Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00305
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Place of Publication: Anna Maria Island, FL
Publication Date: June 2, 2010
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074389
Volume ID: VID00305
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Str Avengers









Look inside for our
special storm-ready
section.




Skimming
the news ...


Meetings: The gov
eminent calendar.
Page 3-A


Anna Maria
mission rejec
plan. Page 4
ASTHBIOR.D TERN
"Am...a.i.

yssjs y


By Rick Catlin
corn- Islander Reporter
ts PAR Anna Maria Commissioner Harry
-A Stoltzfus filed a motion May 24 with the
Manatee County Circuit Court asking the
court to declare the recall petition against
him "not legally sufficient."
Attorney Richard Harrison, represent-
,\ ing Stoltzfus, submitted the complaint,
along with a motion seeking a hearing prior
to May 28 the deadline for Stoltzfus to
~provide a 200-word


Op/Ed: The Islander
editorial, readers'
letters. Page 6-A

Island S4
happeings
Island happenings:
Community news,
events. Pages 10-A-
11-A


statement in defense of
the accusations made in
the recall petition.
That defense state-
ment, submitted to Anna
Maria city clerk Alice
Baird less than an hour
S,..hi/ ,before the deadline, will
be attached to a second petition that requires
signatures of voters for the process to con-


Storm

forecast.

Page 6.,


VOLUME 18. NO. 30


Bird

outlook.

Page 14



ie season!


tinue to a recall vote.
Circuit court Judge Ed Nicholas denied
the accelerated hearing motion on May 26.
Harrison named recall committee chair
Bob Carter, Anna Maria City Clerk Alice
Baird and Manatee County Supervisor of
Elections Bob Sweat as defendants.
The recall petition was "so vague and
ambiguous that it does not furnish (Stoltz-
fus) fair, reasonable and adequate notice of
the charges alleged as grounds for recall," the
complaint states. Stoltzfus is "unable to frame
an appropriate defensive statement" because
of the vagueness of the charges, Harrison


AME kids
perform.

Page 22



2. 2010 m


alleged.
The Recall Commissioner Stoltzfus com-
mittee submitted its first recall petition with
the required signatures to Sweat.
Under Florida law, the committee has
30 days from the date Stoltzfus provides his
defense statement to then obtain the signatures
of 15 percent (204) of the 1,362 voters reg-
istered with the city as of the date of the last
election Nov. 3, 2009.
Harrison's motion for dismissal of the
recall petition does not halt the process, said
Sweat. It would take a court order to put the
brakes on the recall, he indicated.
Carter said the legal maneuvering was
expected.
"We have anticipated this kind of delay
action since we began the process," he said.
"We will respond appropriately."
The committee claimed in its original
petition that since Stoltzfus' election to the
PLEASE SEE STOLTZFUS, NEXT PAGE


Cafe on the Beach all but exhausts options


-ij 7. By Nick Walter
AAMITW does double- Islander Reporter
duty on beach. It's likely over for the present operators
Page 14-A of Cafe on the Beach.
County commissioners decided May
.1 d BZ 25 not to reconsider their decision to award
the Manatee Public Beach concession to a


Island Biz: ( i/..,,.l, i
activities announced.
Page 16-A



Islander Calendar:
What to do. Page
18-A


Streetlife: The police
beat. Page 19-A

Sports: Basketball
at the Center.
Page 20-A

Fishing: Red snap-
per season begins.
Page 21 -A






School: Levengood's
countdown begins.
Page 22-A


Tampa company.
Commissioners Gwen Brown, Larry
Bustle, Donna Hayes and Ron Getman voted
May 11 to award the contract to UPS.
Brown said at the May 25 meeting she
considered rescinding her vote, but believed
she made the right decision.
"The emotions were just so high and
strong," Brown said. "I do know this: If this
one issue determines whether I get elected
or not ... then this job isn't worthwhile."
Commissioners John Chappie, Joe
McClash and Carol Whitmore wanted to
keep current operators Tommy Vayias and
John Menihtas, who sub-lease the restaurant
from P.S. Beach Associates owners Dee and
Gene Schaefer. P.S. Beach has had its con-
tract with the county 18 years.
Despite petitions, pleas from many Cafe
on the Beach supporters at the May 11 meet-
ing and a written protest of the commission
vote from the cafe attorney, according to its
contract with the county, United Parks Ser-
vice will begin operations of the concessions
at Manatee Public Beach July 21.
"I think it's kind of a kick in the teeth
to the local guy," McClash said.
McClash thought the process was unfair
because Vayias and Menhitas did not have
the opportunity to match the UPS bid. He
said it doesn't make sense to throw out local


management that had been successful and
adored by the Island community.
Beachgoers at Cafe on the Beach May 26
were upset with the decision.
"I want to take this place home," said


The county-
run Manatee
Public Beach
in Holmes
Beach should
have a new
look begin-
ning July 21,
when Tampa-
based United
'. Parks Service
takes over
Sthe conces-
sion. Islander
S- Photo:
Nick Walter





Fhe Beach Shop
it Manatee
Public Beach
is discounting
merchandise
.ind looking for
i new location
in anticipation
f new man-
..igement at the
beach July 21.

Sonia Williams, from England. "It's lovely
as it is. Leave it alone."
Holmes Beach resident Chris Thof called
the decision "sad."
PLEASE SEE CAFE, PAGE 3


Stoltzfus files legal motion to halt recall


Stoltzfus files
defense statement
for second recall
petition. Page 2





2-A U JUNE 2, 2010 U THE ISLANDER


Stoltzfus submits recall petition defense


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Commissioner Harry Stoltzfus last
week presented city clerk Alice Baird with a 200-
word statement defending himself against the ongo-
ing recall effort.
Stoltzfus went to city hall about 3:30 p.m. May
28, just 30 minutes before the deadline for him to
submit a statement, which will be attached to a second
recall petition that will circulate among city voters
for signatures.
A Recall Commissioner Stoltzfus committee was
formed in April to obtain signatures on the first peti-
tion. The committee seeks to have Manatee County
Supervisor of Elections Robert Sweat hold a recall
election for Stoltzfus.
The first petition, with 247 signatures, was sub-
mitted to Sweat in mid-May. The committee needed
10 percent of the city's eligible voters (1,362) and
Sweat certified 218 signatures.
The committee has 30 days from May 28 the
date Stoltzfus provided his statement of defense -
for the second petition to be completed and submit-
ted.
Fifteen percent (204) of the city's eligible voters
as of the last election Nov. 3, 2009 need to sign
the second petition.
Stoltzfus' statement, which contains an assort-
ment of excerpts from a variety of Thomas Jefferson
quotes, reads:
A wise and frugal government, which shall
restrain men from injuring one another, which shall
leave them otherwise free.... this is the sum of good
government....
The majority, oppressing an individual, is guilty
of a crime, abuses its strength, and by acting on the
law of the strongest, breaks up the foundations of
society.
Advertisements contain the only truths to be


relied on in a newspaper.
Thomas Jefferson
The charges against me are a collection of neb-
ulous, unsubstantiated falsehoods. Their vagueness
makes a specific, directed response impossible.
As commissioner, I have attempted to uphold
the policies and regulations of our comprehensive
plan and our land-development regulations.
My focus on safety has revealed an inconve-
nient truth. Our city has repeatedly contravened its
policies and regulations.


This recall attempt is spearheaded by a politi-
cally motivated group of people, including some
within this administration, who are either unwill-
ing to accept that truth or unwilling to make the
changes required to bring our city back into com-
pliance.
Anna Marians have a proud history of deal-
ing with similar threats. I'm confident they will
respond appropriately to this misguided effort to
recall me.
Harry Stoltzfus


STOLTZFUS RECALL MOTION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


city commission in November 2009, he has commit-
ted misfeasance and malfeasance in the performance
of his duties.
Carter and the committee claimed Stoltzfus sent
e-mails that contained "libelous and inflammatory
remarks" about city staff, citizens, and professional
consultants that violate the city's policy against per-
sonal attacks and "expose the city to significant legal
expense."
The petition further stated that Stoltzfus has
been "abusing his authority," has employed "evasive
devices to intentionally circumvent state statutes" and
has "conspired with others to deceive citizens and
bring financial harm" to the city by encouraging liti-
gation against the city while hiding his involvement
in the action.
"His conduct cannot be legally justified and con-
flicts with state law," the petition stated.
Not so, wrote Harrison in his motion court.
He called the recall committee charges against
Stoltzfus "vague and ambiguous," and claimed they
were not specific enough to justify a recall.
The committee's charge that Stoltzfus violated
the city's policy against personal attacks "is inade-
quate to establish malfeasance," Harrison said. Addi-
tionally, he claimed the "city has no such policy that


would relate to e-mail communications by a commis-
sioner."
The city does have a pledge of conduct, but it
contains no specified penalty or sanction for any vio-
lation, Harrison said.
Additionally, Harrison continued, the claims of
malfeasance and misfeasance are "mutually exclusive
concepts (and) no single act can constitute both mal-
feasance and misfeasance." The recall petition does
not distinguish between the two acts and this creates
a "legal impossibility," he said.
Harrison asked the court to grant temporary relief to
Stoltzfus to "preserve the status quo, declare the petition
invalid, enjoin the defendants from taking further action
in furtherance of the recall or recall petition," and grant
further relief as the court sees fit.
Harrison concluded by asking the court to award
costs to Stoltzfus.
Sweat said the Manatee county attorney will rep-
resent him in court, while Anna Maria Mayor Fran
Barford said she has given city attorney Jim Dye the
papers served on Baird as a defendant. Carter said
last week the recall committee had not yet decided
if it would seek a lawyer.
As of press deadline May 31, the court had not
set a date to hear the motion.


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Anna Maria
honor for
Mote
Anna Maria
resident Bob
Carter, a
member of the
Mote Marine
Laboratory
board of direc-
tors, accepts
a proclama-
tion May 27
from Mayor
Fran Barford
that the city
recognizes the
55 years Mote
Marine has
been operating.
Islander Photo:
Rick Catlin


CONCESSION DECISION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1


"They run these guys out after all these years?"
Thof said. "There was good service here. The (county)
should have just offered the contract to (Cafe on the
Beach) for a higher rent."
Susie Falzone from Niagara Falls, Ontario, said
UPS has a chance to succeed if it can replicate the
cafe's quality of food. "People right now are saying,
'Oh, poor guy,'" she said. "But if they like the food,
they won't care. They'll forget."
Meanwhile, some Cafe on the Beach employees
are wondering if they'll have their jobs come the end
of July. Danielle Phillips may not wait to find out.
"I'll probably be looking for a job because I'm not
relying on whether they'll let me keep my job or not,"
she said. "I don't even know these people."
Despite Cafe on the Beach attorney Stavros


Tingirides saying the commission made its decision
based on inaccurate facts, some of the commission-
ers voting in favor of UPS say the process had to be
followed.
"We did do the proper procedure, and we need
to let it go," Hayes said May 25. "We' ve got other
issues."
Dee Schaefer, who has been operating the con-
cession since 1992, said she likely will remain on
Anna Maria Island with her gift shop or a restaurant
that serves "ooey-gooey food."
Vayias said he'll take some time off to rest from
four months of fighting for his livelihood.
"The process was unfair to me," Vayias said. "But
I respect their decision and I'll abide by it. Hopefully,
I can make a smooth transition for the new guy."


THE ISLANDER U JUNE 2, 2010 U 3-A


Meetings
Anna Maria City
June 1, 6:30 p.m., planning and zoning board.
June 3, 6 p.m., joint p&z-city commission.
June 9, 6:30 p.m., EEEC.
June 10, 7 p.m., city commission.
June 14, 3 p.m., City Pier Centennial Commit-
tee.
June 15, planning and zoning hearing.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, 941-
708-6130, www.cityofannamaria.com.

Bradenton Beach
June 3, 1 p.m., pier team.
June 3, 5 p.m., mooring field committee.
June 3, 7 p.m., city commission.
June 7, 1 p.m., ScenicWAVES.
June 8, 1 p.m., city commission on budget.
June 16, 1 p.m., redevelopment agency.
June 17, 1 p.m., city commission.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
941-778-1005, www.cityofbradentonbeach.org.

Holmes Beach
June 8, 7 p.m., city commission.
June 17, 10 a.m., code enforcement.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
941-708-5800, www.holmesbeachfl.org.

West Manatee Fire Rescue District
June 17, 6 p.m., district commission.
WMFR Station No. 1, 6001 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, 941-741-3900.

Of Interest
June 8,9 a.m., Board of Manatee County Commis-
sioners, county administrative building, Bradenton.
June 16,2 p.m., Barrier Island Elected Officials,
Holmes Beach City Hall.
Send notices to Lisa Neff at lisaneff@islander.
org.


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4-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER


Anna Maria commission rejects PAR site plan


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The Anna Maria City Commission voted 3-2 at
its May 27 public hearing to deny a Pine Avenue
Restoration LLC site plan for 308 Pine Ave.
Score a victory for Anna Maria Commissioner
Harry Stoltzfus.
Stoltzfus has said for the past seven months that
prior PAR site-plans approved by
the planning and zoning board
are inconsistent with the city's
land-development regulations
and comprehensive plan, and
maintained that position at the
hearing.
This was his first vote on a
'.. .li f PAR project following a change
in site-plan procedures that put
major site-plan approvals in the
hands of the commission.
Stoltzfus, along with Com-
missioner Dale Woodland and
Commission Chair John Quam
voted to deny the plan, while
Commissioners Chuck Webb
Quam and Jo Ann Mattick favored the


plan. The planning and zoning board had recom-
mended approval.
PAR engineer Lynn Townsend Burnett said
the site plan met all city requirements and had the
R -,/ A approval of city planner Alan
Garrett and city attorney Jim
Dye.
But Stoltzfus countered that
the commission has had an "evo-
lution" on interpretation.
"We've had a change in
Coleman understanding and this site plan
requires maneuvering in the
right of way to get into these spaces and our LDR
denies that. So, we need another amendment for this
to comply," he said.
Stoltzfus said the LDR requires sidewalks to be
in the city's right of way. Thus, a vehicle crossing a
sidewalk is in the right of way and that's against the
LDR, he said.
Webb, however, told Stoltzfus not to include him
in any change in understanding. Webb, an attorney,
said he saw the plan as "in compliance" for parking
and sidewalks.
Dye and Garrett disagreed with Stoltzfus' interpreta-
tion that a motorist crossing a sidewalk to park a vehicle


A new signal arm and traffic lights planned at the intersection of Manatee Avenue and Last Bay Drive in
Holmes Beach is now the target of beautification advocates. Islander Photo: Nick Walter

Long-planned traffic improvement


now deemed
By Nick Walter
Islander Reporter
One of the first sights to greet drivers from the
mainland and Perico Island to Holmes Beach is a
simple island of small palm trees and shrubs at the
intersection of Manatee Avenue and East Bay Drive.
That patch of beautification a traffic island -
received an award from the Manatee River Garden
Club last year for its beauty.
But the Florida Department of Transportation has
a project under way that may displace the plants to
replace the traffic signal at the intersection with a new
mast-apparatus that will withstand 130-mph winds.
The signal mast will be 19 inches in diameter.
Holmes Beach Commissioner Al Robinson for
months has been concerned not only about the look
and the price, which he said would cost between
$150,000-$200,000, but, he says, the pole would
be in the line of sight for drivers heading north on
East Bay Drive as they yield to eastbound Manatee
Avenue traffic.
"This spacious and open intersection that is now
the gateway to our city will become just one more
look-a-like intersection," Robinson said in a written
letter to commissioners. "Just like Manatee and 75th
and the eight more going to downtown Bradenton."
Robinson brought the issue up again, asking
commissioners if something can be done to halt the
plan.
Commissioner David Zaccagnino also opposes
the new signal. "When I first started on the city
parks and beautification committee eight years ago,


safety hazard
I can't tell you how many letters I got about that
(intersection) being untidy," Zaccagnino said. "We
finally got it to where we want, although there's been
some issues with the vegetation being too high, but
everyone seems to be happy now and I don't think a
19-inch diameter pole is going to help any."
Zaccagnino said he spoke to a DOT representa-
tive about the issue and one DOT employee said the
pole had already been ordered.
Robinson said, "The 19-inch pole can be used
someplace else."
Mayor Rich Bohnenberger agreed to tell the DOT
the city is opposed to the project.
"Sometimes I get the feeling the DOT gets a blue-
print," Zaccagnino said, "and they don't care how it
turns out, because then they' re gone."

AM election qualifying
established
In other business at the Anna Maria May 27
meeting, commissioners adopted an ordinance to set
the qualifying period for candidates for city office
this year and in all future even-numbered years, to
the latter part of July. This allows the city to "pi_', -
back" with the county election in those years.
For 2010, qualifying for the two commission
seats and the office of mayor up for election will be
from noon, July 19, to noon, July 30. In odd-num-
bered years, qualifying will be in mid-September, city
clerk Alice Baird said.
This year the general election is Nov. 2.


is the same as maneuvering in the right of way.
Mike Coleman of PAR tried to compromise and
said he would agree to a stipulation to retroactively
change the parking at 308 Pine Ave., and all PAR
projects in the city, when the commission adopts a
new parking plan. The commission is already dis-
cussing a parking plan for Pine Avenue that provides
for parallel street parking.
Quam was interested in that prospect, along with
PAR locating the sidewalks in front of the parked
vehicles.
"Is it within the code to move the sidewalk to in
front of parking?" he asked Dye.
Dye said the code does not address the issue.
Stoltzfus argued against moving the sidewalks,
noting that according to the traffic ordinance, any
sidewalk has to abut the right of way. "Those side-
walks can't be moved," he said.
Burnett said the commission has been interpret-
ing the LDR since 1994 to allow backout parking
on Pine Avenue, but Woodland and Stoltzfus were
unswayed.
Woodland said that doesn't mean the commis-
sion can' t decide to change its interpretation.
"And I' m not sure we' ve had similar develop-
ments until recently. It's like if you made this inter-
pretation before, you have to make the same one
again," Woodland said.
Not so, said Mattick.
In recent years, the city has approved numerous
projects with backout parking, she said, "including
the community center, the Hunt property on Pine
Avenue and the Waterfront Restaurant," along with
several other PAR projects.
Mattick said the commission is supposed to make
quasi-judicial decisions, such as a site-plan approvals,
on the basis of information and evidence provided at
the public hearing, and not personal opinion or one's
own interpretation of the LDRs.
Until the LDRs are changed, the commission has
to make a decision "based on whether or not the plan
before us complies with the existing LDRs," she said.
Both the city attorney and city planner have stated
the plan complies, Mattick said.
Dye said that if the commission doesn't like the
interpretation, it can change the LDRs, but indicated
it's supposed to make its decision based upon what
the LDRs state at present.
Woodland disagreed.
"You' re saying that we are interpreting the code
properly, but we don't like the result. I've said it
before that I don't think we are interpreting the code
properly," he said before casting his vote to deny the
application.

