5100.
THE ISLANDER: The best news and the best
results from classified and service advertising!

TILE -TILE -TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 941-726-3077.

CUSTOM REMODELING EXPERT. All phases of
carpentry, repairs and painting. Insured. Meticu-
lous, clean, sober and prompt. Paul Beauregard,
941-730-7479.

GRIFFIN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS Inc. Handy-
man, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets and
shutters. Insured and licensed, 941-748-4711.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR: Carpentry work,
handyman, light plumbing, electrical, light haul-
ing, pressure washing. Call 941-778-6170 or 941 -
447-2198.

SOUTHBAY HOME REPAIRS: If it's broken, stuck,
loose, leaks, needs paint, etc. I'll fix it. Affordable
quality work. 941-720-2906.







SALES & RENTALS

(941) 778-2291
419 Pine Ave. * Anna Maria
www.betsyhills.com









HUGE R L E CALL TARATGITT
0050% - 70% off,000"2004-2006" PRICES










Top rated #1 & #2 hotels (Trip Advisor)
Outstanding occupancy histories

Unlimited owner usage
Bank financing available

. f, I, ,Luxurious 2/2 apts.....
1,200 s/ffrom $325,000course
- 1,400 community.
905 50th St.
Court W.,
Bradenton

CALL TARA GITT
Keller Williams
TTea m41%On The Water
Targeting Your Lifestyle 941 -685-4489




HUGE REAL ESTATE OPPORTUNITY
50% - 70% off "2004-2006" PRICES

Top rated #1 & #2 hotels (Trip Advisor)
Outstanding occupancy histories
'All apartments cash-flow positive
Unlimited owner usage
Bank financing available


t r k r�.. Luxurious 2/2 apts..
S>1,200 s/ffrom $325,000
1,400 s/f from $375,000


TRADE W DS

4 #KC'F.T


Charming 1/1 apts.
372 s/f from $125,000
533 s/f from $150,000


Call David Teitelbaum (Realtor) 941-812-4226
David@AnnaMaria-RealEstate.com

. ISIA NL )
H 1 1 L L S> I %: 9; 1:s a


FOREMOST FENCE: Commercial, Residential.
Chain link, vinyl, aluminum, wood, access control.
Contractors you can depend on. Call 941-748-
2700.
J.E. MURRAY: ESTABLISHED Island builder.
New homes, remodeling. 30-year resident. Call
941-778-2316 or 941-730-3228.


WEEKLY/MONTHLY/ANNUAL rentals: wide vari-
ety, changes daily. SunCoast Real Estate, 941-
779-0202, or 1-800-732-6434. www.suncoastinc.
com.

WATERFRONT KEY WEST STYLE with dock.
Furnished, walk to beach. $150/night, $950/week.
$1,900/month off and $2,490/month in season.
Use of bikes and kayaks included. 941-794-5980.
www.divefish.com.
HOLMES BEACH BUSINESS Center. Rental
units available for office/commercial spaces from
750-2,000 sf. Humidity-controlled mini-storage
units and garage units, 11 x 22 feet. 5347 Gulf
Drive, Holmes Beach. 941-778-2924.
HOLMES BEACH COTTAGE: 2BR/1BA. North-
west Bradenton 3BR/2BA pool home, Palma Sola
3BR/3BA pool home. Vacation rentals: www.coas-
talpropertiesrealty.com. 941-794-1515.
ISLAND ANNUALS: 2BR/2BA ground-level, pool,
55-plus community $1,000/month. 3BR/2BA pri-
vate home with garage, furnished, $1,500/month.
Gulf-Bay Realty, 941-778-7244.
VACATION RENTALS ACROSS from beach.
Openings now. 2BR/1BA, $550/week. Almost
Beach Apartments. 941-778-2374.
WATERFRONT COTTAGE one bedroom, perfect
for one person without much stuff! $1,050/month,
annual lease, non smoking. 941-779-0289.





1 1I 1 I1


GREAT BEGINNINGS with this 3/2 charming
structure in ROR district. Join historical Pine
Avenue with this home - designed to live in
back and utilize front for small business. Includes
spacious kitchen, living room, plus large screened
lanai which may easily be enclosed for additional
living area. Also designed to allow second story
if desired and there's ample parking. Asking
$699.000.

, Mria1l e

"A\e ARE the I.slnld '
SINCE 1957
Mane Franklin, Lic Real Estate Broker
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
E-mail amrealty@verizon.net
Web site www.annamariareal.com





THE ISLANDER 0 June 1, 2011 0 27


L A ND E R A L. :IF

RENALSCotined �y ENTLSConined r� EA ESAT


HOLMES BEACH ANNUAL: Clean 2BR/2BA with
garage. Nice quiet area, references required, no
smoking/pets. $950/month. 941-776-1789.
BRADENTON BEACH: SEASONAL 2BR/1BA.
Steps to beach. No pets. $750/week. 941-778-
4731.
WATERFRONT 2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSE with
boat slip on Palma Sola Bay. Heated pool, patio,
cable, washer and dryer. Lease six months
plus, $950/month unfurnished, $1,000/month
furnished. Call 941-798-3842 or 941-720-7519.
VACATION RENTALS: 3BR/3BA pool home,
2BR/1 BA cottage, 5BR/4BA split pool home, two
blocks to Holmes Beach. 3BR/2BA pool home
NW Bradenton, 3BR/3BA pool home Palma Sola.
Weekly, monthly rentals. Luxury furnishings, all
amenities. Inclusive prices. Coastal Properties
Realty, 941-794-1515.
ANNUAL DUPLEX: 2BR/2BA, central heat/air
conditioning, all appliances, close to beach, no
pets, $850/month. 941-745-0407.
ANNUAL RENTAL: 2BR/2BA in Flamingo Cay.
Split plan, fenced yard, large lanai and deck out-
side with hot tub. Updated baths. Pets OK. Avail-
able July 1. $1,200/month. 941-704-0065.
2BR/1 BA, beach views, $1,000/month. 2207 Gulf
Drive, Bradenton Beach. Mike Norman Realty,
941-778-6696.


BRADENTON BEACH: PRIVATE home on bay.
2BR/2BA enclosed garage, ground level, washer
and dryer hookups, one block to beach, $1,300/
month. 941-778-6170.
RESPONSIBLE RETIRED COUPLE: (No smok-
ing, no pets) desires to lease furnished 2BR/'2BA
unit in Holmes beach or Anna Maria. Prefer annual
but would consider "longer" seasonal arrange-
ment starting in October, 2011. Contact number,
906-420-1389. Please leave message.
SMALL PRIVATE ROOM: North Longboat Key.
Washer and dryer, utilities included. $125/week.
941-383-4856.
LARGE 2BR/2BA DUPLEX near beaches. Cov-
ered parking and outdoor storage area. $925/
month plus security. 262-745-3569, 941-567-
4234.
LOOKING FOR HOME on north side of Anna
Maria Island or older quiet couple. Smoking.
2BR/2BA not too far from beach, not too expen-
sive. 217-273-5167.
ANNUAL RENTAL: 2BR/1BA half duplex, Anna
Maria City, $875/month. Call Sato Real Estate
Inc. 941-778-7200.
SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rentals.
1BR/1BA or 55-plus 2BR/1BA with pool. Walk
to beach, shopping, restaurants. 941-778-3426.
Web site 2spinnakers.com.


DIRECT GULFFRONT: 146 feet on the beach.
3BR/4.5BA, office recreation room, spa, pool,
outdoor kitchen and theater, elevator, turnkey
furnished. $3,950,000. Suncoast Real Estate,
941-779-0202 or 941-720-0288.

DIRECT GULFFRONT: 4BR/4.5BA, den, three-
car garage, pool, spa, elevator, security. Immacu-
late 2005 Mediterranean villa-style architecture,
breathtaking Gulf views, furnished, 5,146 sf under
roof, north Anna Maria Island. 12106 Gulf Drive,
Anna Maria. $3,400,000. Contact owner, broker,
941-920-1699.

FOR SALE: BRADENTON Beach. Sandpiper
Resort, 1BR/1BA, enclosed bonus room, steps
to beach. 813-458-3875.

FOR SALE: TRAILER. Pines Park, Bridge Street.
$45,000. Updated, furnished, three blocks to
beach. Park manager on-site. Boat dock possibil-
ity. Owner, 603-508-2039. Cell, 941-567-6726.

NEW UPGRADED CONDOS: Three miles to
beach, seasonal, $140,000-plus. 941-773-0212.
Taylor Morrison.

MODEST TRAILER FOR sale: 55-plus, 1 BR, new
appliances, parking, 3 miles to beach, boat stake
possible, $7,000. 941-727-5210.


IVWA A i'i~70~D3~,~~


Cw^\pl COaqeS-c
Call Shawn Kaleta,
941.778.8660
or Scott Eason, 941.778.7665


DRASTIC REDUCTION
LOCATED ON NORTH END, STEPS TO GULF,
ENDLESS VIEWS OF SKYWAY BRIDGE and EGMONT KEY,
OPEN and AIRY 3 BR/2BA HOME. $899,000
Visit us on Pine Avenue or online for many more listings and rental info.
ISLAND FACES...SELLING ISLAND PLACES


?-�-






28 E June 1, 2011 U THE ISLANDER


HAPPY BIRTHDAY, NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY! By Bob Klahn / Edited by Will Shortz


NOTE: THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY TURNED 100 ON MAY 23.


O
-o

0






U

Q)





U-
* -
ro







-3
U-
in







E:


Across
1 Be bratty
6 Chaplin chapeau
11 Center of
emotions
16 Long-range
weapon, for
short
20 Spa spot
21 It's got game,
often
22 At just the right
time
23 Pants, in brief
24 The Library's
rare first-edition
printing of "The
Star-Spangled
Banner" is, to its
publisher's
chagrin, ___
28 Pont Neuf's
locale
29 Tractor-trailer
30 Betty of "Dizzy
Dishes"
31 King at Karnak
32 Wingding
33 Unmanned
vehicle that
found the Titanic
35 "Yankee Doodle
Dandy" Oscar
winner
37 Piggish
38 Spanish treasure
39 Heavy cart
40 Very
41 Go out


Answers found
on page 24.