Ex-parte disclosure
Stoltzfus admitted at the start of the hearing
that he had ex-parte communications about the site
plan prior to the public hearing. He said he talked
with Robert and Nicky Hunt about the site plan,
along with other individuals and an attorney with
the law firm of Lobeck and Hanson. He said he did
not speak with another commissioner about 308
Pine Ave.
Dye's advice to Stoltzfus and the other commis-
sioners about ex-parte communications was "don't
do that."

PAR response
Coleman declined to comment after the hearing,
but the next day issued a statement: "Last night's
decision was clearly inconsistent with substantial
competent evidence finding our application compli-
ant with existing codes and ordinances."
"(The application) was also consistent with this
same commission's vote on the boardwalk project
on city property. However, we are hopeful that there
is a simple explanation for this that can be remedied
so that the commissioners can re-consider their vote.
Certainly, we want to provide every opportunity for
the sensible thing to occur at minimum cost to our
city."
Coleman did not rule out investigating a legal
remedy.





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 5-A


Forecast: 'Active' Atlantic storm season


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
The six-month Atlantic storm season opened June
1 with forecasters predicting an "active" season that
includes a 45 percent chance of a storm hitting the
East Coast.
Researchers Philip Klotzbach and William Gray
of Colorado State University, home to one of the lead-
ing forecast institutes, predicted 15 named storms,
including eight hurricanes four of them major.
The probability that at least one major hurricane
would hit the U.S. coastline was 69 percent, com-
pared with the 52 percent average for the last century,
according to the CSU team.
The probability of a major hurricane hitting the
East Coast, including peninsula Florida, was 45 per-
cent, compared with the average for the century, 30
percent.
"We continue to see above-average activity," the
researchers wrote.
Meteorologists with AccuWeather.com also
called for a more active season with above-normal
threats to the U.S. coast.
"This year has the chance to be an extreme
season," said AccuWeather hurricane forecaster Joe
Bastardi. "It is certainly much more like 2008 than
2009 as far as the overall threat.
Bastardi predicted 16-18 named storms, 15 of
which would be in the western Atlantic or Gulf of
Mexico.
Another forecast center, Tropical Storm Risk in
London, predicted two hurricanes and three tropical
storms would hit the U.S. coastline.
The last forecast issued before the season's start
came from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration May 27.
NOAA's Climate Prediction Center predicted
14-23 named storms, including 8-14 hurricanes.
Three to seven of the hurricanes would be major
hurricanes of Categories 3-5.
"If this outlook holds true, this season could
be one of the more active on record," said NOAA
administrator Jane Lubchenco. "The greater likeli-
hood of storms brings an increased risk of a landfall.




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Re-entry tags available
Anna Maria Island residents should make sure they
have obtained a hang-tag a card that hangs from
a vehicle's rear-view mirror needed to re-enter
the Island after an evacuation has ended. Re-entry
tags are available in Anna Maria at city hall, 10005
Gulf Drive; in Holmes Beach at city hall, 5801
Marina Drive; and in Bradenton Beach at city hall,
107 Gulf Drive N. Islanders should bring proof
of residency and photo identification cards when
applying for a tag. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy

In short, we urge everyone to be prepared."
NOAA cited three factors for the season:
A high-activity era continues. Since 1995, con-
ditions have been in sync for more active seasons.
Eight of the last 15 seasons rank in the top 10 for
most-named storms, with 2005 in first place with 28
named storms.
Upper atmospheric winds. Wind shear, which
can tear storms apart, will be weaker since El Niho in
the eastern Pacific has dissipated. Strong wind shear
helped suppress storm development last year.
The 2009 Atlantic hurricane season produced
nine named storms, including three hurricanes.
Warm Atlantic surface temperatures. Sea sur-
face temperatures are expected to remain above aver-
age where storms often develop and move across the
Atlantic. Record warm temperatures to 4 degrees
Fahrenheit above average currently exist.


"The main uncertainty in this outlook is how
much above normal the season will be," said Gerry
Bell, a lead forecaster with the Climate Prediction
Center. "Whether or not we approach the high end
of the predicted ranges depends partly on whether
or not La Nifia develops this summer. At present, we
are in a neutral state, but conditions are becoming
increasingly favorable for La Nifio to develop.
While forecasters offered odds and percentages
for the 2010 season, government officials stressed an
oft-repeated point it takes only one storm to wreak
havoc.
"Regardless of the number of storms that may
form this season, make your preparation plans with
the idea that this is the year you will be struck," said
Bill Read, director of NOAA's National Hurricane
Center in Miami.
Read, last week, attended the annual Florida
Governor's Hurricane Conference in Fort Lauder-
dale along with other administrators, emergency
management officials, first-responders and business
owners.
The conference agenda was set months ago, but
was amended to address questions about the impact
of a hurricane on the growing oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico. An April 20 explosion on an oil rig in the
Gulf of Mexico killed 11 men. A deepwater well at the
site, located about 50 miles off the Louisiana coast,
began leaking an estimated 5,000 barrels of oil.
A hurricane might break up the oil, researchers
said. Also, there is an official worry that storm surge
could carry the oil to land.
"It's going to be part of the ecological catastrophe
that you get anyway with a hurricane," Read said.
Craig Fugate, administrator of the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency, urged coastal residents
to focus on preparing for the storm season and to
leave if an evacuation is ordered.
"We never know where the next hurricane or
disaster will strike, but we know that the more we
do to prepare now, the better the outcome will be,"
he said.


,0U -WO I im
J-I

Sw1 MT,


ACCOMMODATIONS
Tortuga Inn Beach &
Tradewinds Resorts
90 well-appointed rooms, apts., suites
with kitchens, wi-fi, pools, beach, more!
www.tortugainn.com
941-778-6611
www.tradewinds-resort.com

Haley's Motel
An Island jewel with 1950s charm and
21st century amenities. Perfect for all
weddings and reunions.
941-778-5405 or 800-367-7824
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Bungalow Beach Resort
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bungalow@bungalowbeach.com
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BEAUTY & WELLNESS
Acqua Aveda Salon Spa Store
Hair, nails, makeup, skin and massage
for the bride and the entire bridal party.
5311 Gulf Drive,
Holmes Beach
941-778-5400
www.acquaaveda.com


CATERING
Banana Cabana
Caribbean Grill & Restaurant
We'll cater your affair with
Caribbean flair! 941-779-1930
www.bananacabanaseafood.com
FLOWERS
Silvia's Flower Corner
Unique flowers that will WOW you!
9801 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria.
flowercorner@tampabay.rr.com
annamariaflorist.com 941-720-0424
PHOTOGRAPHY
Jack Elka PhotoGraphics
The finest wedding photography, since
1980. Studio located at 315 58th St.
Holmes Beach. Visit my Web site at
www.jackelka.com 941-778-2711

Island Photography
Beautiful and creative photography
that you will treasure for a lifetime.
Dara Caudill 941-778-5676
islandphotography.org

JEWELRY
Bridge Street Jewelers
The Island's full-service jewelry store.
129 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach
941-896-7800
v 8 88 j ,j^ ^


BRIDAL ATTIRE
The Beach Shop at
the Manatee Public Beach
Pretty white dresses for a
casual Island wedding. Dresses
for moms, too! Open daily.
941-778-5442

WEDDING/RECEPTIONS
Rotten Ralph's Restaurants
Now offering catering
and banquet facilities
for weddings and private parties.
941-778-3953.

Queens Gate Resort
Private beach weddings, reception area, &
guest accommodations all in one location.
www.queensgateresort.com
islands58@aol.com
941-778-7153 or 800-310-7153

Bradenton Country Club
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Casual, Formal, Small or Large
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To ADVERTISE, CONTACT IWED EXPERT TONI LYON 941-928-8735 TONI@ISLANDER.ORG





6-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER




o1110o11


Islander motto: Be prepared
Yes, it's hurricane season. Better plan for your
evacuation and your return after the storm -
now.
While many likely have stockpiled batteries, a
roll of plastic drop cloth, water and some non-per-
ishable foods along with assorted battery-powered
devices, there's a list of "to dos" in The Islander
Storm Avenger section that merit your attention.
Is your boat ready for the "big one?"
How about your pets?
And the home? Storm shutters in shape? Roof
tarps ready?
Is the car ready to run all season?
Have you cleared space to safely store the out-
door grill, potted plants and lawn furniture?
Here's some factoids to press the point.
Deadliest: In 1972, an East Pakistan cyclone
killed 200,000-500,000 people.
Most devastating: In 1900, a hurricane struck
Galveston, Texas, and washed the city away. About
15 percent of the population drowned.
Strongest: In 1988, Hurricane Gilbert had
recorded winds of 218 mph when it made landfall in
northern Mexico. The pressure in the storm was the
lowest ever recorded.
Be prepared. Of course, you're going to keep
a kit containing the supplies needed to survive at a
friend's in-town house, a motel or a shelter, then back
at home without electricity or running water for days
or weeks.
You' 11 remember dog and cat food, but will you
keep the pet's other supplies handy? Flea protection?
Heartworm medication? Shampoo for after the inevi-
table dip in bacteria-laden waters?
How about that extra can of gas for the car or the
boat? A can of gap foam spray to put the final seal on
doorways, including the garage door?
Some extra line and a spare anchor for the
boat?
A few gallon jugs of water for washing up, brush-
ing teeth, bathtime for you and the pets, and washing
dishes?
How about some extra propane or charcoal for
the grill? You could be cooking out often.
And also, make a list and keep handy the tools
and supplies you need to clean up the house and yard
in the event the worst happens and you return home
to a disaster.
Hopefully, we' 11 all enjoy the summer vacation
season without the need for an evacuation.
Prepare for the worst, hope for the best.



--w-air -

V Publisher and Editor --
Bonner Joy, bonner@islander.org
Joe Bird i :
Diana Bogan, diana@islander.org
7 Kevin Cassidy, kevin@islander.org
Rick Catlin, rick islanderorgm
SKimberly Kuizon, kimberly@islander.org
Molly S. McCartney i'
Lisa Neff, copy editor, lisaneff@islander org
Nick J. Walter, nick@islander.org
S Contributors
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Mike Quinn I NewsManatee.com
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Accounting Services
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Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
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Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
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WEB SITE: www.islander.org
PHONE 941-778-7978 toll-free fax 1-866-362-9821


ASTHENORLD TERNS


=


Fine tradition
The latest hubbub in the Anna Maria City Coun-
cil carries on the fine tradition of electing nuts.
It began with the Great Depression when the
men folks bankrupted the city. Electors appointed
the postmaster mayor. The men quit. She appointed
an all-woman commission, and they promptly got the
city out of bankruptcy.
One commissioner liked the bottle a little too
much and ran her boat through the city pier. The com-
mission forced her to leave it there so all could walk
over the top of it until repaired. She wasn't partial to
the city pier. She ran her car over the opening in the
Green Bridge in Bradenton and had to be lifted off
by crane.
One would hope that most commissioners would
think through their suggestions before making them,
but some do not.
The current hubbub about the safety of backing
out over sidewalks ignores three important facts:
Probably 98 percent of Island cars back across side-
walks. Island population approaches 10,000 in con-
gested months and exceeds 6,000 in summer, yet
most cannot recall even one backing-out accident.
Island speed limits are 25 mph on both ends and 35
in the middle, so no one is in a hurry.
There are many pressing problems justifying
commission time. Spending days and weeks on mat-
ters of no consequence is a disservice to the city.
John Adams, Holmes Beach

Why oh why?
It is not hard to see why everybody wants to cash
in on our little paradise. What I don't get is why are
we letting them. The way I see it, the developers get
money by building and selling the shops and resi-
dences, the feds get the income tax from the profits,
the state gets the sales tax, the county gets the prop-
erty taxes and the bed tax and we get the traffic.
Why then have our elected officials allowed the
developers to manipulate our ROR areas, our land-


/

I, -
F I'
II
~


development regulations and ignore parts of our
comp plan?
And what happened to the mom-and-pop rule?
Where did we lose that?
I believe the answer is that our mayor and sev-
eral commissioners have become too friendly with
the developers. The Pine Avenue Restoration people
should not be able to walk into city hall, go through
closed doors and make a pot of coffee. They should
not be going to lunch with our mayor or her staff.
And why on Earth are we ready to oust the one guy
that is willing to fight the control that the developers
have gained on our city?
Steve Doyle, Anna Maria

Rubbish
The idea of collecting rubbish and recycling on
one day is great, but the problem is who puts the
green barrel and the blue buckets away from the
street.
The renters in the house across from me on 80th
Street left two weeks ago, the rubbish was collected,
but the barrels and buckets are still on the street.
I understand the people who own the rental are in
London, and the renters were from Norway, but who
is supposed to put those barrels away? Next door to
me the rental is owned by people in Germany, people
from Poland were there last and the barrels sat by the
street for almost two weeks.
Two houses on the other side, same problem.
Is there a solution to this problem? Any sugges-
tions?
Nancy Richard, Holmes Beach

Have your say
We welcome and encourage your comments on
topics, columns and editorials in The Islander.
Address letters of 200 words or less by e-mail
to news@islander.org or mail to 5404 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach FL 34217, or comment on matters on
The Islander Web site at www.islander.org.






. .


yOa Opinion


Family defense
Harry Stoltzfus is a brother of mine, and intro-
duced my wife and I, along with another brother, a
niece, and another very good friend of ours, to Anna
Maria over 10 years ago. We all became property
owners in Anna Maria.
On one of our first drives through Anna Maria,
with Harry riding with me, I did a drift through at
a four-way stop sign. Harry said: John, if you keep
that up you will get a ticket and by the way be sure
to always obey the speed limit, the sheriff will ticket
you at 5 mph over the speed limit, this town is serious
about taking care of pedestrians as there are a lot of
slow-moving retired people here in Florida.
10 years later who would have known that Harry
would be in a fight for his political life, because of a
concern that rules are not being followed and enforced
in land planning, and a deep concern for the safety
of residents and guests of Anna Maria. Harry also is
committed to preserve the character of Anna Maria
by responsible development. We don't need or want
another St. Armands Circle in Anna Maria.
In my opinion, this whole recall process has noth-
ing to do with purported Sunshine Law violations,
trumped up ethics charges and other vague accusa-
tions designed to destroy the messenger in an attempt
to malign Harry's character and attack his integrity,
rather than deal with issues.
There is a move afoot to circumvent what could not
be won at the ballot box by people who appear to be
more interested in interpretation of the land-use laws in
ways that fit their financial interests, instead of follow-
ing the rules outlined in the comprehensive plan.
When anti-Harry forces are permitted to set up
outside the post office, approaching every person
coming and going into the post office, with some
having no idea of what they are signing, there is


something wrong with that picture.
Guests of ours, while renting our home, visited
the post office and were approached about signing the
recall petition and were very upset by this process.
Harry is a man of integrity, and he will do what
he says he will do. Is he perfect? No, of course not.
Will he work for what is right? Absolutely, you can
count on it.
In closing, I appeal to all voters in Anna Maria
to ask themselves who will stand up and defend
the process of responsible land planning and
development if this is how elected officials with
strong convictions are treated by those who have
resources to file endless legal actions instead of
winning at the ballot box?
Think about it.
John M. ,. .Ih:fi;,, Anna Maria and Gordonville,
Pa.
And our opinion...
While we have no doubt it's a right and maybe
moreso a moral responsibility to support family, there
is some misgiving here that Harry Stoltzfus' brother
John has his finger on the pulse of Anna Maria.
We find the current that presently runs in Anna
Maria in favor of a recall vote is largely based on
Harry's plan to enjoin and help finance legal actions
against the city the city he was elected to represent
in good faith and those lawsuits are a reality.
John Stoltzfus asks if a recall is what officials
can expect from people who didn't win at the ballot
box and the answer is yes. It's the citizens' right to
hold a recall election to take back their vote and that's
what's happening and why.
And it's likewise the voter's choice to retain
Harry if the opportunity arises.
Bonner Joy, Islander publisher


z" -" m


TEMPS
Date
May 23
May 24
May 25
May 26
May 27
May 28
May 29


AND DROPS ON AMI


Low
69
69
"71


High
94
90
'89
89
88
87
88


Rainfall
0
0
.04
0
trace
0
0


Average Gulf water temperature 870
24-hour rainfall accumulation with reading at approximately 5 p.m. daily


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CITY


THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 7-A


Tie Islander


In the May. 31, 2000, issue of
The Islander, headlines announced:
Anna Maria city commissioners awarded
Mario Schoenfelder, owner of the Rod & Reel Pier,
a 10-year lease to operate the city pier and restau-
rant. Schoenfelder was the only bidder who offered
to repair the structure at his expense, relieving the
city of the estimated $200,000 cost. The agreement
called for $5,000-a-month lease payments to the city
with a 10 percent increase every two years.
Manatee County Commissioner Joe McClash
proposed the county look into obtaining a federal grant
to start the Island trolley project. The trolley idea came
up in 1998, but was rejected by the county and all three
Island cities because the four entities would have had to
split the estimated $1.27 million start-up costs and the
$500,000 to $600,000-per-year operating costs.
Anna Maria building official Phil Charnock had
his salary cut $4,152 per year by the city commission,
a few months after newly elected Mayor Gary Def-
fenbaugh stripped him of his public works and code
enforcement duties. Charnock was found guilty of a
road-rage incident in which he brandished a .22-cali-
ber pistol at another motorist. He was fined $200 and
ordered to surrender the pistol.




8-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER










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Lizzie Vann
Thrasher
addresses a
gathering she
and husband
Mike Thrasher
hosted on
their pro-
posed Historic
Green Village
development.
Islander
Photo: Rick
Catlin

By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria couple Lizzie Vann
Thrasher and husband Mike Thrasher
were relieved following a May 26 forum
on their proposed Anna Maria Historic
Green Village on Pine Avenue.
"It was a most positive meeting,"
said Mike Thrasher.
"There were about 60 people at the
meeting and the majority of the com-
ments were very favorable. The few
negative comments weren't really nega-
tive, just about housekeeping issues."
Vann Thrasher made the presenta-
tion, including a 30-minute slide show
on the site plan.
The historic village concept would
be on the lots they own at 501, 503, 505
and 507 Pine Ave.
The Thrashers also own the Beach
Bums property at 427 Pine Ave., an
adjacent garage/warehouse at 425 Pine
Ave., and the Anna Maria General
Store at 307 Pine Ave., in addition to a
number of rental homes.
Three existing homes will be in
the historic village, including a 1930s
Sears, Roebuck and Co. kit-house that
will be moved June 8 to from 308 Pine
Ave. to 505 Pine Ave., Vann Thrasher
said.
The other existing homes on the
site are the Rosedale cottage, which
was occupied by the Rosedale family
for nearly 60 years, and an older home
in need of repair, Thrasher said.
Two new retail-office-residential
structures would be added to the his-
toric village, Vann Thrasher said.
The goal is to preserve and show-
case the "authentic Old Florida" homes
in Anna Maria, beautify Pine Avenue,
and create jobs for Anna Maria resi-
dents and businesses to serve the area.
"We want to have useful businesses
run by local people in the historic vil-


lage," Vann Thrasher said. "We've had
a lot of suggestions, including a small
medical clinic, a micro-brewery, a cafe
and an art gallery," to name just a few,
she said.
Local companies have been hired to
design and construct the historic village,
which will be operated primarily with
green e ni. i .', Vann Thrasher said.
Native trees and plants will be used
throughout the grounds, creating a natu-
ral look. Vann Thrasher said she is con-
sidering a lot of trees because she is a
"tree person."
Vann Thrasher said another idea is
to move the general store to 427 Pine
Ave., because it could be expanded at
that location.
Generally, the audience was recep-
tive to a small medical facility, an art
studio and a small cafe as businesses that
would fit the village concept.
"These are all just ideas," Vann
Thrasher said. "We're still looking for
criticisms."
But there were no real criticisms
from those in attendance, just sugges-
tions on landscaping and decorating.
And all parking at the historical vil-
lage will be either on site or on the side
street, Vann Thrasher said, negating what
has been a major objection by some in
the city to other ROR site plans.
"We revised (the parking plan) three
times, and we believe it will work,"
Vann Thrasher said. The plans call for
25 parking spaces, including spaces that
comply with the U.S. Americans with
Disabilities Act.
It's a lot better concept for Pine
Avenue than some of the others that
have caused the "brouhaha" in the city,
one man said from the crowd.
The site plan for the historical vil-
lage will be reviewed by the planning
and zoning board June 15 for a recom-
mendation.


Zaccagnino proposes Islandwide
police department


By Nick Walter
Islander Reporter
Imagine one police station for the
three Anna Maria Island cities, with
officers in those cities working as a
cohesive unit.
Holmes Beach Commissioner
David Zaccagnino proposed the idea at
the May 25 meeting at Holmes Beach
City Hall.
He said consolidating police services
might help the cities save money.
But Mayor Rich Bohnenberger said
the idea has been proposed before and the
other cities did not respond favorably.
Haas-Martens said a consolidation


would put too much of a work load on
HBPD.
"The bottom line is we are already
policing those cities," Bohnenberger
said.
In other business May 25, the com-
mission appointed Ruth de Haan and
Caroline Molyneux as alternate mem-
bers on the parks and beautification
committee.
The commission also reappointed
Peter Ereg to the board of adjustment.
The next city commission meet-
ing is at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 22, at
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina
Drive.


Thrashers' Historic Green

Village well-received





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 U 9-A

I-H I-. -.`p I \\1II.I. IX) 4 .


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Attorney Jeremy Anderson thanked
Anna Maria Mayor Fran Barford for her
quick response to his May 21 e-mail
in which he wrote that the mayor was
improperly directing the attorney for
Pine Avenue Restoration LLC to respond
to the Florida Department of Commu-
nity Affairs "on behalf of the city."
Barford
quickly wrote
Anderson back,
explaining that, in
Perry's letter to the
DCA, "there was an
unfortunate impli-
Barford cation that I had
authorized her to
write the letter on
behalf of the city of
Anna Maria. That
is not the case.
"Prior to the
April 23 letter,
PAR had asked if
Anderson (Ricinda) Perry
could contact city
attorney Jim Dye regarding the peti-
tion filed with the DCA. I said I had no
objection if Mrs. Perry made a phone
call to Mr. Dye. I never talked with Mrs.
Perry and did not authorize her to act on
behalf of the city.
"In some fashion, there may have
been a miscommunication," Barford
said, but the "underlying facts sent to
the DCA by Mrs. Perry were, to my
knowledge, correct."
Barford rebuked Anderson for a
vague accusation he made that she
had "hugged and patted on the back a
certain developer after some unspeci-
fied approval favorable to the unnamed
developer."
The mayor said if Anderson was
accusing her of ht_,in, Michael Cole-


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria city officials held a
two-hour telephone conference May
25 with Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs representative Mar-
lene Stern to explain how and why
the city computes density.
The DCA began investigating
the city's density calculations after
it received a complaint in February
from Robert and Nicky Hunt, devel-
opers of a project at 303 Pine Ave.
The Hunts claim the city's method
of computing density comes to 8.6
units per acre, well above the 2007
comprehensive plan limit of 6 units
per acre.
Mayor Fran Barford said the tele-
conference with Stern was productive
for both the city and the DCA.
"We were able to explain our
position on density and the reasons
behind our calculations," Barford
said. "It was a good meeting for both
of us. It was a good call," she said.
Stern had a lot of questions,
according to building official Bob
Welch, who participated in the con-


man of Pine Avenue Restoration LLC,
"that never happened.
"In the present political scene in
the city of Anna Maria, there are sev-
eral people that are not on my 'A list
to receive hugs. Mr. Coleman is in that
group, along with Mr. Anderson."
She concluded her reply by asking
all parties in the recent land-use dis-
putes in the city to "work together in as
cordial and polite an atmosphere as pos-
sible, without name-calling, personal
slurs, and other divisive actions that
turn neighbors against neighbors."
Barford asked all parties to assist
the city commission and Chair John
Quam to move forward with parking
initiatives "in good faith."
"It is easy to pick away and be
negative. It's much harder to sit down
in good faith to get the job done in the
best interests of the citizens of Anna
Maria," she concluded.
Anderson replied May 24, thank-
ing the mayor for her clarification.
"It is our hope that you have, or
will provide, a stern letter of rebuke to
Ms. Perry for erroneously asserting that
she had the authority to act on behalf
of the city," Anderson wrote.
He also asked Barford to send the
DCA a letter clarifying that Perry "did
not have authority to act on behalf of
the city as it relates to the petition filed
by my clients."
Further, Anderson asked Barford
to reply to his previous request related
to the use of city planning services by
PAR. "The citizens deserve a clear
explanation on this matter," Anderson
said.
Barford said she was not going
to respond as to how developers are
allowed consultation and fees for use
of the city planner. That has been dis-
cussed many times at city commission
meetings, she said.


ference call. Welch characterized
the discussion as "extremely benefi-
cial."
City attorney Jim Dye and city
planner Alan Garrett also participated
in the call. The attorney for the Hunts
did not.
Dye explained that the gross-
acreage method is used by the city
to keep smaller lots conforming and
buildable, and it was never the city's
intention to make them unbuild-
able.
The smaller lots are grandfa-
thered for non-conforming use, but
would become non-conforming and
unbuildable if the DCA requires
the city to use the six-lots-per-acre
method for existing lots, Dye said.
That could be considered a
"taking" by the courts, Dye said pre-
viously.
The DCA can rule in favor of
either the Hunts or the city, but the
losing side can appeal the decision to
an administrative judge.
Barford said Stern told the city
it would have an answer from her
office "in a couple of weeks."


. <, .-s .v


Anderson OK with Barford

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10-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER


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Isla


Islander interv


Anna Maria photojournalist David McGou
was interviewed for the HBO documentary "Sma
His Camera," about paparazzo Ron Galella.
The documentary debuts at 9 p.m. Monday, Ji
7, and runs throughout June on the cable network
"Over the course of a 50-year career marl
by perseverance, Galella has been praised and v
fied for his pioneering work in hit-and-run celebi

Studio to host opera class
The Studio at Gulf and Pine, 10101 Gulf Dri
Anna Maria, will host "Opera on the Island," a cou
offered through the Lifelong Learning Academy
Sarasota.
The class will meet at 6 p.m. June 22, July
Aug. 3, Aug. 17 and Aug. 31.
Each evening will involve a DVD viewing of
opera performed by a major house, as well as disc
sion of the work with instructor Jan Skalny.
To register, call 941-359-4296.


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Kiwanis to meet
The Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island will
meet at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, June 5, at Cafe on the
Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
The scheduled speaker is Ava Ehde of the Island
Branch Library.
For more information, call Ralph Bassett at 941-
795-8697.


Stock and celebration
Marilyn \'O" w. y, Margie Motzer, Priscilla Seewald
and Charlie Johnston attend the celebration for the
relocation of the Island food bank from a closet at
Roser Memorial Community Church to a spacious
and renovated room in a church auxiliary build-
ing across Pine Avenue in Anna Maria. Islander
Photos: Edna Tiemann


Rotary club to meet
The Rotary Club of Anna Maria will meet at
noon Tuesday, June 8, at the BeachHouse Res-
taurant, 200 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton Beach.
The speaker will be Rotarian Cindi Doragh
talking about the Rotary's youth exchange pro-
gram.
For more information, go to www.annamari-
arotary.org.


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appenings


iew on H BO show
Photographer/artist
David McGough,
third from left, joins
fellow artists Carrie
Price Whaley Jr.,
Layla Copeland,
McGough, Bill
Martin and Hugo
Porcaro at their
collective show at
Palmetto Art Center
in March. Islander
Photo: Courtesy
Ann Clifford



ugh photography, sparking a fierce debate about privacy
ash versus free speech that continues to this day," stated
a news release from HBO on the documentary filmed
une by Leon Gast.
k. The film features interviews with McGough, col-
ked umnist Liz Smith, artist Church Close, editor Gray-
ili- Don Carter and former museum director Thomas
rity Hoving.








Isla lWappenings


Islan Players honors students


The Island Players, holding an annual meeting and reception at the Anna Maria Theater May 25, awarded
$1,000 scholarships to Kiley Arbor, a graduating senior from Manatee High School, and Seth Smith, a
graduating senior from Manatee School of the Arts. Kiley will attend Furman University in Greenville,
S.C., and Seth will attend Florida School of the Arts. They are pictured with Island Players president Dolo-


res Harrel, left, and treasurer Peggy Faarup, right.
Blood drive to benefit
Island groups
The 10th annual Island Blood Drive, will take
place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 5, and
Sunday, June 6, at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248
S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
The drive results in the collection of much-
needed blood for Florida Blood Services when winter
residents have returned north for the summer.
Also, the blood drive will raise money for local
nonprofits Anna Maria Island Community Center,
Anna Maria Island Privateers, Anna Maria Island
Rotary Club, West Manatee Fire Rescue Association
and Wildlife Inc.
The dollars are generated by an anonymous
foundation, which each year pledges $100 to char-
ity for each "good" unit of blood contributed. The
blood donors get to chose which charity their con-
tribution assists or share the funding among the
five charities.
The blood drive is for walk-ins, but people also
can schedule appointments by calling FBS at 800-
682-5663.


Banking on donations
Ed Misner and Barry Gould, volunteers with the
Rotary Club of Anna Maria, collect donations at
the Island Publix May 29 through the club's Food-
Raiser. Members of Island brownies troops assisted
in the one-day campaign, which was to benefit the
All Island Denominations food pantry at Roser
Memorial Community Church and the Manatee
County Food Bank. Islander Photo: Lisa Neff


Library to host summer
teen programs
The Friends of the Island Branch Library will
host a summer teen series "Make Waves @ the
Library."
Programs will take place at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday
at the library, 5701 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
The schedule includes:
June 16: \ lki ng Sense of Sharks," presented by
Mote Marine Laboratory, about all the senses sharks
use to navigate the depths.
June 23: "Origami with Judy," in which Judy
Pruitt teaches the ancient art of folding paper.
June 30: \ Lnng.i, Anime, and Cosplay," about
Japanese cartoons and TV shows.
July 7: "DIY T-Shirt Surgery," about updating,
modernizing and customizing an old shirt.
July 14: "Lions and Tigers and Bears and a
Fennec Fox," about Elmira's Wildlife Sanctuary.
July 21: "Giving Tree Drum Circle," a hands-on
musical experience.
July 28: "Photography with James Corwin John-
son," about the tips and tricks of shooting like a pro.
For more information, call the library at 941-
778-6341.


AGAMI honors student
Peggy Potter of the Artists Guild of Anna Maria
Island presents a scholarship award to Nicholas
L'Heureux at a Lakewood Ranch High School
awards ceremony May 18. Nicholas, a graduating
senior, plans to major in fine art in college.


THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 U 11-A

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12-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER

Dissention
By Nick Walter
Islander Reporter
The guidelines on the agenda for the Florida
Institute for Saltwater Heritage special meeting May
25 read, "Focus on FISH business, agree to disagree,
be courteous and civil."
The meeting, however, was mostly lacking in
courtesy and civility.
The Cortez Community Center on 123rd Street
Court in the village was peppered with accusations
stemming from FISH's May 4 annual meeting at
which some 100 absentee ballots were tallied for the
election of officers. The ballot controversy was the
reason for the special meeting.
Outgoing FISH treasurer Karen Bell said the
process of registering new members to cast absentee
ballots violated numerous FISH bylaws.
Throughout the meeting, some board members
pleaded with others to focus on what they said was
most important: protecting the heritage of Cortez.
A majority of board members voted to allow the
absentee ballots and to let stand the results of the
election. The newly elected board members were
to take office June 1, including new president Kim
McVey, replacing Richard Culbreath.
Holmes Beach Commissioner David Zaccagnino
returned as vice president. Sheila Mora retained her
secretarial position. Joe Kane filled another secre-
tarial position. Jane von Hahmann replaced Bell as
treasurer.
Bell, Culbreath and Richard Estabrook retained
board seats.
But bitter feelings were far from soothed.
"The gathering of absentee ballots in this manner
gave no consideration as to how dedicated the mem-
bers (were) who were voted off the board," Culbreath

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erupts at FISH board meeting
said at the meeting. "It gave no consideration to the been working in the Manatee County Clerk of Courts
countless volunteer hours they have given to FISH, office in downtown Bradenton while being suspended
and their biographies weren't even read. The absen- by the county for selling a shrimp boat donated to
tee ballots voted onto the board two individuals who FISH without consulting the board.
have never even attended a FISH meeting, except Bell was surprised the board showed so much
possibly an annual meeting. That is not what I con- concern for Allen, who is not a voting member of
sider a fair tradeoff." FISH.
Based on what some said was unethical recruit- "Roger has done things from paying someone
ing of members, FISH board members also agreed to cash ... to selling the shrimp boat, to wanting to loan
establish a joint nominating and ethics committee. a board member $11,500 and doing a phone poll to
"I view this as a hostile takeover to realign the approve that," Bell said. "It's just a number of things
board of directors and control the FISH assets that we he's done wrong. I don't know why everyone keeps
have been instrumental in acquiring," Culbreath said. turning their heads to it."
"The votes gathered by absentee ballots were to carry Bell does not think the latest election bodes well
out a vendetta caused by a couple of malcontents." for the future of FISH.
A majority of the board also was in favor of "I think FISH is headed down the wrong path
returning Cortez historic sites manager Roger Allen with its current leaders," Bell said. "I think people
to work at the Florida Maritime Museum. Allen had forget who got FISH to this point."

BB commissioner seeks storm review


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
With the 2010 hurricane season aiili in,'. Bra-
denton Beach City Commissioner Janie Robertson
is thinking about storm-readiness.
And the need, she said, for Bradenton Beach to
plan for hardening city buildings against a storm.
Robertson recently suggested that the city com-
mission ask the planning and zoning board to work
on a plan.
"It's part of our mandate, and I think we should
do that," Robertson said.
The commission already has approved a long-
range strategy for mitigating the impact of disas-
ters.
The strategy includes: installing storm shutters
and hardening city hall, elevating the public works
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North, purchasing new communications devices
for the police and public works departments, rais-
ing some roads to combat flooding, installing more
dunes on the beaches, improving drainage along Bay
Drive South and updating the city's phone system.
But how the goals are to be carried out is not
detailed in the long-range plan. For example, city
officials may decide to relocate city hall.
Robertson raised the hardening issue at a recent
meeting of the community redevelopment agency.
At the meeting, CRA member Ed Chiles said,
"The city is required on a 20-year basis to provide
for survival of its critical structures. A one-story city
hall sitting across from a beach ... is not good."
Robertson asked whether the CRA or the city
commission would be best tasked with asking the
planning and zoning board to take up the issue.
Others on the CRA agreed that the commission
was the appropriate body.
"While the CRA should be supportive of it, that's
an issue for the city commission," said Chiles.
Robertson agreed to raise the issue at a future city
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THE ISLANDER U JUNE 2, 2010 U 13-A


Lawyers seek to unite fishers in BP battle


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
There is no Deepwater Horizon oil on the local
shore, and there may never be any oil from the rup-
tured British Petroleum well on the local shore.
But the massive oil spill still may doom a way of
life in Cortez. Such was the worry of the estimated 40
people who gathered May 27 at the old 1912 Cortez
Schoolhouse/Florida Maritime Museum in the his-
toric fishing village.
"It's a whole way of life that can be wiped out
with the change of the tide," said Manatee County
Commissioner John Chappie, who lives in Bradenton
Beach and represents the Island and Cortez.
The audience assembled at the schoolhouse to
hear from attorneys with an influential, Miami-based
firm, Alters, Boldt, Brown, Rash and Culmo, PA.,
about potential litigation against BP and other com-
panies over what the president termed "an economic
and environmental tragedy."
On April 20, an explosion at an oil rig about 50
miles off the coast of Louisiana killed 11 crewmem-
bers. Soon after it was reported that a BP deepwa-
ter well at the site was leaking oil and natural gas.
Reports have varied on how much oil has spilled from
the well from 12,000 barrels a day to 70,000 bar-
rels.
As BP has taken a variety of steps to stop the
leak, most recently filling the well with mud and a
force of 20,000 people corporate, government and
volunteer has worked to skim the oil and protect
the coast lines of Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi
and Florida.
A focus in Florida has been on preparing for if
the oil washes ashore and informing potential tourists
around the world that the Sunshine State's beaches
are clean and its resort communities, including Anna
Maria Island, are open for business.
There was little discussion in the schoolhouse
about marketing messages and clean beaches, because
the Gulf of Mexico, where so many Cortezians earn a
living, is not clean and about 25 percent of the federal
waters are closed.
"This is really a watershed moment," said attor-
ney David C. Rash. "You are talking about your live-
lihood."
Rash and firm partner Justin Grosz have held a
number of meetings with commercial fishers on the
coast since the spill a month ago.
Loss of income, Rash told the Cortez crowd last
week, is inevitable.
Lawsuits also are inevitable, and Rash, emphasiz-
ing that commercial fishers who traditionally are
independent laborers must unite.
"It is important for the commercial fishermen
to be united in their efforts against BP," said Rash,
who dismissed as a tactic the oil company's rush to
distribute $5,000 checks to those filing claims over
a toll-free hotline. "Because make no mistake about
it BP is going to make an all-out assault."
Rash predicted that the legal claims against BP
and other parties would build to become the largest
multi-district litigation in U.S. history.