43 Norbert Pearlroth
spent 52 years of
60-hour weeks in
the Library's
Reading Room
collecting
material for
51 Fabulous writer?
52 "The Creation"
composer
53 Ring site
54 Jagged chain
56 Lee, e.g.: Abbr.
58 Big name in
country
59 This is not going
anywhere
61 Cry of praise
65 Do some grilling
67 Rail org.
68 Amigo
69 The Library's
Special
Collections
include one of
George
Washington's
creations, ___
76 Uganda's Amin
77 Some chest-
pounding,
briefly
78 Have something
79 Boxes
80 Progresso
offering
85 Take to a higher
power
88 Plot thickener
89 Smooth as silk
90 Article used by
Einstein
91 Grace in film
93 Fashionable
beach resorts


97 The Library's
Periodicals
Room was the
source of most
of the excerpted
material in the
first issue of
101 Thermal
opening?
102 A Lincoln
103 KFC side dish
104 Dye container
105 Hines of jazz
109 Pull-up pullers
112 Fret
113 Tease
114 Pinafores
116 Spot on the
staff?
117 Neighbor of
Swe.
118 Button ridge
120 The handle of
Charles
Dickens's ivory
letter opener, in
the Library's
collection, is

125 Reddish purple
126 Without
digressing
127 John who wrote
"The Bastard"
128 Go-between
129 Goes on to say
130 Cartoonist Bil
131 Indolence
132 Irascible

Down
1 Bozo
2 Informal talk
3 Stretchy garments
4 Disconnect
5 Hassle
6 Internet option,
briefly


7 Vitamin-rich
snack
8 Kind of wave
9 Crow
10 Short agreement
11 "Jabberwocky"
birds
12 Lyonnaise sauce
ingredient
13& 14 Visually
investigate
15 Predecessor of
Rabin
16 Caller ID?
17 Sign of the
times?
18 Ulna and fibula
19 Cartoon criminal
25 Lachrymose
26 Humble
27 Wales, in
medieval times
32 Roman squares
34 Torrent
35 Borneo borderer
36 Besides
39 Bank (on)
40 Hag
42 Pear variety
44 The Hub hub
45 Look on
46 Wonderland cake
message
47 Inflamed
48 Hockey goal part
49 Small African
antelopes
50 Barnstormers
55 Llullaillaco's
locale
57 Shanghai-to-
Beijing dir.
60 Easily handled,
as a ship
61 Huzzahs
62 Words of worry
63 H6lene or
Genevieve


82 Where "Parks
and Recreation"
is set
83 High-pH
solutions
84 Heyday
86 Alphabetical
order?
87 Setting of Johnny
Depp's feature
film debut
92 Noah Webster's
alma mater
94 Splits


95 Tilted
96 Dickens's Mr.
Pecksniff
98 Good name for a
thief
99 Goggles
100 Goggles
105 Mullah's edict
106 Honeydew
producer
107 Drift
108 They may be
high
110 ___ dignitatem


111 Folkie Leonard
112 Show-stopping
113 Bench warmer?
115 Love letters
117 Actress Patricia
119 Spruce
121 Words of praise
122 Spinmeisters?
123 Can opener?
124 Communication
syst. for the deaf


B'Ej"'; Ni -::;.i ;."
.: ' . : ... . .. .. .




BE AN


SLANDER INSIDER.


Anna Maria's beautiful beaches have so very much to offer. Now we humbly add a special bonus - iPass.



iPass is your ticket to exclusive weekly offers from up to 10 Islander advertisers. iPass is your ticket to all the

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The Islander now brings you all the local news, announcements, commentary and events that define the Anna Maria

lifestyle in an easy-to-read, page-turning online edition. And iPass is now your ticket to some restricted-information

online at The Islander website, including the newspaper's valuable archives.



Start enjoying your bonus today. Order your online iPass subscription to The Islander.



The Islander e-edition is $36 for an entire year!


annuall (snail) mail subscriptions are $54.


\.Th ..e. I lan.r


64 Missile paths
66 You may get
them in a bunch
70 Products with
earbuds
71 Set straight
72 Melancholy,
musically
73 Chart checkers,
for short
74 Mandatory
recycling, e.g.
75 Andalusian port
81 Andalusian aunt


www~islander1o1



























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2-B U 2011 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER


Get ready, get set, get gone


Now, before the first storm forms out there:
* Recheck your supply of boards, tools, batter-
ies, non-perishable foods and other equipment you' 11
need to secure your property.
* Prepare or update your survival kit, including
medicines, special dietary foods, blankets, pillows,
sleeping bags, flashlight, lots of batteries, a portable
radio, clothing, lightweight folding chairs, cots, per-
sonal items, quiet games and toys, important papers
and snacks. If you have a pet, include its needs as
well.
* Develop a plan for where you' 11 go if you need
to leave home. Friends on the mainland or hurricane
shelter locations should be identified and a route to
the safe shelter plotted.
If advisories list Southwest Florida as a threat-
ened region, pay attention to local weather broadcasts
for updates, and:
* Fill your vehicle with gasoline and be sure to
check the oil, tires and wiper blades.
* Collect your hurricane survival kit.
* Moor your boat securely or evacuate it to a safe
mooring.
* Be prepared to board windows or protect them
with tape or storm shutters. Remember, damage to
small windows is mostly caused by wind-driven
debris; damage to larger windows may come from
debris, as well as wind pressure.
* Bring indoors patio furniture, plantings, lawn
ornaments and anything that can be moved. Secure
outdoor objects that can't be moved.
* Stock up on drinking water. Bathtubs, jugs,
bottles or pots can be used, or buy bottled water.
Remember, water service may be disrupted for days
or weeks after a hurricane. You should have one
gallon of water per person per day, and you should
have at least a seven-day supply.
* Stock up on non-perishable food. Remember
that electricity may be off for days or weeks, so make
plans to prepare food or have food that can be eaten
cold. Check to make sure you have a manual can
opener.
* Check all battery-powered equipment. Hurri-
cane experts caution against candles due to the threat
of fire.
* Stock up on cleanup materials: mops, buckets,
towels, cleansers and the like.
* Make arrangements for boarding your pet. Pet-
friendly shelters will open in Manatee County, but the
animal must have all its shots and paperwork and be
in a carrier.
If hurricane advisories list Southwest Florida as
a possible landfall for a hurricane:
* Board all windows.
* Be prepared to leave. Remember, traffic leaving
the Island will be worse than you can imagine. Hur-


ricane authorities predict it will take 12-17 hours to
evacuate the Island.
* Watch or listen to local news broadcasts for
shelter openings.
If officials order an evacuation:
* Leave.
* Leave your swimming pool filled and super
chlorinate. If possible, remove the pump, otherwise
cover the pool.
* Turn off electricity and water to the property.
* Turn off gas valves at the appliance, not at the
main valve.
* Let your friends and relatives know where
you' re going.
* Check with neighbors to make sure they have
a safe, timely ride out of the area.
After the hurricane passes:
* Be patient. Access to damaged areas will be
limited and you may not be able to return to your
home immediately. Roads may be blocked by trees
and li\, L '\\, linlc . lNiid m.lln..'i \ ic l c. . I.\ \ I "ill ik-cd


time to make the area safe.
* Expect security checkpoints, so make sure you
have valid identification showing your proper local
address.
* Do not drive unless you must, and don't sight-
see. Roads should remain clear for emergency vehi-
cles.
* Avoid downed or damaged electrical wires.
* Beware of snakes, insects and animals that may
have sought higher ground to avoid flood waters.
* Re-enter your home with caution. Open win-
dows and doors to let air circulate and dry out the
house.
* Be cautious with fire until you have checked
the area thoroughly for gas fumes.
* Assess and photograph damage to structures
and contents to hasten insurance claims.
* As soon as feasible, report any broken power,
water, sewer or gas lines to authorities.


.4 II .\~.A/AD Council
*..lll/'..ln encourages
I .. I. .to preparefor
,I.. li..,l disasters. For
,,,, i,. information
,I.. ,,t disaster readi-
i I.... go to ready.gov.


Is that rust around the rim of the Spam can?
Are those batteries leaking?
With a new storm season comes reason to
review, repack and replenish supplies in the disas-
ter kit.
Emergency management experts recommend
that kits contain five days worth of supplies, includ-
ing:
* Water - bottled H20 for drinking and t:
gallon containers for cleaning up. . '
* Beverages.
* Non-perishable foods, especially \ ,
ready-to-eat items.
* Disposable utensils and plates.
* Toiletries.
* Cash, including a roll of quarters and small
bills for vending machines. Many vendors may
not be able to accept credit or ATM cards after a
storm.
* Important papers, such as birth certificates,
passports, wills, address books, insurance docu-
ments.
* Cooking pan.


Stocking up

Disaster kits should include cash, because systems
to process credit cards or to dispense cash may go
down in a storm and remain down after.


* Grill.
* Medication.
* First-aid kit.
* Small tools.
* Pocket knife.
* Flashlights.
* Candles.
* Matches.
t * Clothing.
W' * Bedding.
STrash bags.
& * Lawn chairs.
* Games and toys.
* Battery-powered radio and earphones.
* Batteries.
* Cleaning supplies.
* Rubber gloves.
* Florida road map.
* Reading materials, including The Islander
Storm Avengers guide and maybe a Tim Dorsey
or John D. McDonald novel - but not his hur-
ricane disaster epic, "Condominium." Read that
one now.




THE ISLANDER 0 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 B-3

From school to shelter


County emergency management officials encour-
age residents to consider options other than public
shelter, including hotels or other lodging or stays
with family or friends out of the evacuation zone.
Turn to local media for public shelter openings,
including which shelter will serve as a pet-friendly
location and which shelter will serve people with
special needs. The designated special needs shelter
opens in advance of other shelters, but the location
changes depending on storm predictions.
The county's shelter roster:
* Bashaw Elementary School, 3515 Morgan
Johnson Road, Bradenton.
* Bayshore Elementary School, 6120 26th St.
W., Bradenton.
* Braden River Middle School, 6215 River Club
Blvd., Bradenton.
* Braden River High School, 6545 SR 70 E.,
Bradenton.
* Buffalo Creek Middle School, 7320 69th St.
E., Palmetto.
* Daughtrey Elementary School, 515 63rd Ave.
E., Bradenton.
* Freedom Elementary School, 9515 SR 64 E.,
Bradenton.
* Gullett Elementary School, 12125 44th Ave.
E., Bradenton.
* Haile Middle School, 9501 SR 64 E., Braden-
ton.
* Johnson Middle School, 2121 26th Ave. E.,
Bradenton.
* Kinnan Elementary School, 3415 Tallevast
Road, Sarasota.
* Lee Middle School, 4000 53rd Ave. W., Bra-
denton.
* Lincoln Middle School, 305 17th St. E., Pal-
metto.
* Manatee High School, 1000 32nd St. W., Bra-
denton.