A commercial
fishing boat
comes into a
dock on the :.*"~
Cortez water-
front. Comn- ..
mercial fishers .
met May 27 in
Cortez with a
legal team from
Miami to dis-
cuss the impact
of the oil spill H. |,.
in the Gulf of
Mexico.


It's Rash's goal that his firm be named lead coun-
sel in the case. It's also Rash's goal to represent a
band of fishers, fish-house operators and others in
industries tied to the Gulf.
"You don't want to be at the bottom and splin-
tered, with various lawyers," he said. "When I talk
about being united, I'm talking about coming to the
table as one."
The attorneys handled questions about:
The status of the spill. Scientists studying the
spill reported last week a plume of oil about 22
miles long was discovered near an underwater
canyon where currents feed sea life in waters off
Florida.
"It is gigantic and on the edge of the Loop Cur-
rent," Rash said.


The Cortez audience includes lifetime fisher Larry
Fulford, right front, for a meeting on possible legal
actions against BP over the oil spill in the Gulf of
Mexico.


Attorneys Justin
Grosz, left, and
David Rash
distribute blank
contracts to those
attending a meet-
ing to discuss pos-
sible legal actions
against BP over
the oil spill in the
S Gulf of Mexico.
The meeting took
place May 27 at
the Florida Mari-
time Museum
in Cortez.
Islander Photos:
Lisa Neff



The cause of the spill. "It clearly is a situation
where there is going to be gross negligence, will-
ful misconduct and violation of federal regulations,"
Rash said.
Reports that BP's damages liability will be
capped at $75 million. "That is never going to apply
in this case," Rash said.
Perhaps the most difficult answers for the attor-
neys were the most pressing questions from the audi-
ence about the long-term impacts of the spill and the
chemicals being used to break up the oil.
\ily son would be the sixth generation," Mary
Campbell said of her family's ties to commercial
fishing. "What insurance is there for future genera-
tions?"
Rash replied, "If the Gulf of Mexico fisheries are
so damaged that grouper stocks are crushed and closed
for the next five years, that will be calculated."
Capt. Zach Zacharias raised concerns about the
dispersants being used. "That whole thing could blow
out the whole Gulf," he said.
"It can be very damaging," Rash said.
He referred to the Exxon Valdez disaster in 1989,
which, until the Deepwater spill, was the largest oil
spill in U.S. history. An estimated 18 million to 39
million gallons of oil has leaked from the Deepwater
Horizon well. The grounded Exxon Valdez tanker
spilled 11 million gallons of oil.
"We know from studies and what happened in
Alaska. There are fisheries in Alaska that never came
back," Rash said.
The meeting came to a close with a question from
the audience: What's next?
The attorneys brought blank contracts for people
to read and distributed business cards for follow-up
conversations.
"We won't stop until we get what's due," Rash
said. "And we won't let BP get off the hook. They
caused it and they are going to pay for what they've
done to the Gulf of Mexico."
A number of people, as they left the schoolhouse,
said they felt certain they would need a lawyer, they
just didn't know when.
For more on the Gulf-BP oil spill, visit www.
islander.org.


Manatee chamber hosts
oil spill forum
The Manatee Chamber of Commerce will
hold a free seminar on how the Deepwater Hori-
zon incident could impact local business and
tourism.
Speakers will represent Manatee County
Natural Resources and Emergency Management
department, the Bradenton Area Convention and
Visitors Bureau and Mote Marine Laboratory.
The seminar will take place at 9 a.m. Wednes-
day, June 2, at the chamber office, 222 10th St.
W., Bradenton.
For more information, including registration
details, call the chamber at 941-748-4842.





14-A U JUNE 2, 2010 U THE ISLANDER


AMITW does double-duty on beach


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch executive direc-
tor Suzi Fox raised her binoculars and scanned the
beach.
AMITW section coordinators Pete and Emily
Gross tied rope and ribbon around yellow stakes to
mark off a nesting area.
Already the mid-morning sun was hot.
And AMITW's primary mission, the monitoring
of the beach for turtle-nesting activity, was done for
May 28.
Soon after dawn, Fox responded to a call from
an AMITW walker on the shore in Bradenton Beach
and documented the second loggerhead nest of the
season. The first was found May 23.
AMITW also has documented six false crawls since
the turtle-nesting season officially began May 1.
But the nonprofit has collected a lot of other
data thus far in 2010 much of it from nesting
sites on the north end of Anna Maria that have
attracted snowy plovers, least terns and black
skimmers, among other birds.
AMITW strengthened its shorebird monitoring
program this year and, early in the season, staked out
an area north of the Sandbar Restaurant for nesting
plovers and terns.
This year's hatchling rate already is higher than
in past years for sure the last three years, said Fox,
and maybe the last decade.
Last week, with hatchlings in one nesting area,
a second colony of least terns arrived in Anna Maria
and Fox and the Grosses staked off two more nesting
areas.
"There is so much to see," Emily Gross said of
the birds. "And, since we haven't had much turtle
activity, this has added another dimension to our
walks on the beach."
Daily, Emily and her husband walk from the Mar-
tinique in Holmes Beach to the north end and then
back.
They are veterans with AMITW, but just this


season took a real interest in the shorebirds.
"I never thought of us as birders before," Emily
Gross said.
Meanwhile, Fox's interest in the birds has inten-
sified.
"This is so damned fun," she said of the bird
monitoring.
Fox said the turtle watch and bird watch work
are different.
When she awakes mornings during turtle-nesting
season, she said she wonders about the turtles: "Are
they on the beach right now?"


And heading out to the beach to document a nest,
she described as "a present."
But often Fox and others with AMITW do not
come into contact with the turtles the adults nest at
night, the hatchlings head for the Gulf in the dark.
'The birds," she said, "are different. They are
here, now."


1. .


..


aj


Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch volunteers Pete
and Emily Gross stake out an area on the north end
of Anna Maria Island, where a colony of least terns
are nesting. Islander Photos: Lisa Neff


Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch volunteer Pete
Gross arrives with stakes as executive director
Suzi Fox plants a stake to mark off a bird nesting
area in Anna Maria.


Through the lens
Above, Manatee County Audubon Society volun-
teer Matthew Willey studies nesting shorebirds and
chicks on the beach in Anna Maria May 29. Volun-
teers were on the beach with binoculars, a scope
and leaflets about protecting habitat for nesting
shorebirds for much of the Memorial Day weekend.

Left, Anna Maria resident and former City Com-
missioner Carol Ann Magill views a black skimmer
nesting in a cordoned off area on the beach north
of the Sandbar Restaurant. "I'm so excited about
them roping off this area," Magill said, adding
that her idea of "preserving is protecting" is
caring for the threatened shorebirds.
Islander Photos: Lisa Neff


Damen Hurd is the new wildlife tour guide at
Mixon Fruit Farms in west Bradenton.

Mixon farms welcomes new

wildlife tour guide
Mixon Fruit Farms, owned by Islanders Dean and
Janet Mixon, has a new tour guide and new partner-
ship with Wildlife Inc.
The new guide at the farms, 2712 26th Ave. E.,
Bradenton, is Damen Hurd of Bradenton Beach-based
Wildlife Inc. And Hurd will be showing animals at
the farms, a popular tourist destination in Manatee
County.
"The people going on the tours will have a great
time, because Damen is so knowledgeable about the
animals," said Gail Straight of Wildlife Inc.
"We already have some new animals along with
some of the regulars and I learn something every time
Damen talks on the tours," said Janet Mixon.
For more information, go to Mixon's website,
www.mixon.com.


Turtle nesting
by the numbers
As of May 28, Anna Maria Island Turtle
Watch reported:
Number of nests: 2
Number of false crawls: 6
Number of disorientations: 0
Number of hatchlings to the sea: 0




THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 15-A


Look what's happening(

That's a 'wrap'
Participants in the Anna Maria Island Relay for Life fill out questionnaires during
the fundraiser wrap party, held May 25 at Bayside Banquet Hall in Cortez. Dona-
tions are being collected through August. Thus far, the 2010 fundraiser has raised
$34,000 for the Manatee County chapter of the American Cancer Society. Islander
_ _ _Photos: Lisa Neff


Judy Athari of the American Cancer Society
shares a theme suggestion at the Island relay
wrap party for next year's Island Relay for Life
theme: "Pirate Madness."
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Pastor Rosemary W. Backer
Saturday 5pm Celebrate!
9:30am Traditional Worship
Youth Sunday School
Fellowship follows
9:30 service
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5701 21st Ave. W., Bradenton 1 mile West of 1-75
Convenient to W. Bradenton & the Beaches Convenient to East County


Greenwood helps s
By Nick Walter
Islander Reporter
Trudy Moon, chair of the Anna Maria Island
Community Center Affaire to Remember gala, said
at a March 19 board meeting at the Center that the
addition of Lee Greenwood to the gala had people
talking all the way down in Sarasota.
"I think there are no barriers for this event,"
Moon said.
She said the 352 people at the gala were particu-
larly pleased with the addition of the country singer
and Island property owner.
"That's a lot of attention we probably wouldn't
have got without his name this year," Moon said.
"Greenwood was one of the kindest, most generous
people."
Moon said the board will consider asking Green-
wood to return to next year's April 2 gala.


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Roser Memorial
COMMUNITY CHURCH
512 Pine Avenue, Anna Maria 941-778-0414
10oam
Sunday Worship in the
Sanctuary
9 am
Adult Sunday School
10 am
Child & Youth Services

s e c


Tim "Hammer"
Thompson wel-
comes a crowd
to the Bayside
Banquet Hall in
Cortez, opening
the wrap party
for the Anna
Maria Island
Relay for Life.



park Center funds
The April 24 gala netted $165,041 for the center.
Coupled with $100,000 raised for the Lester Chal-
lenge, Center board member Bill Ford said the Center
is financially strong heading into the summer.
"We have $285,000 in cash for operating funds
going into the summer versus $115,000 last year,"
Ford said. "This is the first time in three years that
we can go into the summer feeling good from an
operations standpoint."
Of the Center's $663,229 expenses this year,
Ford noted $346,596 has gone toward salaries.
The board announced its summer camp will take
place from June 14 to Aug. 18.
The board also announced the addition of member
Jason Sato.
"I grew up in the Center and I want to give back,"
Sato said. "So hopefully we can keep this thing going
for a long time."


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16-A U JUNE 2, 2010 U THE ISLANDER


dBiz
By Rick Catlin


Chamber June activities
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce will hold its June business luncheon from
11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, June 2, at the
Gulf Drive Cafe, 900 Gulf Drive N., Bradenton
Beach.
Cost of the luncheon is $15 per person and res-
ervations are required.
The chamber's June Sunrise Breakfast will be
from 7:45 a.m. to 9 a.m. Wednesday, June 9, at Cafe
on the Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.
The cost of the breakfast is $8 per person and res-
ervations are required. Members may bring guests.
For more information on the luncheon and break-
fast, call the chamber at 941-778-1541.

Hot spots for AMI
computer users
The surfing is free and easy on the Internet at The
Islander, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
Other free hot spots on the Island:
Anna Maria
Feeling Swell, 9903 Gulf Drive.
Ginny's and Jane E's at the Old IGA, 9807 Gulf
Drive.
Bradenton Beach
Back Alley, 121 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
Tingley Memorial Library, 111 Second St. N.,
Bradenton Beach.
Holmes Beach
Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce,
5313 Gulf Drive.
Island Branch Library, 5701 Marina Drive.
Island Flea, 5704 Marina Drive.
Melinda's Cafe & Catering, 5315 Gulf Drive.
Sand-N-Sudz Coin Laundry, 5400 Marina
Drive.
The Islander is compiling a list of locations offer-
ing free wireless Internet service to computer users
on the Island. If you offer this convenience, please,
e-mail reporter Lisa Neff at lisaneff@islander.org,
and include a name and telephone number with the
location of the hot spot and a password if needed.


Euphe-
mia Haye
bartender
Eric Bell
has been
at the
Longboat
Key res-
taurant for
18 years.
Islander
Photo:
Michael
Riter


Honors for Euphemia staffers
Three employees of the Euphemia Haye restau-
rant at 5540 Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key,
were recently honored by the Sarasota Convention
and Visitors Bureau for outstanding work in 2009.
Bartender Eric Bell won first place in the Guest
Services Excellence, Front Line category, while
general manager Colin Wilson was a finalist in the
management division. Administrative assistant Amy
Whitt was named a finalist for the Heart of the House
award.
Winners and finalists in each category were nom-
inated by staff members from area restaurants, and a
selection panel of hospitality industry members voted
for the winners.
Bell has been with Euphemia Haye since 1992
in the Haye Loft, the restaurant's upstairs lounge.
Wilson has been the general manager since 1989,
while Whit started in 2007 as the assistant to co-
owner D'Arcy Arpke.
"We're thrilled that others in our industry rec-
ognized Eric, Colin and Amy for all that they bring
to our restaurant," said co-owner/chef Raymond
Arpke, D'Arcy's husband.
"We consider all of them to be winners. This rec-
ognition is for three different areas of our manage-
ment team, but it really speaks to their excellence
in customer service and ensuring that everyone who
visits Euphemia Haye has an outstanding experi-
ence," he concluded.
For more information on the restaurant, visit the
website at www.euphemiahaye.com.


Realty raves
Mike Norman Realty at 3101 Gulf Drive N.,
Holmes Beach, has named Sally Greig as its top sales
agent for May, while Rochelle Bowers garnered the
top listing agent award at the company.
To reach either Sally or Rochelle, call 941-778-
6696.

Got a new business going up on Anna Maria
Island or Longboat Key, or in Cortez, Palma Sola,
or west Bradenton? How about a new product or
service, an anniversary, a new hire, or an award-
winning staff member? Call Island Biz at 941-778-
7978, fax your news to 866-362-9821, or e-mail us
at news@islander.org.



Island real estate
transactions
322 Tarpon St., Anna Maria, a 1,844 sfla
2,750 sfur 2bed/2'2bath/2car canalfront home
built in 1988 on a 75x1 15 lot was sold 05/12/10,
Birnbaum to Day for $605,000; list $655,000.
610 Hampshire Lane, Holmes Beach, a
1,911 sfla / 2,536 sfur 3bed/2/2bath/2car canal-
front home built in 1969 on a 95x105 lot was
sold 05/11/10, Fox to McDonnell for $500,000;
list $559,000.
2305 Avenue B, Bradenton Beach, a 1,588
sfla / 1,603 sfur 3bed/ 1/bath home built in 1963
on a 50x100 lot was sold 05 10/10, Hamel to
Heimann for $290,000; list $319,000.
1801 Gulf Dr., Unit 153, Runaway Bay, Bra-
denton Beach, a 1,080 sfla / 1,140 sfur 2bed/2bath
condo with shared pool built in 1978 was sold
05/14/10, Micali to Chang for $245,000; list
$269,000.
6909 Holmes Blvd., Holmes Beach, a 866
sfla / 1,081 sfur 2bed/2bath half-duplex built in
1982 on a 36x85 lot was sold 05/14/10, Fifth
Third Bank to Kempany for $172,900; list
$185,000.
2315 Ave. C, Unit 5, Lay-Z-Liv-N, Braden-
ton Beach, a 488 sfla lbed/l bath condo with
shared pool built in 1979 sold 05/11/10, Smith
to Alandan Properties 5 LLC for $123,500; list
$139,900.
Jesse Brisson, broker/associate at Gulf-Bay
Realty of Anna Maria, can be reached at Gulf-
Bay 941-778-7244.


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18-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER


00G0a00.0





Wednesday, June 2
6p.m. Pizza dinner for middle school students at CrossPointe Fel-
lowship, 8605 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-0719.

Thursday, June 3
5 p.m. Intergenerational garden volunteer work meeting at Annie
Silver Community Center, 103 23rd St., Bradenton Beach.

Friday, June 4
7p.m. Hook 'em and Cook 'em Fish Tournament captain's meet-
ing at Rotten Ralph's, 200 Bridge St., Bradenton Beach. Information:
941-794-6601.

Saturday, June 5
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Island blood drive to benefit Island nonprofits
at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
Information: 800-682-5663.

Sunday, June 6
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Island blood drive to benefit Island nonprofits
at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 248 S. Harbor Drive, Holmes Beach.
Information: 800-682-5663.
Noon to 6 p.m. Hook 'em and Cook 'em Fish Tournament "All U Can
Eat" awards banquet at the Bayside Banquet Hall, 4628 119th St. W.,
Cortez. Information: 941-794-6601. Fee applies.

Tuesday, June 8
Noon Rotary Club of Anna Maria meets with guest speaker Cindi
Doragh to discuss youth exchange programs at the BeachHouse Restau-
rant, 200 Gulf Drive, Bradenton Beach.

Ongoing:
First Monday of each month, 6:30 p.m., Artists Guild of Anna Maria at the
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.


Hines featured artist at IGW
Island Gallery West, 5368 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach, will host a public reception for Barbara
Hines at 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 11. Hines, a
Holmes Beach resident, is the gallery's featured
artist in June. For more information, call IGW at
941-778-6648 or visit www.islandgallerywest.com.

The first and third Mondays of each month, the American Legion
Post 24, 2005 75th St. W., Bradenton, hosts dinners for the public. Fee
applies. Information: 941-794-3390.
Tuesday, 12:30 p.m., Anna Maria Duplicate Bridge Club at the
Episcopal Church of the Annunciation, 4408 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach.


Information: 941-778-0504.
Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m., teens meet at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria. Information: 941-
778-1908.
Alternating Wednesdays, 11 a.m., memory loss support group at
the Longboat Island Chapel Aging in Paradise Resource Center, 6200
Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key. Information: 941-383-6491.
Wednesday and Saturdays, 9 a.m., players pitch horseshoes in
the pits at Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, Anna Maria. Informa-
tion: 941-708-6130.
Friday, 11 a.m., Over 39ers group meets at Gloria Dei Lutheran
Church, 6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Information: 941-778-1813.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m., Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island meets at
Cafe on the Beach, Manatee Public Beach, Holmes Beach.

OFF-ISLAND EVENTS
Friday, June 4
6 to 9p.m. -ArtWalk reception for Island artist Sara Gafvert at the
Manatee County Cultural Alliance Gallery, 926 12th St. W., Bradenton.
Information: 941-746-2223.

Saturday, June 5
8:30 a.m. Boating safety course at the Anna Maria Island Sail
and Power Squadron, 1200 71st St. N.W., Bradenton. Information: 941-
795-0482. Fee applies.

Coming Up:
June 11, artist reception, Island Gallery West.
June 12-13, St, Armands Circle Craft Festival.
June 13, Anna Maria Island Privateers car, truck and bike show,
Mexicali Border Cafe.
June 14-18, Vacation Bible school at St. Bernard Catholic
Church.
June 16, Making Sense of Sharks teen program, Island Branch
Library.

Save the Date:
June 26, Seafood Fest Biker Bash benefit at Cortez Kitchen.

Send calendar announcements to diana@islander.org. Please
include the time, date and location of the event, a brief description and a
contact via e-mail and phone.