In an evacuation, emergency management officials encourage people to seek shelter withfriends or family,
but public shelters also are available. Islander Photo: Lisa Neff


* McNeal Elementary School, 6325 Lorraine
Road, Bradenton.
* Miller Elementary School, 4201 Manatee Ave.
West, Bradenton.
* Mills Elementary School, 7200 69th St. E.,
Palmetto.
* Myakka City Elementary School, 37205 Man-
atee Ave., Myakka City.
* Oneco Elementary School, 5214 22nd Street
Court E., Bradenton.
* Prine Elementary School, 3801 Southern Park-
way, Bradenton.
* Rodgers Garden Elementary School, 515 13th


Ave. W., Bradenton.
* Rowlett Elementary School, 3500 9th St. E.,
Bradenton.
* Seabreeze Elementary School, 3601 71st St.
W., Bradenton.
* Tillman Elementary School, 1415 29th St. E.,
Palmetto.
* Williams Elementary School, 3404 Fort Hamer
Road, Parrish.
* Willis Elementary School, 14705 The Masters
Ave., Bradenton.
* Witt Elementary School, 200 Rye Road, Bra-
denton.


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4-B 1 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER


Stormy weather


Tropical cyclones are low-pressure weather sys-
tems that have thunderstorm activity and rotate coun-
terclockwise.
A tropical cyclone that has winds of 38 mph or
less is called a "tropical depression."
When the tropical cyclone's winds reach 39-73
mph, it is called a "tropical storm."
When winds exceed 74 mph, a storm is consid-
ered a "hurricane." The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane
Scale defines hurricane strength by categories, but
the category of the storm does not necessarily relate
directly to the damage it will inflict.
Lower category storms and even tropical storms
can cause substantial damage depending on what
other weather features they interact with, where they
strike and how slow they move.
Typical hurricanes are about 300 miles wide,
although they can vary considerably in size. The eye
at a hurricane's center is a relatively calm, clear area
about 20-40 miles across.
The wall surrounding the eye of the storm is com-
posed of dense clouds the highest winds.
The storm's outer rainbands - often with hur-
ricane or tropical storm-force winds - are made
up of dense bands of thunderstorms ranging from a
few to 10 and more miles wide and spanning from
50 to 300 miles long.
Hurricane-force winds can extend outward to
about 25 miles in a small hurricane and to more than
150 miles for a large one. Tropical storm-force winds


can stretch out as far as 300 miles from the center of
a large hurricane.
Frequently, the right side of a hurricane is the
most dangerous in terms of storm surge, winds and
tornadoes.
A hurricane's speed and path depend on com-


NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
p ATLANTIC* CARIBBEAN GULF OF MEXICO* HURRICANE TRACK


Boaters: brace against wind, waves


Some tips and cautions for boaters in hurricane
season:
* If an anchorage/mooring plan calls for moving
vessels and there is sufficient notice, a boater should
relocate at least 48-72 hours before a storm is forecast
to strike.
* Make sure fuel tanks are full, fuel filters are
clean, batteries are charged, bilges are clean, cockpit
drains are clear, fire-fighting equipment is working
and lifesaving equipment is in good condition.
* Remove or secure deck gear, portable gear,
radio antennas, outriggers, fighting chairs, deck
boxes, tops and side canvas/curtains, sails, boom,
extra halyards, canister rafts and dinghies. Make sure
hatches, ports, doors, lazarettes and sailboat rudder
are secure.
* If a vessel is moored at a dock or a canal, in a
river or in a marina near the ocean, it is possible that
with an additional 5-10 feet or greater storm surge,
the vessel could take a beating against the dock or
even crash into pilings.
The best offshore mooring for a vessel to ride
out a storm is in the center of a canal or narrow river
where at least doubled mooring lines can be secured
to both shores, port and starboard, fore and aft.
* Do not raft vessels together at moorings or
docks, especially if larger and smaller vessels are


involved. The probability of damage to the vessels is
greater than if they are moored singly.
* If the vessel must remain dockside at a private
dock or marina, heavy-duty fender boards should be
used on a bare-wood center piling. Lines should be
doubled and even tripled in length where necessary to


Key West resi-
dents try to get
a boat stranded
by Hurricane
Wilma back
into the water
by attaching a
rope. Islander
File Photo: Joc-
elyn Augustino/
FEMA


hold a vessel in the center of a berth or off seawall
or dock pilings.
* Do not stay aboard a vessel during a storm.
Sources: National Hurricane Center, Florida
Division of Emergency Management, American
Boating Association.


.0 35- 30 2. S20" 1 10' V WI0 Ea- t 5* The first
named
CHART - storm of
+ '~*- . " 2011 would
be called
'-"'. *' "Arlene."
. -' ". ' The 2005
i , season,
S,. normally
SI June-Novem-
ber, ran into
' ... 2006, and
.." ' consisted of
, ." 28 named
storms.
- It also
S7 . began with
S r1'= " .' "Arlene."
-" t Islander File

tesy National
- , ' Hurricane
_ _ _ --_ _ Center

plex ocean and atmospheric interactions, including
the presence or absence of other weather patterns.
Do not focus on the eye or the track - hurri-
canes are immense systems that can move in com-
plex, difficult patterns to predict. Be prepared for
changes in size, intensity, speed and direction.


Be safe,

be smart,

be ready ... When you

DIGI need to
T 1511 A I^ most, no

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Remember

-< everything.

We Document Your Property
Home and Small Business Inventories
Summer packages start at just $299

941-713-4507

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I




THE ISLANDER 0 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 B-5


For planners: the first
named storm of 2011 will
be called Arlene, the first
named storm of 2012 will
be Alberto and the first
named storm of 2013 will
be Andrea.
The use of short, dis-
tinctive, assigned names is
quicker and less subject to
error than the use of latitude-


Meet -
Katrina.
The storm R;:*
name was ...
retired
in 2005.
Islander ,
Photo:
National b
Hurricane
Center .


longitude identification meth-
ods for storms.
These advantages are
especially important in
exchanging detailed storm
information between hun-
dreds of widely scattered
stations, coastal bases and
ships at sea, according to the
National Hurricane Center.
Since 1953, Atlantic trop-


ical storms have been named
from lists originated by the
NHC.
The first lists featured
only women's names. Then,
in 1979, men's names were
introduced. They alternate
on the list with the women's
names.
The only time there is a
change in the pre-set list is if


a storm is so deadly or costly
that the future use of its name
on a list would be inappropri-
ate and insensitive.
In the event that more
than 21 named tropical
cyclones occur in the Atlantic
basin in a season, additional
storms take names from the
Greek alphabet: Alpha, Beta,
Gamma, Delta, and so on.


Storm IDs: Short, distinctive


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2011
STORM
NAMES
The storm names for
the 2011
Atlantic hurricane
season are:
Arlene (pronounced
ar-LEEN),
Bret (bret),
Cindy (SIN-dee),
Don (dahn),
Emily (EH-mih-lee),
Franklin (FRANK-lin),
Gert (gert),
Harvey (HAR-vee),
Irene (eye-REEN),
Jose (ho-ZAY),
Katia (ka-TEE-ah),
Lee (lee),
Maria (muh-REE-uh),
Nate (nait),
Ophelia (o-FEEL-ya),
Philippe (fee-LEEP),
Rina (REE-nuh),
Sean (shawn),
Tammy (TAM-ee),
Vince (vinss),
Whitney (WHIT-nee).


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6-B 1 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER

Prepare a Survival Kit For Your Pets!
* Current photo of your i- I
* Leash & collar with ID .

* Two-week supply of
food & water . -1
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can-opener
* Pet medications
" Cat litter and pan
" Trash bags


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NS



Storm name Date formed
Alex
Arlene-
Bret
Cindy ____ AZORES .
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
BERMUDA Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia-- N
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy _ _____
Vince
B.V .I. -
ANGUILLA Whitney
- .ST. MARTIN
U.S.
V.'. ST. KmsFS ,ARTIGUA Source: National Hurricane Center
and NEVIS GUADE UPE
_DOMIF ICA
MA TINIQUE
ST. LUCIA
0 BARBADOS
GRENADA 0
SA
^ TRI DAD 10N___________________N


UELA

651W 60-W 551W 5s0W 45-W 40>W 35-W 30-W
_ I-i_


We've experienced many hurricane seasons.
Personal advice from three Island natives ... prepare
... don't panic. Possessions are replaceable.

NlMarh


SINCE 1957
"We ARE the Island!"
Marie Franklin, Lie. Real Estate Broker
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
E-mail amrealty@verizon.net
Web site www.annamariareal.com


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HARDWARE AWSORE


CHECK LIST
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:


J Lanterns & Fuel
J Flashlights
J Batteries
J Candles
J Tapes
J Plastic Bags
J Nails


J Hand Tools
J Can Openers
J Portable Radios
J Coolers
J Sandbags
J Propane Cylinders
for Stoves & Grills


We'll help you with all the supplies you
need to be "storm ready."
Island Shopping Center * 778-2811 * Fax 778-6982
Open Daily


THE ISLANDER 0 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 B-7


During any emergency
we are there for you!



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8-B 1 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 THE ISLANDER


PET-FRIENDLY PLANNING


TWEETING IN


Any disaster that threatens humans, threatens
animals as well. So making arrangements for pets
- among the most vulnerable in a storm - must be
part of any household disaster planning.
Some recommendations:
* Make sure your pet has current immuniza-
tions.
* If you plan to go to a motel, determine in
advance whether pets are welcome and what rules
apply. A good resource is www.petswelcome.com.
* If you plan to board your pet, check whether
your veterinarian will be boarding in an emergency.
There's a chance the local vet's office will be evacuat-
ing as well.
* Friends or relatives in a safe area are the best
choice for sheltering you and your pet.
* Pack a pet survival kit that includes an ID collar
and rabies license tag, leashes, water and food bowls,
medications, food supply to last about two weeks,
newspapers/plastic bags for waste disposal, toys and
comfort items.
* All pets should have secure carriers or collaps-
ible cages. Carriers should be large enough for the
pets to stand comfortably and turn around. Famil-
iarize your pets with the carrier ahead of time. The
carrier should be a comforting refuge if the animal
is required to live in it for days or weeks after the
storm.
* Pets evacuated to the designated county pet-
friendly shelter are required to remain in the owner's
kennel.
* Throughout the evacuation, your pet will need
calm and reassurance from you. Keep as close to its
normal routine as possible and speak to it regularly
in a calm, reassuring voice.
* After the storm passes, take precautions if allow-


Baby Bird, a cairn terrier, gets familiar with a
kennel at Island Dogs Grooming pet spa and bou-
tique. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy

ing your pet outdoors. Familiar scents and sights may
be altered or gone, disorientating the animal. Addi-
tionally, debris, insects, wildlife and water may pres-
ent hazards.

ON THE WEB
For more information about disaster planning
for a household with pets, go to www.humane-
society.org.