Sailing club anchors in Bimini
The Baysailors Singles Club of St. Petersburg recently anchored in Bimini Bay. The
crews cooked, swam and relaxed while enjoying the body of water that separates
Anna Maria and Holmes Beach on the bayside of Anna Maria Island. The club holds
monthly meetings and, twice a month, takes to the water. The next meeting was set for
7 p.m. Wednesday, June 2, at Tucson's restaurant in Largo. For more information, go
to www.baysailors.org. Islander Photo: Courtesy Christine Galanopoulos


Thelma and Dick Suman, formerly of Holmes Beach and also staff at the former
Islander newspaper in the 1970s, are surrounded by extended family, including the
Lundys and Bryans, many of whom have enjoyed 50 years of reunions together. The
Sumans formerly resided at 6907 Holmes Blvd., the site now of a city park, and they
offer to Mayor Rich Bohnenberger their suggestion to name the location Reunion
Park. Islander Photo: Bonner Joy


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By Nick Walter
Islander Reporter
A woman had her purse snatched in the Publix
parking lot at 3900 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach,
according to a May 25 Holmes Beach Police Depart-
ment report.
Rashad Austin, 18, of Sara-
sota, allegedly pulled the purse
from the arm of the woman
before jumping into a waiting
vehicle.
The woman gave HBPD
a vehicle description and tag
Austin number, and at approximately
9 p.m., a Manatee County Sheriff's Office deputy
stopped the vehicle in the 4200 block of Manatee


Carol J. Cozan
Carol J. Cozan, 63, of Bradenton, died May 27.
Ms. Cozan moved to Bradenton in 1996 from
Guam, where she had been a professor at the Uni-
versity of Guam for 19 years. She held a doctorate
degree and was a graduate of the University of Arkan-
sas.
Since moving to Bradenton, Ms. Cozan was
active with the master gardener program, Red Hat
Society and Island Players, where she volunteered
and served on the board of directors and as stage
manager for numerous productions. She was also
very active in her community at Perico Bay Club.
At her request, there was no service. Memo-
rial contributions may be made to Tidewell Hospice
& Palliative Care, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL
34238.
Ms. Cozan is survived by nieces, Teresa Jensen,
Trudy Kniffin and Tracie Hess, all of New York,
many other family members and close friends.


Marie A. Troutman
Marie A. Troutman, 81, of Bradenton, died April
28.
Mrs. Troutman was born in Chicago, where she
lived with her husband and nine children until 1972.
She came to Anna Maria Island with her family and
worked at the former Anchor and Harbor House res-
taurants for many years.
She opened a shell shop on Cortez Road and
created and sold her treasures of shell art. She also
worked at Publix before retiring.
Services for Mrs. Troutman were private. Memo-


Avenue West.
The deputy recovered a purse, wallet, diamond
cross pendant, credit card and cell phone. There was
$100 missing from the wallet.
The woman driving the suspect vehicle said she
was unaware of the actions of Austin, her boyfriend.
She said they had been at the beach and decided to
get some food at Publix.
Austin said he did not tell his girlfriend of his
plans and that he had decided to rob the woman "just
for the thrill of it," according to the report.
Austin was arrested, charged and faces a charge
of unarmed robbery. He was transported to the Mana-
tee County jail without bond.
Mike Quinn, publisher of www.newsmanatee.
corn, contributed to this report.


Carol
Cozan
receives
congratu-
lations
from
Island
Players
president
Peggy
Faarup
on
naming
Cozan
winner of
the Play-
ers Igo
Award for
service.


rial donations are welcome at the Manatee County
Humane Society, www.humanesocietymanatee.org.
Mrs. Troutman is survived by daughters Mary
Ann and husband Cecil Dust of Ellisville, Mo., Sandra
Ann and husband Bob Berger of Winnetka, Ill., Nanci
Faye and husband Patrick Grach of Monroe, N.Y.,
Alice Rose Sistak of Bradenton, and Linda Toby and
husband Mike Miller of Ellenton; sons Adrian Doug-
las Jr. of Winlock, Wash., William Arthur of Kilauea,
Hawaii, and James Alpha and wife Lisa of Bradenton;
19 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren.


Purse snatched in Holmes Beach


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THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 U 19-A


Streetlife

Island police blotter
Anna Maria
No new reports.
Bradenton Beach
March 23, 600 block of Gulf Drive N., driving
with suspended license. An officer observed a man
speeding on his motorcycle. Once he was pulled over,
the officer found the man had several suspensions for
failing to appear in court and a warrant for his arrest
in Hillsborough County.
March 23, 1400 block of Gulf Drive S., burglary
of a vehicle. Someone burglarized a vehicle parked
in Coquina Beach. Some items were later recovered
from Holmes Beach Police Department when a man
was arrested for strong arm battery.
March 25, 2000 block of Gulf Drive S., Coquina
Park, burglary of a vehicle. Someone burglarized a
vehicle parked at Coquina Beach. The victim also
had her keys stolen from a bag that was hanging on
a picnic table. Some items were later recovered when
a man was arrested for strong arm battery.
March 25, 200 Bridge Street, domestic battery.
A man got into a verbal argument with a girlfriend
before the incident got physical.
Holmes Beach
March 24, 5900 block of Marina Drive, petit
theft. A woman went to the Holmes Beach Police
Department to report the past theft of two potted
plants valued at $150 from in front of her business.
March 25, 4000 block of Gulf Drive, theft of a
vehicle. An officer came to HBPD to meet a victim
in reference to a past theft. The victim said she was at
Manatee Public Beach on March 24 when she placed
her purse and wallet in the trunk of her vehicle and
locked the car before heading to the beach. When
she arrived home, her purse and wallet were missing
from her trunk.
March 26, 4000 block of Gulf Drive, theft.
An officer was dispatched to the Holmes Beach
Police Department in reference to a past theft. He
met with the victim who said while at Manatee
Public Beach someone took his wallet from his
backpack.
March 26, 400 block of Clark Drive, burglary
of a residence. Officers spoke to roommates who
said while they were gone someone stole their secu-
rity box containing $300 and birth certificates. One
resident said she also was missing a canvas bag with
$200 in change.


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20-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER


Youth basketball divisions tighten up


By Kevin Cassidy
Islander Reporter
With the season winding down and the playoffs
looming, the standings have tightened up in the three
divisions of youth basketball at the Anna Maria Island
Community Center.
The Gathering Place's once big lead has shrunk
to only a game, while Sandbar has caught up to Con-
nie's Landscaping to tie for first place. Division II has
two teams Bob Vita Lawn Service and Ross Built
- chasing down first-place Walter & Associates with
three games left to play in the regular season.
This all bodes well for playoff excitement.

The games
Ross Built jumped out to a 10-0 lead before hold-
ing on to a 23-18 victory over Beach to Bay Con-
struction in Division II basketball action May 28.
Though it doesn't show up in the stat sheet, Jack
Coleman played a big role in the victory for Ross
Built, playing solid defense, grabbing rebounds and
diving on the ground for loose balls.
Offensively, Ross Built was led by Andrew Ross,
who finished with 10 points, and brother Jake Ross
finished with 5 points. Luke Valadie added 4 points
for Ross Built which also received 2 points apiece
from Cooper Hardy and Coleman in the victory.
Beach to Bay Construction was led by Cameron
Brauner's game-high 12 points while teammates
Michael Latimer, Dayton Modderman and Jean-Paul
Russo scored 2 points apiece in the loss.
Walter & Associates rolled past Anna Maria
Oyster Bar 21-2 on May 28 to retain its lead over
Ross Built in the Division II standings. Seth Walter
scored a game-high 16 points while Moriah Goode
added 5 points in the victory.
Reese Helvey scored 2 points to lead the Oyster
Bar in the loss.
Sandbar defeated Beach Bistro 16-8 on May 27 to
pull into a tie for first place in Division III with Con-
nie's Landscaping. William Bernet led the way for
the Sandbar, scoring 9 points while Joe Rogers added
5 points and Josh Class finished with 2 points.
Joey Stewart led Beach Bistro with 6 points while
Andrew Proctor and may Sapienza each added 1 point
in the loss.
Beach Bistro upset first place Connie's Landscap-
ing 10-9 in Division III action May 26. Joey Stewart
led the way with 4 points while Trent Shackleford,
Andrew Proctor and Griffin Heckler each scored 2
points in the victory.
Connie's was led by Leo Rose's 4 points and 3
points from Dylan Joseph. Taro DeHaan and Clayton
Wilkinson each scored 1 point to complete the scor-
ing in the loss.
Walter & Associates rolled past Bob Vita Lawn
Service 26-10 in Division II basketball action May
26. Seth Walter scored 14 points and Moriah Goode
finished with 12 points to lead the team to victory.
Gavin Sentman and Adam Clark scored 4 points
apiece to lead Bob Vita, who also received 2 points


Andrew Ross and Cameron Brauner leap for the
opening tip during Division II basketball action at
the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Islander
Photo: Kevin Cassidy
from Ethan Bertrand in the loss.
Rotten Ralph's edged The Gathering Place 42-40
on May 26 to pull a game closer to first place in the
Premier League. Forrest Schield scored 16 points and
Brandon Gengler added 11 to lead Rotten Ralph's,
who also received 6 points from Daniel Janisch and
5 points from J.T. Goode in the victory.
Kyle Aritt scored 14 points and Chandler Hardy
scored 12 to lead The Gathering Place. Wyatt Hoff-
man added 6 points while Jerry Mayer, Denver Hardy,
Helio Gomez and Patrick Edwards each finished with
2 points in the loss.
The Gathering Place rode a balanced scoring
attack to a 48-27 victory over Tortilla Bay Club May
25. Kyle Aritt's 14 points and 13 points from Chan-
dler Hardy led the way for The Gathering Place, who
also received 9 points from Jerry Mayer and 8 points
from Wyatt Hoffman in the victory.
Max Miller's 11 points and 6 points from Daniel
Pimental paced Tortilla Bay, who also received 5
points apiece from Travis Belsito and Christian High-
tower in the loss.
Sandbar defeated Connie's Landscaping 16-10
in Division III basketball action May 24. Joe Rogers
and Josh Class led the way with 4 points apiece while
William Bernet, Brooke Capparelli, Leo Tilelli and
Connor Gsell each scored 2 points in the victory.
Dylan Joseph scored six points and Leo Rose added
four points for Connie's Landscaping in the loss.
Beach to Bay Construction rolled past Anna



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Captain Steven Salgado
Owner/Operator
Lifetime experience in local waters


Full & Half Day Trips
Custom Trips Available
U.S.C.G. Licensed
Custom-built Privateer
Fishing License, Ice, Bait &
Tackle Furnished
Anna Maria Island
Florida

778-9712


Maria Oyster Bar 20-8 in Division II action May 24
behind a game-high 10 points from Cameron Brauner.
Michael Latimer added 8 points and Dayton Modder-
man finished with 2 points in the victory.
Tyler Yavalar scored 4 points while Brandon
Mills and Reese Helvey scored 2 points apiece to
lead the Oyster Bar in the loss.
Rotten Ralph's squeaked past Tortilla Bay Club
36-33 in Premier League action May 24. Brandon Gen-
gler scored 12 points and J.T. Goode added 8 points to
lead Rotten Ralph's. Daniel Janisch and Forrest Schield
each added 6 points while Gussie Lardas and Blake
Rivers each finished with 2 points in the victory.
Tommy Price's game-high 15 points lead Tortilla
Bay Club, which also received 8 points from Christian
Hightower and 6 points from Max Miller in the loss.
AMICC youth sports standings and schedules can
be found online at www.islander.org.

Key Royale golf news
The Key Royale Club men played an 18-hole,
individual low net tournament May 26. Jim Thorthon
fired a 5-under par 59 to take a three-stroke victory
over second-place finisher Danny Hayes, who fin-
ished with a 2-under 62. One shot back in third place
was Bill Shuman with a 63.
The men played a nine-hole, low net of partners
game on May 24. Three teams Vince Mercadante
and Bob Kral, Paul Kaemmerlin and Jim McCart-
ney and Chet Hutton and Matt Behan all carded
1-under par 63s to finish in a three-way tie for first
place. Second place went to Webb Cutting and Bill
Martin, with a score of 68.

Horseshoe news
Two teams emerged from pool play and were left
to battle for the day's br''iii' rights during May 29
horseshoe action at the Anna Maria City Hall horse-
shoe pits. In a see-saw battle, walker Jerry Bennett
pulled away for a 21-14 victory over John Johnson
and Debbie Rhodes.
The May 26 horseshoe games saw only Sam
Samuels and Norm Good achieve the prerequisite
three victories and were the day's outright champs.
Tim Sofran and Jerry Bennett were the runner-ups.
Play gets under way at 9 a.m. every Wednesday
and Saturday at the Anna Maria City Hall pits.

Squadron holds classes
The Anna Maria Island Sail and Power Squad-
ron will hold a boating course and seminars at the
squadron building, 1200 71st St. N.W., Braden-
ton.
Students must pre-register by calling 941-
795-0482.
The squadron will offer a two-part boating
safety course at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, June 5, and
Saturday, June 12.
The course fee is $35. Graduates qualify for
a Florida boating-education certificate.

Make one stop to shop for the Dock!

MARINE DOCTOR
Sales Service Supplies & More
Jet Ski Lifts E Boat Lifts Dock Accessories
Remote Contiols Piling Cones
Stainless Motois Mluminum Ladders
Cables and S, itches
i'pen Jlon-FI -4,,
Saturday by Appointment
12044 Cortez Rd. W, (941) 792-7657
marinedocktor@ msn.com





THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 U 21-A


Tarpon tussle on, red snapper season begins


By Nick Walter
Islander Reporter
Red snapper season began June 1 and will end
July 23. Because a recent red snapper assessment
update projected that overfishing ended in 2009, the
total allowable catch was increased and so the recre-
ation season was extended.
But the hot target is tarpon, which are thick on
the beaches, around the Sunshine Skyway Bridge, off
Egmont Key and in the passes.
Capt. Logan Bystrom said he's been sticking
primarily to tarpon off the beaches on shiners and
threadfins. He's been fishing in the morning because
the winds had been heavy in the afternoon. He said
tarpon fishing also is good in the passes, where pass
crabs are running thick. The beach tarpon are averag-
ing about 100 pounds, he said.
Capt. Mark Howard of SumoTime Fishing
Charters said the summertime fishing pattern is in
full swing with tarpon taking main stage. The silver
kings have shown up strong off the beaches, in the
passes and at the Skyway Bridge. "For the beaches
a quiet approach to the pods of fish is imperative,"
Howard said. "Use a trolling motor, wind and current
to get into position to present bait to the fish. Pulling
up to the fish with the outboard running will shut the
bite down."
He said strong outgoing tides will mean the
tarpon are loading up in the passes. Howard reported
on May 26 his anglers jumped six tarpon on a strong
outgoing tide. The baits of choice were crabs and
threadfins. "Speckled trout continue to bite fever-
ously on moving water," he said. "Shiners hooked in
the pectoral area have triggered the most strikes. Fish
the drop-off of flats and the Intracoastal Waterway for
some fun and lively action. Big, over-the-slot redfish
have moved into Tampa Bay. Follow the schools from
the flats into the mangroves as the tide is incoming
and then vice versa as the tide drops."


'^$cao/? lqe


Capt. Todd Best, middle, holding a 60-pound king-
fish on a trip with these Southwest Airlines atten-
dants from California on the Happy Hooker One
Charter out of the Cortez Fishing Center.


* S LIGHT TACKLE
SPORTFISHING
CAPT. RICK GROSS

794-3308
CELL 730-5148
1/2 DAY & FULL DAY CHARTERS
Catcher's Marina 5501 Marina Dr., Holmes Beach, FL




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Capt. Mark Johnston of Legend Charters out
of Annie's Bait & Tackle said he has been fishing
the 1-mile reef and catching his limits on trout. He
reported a lot of blacktip sharks up to 30 pounds
going crazy for live shiners. Spanish mackerel and
kingfish are plentiful as well. He added the waters
are clear and the tide isn't really making a difference
right now, especially with sharks.
Capt. Mike Greig also has been tarpon fishing and
reported on the night of May 27 his anglers hooked eight
and brought two to the boat. He added he's still been
catching grouper and kingfish in the Gulf.
Capt. Steven Salgado said there were tons of
fish in 55-60 feet of water last week. He reported
kingfish to 25 pounds, bonito, gag grouper to 10
pounds, kingfish and mangrove snapper. He said on
one trip there was a whale shark beneath his Parker
25-foot boat for two hours. He estimated the whale
shark was 22-23 feet long. He also reported seeing
an estimated 90-pound sailfish in 60 feet of water. He
said Ii,_'in, for bottom fishing included wire lead-
ers with dead, tail-pinched sardines on a 2/0 or 3/0
hook. Later in the day, he would head to the passes
for tarpon fishing with pass crabs on the hook.
Capt. Warren Girle reported steady tarpon
action off the beaches, mixed with a 40-pound cobia.
He has seen tarpon to 135 pounds were caught from
Egmont Key to Casey Key. He added he fished a
wreck 20 miles offshore that was loaded with 10-25
pound amberjack. He said an occasional goliath
grouper would come along and snatch 10-plus pound
amberjack off the hooks.
Capt. Danny Stasny of Island Discount Tackle
said there are a lot of Spanish mackerel around the
Sunshine Skyway Bridge that's he's been using as
bait for some quality shark fishing in Tampa Bay.
He heard fishing is on fire for pompano between
20-30 pounds on the Sarasota M-reefs. He also heard
reports of fast gag grouper action 60-70 miles off-
shore. "These guys said they were throwing back 25


FISHING CHARTERS
Capt. Warren Girle

Inshore Offshore
Redfish ~ Snapper
Snook Grouper
Light Tackle Fly
Over 30 years experience in local waters USCG Licensed
Full / Half Day Trips 941.387.8383 (H) 941.232.8636 (C)


Stephanie Blakely
of Louisville, Ky.,
with a kingfish
caught on a sar-
dine in about 40
feet of water depth
fishing offshore
of Anna Maria
Island with Capt.
Larry McGuire of
Nh. -I AMe the Fish
Charters. Islander
Photo: Courtesy
Larry McGuire




inches and just keeping the big ones," Stasny said.
Like many anglers, Stasny has been primarily
targeting tarpon.
Derek Olson from the Rod & Reel Pier said
anglers at night have been catching a lot of black
drum to about 18 inches. Shark is a nightly mainstay,
and a lot of tarpon have been spotted but anglers at
the pier haven't yet hooked up the silver kings. He
said there might be an occasional mangrove snapper
to be hooked in the mornings.
Dave Sork from Anna Maria City Pier said
anglers have hooked a few tarpon, but most of the
action has been with Spanish mackerel. He said one
angler caught a keeper cobia.
Send fishing news and photos to fish@islander.
org.

Crist declares free fishing Days
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist designated Free Salt-
water Fishing Days for the taking of saltwater fish
for non-commercial purposes June 5-6.
During these days, any person can take saltwa-
ter fish without obtaining or possessing a license or
permit or paying a license or permit fee.
Crist also designated the fishing holiday for
Memorial Day weekend.


Fishing tournament planned
The Cortez Yacht Club and Edison Academics
school will host the Hook 'Em and Cook 'Em fishing
tournament June 4-6 with $6,000 in prize money.
The tournament will raise money for youth schol-
arships to the Bradenton academy.
For more information, call yacht club commo-
dore Joe Garbus at 941-794-6601 or e-mail jgarbus@c
tampabay.rr.com.

-gC--

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-----A





22-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER


AME: Levengood's countdown begins


By Kimberly Kuizon
Islander Reporter
As this school year draws to an end, Anna Maria
Elementary School principal Tom Levengood will
only have one year remaining at AME.
It has been nearly four years since Levengood
was assigned to AME and 35
years since he started working
with students in Manatee County.
When the 2010-11 school year
ends, Levengood will retire.
"I want my last year to be
a positive influence on the stu-
dents, parents and staff." he said.
Levengood "I feel my goal will be to encour-
age everyone that I am in contact
with to do their best."


Saying goodbye
Parents, teachers and citizens gathered May 24
at Anna Maria Elementary School to say good-
bye to teachers DeAnn Davis and Joan Sackett.
Above, Dalton Hicks, now in high school, returned
to AME to say good luck and goodbye to Davis.
Islander Photos: Kimberly Kuizon

AME says goodbye
By Kimberly Kuizon
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Elementary School teachers DeAnn
Davis and Joan Sackett's number of years teaching
school totals 70 years.
As the 2009-10 AME school year comes to a
close, Davis and Sackett will embark on a new jour-
ney in retirement.
"I'm going to be sad, but they are starting a new
chapter. They are my friends. I know they will come
back and visit," said teacher Maureen Loveland during
Davis' and Sackett's retirement party May 24.
Students both current and former joined parents and
other community members to honor the hard work and
dedication Davis and Sackett gave to AME.
"Mrs. Davis was one of the best teachers I had. She
helped me get through math when I was struggling with
the subject," said high schooler Dalton Hicks.
Davis started her career teaching math at Plant
High School. After realizing she wanted to try some-
thing else, Davis returned to school to become certi-
fied to teach in elementary education.





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Next year, Levengood plans to continue to set
goals for his school and help students and staff
achieve them. "I have been working and will continue
to build leadership with our staff. Stronger leadership
among current staff will help to make a smoother
transition between myself and my replacement," he
said.
While his time is over. Levengood says he
wouldn't do ,n i\ th ing differently.
"I wouldn't have changed any of it. It is a tremen-
dously humbling experience when you begin to look
back at just how many lives that you have touched
over the year," Levengood said.
The process for finding a new AME principal
has begun. The Manatee County School Board will


Former AME physical education teacher Jean Burr
visits with Joan Sackett at the Sackett-Davis retire-
ment party. Sackett has plans to travel to Hawaii in
October.

She was hired by the Manatee County School
board 34 years ago, started a new job at AME and
stayed. Davis' first classroom was in the AME audi-
torium along with three other classes.
"Mrs. Davis was a teacher I'll always remember,"
said Michael Coons, who was in Davis' class in 1976.
\ly children come here, and I was really hoping
she'd stay so they could have her."
For 40 years, Joan Sackett has been teaching on
and off. Her journeys include teaching in Miami after
a sailing trip with her husband and teaching on a


AME calendar
9 a.m, June 3, third-and fourth-grade awards
assembly.
9 a.m, June 4, fifth-grade awards assembly.
June 4, early out 1:15 p.m.
June 8, fifth-grade luncheon at the BeachHouse
Restaurant.
June 9, last day of classes for 2010.
For more information, call the school office at
941-708-5525. AME is at 4700 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.


h@


advertise Levengood's position to existing princi-
pals.
After narrowing down the search to a few appli-
cants, an interview team made up of district members
and AME staff, along with a Parent Teacher Orga-
nization member and a community member will
question each applicant. Then a new principal will
be chosen.
If no existing principals apply, the district will
advertise the post. "I did take the time to express my
feelings of what type of person is needed at AME,"
Levengood said.
There is a possibility a new principal will be
selected a few months before the end of the 2010-11
year to ease the transition. It will give parents and
students a chance to meet the new principal before
the 2011-12 year begins.
"This has definitely been the highlight of my
career," Levengood said. "I love the students, par-
ents and community. My favorite part has been the
students here at AME."

'I need
a vacation"
AMAE fifth-graders
perform "I Need a
Vacation" May 25
for their fellow stu-
dents, and again
later that day for
parents and family
members. Students
acted out going
to summer camp,
attending baseball
games and taking
family road trips.



AME kids 'need a vacation'
With summer temperatures outside, graduating
fifth-grade students inside the Anna Maria Elementary
auditorium performed "I Need a Vacation."
The May 25 performance took its audience on a
whirlwind tour of how summer vacations play out.
A family road trip started off the play, and led to
fishing, summer camps and baseball.
As the fifth-graders performed, onlookers tapped
their feet to the music.
And as the play ended back in setting of AME,
teachers Heather Nyberg and DeAnn Davis left Anne
Kinnan with all the summer responsibilities.
Davis retired at the end of the play and Nyberg
is on leave, awaiting the arrival of her baby.
The highlights of the play were when the fifth-
graders rocked out to Alice Cooper's "Schools Out,"
and ended with a look back at the students over their
years at AME.

Native American reservation in Wisconsin.
Since 1997, Sackett has worked with AME stu-
dents.
"I had Mrs. Sackett for two different grade levels
and it was a big part of my life. She is one of my
favorite teachers. She was fun and not very strict.
It's going to be weird not having her at AME," said
eight-grader Chelsea Perez.
"I can't believe I have only two more weeks with
the kids. I'm going to miss them the most," Sackett
said.
While Sackett is retiring, she will conduct surveys
in schools. She said she plans to work just enough so
she can travel. In October the long-time teacher will
go to Hawaii.
"I want to thank everyone who made me feel very
welcomed when I started at AME," she said. "It can
be hard to start a new school, but not here. There's
one thing I won't miss-homework."
As people started to leave the Parent Teacher
Organization retirement party they said their fare-
wells to Sackett and Davis knowing that while the
teachers are retiring, they will always remain close
to their hearts.




THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 23-A

ISA NECA S IDS


BEAUTIFUL WOVEN WICKER sofa, tan
cushions. Was $2,000 new, now, $195.
Wheelchair carrier, $75. 941-778-2471.
GOLF SET OF professional galley irons (Ping
knock-offs). 3- to 9-iron, plus pitching wedge,
total 8 irons. $25. 941-778-4783.
X-ACTO GUILLOTINE PAPER trimmer with
measurement grid. 12x14-inch cutting sur-
face. $15. Call 941-778-0364.
AERIAL PHOTOS of Anna Maria Island. View
and purchase online: www.jackelka.com.
COMMERCIAL RESTAURANT SUPPLIES:
Ice machine: install and service $2,100. You
pick up, $1,600. Assorted stainless shelves:
$75. Six-burner gas cooktop and charbroiler:
$1,800. 941-730-2606.
FREEBIE ITEMS FOR SALE: Individuals
may advertise up to three items, each priced
$100 or less, 15 words or less. FREE, one
week. Deliver in person to The Islander, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach, e-mail classi-
fieds@islander.org, fax toll-free 1-866-362-
9821. (limited time offer)


GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN Church: All are
welcome to come and worship with us!
Please call 941-778-1813 or visit us at: www.
gloriadeilutheran.com for worship times. 6608
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
BRADENTON ROTARY CLUB meets at noon
Monday at Mattison's Riverside, 1200 First
Ave. W., Bradenton. Club members enjoy fel-
lowship with like-minded professionals. Club
projects offer opportunities to benefit the
community locally and worldwide. To attend
a meeting as our guest, call Trish, 941-747-
1871. More information: www.bradentonro-
tary.org.
THEY'RE BACK! EVERY Monday night all-
you-can-eat fish fry. $10. Live entertainment.
Tiki bar open. Bayside Banquet Hall, 4628
119th St. W., Cortez, end of road.
HAITI $$$ DONATIONS to the Ministry of
Presence Inc., www.ministryofpresence.org,
urgently needed for local representatives to
aid homeless children. Info: The Islander,
941-778-7978.


TERRY HAYES, REALTOR. Signature
Sothebys International. 941-302-3100. Terry.
hayes@sothebysrealty.com. Discoveranna-
maria.com.
WANTED: YOUR OLD cell phone for recy-
cling. Deliver to The Islander, 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach.
FISHING GEAR WANTED: The Privateers
and The Islander are collecting new or used,
repairable fishing poles and reels, nets, tackle,
buckets, etc. to give to children. Donate your
gear at The Islander newspaper office, 5404
Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.
FREE GUN LOCK courtesy of Project Child-
safe, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission and Holmes Beach Police
Department. Pick up at The Islander office,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach. Don't be
sorry, be safe.
ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can
place classified ads and subscribe online
with our secure server? Check it out at www.
islander.org, where you can read Wednes-
day's classified Monday night.


%-


t
Available

i



1


"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Contentm

from Commercial News Providers"
I |,.


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24-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER

Sandy's Lawn Service Inc.
Sands Established in 1983
LCelebrating 25 Years of
Lw Quality & Dependable Service.
Service Call us for your landscape
778-1345 and hardscape needs.
Licensed & Insured

Paradise Improvements 778-4173
S Kitchen and Bath Remodeling Specialist
Fu-- l; Replacement Doors and Windows
Steven Kaluza Andrew Chennault
Fully Licensed and Insured Island References
Lic#CBC056755


Windows & Doors

941-730-5045

RDI CONSTRUCTION INC.
Residential & Condo Renovations
SKitchens Bath Design Service
V Carpentry Flooring Painting
Commercial & Residential
References available 941-720-7519

PLANET STONE
Marble & Granite Inc.
Counter tops, vanity tops,
bar tops and more.
otz Road W., Bradenton 941-580-9236

HONEY DO HOME REPAIR it
941 807 5256-cell 941.896.5256-office & fax
Drywall & Texture Repairs Painting
Soffit & Siding Tile & Laminate Flooring
"We Can Repair or Install Anything With Your Home"
www.honeydohomerepairinc.com

DAY AS SIST BY (Day Planners
HOME & SPECIALTY WATCH SERVICES
PROFESSIONAL & PERSONAL CONCIERGE
SEAN POWERS
941.518.628o WWW.DAYASSIST.COM SEAN@DAYASSIST.COM

--rBed: A againai!
K il '-icci Fi ll Twin,
Ii l,!cd !ii I ', 0 onew/used.
, a, I-,_- .,-, ,2- II
JCCpl. n, H i


Marianne Correll REALTOR
The Big Picture...It's all about Real Estate.
It's a GREAT TIME to buy!

I ISLAND
'\ REAL-ESTATE
I-- OF ANNA MARIA ISLAND, INC.
941-725-7799 941-778-6066 mariannebc@aol.com



ADOPT-A-PET
I w1 I, 1 1I [,1'




11.: 1111, 1. :1,1111 I ,e
TTiiI, .i, aind1ri.11


ROSER THRIFT SHOP: Open 9:30 a.m.-2
p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, 9 a.m.-noon Satur-
day. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. 941-779-
2733.
SALE: 8 a.m.-noon Friday, June 4. Island
treasures. Furniture, too. 210 Lakeview, Anna
Maria. (Crescent and Pine Avenue, north.)
BYOBAG.
GIRL SCOUT COOKIE SALE atThe Islander,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


LOST: IPOD in Bradenton Beach at/near
Herb Dolan Park. Belongs to grandson.
Please return to Wildlife Inc. 941-778-6324.
LOST: BLACK-RIMMED glasses. May 10
on Second Avenue between 55th Street
and Publix, Holmes Beach. John, 941-778-
2416.
FOUND: SONY CYBER-shot digital camera,
April 24, on beach near Gulf Boulevard. Con-
tact 813-310-0390 to arrange return.


PARENTS NEEDED for loving homes to
foster puppies and kittens until they are old
enough for adoption. All food and medical
provided. Julie, 941-720-1411.


2004 WHITE FORD 16-foot box truck with
new hydraulic-lift gate (Tommy Gate). Low
miles, new tires. $11,500 pays off loan. Can
be seen at Pebble Springs Plaza on Manatee
Avenue at the new Jam Rocks restaurant. Call
941-932-2688 or 383-1222.


BIMINI BAY SAILING: Small sailboat rentals
and instruction. Day. Week. Month. Sunfish,
Laser, Zuma, Precision 15, Windrider 17 and
Trimaran. Call Brian at 941-685-1400.
DEEP-WATER BOAT slip for rent: North end
of Anna Maria, easy access to Gulf. 941-794-
8877.


SALES ASSOCIATE: MOTIVATED, experi-
enced real estate licensee for busy Island
office. Please call Jesse or Robin at 941-778-
7244.
PART OR FULL-time help wanted. Island
company. Delivery person, customer service.
Reply: annamariaisland @hotmail.com.


LOOKING FOR A babysitter or pet sitter?
Call Kendall, first aid-certified. Great with kids
and animals. Four years experience, high
school student. 941-779-9783.
ISLAND TEEN WILL help with yard work,
mowing, moving furniture, garage cleaning,
window washing, more. 941-518-8841.
KIDS FOR HIRE ads are FREE for up to three
weeks for Island youths under 16 looking for work.
Ads must be placed in person at The Islander
office, 5404 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach.


HEALTH FOOD STORE on Anna Maria
Island, located in busy shopping center, large
inventory, all equipment and fixtures, com-
pletely turnkey, business growing monthly,
owners moving, great opportunity for mom
and pop. Call Jim, 941-580-0626.


GIFT SHOP FOR sale. Call owner, 941-779-
2624.


ACTIVE LADY WITH spinal injury needs
LPNS and experienced CNAS to assist with
personal care. A Hoyer lift for transfers. Five-
hour a.m. shifts and overnight sleepover shifts
are from 9:30 p.m.-7a.m. Travel opportunity.
941-383-6953.


LET US DRIVE YOU! Airports, cruise ports.
Flat rates. Anna Maria Sunshine Car Service.
941-778-5476.

ISLAND PRESSURE CLEANING, wash away
mildew, dirt, salt. Thorough, reasonable, reli-
able. Free estimates, licensed, insured. 941-
778-0944.

I DON'T CUT corners, I clean corners. Pro-
fessional, friendly cleaning service since
1999. 941-778-7770. Leave message.
ISLAND PET NANNY: Loving pet care. Long-
time Island resident, background check, pet
CPR-certified, references. Karen Robinson,
941-779-2830 or 941-730-5693.
LIGHT CARPENTRY, HOME repairs, handy-
man work, deck repairs, dock repairs, etc.
Retired tradesman, Island resident. No job
too small. Call Steve Doyle 941-778-1708.
ANNE'S TROPICAL BREEZE cleaning,
errands and gardening. Reasonable rates,
Local references, bonded. Please call Anne,
941-465-7967.
TOTAL DOOR AND Window Service: Repairs,
replacements, sales, parts, stormcatcher hur-
ricane covers, Simonton windows, Plastpro
doors, ODL inserts. TDWSINC@msn.com.
941-730-1399.
EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER. DEPEND-
ABLE, honest with local Island references.
Call Nancie, 941-755-5948.
DAVE'S CURB APPEAL: Paint, landscape,
light repair, remodel, cleanup. Affordable
Island work, $75 per four hours. Island owner,
resident, with tools. Dave, 715-418-3531.
RENTALS RENT fast when you advertise in
The Islander.


ICH SPRECHE DEUTSCH!
Your German Connection in Manatee County!
Sabine Connerley, Realtor
Office: 941.795.2211
4009 Manatee Ave.W., Bradenton, FL 34209
E-MAIL sabine.connerley@floridamoves.com








U if"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


f


I .


359-1904
"Movers Who Core"
TWO MEN AND A TRUCK,


JILA DE LA SII.S


--d











HOUSECLEANING AND HANDYMAN ser-
vices: Pressure washing, anything you need.
Excellent references. 941-539-6891.

GOT STUMPS? CALL an experienced, reli-
able expert. Brad Frederick's LLC Tree Stump
Grinding. 941-730-0001. Northwest Braden-
ton.
ELDERLY CAREGIVER: 28 years experi-
ence, top references, days or nights, personal
care, household duties. 941-545-7114.
ERRAND RUNNER: NEED assistance with
your errands? Senior discounts. Call Melissa,
941-350-2892 or email: melis200@yahoo.
com.
ARE YOU READY for storm season? Relieve
your stress and worry! One claim can pay
for a small investment in complete home or
business inventory from Bradenton Home
and Business Inventory Services. Call now!
941-773-2382.
BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS JD's Window
Cleaning looking for storefront jobs in Holmes
Beach. 941-920-3840.
COMPUTER GOT YOU down? Got a virus?
Need wireless, network setup? Web site?
Need help? Call JC, 941-487-7487.
ISLAND MERMAIDS CLEANING and Co.:
34 years of happy customers. Senior check,
pet-watch, storm-check, tour guide, etc.
Rentals our specialty. 941 -778-3046 or 941 -
580-4487.
DESIGNER FOR HIRE! All your graphic
needs covered! Web design. Call Jon at
Smashcat Studios, 941-778-2824 or 941-
545-0192.
BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat,
refrigeration. Commercial and residential
service, repair and/or replacement. Serving
Manatee County and the Island since 1987.
For dependable, honest and personalized
service, call William Eller, 941-795-7411.
CAC184228.
ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional
creates a portrait. I want to be at your wed-
ding! www.jackelka.com. 941-778-2711.
MORE CLASSIFIEDS equals more read-
ers.


NADIA'S EUROSAGE Relaxing, healing
massage in the comfort of your home. Call
today for an appointment, 941-795-0887.
MA#0017550.
CHECK MY HOUSE! When you're away, we
stay close to home. We provide full house
checking services to ensure your house is
secure while you are away. Call 941-928-
8735, or e-mail check.my.house@verizon.
net for details.
TUTORING SERVICES: Specializing in alge-
bra, geometry, calculus, trigonometry and
science. Special need students welcome.
Grades 3-12. Jenifer, 941-224-1760.
UPSCALE NAIL SALON: Nails on the Island. 30
years experience. Call for an appointment. Now
offering in-home services. 941-713-5244.
MUSIC LESSONS WITH Koko Ray. Island
studio open now. Instruction in flute, clarinet,
saxophone, guitar and piano. 941-778-8323,
or evenings, 941-758-0395. 315 58th St.,
Studio I, Holmes Beach.