Boaters
beware
Boats are
anchored south
of the Historic
Bridge Street
Pier in Bradenton
Beach. Boat-
S-, -- - ers should be
among the first
to act when the
forecast shows
an approach-
ing storm. For
information about
securing a vessel
before a storm, go
to www.boatsafe.
com. Islander
Photo: Lisa Neff


THE WIND

NASA is a twitter. So are the National Hurricane
Center, NOAA and the National Weather Service.
The 2011 storm season has arrived, and govern-
ment agencies are using social media tools to keep
populations informed.
NASAHurricane is sending regular tweets, as is
the NHC.
NOAA is getting liked on Facebook, as is the
Federal Emergency Management Agency and the
popular Weather Underground.

Additional Web resources for the storm season:
* Manatee County Emergency Management:
www.mymanatee.org.
* Florida Division of Emergency Management:
www.floridadisaster.org.
* NOAA hurricane hunters: www.aoc.noaa.gov.
* National Climatic Data Center: www.ncdc.noaa.
gov/oa/climate/severeweather/hurricanes.html.
* FEMA: www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/.
* National Flood Insurance Program: www.floods-
mart.gov.
* National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.
gov/.
* U.S. Coast Guard storm center: www.uscg.mil/
news/stormcenter/.
* Tropical Meteorological Project: tropical.atmos.
colostate.edu/Forecasts/.
Weather Underground: www.wunderground.com/
tropical/.
The Islander: www.islander.org.

Print resources
The Islander has contingency plans to continue
publishing through a storm, as do local daily news-
papers, including the Bradenton Herald and Sarasota
Herald-Tribune.
Especially in the event of widespread and lengthy
power outages, these resources may be the most reli-
able form of communicating information.

Television resources
Local television will report breaking news and
updates in the event of a storm, and Bay News 9 pro-
vides 24-hour news.


DID YOU KNOW?

About 36.8 million people - almost 12
percent of the U.S. population - live in
the coastal portions of states most threat-
ened by Atlantic hurricanes. In 1960, the
population of the coastal area from North
Carolina to Texas was 14 million.





THE ISLANDER 0 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 B-9


CATEGORIZING 'CANES


The United States measures hurricanes using
the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale, which provides
examples of the type of damage and impacts asso-
ciated with winds of certain intensities. In general,
damage rises by a factor of four for every category
increase.

Category 1
Wind: 74-95 mph.
Surge: 4-5 feet.
Effects: No real damage to building structures.
Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes,
shrubbery and trees. Also, some coastal flooding and
minor pier damage.

Category 2
Wind: 96-110 mph.
Surge: 6-8 feet.
Effects: Some roofing material, door and window
damage. Considerable damage to vegetation, mobile
homes, etc. Flooding damages piers and small craft
in unprotected moorings may break its moorings.

Category 3
Wind: 111-130 mph.
Surge: 9-12 feet.
Effects: Some structural damage to small resi-
dences and utility buildings, with a minor amount
of curtainwall failures. Mobile homes are destroyed.
Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures
with larger structures damaged by floating debris.
Terrain may be flooded well inland.

Category 4
Wind: 131-155 mph.
Surge: 13-18 feet.
Effects: More extensive curtainwall failures with



Above-normal

hurricane

season

predicted

Government forecasters are predicting an above-
normal hurricane season for the Atlantic basin.
The predication came in the seasonal outlook
produced by the Climate Prediction Center of the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
The outlook ushered in the six-month hurricane
season begins June 1.
The CPC predicted:
* 12 to 18 named storms with winds of 39 mph
or higher.
* Six to 10 of those storms could become hur-
ricanes, with winds of 74 mph or higher.
* Three to six of those hurricanes could be cat-
egory 3, 4 or 5, with winds of 111 mph or higher.
Another group of forecasters, scientists at Colo-
rado State University, also predict an above-average
season. CSU's forecast released in April predicted
16 named storms, including nine hurricanes, five of
them major.
The seasonal average is for 11 named storms,
including six hurricanes, two of them major hurri-
canes.
"The United States was fortunate last year. Winds
steered most of the season's tropical storms and all
hurricanes away from our coastlines," NOAA admin-
istrator Jane Lubchenco stated with the release of the
report. "However, we can't count on luck to get us
through this season. We need to be prepared, espe-
cially with this above-normal outlook."
The forecasters based their outlook on several
climate factors, including:
* An era of continued high activity. Since 1995,
the NHC has charted more active hurricane sea-
sons.
* Warm Atlantic Ocean water. Surface tempera-


Hurricane survivor Katelin Burkey looks at damage around her Port Charlotte home following Hurricane
Charley. Charley was a Category 4 hurricane that was forecast to make a direct hit at Anna Maria Island,
but made landfall to the south near Port Charlotte. Islander File Photo: FEMA/Andrea Booher


some complete roof-structure failure on small resi-
dences. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may be
flooded well inland.

Category 5
Wind: 155 mph and more.
Surge: 18 feet and more.


Effects: Complete roof failure on many resi-
dences and industrial buildings. Some complete
building failures with small utility buildings blown
over or away. Flooding causes major damage to lower
floors of all structures near the shoreline. Massive
evacuation of residential areas may be required.
Source: National Hurricane Center


Hurricanes Karl, left, Igor and Julia were part of the onslaught of Atlantic storms last hurricane season.
Islander File Photo: NOAA


tures where storms often develop and move across the
Atlantic are up to 2 degrees warmer-than-average.
* La Nifia, which continues to weaken in the
equatorial Pacific Ocean, is expected to dissipate in
the coming weeks, but its impacts, such as reduced
wind shear, are expected to continue into the hur-
ricane season.
"In addition ... seasonal climate models also
indicate an above-normal season is likely, and even
suggest we could see activity comparable to some of
the active seasons since 1995," said Gerry Bell, lead
hurricane forecaster at the CPC.
The forecasters' seasonal outlook does not predict
where or when storms might hit. For each storm, the
NHC forecasts how weather patterns affect a storm's
track, intensity and landfall potential.
"The tornadoes that devastated the South and
the large amount of flooding we've seen this spring
should serve as a reminder that disasters can happen


anytime and anywhere," FEMA administrator Craig
Fugate said. "Now is the time, if you haven't already,
to get your plan together for what you and your family
would do if disaster strikes."
In late May, Island officials - representatives
from local governments and first-responder agencies
- attended a state hurricane conference in prepara-
tion for the new storm season.
They returned to remind citizens to get prepared
by completing disaster plans and stocking disaster
kits.
Advice on such will be presented during a forum
at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, at the Anna Maria
Island Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.
The event, presented by the center, American Red
Cross and Community Emergency Response Team,
will present a discussion of hurricane basics by emer-
gency management officials, disaster relief reps and
a meteorologist.





10-B U 2011 STORM PLANNER U THE ISLANDER


History lesson learned: Charley 2004


The inlet wash-out at the Sanibel-Captiva Bridge. Islander Photo: Jack Elka


Local emergency crews arrive in Charlotte County. Courtesy Islander Photo


West Manatee firefighters search rubble in Charlotte County. Courtesy Photo Damaged properties in Charlotte County. Islander Photo: Jack Elka


The water
tower in
Arcadia ...
became a
symbol of
Hurricane
Charley for
area media.
Islander
Photo:
Bonner Joy







CHARLEY'S

STRIKE
The forecast track for Hurri-
cane Charley, on Aug. 13, 2004,
showed the storm making a direct
hit on Anna Maria Island. The
storm turned just hours before
the predicted landfall at Tampa
Bay, hitting hard at Punta Gorda
and Port Charlotte and then bar-
reling into Arcadia,Wauchula
and crossing the state.
Islanders, having been
spared in the strike, remained in
relief mode and volunteered to
help with the recovery effort in
those nearby ravaged communi-
ties.


- - --


An Airstream trailer is crushed along State Road 64 near Wauchula. Islander
Photo: Jo Ann Meilner


A Desoto County church - far inland from the Port Charlotte land-
fall of Charley - is demolished. Islander Photo: Nancy Ambrose


A new pass created on Cayo Costa Key, which is
south ofBoca Grande. Islander Photo: Jack Elka








Yes, there is an app for that.
More than a dozen apps exist for
tracking hurricanes and other severe
weather for iPhones, Androids, Black-
berries and other mobile devices.
A number of apps, at least for the
iPhone, can be downloaded for free,
including:
* The Weather Channel, which fea-
tures radar maps and severe weather
alerts.
* Hurricane Track, which offers
eight radar animations, projected paths
and tropical weather summaries.
* iHurricane, the most popular hur-
ricane tracking app with alert PUSH
notifications and interactive maps.
* Hurricane Hub, with eyewit-
ness reports, breaking news, volunteer
opportunities and storm histories.
* Hurricane Tracker, which can
be downloaded for a specific state
and offers alerts, satellite maps and
radar.
* Hurricane Forecaster, which
offers current storm locations, poten-
tial paths and 48-hour forecasts.
Top-ranked for-sale apps include


Kitty Code's Hurricane and EZ Apps
Hurricane Tracker.


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Hi /"i . .-.e of
S.iii" iher

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Island
connection
To get storm updates directly
related to Anna Maria Island, sign up
for the newspaper's breaking news
posts and alerts at www.islander.org.
Links to connect to The Islander's
Facebook page and Twitter feed also
can be found at www.islander.org.


THE ISLANDER 0 2011 STORM PLANNER 0 B-11

Caution: No wake


Islanders are fond of telling new-
comers and vacationers that for what-
ever reason - karma, geography or luck
- Anna Maria Island has not suffered a
direct hurricane strike.
Islanders cannot say the same of
flooding. On a barrier island, flooded
streets and sometimes flooded homes,
can come with a simple occurrence of
a big rain at high tide.
Driving through flooded streets can
damage vehicles, as well as threaten
health and safety of people.
Some cautions:
* Floods are the most common haz-
ards in the United States.
* Floods can be local, impacting
a neighborhood or community, as can
be the case of thunderstorm-associated
floods, or impacting an entire region, as
can be the case in a hurricane.
* Most cars will float and can be
swept away in 18-24 inches of moving
water.
* Trucks and SUVs do not fare
much better, with only 6-12 more
inches of clearance.
* Flooded road bottoms can wash


away, making the water much deeper
than it appears.
* If you drive through high water,
be sure to soon after wash the undercar-
riage.
Some precautions:
* Keep any vehicle well-maintained
and supplied with emergency supplies.
* In a ground-level home on the
Island, consider raising some items,
including expensive furniture pieces,
appliances and equipment, such as the
television and the furnace.
* Look around your property to keep
drains clear and remove any vegetation
that might clog the stormwater drainage
system.
Source: FEMA

DID YOU KNOW?
Hurricane Katrina, which made
landfall along the Louisiana coast
Aug. 29, 2005, killed 1,833 people
in the United States and cost an esti-
mated $125 billion. Katrina was the
costliest tropical cyclone in U.S. his-
tory.


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