CONNIE'S LANDSCAPING INC. Residential
and commercial. Full-service lawn mainte-
nance, landscaping, cleanup, hauling and
more! Insured. 941-778-5294.
ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER service and
repair. Your complete irrigation repair com-
pany. Call 941-778-2581.
TREES BY BREEZE Inc.: Custom land-
scapes, tree trimming, property maintenance.
Insured. Since 1988. Chris, 941-778-2837.
ECONOMY TREE TRIMMING, hedges,
mulching. Lowest prices starting at $15.
12-year Island resident. Cell 941-951-1833.
JR'S LANDSCAPING AND MAINTENANCE
Lawns, native plants, mulching, trimming,
hauling, cleanup. Island resident 25 years.
Call 941-807-1015.


STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE. For all your
landscape needs. Shell $45/yard. Call Shark
Mark. 941-301-6067.
MORE CLASSIFIEDS equals more read-
ers.


JISLA DER LASSIIE.S


P*---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------*1

PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
Print and online classified ad submission:


CLASSIFIED RATES business or individual: Minimum $12 for up to 15 WORDS. 16-30 words: $20.
31-45 words: $40. Box: $4. (Phone number is a "word." Spell out all words.)
The deadline is NOON Monday for the following week's paper.


Run issue date(s)
Amt. pd


Date


Ck. No.[


Credit card payment: 1 No.
Name shown on card:
House no. or P.O. box no. on cc bill


or TFN start date:
Cash -


_card exp. date
-Billing address zip code


Your e-mail for renewal reminder: I
Web site: www.islander.org A|"_ Isl -, E-mail: classifieds@islander.org
5404 Marina Drive Th eU Islain d er Fax toll free: 1-866-362-9821
SHrlmat Ranrh FlI A91 7 Phrn- 9A41-77R-797R I
L ------------------------------ ----------------------


i-qlad elleA
BEC6MSAE YG


Rih mr h bah


mm4-2038


CALL THE ISLAND'S FINEST...
MORE THAN 2,500 LARGE AND SMALL
PROJECTS ON AMI SINCE 1988!
We provide design plans-You preview 3-D drawings

WASH FAMILY CONSTRUCTION

941.725.0073
Darrin J. Wash State Lic. CRC 1329024
LOCALLY OWNED AND FAMILY OPERATED SINCE 1988


THE ISLANDER i JUNE 2, 2010 i 25-A

CHRISTIE'S PLUMBING Residential
Serving the Island, LBK, Manatee & Sarasota CoLnii-: :in.. 1': co
New Construction Remodeling
All Phases of Plumbing Repair & Service (
778-3924 or 778-4461 5508 Marina Drive, Holrr,-:, .ii', I 1p- Sat.

BOAT, RV & TRAILER STORAGE
Wash Down Easy Access Clean Security Cameras
941-232-9208 Rates starting at $40
Centrally located off Cortez Road 4523 30th St. W.
Warehouse/Workshops also available







> MANATEE MOVING
Pickup & Delivery Services
Apartments Condos Homes *
1 item or Household
Free Estimates Affordable Rates
Call Mimikel 739-8234
Licensed Insurecd FL Mover Reg. # voIM601

!N'S RESCREEN IN,
:.L *:-,GES, LANAIS, PORCHES, WINDOWS, C.:1 :*P
rj: .:b TOO BIG or Too SMALL. Free Estima.: .
Call Dan, 941-713-3108


KERN CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Additions Remodels New Construction
941-778-1115 kernconstructioninc.com
SINCE 1966

AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION
941-580-5777
s -Shutate Sr-.,ice n fI Inc. Airport Permitted
S A Dolphin Limousines Corp and Livery Insured
HcpTCi10105 Swww.shuttleserviceami.com

AMI TAXI
professional, metered, on-call, gps, cards accepted
www.amitaxi.com amitaxi4u@gmail.com
holmes beach, bradenton beach, anna maria
800.301.4816
airports shops dining

Junior's Landscape & Maintenance
Lawn care PLUS native plants. f. tY
mulch, trip, hauling and cleanup.
Call Junior, 807-1015 d "


We Come To You Full Warranty
* Antennas *MirrorsI-
ePower Lockss
Trunks Door Handles 941-780-1735
POWERUPAUTO.COM SINCE 1995 FREE ESTIMATES FL MV-46219





26-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER

IL AAD


KARAZ LANDSCAPE LAWN service. Mulch,
clean ups, power washing, tree trimming and
more. 941-448-3857 or 941-448-5207.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. Premium
grade-A, $45/yard B-grade, $30-$40/yard.
Hauling all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil
with free estimates. Call Larry at 941-795-
7775, "shell phone" 941-720-0770.

NATURE'S DESIGN LANDSCAPING. Design
and installation. Tropical landscape specialist.
Residential and commercial. 30 years experi-
ence. 941-729-9381.



VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial,
interior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper.
Island references. Bill, 941-795-5100.

TILE -TILE -TILE. All variations of ceramic tile
supplied and installed. Quality workmanship,
prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call
Neil, 941-726-3077.

CUSTOM REMODELING EXPERT. All
phases of carpentry, repairs and painting.
Insured. Meticulous, clean, sober and prompt.
Paul Beauregard, 941-779-2294.

GRIFFIN'S HOME IMPROVEMENTS Inc.
Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops,
cabinets and shutters. Insured and licensed,
941-748-4711.

JERRY'S HOME REPAIR: Carpentry work,
handyman, light plumbing, electrical, light
hauling, pressure washing. Call 941-778-
6170 or 941-447-2198.

EXPERIENCED BUILDING CONTRACTOR:
Carl V. Johnson Jr. Inc. New homes, porches,
decks, remodel, repairs, etc. Quality work.
Fair price! 941-795-1947.

ISLANDER CLASSIFIEDS:The best news in
town and the best results from classified ads
and service advertising!



r"4103 s


GRAND CANAL IN HOLMES BEACH Ground level,
2 BR/2BA located on double wide canal. Boat lift, dock,
screened porch, 1 car garage & new A/C. $450,000


344 FT. OF WATERFRONT IN KEY ROYALE On over
1/2 acre, 3BR/3BA at the point of two canals. Updated
kitchen & baths, huge 30' X 78' screened lanai, large pool,
wet bar, 20K lb. boatlift. $895,000
M ike 800-367-1617
Norman" I 941-778-6696
3101 GULF DR
Realty INC HOLMES BEACH
www. mikenormanrealty.com


SOUTHBAY HOME REPAIRS: If it's broken,
stuck, loose, leaks, needs paint, etc. I'll fix it.
Affordable quality work. 941-720-2906.

FOREMOST FENCE: Commercial, Resi-
dential. Chain link, vinyl, aluminum, wood,
access control. Contractors you can depend
on. Call 941-748-2700.
PAINT AVERAGE ROOM: $75. Customer
supplies paint. Exterior, one story. Pressure
washing. Free estimates. New phone number!
941-721-7521. Lic.#RR0066450.
HANDYMAN FOR HIRE: $15 per hour. No
job too small. One call does it all. Call Arthur,
941-301-0624. Quality satisfaction guaran-
teed.
J.E. MURRAY: ESTABLISHED Island builder.
New homes, remodeling. 30-year resident.
Call 941-778-2316 or 941-730-3228.


WEEKLY/MONTHLY/ANNUAL rentals: wide
variety, changes daily. SunCoast Real Estate,
941-779-0202, or 1-800-732-6434. www.sun-
coastinc.com.

OFFICE, RETAIL, PROFESSIONAL space.
8803/8799 Cortez Road, Bradenton. 600 sf,
$500/month. 1,200 sf, former salon and 1,300
sf. Call 1-800-952-1206.

WATERFRONT KEY WEST STYLE with
dock. Furnished, walk to beach, eateries and
shops. $150/night, $950/week. Use of bikes
included. 941-794-5980.
RENTAL WANTED: ISLAND business owner
seeks 3BR/2BA home for two year or longer
lease. Call Tom, 941-993-4909.
ANNA MARIA BEACHFRONT, waterfront
vacation rental. 5BR/4BA. $2,200/week. 559-
760-1331. tampabaybeachhouse.com.
FISHING FOR a good deal? Always look in
The Islander, 941-778-7978.






SALES & RENTALS

(941) 778-2291
419 Pine Ave. Anna Maria
www.betsyhills.com




gulfBay fSafty of.9nna 9ariaInc.-
1\.4^ ) Jesse (Bnrisson Broker-Associate, g4f
941-713-4755 800-771-6043

ANNA MARIA HISTORIC HOME
Known as the
Clay House this 2
bedroom historic
home sits on a
huge 11,308 sq ft
lot in central Anna
Maria. Close to
the bay and the beaches on quiet Spring Ave. This
property has unlimited potential. $399,000
Call Jesse Brisson
941-713-4755.*


VACATION RENTALS: 3BR/3BA pool home,
2BR/1 BA cottage, 5BR/4BA split pool home, two
blocks to Holmes Beach. 3BR/2BA pool home,
northwest Bradenton, 3BR/3BA pool home,
Palma Sola. Weekly, monthly rentals. Luxury fur-
nishings, all amenities. Inclusive prices. Coastal
Properties Realty, 941-794-1515.
ANNUAL PERICO BAY Club. Guard-gated
24/7. Sunny bright end unit, 2BR/2BA villa
with spacious two-car garage and extra-long
driveway. Nicely furnished, new stainless-
steel appliances, TVs in living room, master
bedroom and master bath. Screened porch
plus deck overlooking small lake. Private
courtyard entry. Neighborhood heated pool
and spa, plus large community lap pool.
Available July 1. $1,350/month plus electric.
Call owner, 941-792-4767.

WALK TO GULF beaches: Anna Maria Island.
Sandpiper 55-plus 2BR/1 BA. Furnished, car-
port, bay view. No smoking, no pets. $650/
month, $500 deposit. 941-545-8923.

WATERFRONT: UNBELIEVABLY BEAUTI-
FUL. Remodeled (granite, stainless-steel),
designer furnishings, DSL, 2BR/2BA,
Holmes Beach, Jacuzzi, tennis. Homeaway.
com#270319. Three-month minimum. Jan-
uary-March, $2,999/month. February-April,
$3,300/month. 941-209-8789.
BRADENTON BEACH: ADORABLE one-
room beach cottage on the bay, with dock.
$2,000/month, annual, utilities included. 941-
779-0289.
STEPS TO BEACH: Sandpiper 55-plus.
Three rentals. 1BR/1BA, $575/month, May-
October. 2BR/1 BA large lanai, $625/month,
May-December, annual, $775/month, sea-
sonal, $1,800/month. 2BR/1 BA bay view,
patio, annual, $775/month, seasonal, $1,975/
month. 941-778-3051 or 941-567-9492.
DON'T FORGET! The Islander has "mullet"
T-shirts. Stop in our office at 5404 Marina
Drive, Holmes Beach or order online www.
islander.org.


HAiOLD SMALL REALTOR
Office: (941) 778-2246. (941) 792- 8628
E-mail: haroldsmall@wagnerrealty.com


~.1


WAGNER REALTY
Brmin Peqple S 5im 1919
2217 GULF DIVE NOQTH BQADENTON BEACH, FL


(.0"4? EXPERIENCE
REPUTATION
riatITOR. RESULTS
36 Years of Professional Service
to Anna Maria Island and Bradenton
HERONS WATCH 8 min. to beaches. Lakeview, 3BR/2BA,
Stone Fireplace, Corian & other upgrades. Room for a pool. $299,900.
3 MIN. TO BEACH. Perico Island 2BR/2BA, large greatroom with cathedral
ceilings, private courtyard and enclosed lanai, Jacuzzi tub & more. $259,500.
CANAL-FRONT LOT. Holmes Beach. $400,000.
RENTALS:
LUXURY GULF-FRONT VILLAS. Anna Maria. Weekly & monthly.
8 MIN. TO GULF BEACH. 3/2, 5 yrs. old $1,300/mo Annual.
RIVER OAKS 2BR/2BA seasonal, tennis, pool, clubhouse. $1,700/mo.
CANALFRONT 2BR/2BA, family room, garage. Seasonal.
CANALFRONT 3BR/2BA bayview, pool, boatdock, $2,900/mo. Seasonal.
GULFFRONT 5BR/4.5BA, Wedding/reunions, seasonal/vacations.
HOLMES BEACH- 941-778-0807
tdollyl @comcast.net www.tdollyyoungrealestate.com


I




THE ISLANDER 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 27-A

LAASD


PALMA SOLA: 500 Cordova Drive. 3BR/2BA,
two-car garage, seven rooms. 11x40-foot
screened lanai, caged pool. One block to
bay. $1,595/month. 941-778-3051 or 941-
567-9492.
ROOM TO RENT: Private bath, kitchen and
house privileges. North end Longboat Key.
941-387-0419.
BRADENTON BEACH: 2BR/1 BA, non-smok-
ers. Partially furnished. Steps to beach. $700/
month, first, last, deposit. Water, garbage
included. 941-778-2471.
ONE BLOCK TO Gulf: 2BR/1 BA, 900-sf,
garage. 3008 Gulf Drive N., Holmes Beach.
Call Ennis, 813-244-0955.

$350/WEEK: 55-plus, Sandpiper Resort.
1 BR/1 BA sleeps four. Turnkey, walk to beach.
$700/month. 941-778-5152.

SEASONAL OR WEEKLY cottage-style rent-
als. 1 BR/1 BA or 2BR/1 BA with pool. Walk to
beach, shopping, restaurants. 941-778-3426.
Web site 2spinnakers.com.


BUILD WEALTH! Call or e-mail for our free
brochure. Discover how easy it is to build
wealth through short sales and foreclosures.
Adkins Florida Group, Wagner Realty. Free@
AdkinsFloridaGroup.com. 941-713-0635.
THE ISLANDER. The best news on Anna
Maria Island since 1992.


DISCOVER THE OTHER Island! Tidy Island
in Sarasota Bay. Waterfront, renovated
2BR/2BA two-car garage condo. Guards,
nature and so much more. Pet friendly!
Owner financing, $239,900. Realtor/owner,
Katharine Pepper, RoseBay Real Estate,
941-792-9459.
DIRECT GULFFRONT 4BR/4.5BA, den,
three-car garage, pool, spa, elevator, security.
Immaculate 2005 Mediterranean villa-style
architecture with breathtaking Gulf views.
5,146 sf under roof on north Anna Maria Island,
12106 Gulf Drive. $3,500,000, furnished. Con-
tact owner, broker, 941-920-1699.
AQUARIUS CLUB PENTHOUSE! Amaz-
ing Gulf views. 2BR/2BA, light, airy, 9-foot
ceilings. New hurricane windows and doors.
$599,900. Katharine Pepper, RoseBay Real
Estate, 941-792-9459.
DIRECT GULFFRONT: 146 feet on the beach.
3BR/4.5BA, office recreation room, spa, pool,
outdoor kitchen and theater, elevator, turnkey
furnished. $3,950,000. Suncoast Real Estate,
941-779-0202 or 941-720-0288.
ISLAND HOME: 2BR/1.5BA. Quiet neighbor-
hood, well kept-up home across from com-
munity boat ramp. Just reduced to $329,000.
Call John Wize, 941-704-4591, Betsy Hills
Realty.
PRICE REDUCED: DUPLEX on two deeded
lots, both units 2BR/1.5BA, elevated, park
under building. $450,000. Call owner: 941-
730-2606.


CaLL THe FLiP-FLOP

COMPaNY FiRST...
TO FiND THO PeRF6CT VaCaTION ReNTaL!
More than 200 beautiful
hand-selected properties
to choose from.

Stop by our offices or visit
our web-site to book your
next vacation in paradise!
~ Anra l Isilin4



315 Pine Avenue Anna Maria
5604-B Marina Drive Holmes Beach 941-779-0733
www.annamariaparadise.com


Sales & Rentals
32 Years...2 Generations


Leckona
npsiBrsffect
cutrnur h
S nf*rthr..
TMIslander

PitaBB~gS


WATERFRONT SALE! Seven acres with
dockable lakefront, $34,900. June 5. Wooded,
park-like setting on one of Alabama's top rec-
reational lakes. All amenities completed. Boat
to Gulf of Mexico! Excellent financing. Call
now, 866-952-5302, ext. 5422.
OVERSIZE LAKE LOT! Three-plus acres,
$29,900. Was $49,900. Free boat slips.
Park-like hardwood setting near lake. Enjoy
deeded access to private lake, free boat slips
and pavilion. Quiet road frontage, utilities,
warranty deed. Excellent financing. Must see,
call now, 888-792-5253, ext. 3503.
RENTALS RENT fast when you advertise in
The Islander.
CENTRAL GEORGIA: 280 acres, $1,375
per acre. Auchumpkee Creek, rocky shoals,
several pond sites, hardwoods and planted
pine. 478-987-9700. www.stregispaper.com.
St. Regis Paper Co.
NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAINS closeout
sale! Cabin shell, two-plus acres with great
view, very private, big trees, waterfalls and
large public lake nearby, $99,500. Bank
financing. 866-275-0442.
ONLINE SERVICE: Did you know you can
place classified ads and subscribe online
with our secure server? Check it out at www.
islander.org, where you can read Wednes-
day's classified Monday night.

FOR EXPERT ADI(E ON ISLAND PROPERTIES
CALL THE ISLANDERS
(941) 778-6066
B tt C(LLTHEISLNDERS.(OM
S 1jOHN NCALL THEISLANDERS.COM

. ISLAND
RF I [SITTE
..... ...... ...... -.... ....


VILLAGE GREEN CONDO
2BR/2BA WITH BRAND NEW A/C UNIT
AND TILED FLOORS REDUCED TO $99,000
Visit us on Pine Avenue or online for many more listings and rental info.
ISLAND FACES...SELLING ISLAND PLACES


Sally Norman Greig Mike Norman Marianne Norman Ellis
Broker Associate Broker Sales Associate
Property Manager Property Manager
19 Years 32 Years 12 Years
We Must Be Doing Something Right!
Mike t*/ 800.367-1617
KNorman . h 941-778-6696
Re manty INC3101 GULF DR
oRealty aHOLMES BEACH
www. mikenormanrealty.com




28-A 0 JUNE 2, 2010 0 THE ISLANDER


BEA


BON


Anna Maria's beautiful beaches have so very much to offer. Now we
bonus iPass.


humble add a special


iPass is your ticket to exclusive weekly offers from up to 10 Islander advertisers. iPass is your
ticket to all the shopping and dining variety the island offers.
'ss is yoursFREE when you subscribe to The Islander e-edition.
heIslander no.v bngs you all the local news, announcements, commentary and events that
S efie the Anna Maria lifestyle in an easy-to-read, page-turning online edition. And iPass is
r,2nd your ticket to some-restricted-information online at The Islander website, including the
- ewsoaoer's valua blerchives.


h Innadiaria . *
The Islander
.^ . ...-


.. ... . .


ft


Photo: Jack Elka
''* .......-_____


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Special Storm-Ready Section
e lander


THE ISLANDER 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 B-1
Hurricane Season: Jmne-November 2010

Avengers


.m aKewjsami ^ls
J-
u~irnalfwmudimn


The Islander
All Gou need
to know ...





2-B 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER


Stormy weather


A hurricane is the most
severe category of the meteoro-
logical phenomenon known as
the "tropical cyclone."
Tropical cyclones are low-
pressure systems that have
thunderstorm activity and rotate
counterclockwise.
A tropical cyclone that has
winds of 38 mph or less is called
a "tropical depression."
When the tropical cyclone's
winds reach 39-73 mph it is
called a "tropical storm."
When the winds exceed 74
mph the storm is considered
to be a "hurricane." The Saf-
fir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
defines hurricane strength by
categories, but the category of
the storm does not necessarily
relate directly to the damage it
will inflict.


eve
dep
inte
moN


can cause substantial damage. Islander file


Lower category storms and although they can vary considerably in size. The eye
n tropical storms can cause substantial damage at a hurricane's center is a relatively calm, clear area
'ending on what other weather features they about 20-40 miles across.
ract with, where they strike and how slow they The eyewall surrounding the eye is composed
ve. of dense clouds that contain the highest winds in the
Typical hurricanes are about 300 miles wide, storm.


The storm's outer rainbands
often with hurricane or
tropical storm-force winds -
are made up of dense bands of
thunderstorms ranging from a
few miles to tens of miles wide
and 50 to 300 miles long.
Hurricane-force winds can
Extend outward to about 25
miles in a small hurricane and
to more than 150 miles for a
large one. Tropical storm-force
winds can stretch out as far as
300 miles from the center of a
large hurricane.
Frequently, the right side of
a hurricane is the most danger-
ous in terms of storm surge,
winds and tornadoes.
A hurricane's speed and
path depend on complex ocean
and atmospheric interactions,
including the presence or
absence of other weather patterns.
Do not focus on the eye or the track hur-
ricanes are immense systems that can move in
complex patterns that are difficult to predict. Be
prepared for changes in size, intensity, speed and
direction.


Sorting hurricanes: Categories 1-5
Hurricanes in the United States are measured dences and industrial buildings. Some complete
using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. The scale building failures with small utility buildings blown
provides examples of the type of damage and impacts over or away. Flooding causes major damage to lower
associated with winds of the indicated intensity. In floors of all structures near the shoreline. Massive
general, damage rises by about a factor of four for evacuation of residential areas may be required.
every category increase. Source: National Hurricane Center


Category 1
Wind: 74-95 mph.
Surge: 4-5 feet.
Effects: No real damage to building structures.
Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes,
shrubbery and trees. Also, some coastal flooding and
minor pier damage.
I


Fladkd I LO i, H ZIn. Celein 1 Bi.n




A map showing storm surge in Manatee County
with a Category 1 hurricane.
Category 2
Wind: 96-110 mph.
Surge: 6-8 feet.
Effects: Some roofing material, door and window
damage. Considerable damage to vegetation, mobile
homes, etc. Flooding damages piers and small craft
in unprotected moorings may break their moorings.


A map showing storm surge in Manatee County
with a Category 2 hurricane.


A map showing storm surge in Manatee County
with a Category 3 hurricane.
Category 3
Wind: 111-130 mph.
Surge: 9-12 feet.
Effects: Some structural damage to small resi-
dences and utility buildings, with a minor amount
of curtainwall failures. Mobile homes are destroyed.
Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures
with larger structures damaged by floating debris.
Terrain may be flooded well inland.


A map showing storm surge in Manatee County
with a Category 4 hurricane.
Category 4
Wind: 131-155 mph.
Surge: 13-18 feet.
Effects: More extensive curtainwall failures with
some complete roof-structure failure on small resi-
dences. Major erosion of beach areas. Terrain may
be flooded well inland.

Category 5
Wind: 155 mph and more.
Surge: 18 feet and more.
Effects: Complete roof failure on many resi-


A map showing storm surge in Manatee County
with a Category 5 hurricane.

TIME TO CHANCE THE SIGNS


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THE ISLANDER 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 B-3


County revises evacuation map


M anatee County recently revised its hurricane
evacuation map, and Anna Maria Island remains in
the first-to-evacuate zone.
The changes in the map deal primarily with west
Bradenton.
On the new map, about 6.5 percent more people
would evacuate their residences if a Category 1
storm was to directly hit Manatee County, according
to Laurie Feagans, the county's emergency manage-
ment chief.
The new map puts 60 square blocks in northwest
Bradenton in the Level A evacuation zone, the same
level applied to all of Anna Maria Island. On the old
map, the northwest Bradenton properties were in a
Level B zone.


ARE YOU NAMED?


Earl otto Alex
S* Colin
Julia

VPir Nicole
Shary

MatthewKaln

Fiona
Gaston on
bonnie anielle


If a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds
of 74-95 mph, was whirling its way toward Manatee
County, the county would order an evacuation of the
Level A zone.
The new map was drafted using more precise
topography measurements, according to Feagans.
The updated map also shows a change for Bay-
shore Gardens in Bradenton, which is now in either
Level B or Level C rather than Level A zones.
Those who pay close attention to the evacuation
maps may notice another change the colors.
Old evacuation maps showed the Level A zone in
light purple. The new map shows the first-to-evacuate
zone in emergency red, a color that is becoming stan-
dard across the state.


Evacuation routes
Primary evacuation routes for the area are:
North/south: Interstate 75, U.S. 19, U.S. 41 and
U.S. 301.
East/West: State Road 62, S.R. 64/Manatee
Avenue and S.R. 70.
To keep traffic moving, Manatee County's emer-
gency management team and local law enforcement
agencies work with wrecker services to remove dis-
abled vehicles during an evacuation.
To signal a problem, motorists should place a
white cloth flag on the exterior of the vehicle.
The service also can assist a motorist with a dis-
abled vehicle to reach shelter.
For information, go to www.mymanatee.org.


Manatee County
has revised
its evacuation
map, expanding
the area that
must be evacu-
ated prior to a
direct hit from a
Category 1 hur-
ricane. Islander
Images: Cour-
tesy Manatee
County


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4-B 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER

Prepare a Survival Kit For Your Pets!
Current photo of your "-
Leash & collar with ID
Proof of vaccinations
Carrier or cage
Two-week supply of
food &water [ ip
Food/water bowls, liI, '..ip
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Pet medications
Cat litter adn p
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NF ? Antam Mar i
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Storm name Date formed
Alex
Bonnie- -N
Colin ______ _
Danielle AZORES I .
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
BERMUDA Igor
Julia
Karl _
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula ___ _- 2
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie __ ____ ___
Walter
B.V .I. -
ANGUILLA Source: National Hurricane Center
| .ST. MARTIN
U.S. -
V.I. ST. KITS% SAITIGUA
and NEVIS GUADE OUPE
DOMI ICA
SMA TINIQUE
ST. LUCIA 0
0 > BARBADOS
GRENADA 0
TRI NDAD __0N

LJELA

65-W 60-W 551W 50W 45-W 4O=W 35-W 30-W
__S/-NTv________,


We've experienced many hurricane seasons.
Personal advice from three Island natives ... prepare
... don't panic. Possessions are replaceable.




SINCE 1957
"We ARE the Island!"
Marie Franklin, Lic. Real Estate Broker
941 778-2259 Fax 941 778-2250
E-mail amrealty@verizon.net
Web site www.annamariareal.com


1LLL~
~


ire
0 Ask us how
tomq get cash
,-'-reates for

trepairing
your
irrigation
I system.

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M-F 7:30-5 Sat 8-noon
8700 Cortez Road W. Bradenton
792.9304 Fax 792.9354


Where the locals gather
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Breakfast 6 Lunchl






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S z tr s Pra. Notines Bearh

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and large losses
FIRE FLOOD MOLD


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941-792-7715
Like it never even happened.





IHARHDWEAR


CHECK LIST
FOR STORM
PREPARATIONS:


J Lanterns & Fuel
J Flashlights
J Batteries
J Candles
J Tapes
J Plastic Bags
J Nails


J Hand Tools
J Can Openers
J Portable Radios
J Coolers
J Sandbags
J Propane Cylinders
for Stoves & Grills


We'll help you with all the supplies you
need to be "storm ready."
Island Shopping Center 778-2811 Fax 778-6982
Open Daily


THE ISLANDER 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 B-5

During any emergency
we are there for you!



WEST COAST
Air ConditioningyHeating Inc

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5347 Gulf Drive #4
Holmes Beach Business Center
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6-B U 2010 STORM SPECIAL U THE ISLANDER


Ruffing the storm out


Any disaster that threatens humans, threatens
animals.
Emergency management officials urge people
to make plans to care for their pets in the event of a
hurricane:


Baby Bird, a young cairn terrier, appreciates
the security of her kennel.


Make sure pets have current immunizations.
Locate a pet-friendly shelter a motel or
hotel or housing with friends or family.
Pack a pet survival kit that includes ID tags
and collars, records, a carrier for each pet, water and
food bowls, medications, food, plastic bags, litter
and a box, toys and comfort items, muzzles if neces-
sary and a manual can-opener.


large enough to serve as a temporary shelter for the
animal, which may be required to live in the carrier
for days or weeks.
In an evacuation, leave early. An unnecessary
trip is better than waiting too long to leave safely.
Throughout the evacuation and the storm, pets
will need reassurance. Remain calm, keep as close
to their normal routine as possible and speak to them


Make sure the carrier is comfortable enough and regularly in a calm voice.


Planning equals prepared


Emergency management officials at the local,
state and federal levels advise residents and
businesses to develop a disaster plan.
The planning should include:
A discussion on the type of hazards that
could affect the household or business, and a
property's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding
and wind.
A check of the property the roof, win-
dows, shutters, doors and straps especially.
The identification of a safe room or the
safest areas in a home or business, and the iden-
tification of other shelter possibilities in the event
of an evacuation.
The identification of escape routes from
a property and evacuation routes from home,
which should be measured in tens of miles rather
than hundreds of miles.
A list of out-of-state friends and family for
emergency contacts.
Identification of how pets will be cared for
and sheltered in an emergency.
A list of post-emergency telephone num-
bers.


- ---.---~---..-
Sol w win..
|men


For a step-by-step guide to developing a house-
hold emergency plan, go to www.floridadisaster.
org/family. For a guide to developing a plan for a
business, go to www.floridadisaster.org/business.
Islander Image: www.floridadisaster.org
A check to verify adequate insurance cover-
age.
A review of non-perishable emergency sup-
plies in the disaster kit and a restocking of any-
thing that might have been "borrowed."


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THE ISLANDER 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 B-7


Storm names: Short,

if not so sweet


Meteorologists and emergency management
experts have determined that the use of short, dis-
tinctive given names is quicker and less subject to
error than use of latitude-longitude identification
methods.
These advantages are especially important in
exchanging detailed storm information between
hundreds of widely scattered stations, coastal bases
and ships at sea, according to the National Hurri-
cane Center.
Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms have been
named from lists originated by the NHC. The orig-
inal name lists featured only women's names. In
1979, men's names were introduced and they alter-
nate with the women's names.
The only time there is a change in the pre-set
list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future
use of its name on a different storm would be inap-
propriate for reasons of sensitivity.

Earl Otto Alex
Colin
Julia

Paula Nicole
a C U -l LV,,-rgile Rih.,l.I
Shary

Matthew Kal

Fiona
Gaston
Bonnie Danielle


In the event that more than 21 named tropical
cyclones occur in the Atlantic basin in a season,
additional storms will take names from the Greek
alphabet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and so
on.


Manatee County opens emergency shelters as
needed. Shelter openings will differ by the size and
intensity of a disaster.
County emergency management officials encourage
residents to consider options other than general public
shelter, including hotels or other rental lodging outside
the evacuation area or stays with family or friends.
If public shelter is needed, officials recommend
tuning to local media for updates on shelter openings,
including which shelter will serve as a pet-friendly loca-
tion and which shelter will serve special needs.
Locations on the county's shelter roster:
Bashaw Elementary School, 3515 Morgan John-
son Road, Bradenton.
Bayshore Elementary School, 6120 26th St. W.,
Bradenton.
Braden River Elementary School, 6125 River Club
Blvd., Bradenton.
Braden River Middle School, 6215 River Club
Blvd., Bradenton.
Braden River High School, 6545 SR 70 E., Bra-
denton.
Buffalo Creek Middle School, 7320 69th St. E.,
Palmetto.
Freedom Elementary School, 9515 SR 64 E., Bra-
denton.
Gullett Elementary School, 12125 44th Ave. E.,
Bradenton.
Haile Middle School, 9501 SR 64 E., Braden-
ton.
Johnson Middle School, 2121 26th Ave. E., Bra-
denton.


A storm washes across the Anna Maria City Pier.


Kinnan Elementary School, 3415 Tallevast Road,
Sarasota.
Lee Middle School, 4000 53rd Ave. W., Braden-
ton.
Lincoln Middle School, 305 17th St. E., Pal-
metto.
Manatee High School, 1000 32nd St. W., Braden-
ton.
McNeal Elementary School, 6325 Lorraine Road,
Bradenton.
Miller Elementary School, 4201 Manatee Ave.
West, Bradenton.
Mills Elementary School, 7200 69th St. E., Pal-
metto.
Myakka City Elementary School, 37205 Manatee
Ave., Myakka City.
Oneco Elementary School, 5214 22nd Street
Court E., Bradenton.
Prine Elementary School, 3801 Southern Park-
way, Bradenton.
Rowlett Elementary School, 3500 9th St. E., Bra-
denton.
Seabreeze Elementary School, 3601 71st St. W.,
Bradenton.
Tillman Elementary School, 1415 29th St. E.,
Palmetto.
Williams Elementary School, 3404 Fort Hamer
Road, Parrish.
Willis Elementary School, 14705 The Masters
Ave., Bradenton.
Witt Elementary School, 200 Rye Road, Braden-
ton.


We Build Strength


We build strong homes, meant to last
tides and time, and we can help you
with hurricane preparedness.

Call Shoreline for all your
prepare or repair needs.


Call 941.778.1015 Shoreline
Builders
od Solehu s I1i4m. LIL


Phone 941.778.1015
Fax 941.778.1021
5345 Gulf Drive, Suite 300
Holmes Beach
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Shelter from the storm


-/-






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State Cert# CRC 049564





8-B 0 2010 STORM SPECIAL 0 THE ISLANDER


Survival tips to heed before a sto


Storm avengers caution that all coastal residents
should have a hurricane kit. What's in your kit?

Stocking up
Consider the hurricane kit the ultimate camping
package.
What to pack?
Emergency management experts recommend five
days worth of supplies, including:
Water bottles for drinking and gallon con-
tainers for washing.
Beverages.
Non-perishable foods ready-to-eat items.
Disposable utensils and plates.
Toiletries.
Additionally, experts recommend:
A full tank of gasoline in vehicles.
Cash, including a roll of quarters and small bills
for vending machines. Many vendors may not be able
to accept credit or ATM cards after a storm.
Important papers, such as birth certificates, pass-
ports, wills, address book, insurance documents.
Cooking pan.
Medication.
First-aid kit.
Small tools.
Pocket knife.
Flashlights.
Candles.
Matches.
Clothing.
Bedding.
Bathing supplies.
Trash bags.
Lawn chairs.
Games and toys.
Battery-powered radio and earphones.
Batteries.
Cleaning supplies.
Rubber gloves.
Florida road map.
Reading materials and The Islander hurricane
guide.


Lesson learned?
Be prepared
Storm damage to boats
can be a severe problem.
Not only are boats dam-
aged, but seawalls and
docks can suffer
the effect of the
vessel crashing and -
pushing from its
moorings. Islander
Photo: Jo Ann Meilner .


FAT 0A i
a;woum a Ff -o
778-2882 or 387-0607 O www.FatCatCarpetCleaning.com


Boaters brace against

wind, waves
Some tips and cautions for boaters during hur-
ricane season:
If a plan calls for moving vessels and there is
sufficient notice, a boater should relocate at least
48-72 hours before the hurricane is forecast to strike
the area.
Make sure fuel tanks are full, fuel filters are
clean, batteries are charged, bilges are clean, cockpit
drains are free and clear, fire-fighting equipment is
in good order and lifesaving equipment is in good
condition, in place and readily accessible.
Remove and/or secure deck gear, portable
gear, radio antennas, outriggers, fighting chairs, deck
boxes, Bimini tops and side canvas/curtains, sails,
boom, extra halyards, canister rafts and dinghies.
Make sure hatches, ports, doors, lazarettes and sail-


A large number of boats anchor to the south of
the Historic Bridge Street Pier in Bradenton
Beach. Islander Photo: Lisa Neff


Seabreeze Insurance
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--941778-8303


Quotes online 24 hours a day! Call 'til 10 pmr
Seabreeze Insurance LLC, 315 58th St., Suite F, Holmes Beach
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rm, long before


Know
where to
go and, if
ordered
to evacu-
ate, do so
e i l promptly.
Also
secure a
plan for
alternative
Lodging
and share
those plans
*.,t-, Dswith family
: members
or friends.



boat rudder are secured.
If a vessel is moored at a dock or a canal, in a
river or in a marina near the ocean, it is possible that
with an additional 5-10 feet or greater storm surge,
the vessel could take a beating against the dock or
even impale itself on pilings.
The best offshore mooring for a vessel to ride
out a storm is in the center of a canal or narrow river
where at least doubled mooring lines can be secured
to both shores, port and starboard, fore and aft.
Do not raft vessels together at moorings or
docks, especially if larger and smaller vessels are
involved. The probability of damage to the vessels
is greater than if they are moored singly.
If the vessel must remain dockside at a private
dock or marina, heavy-duty fender boards should be
used on a bare-wood center piling. Lines should be
doubled and even tripled in length where necessary
to hold a vessel in the center of a berth or off seawall
or dock pilings.
Do not stay aboard a vessel during a hurri-
cane.
Sources: National Hurricane Center, Florida
Division of Emergency Management, American Boat-
ing Association.

Linking up...




NOAA storm tracker: www.stormtracker.noaa.
gov.
NOAA hurricane hunters: www.aoc.noaa.
gov.
National Climatic Data Center: www.ncdc.
noaa.gov/oa/climate/severeweather/hurricanes.
html.
FEMA: www.fema.gov/hazard/hurricane/.
National Flood Insurance Program: www.
floodsmart.gov.
National Hurricane Center: http://www.nhc.
noaa.gov/.
U.S. Coast Guard storm center: www.uscg.mil/
news/stormcenter/.
Tropical Meteorological Project: tropical.atmos.
colostate.edu/Forecasts/.
Weather Underground: www.wunderground.
com/tropical/.
Manatee County Emergency Management:
www.mymanatee.org
Florida Division of Emergency Management:
www.floridadisaster.org.

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