Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074389/00266
 Material Information
Title: Islander (Anna Maria, Fla. : 1992)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Creator: Islander
Publisher: Bonner Joy
Place of Publication: Anna Maria Island, FL
Publication Date: September 2, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Manatee -- Anna Maria
Coordinates: 27.530278 x -82.734444 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074389
Volume ID: VID00266
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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WATCH OUT FOR KIDS BACK TO SCHOOL!


Kennedy's service.
Page 28




Skimming
the news...


Island tourism defies
national trends.
Page 4
Op/ed: The Island-
er's opinion, readers'
opinions. Page 6
WMFR budget
approved. Page 7
Holmes Beach panel
reviews draft flood-
plain plan. Page 8





Tampa tops Sarasota
on scallop count.
Page 10
Port Dolphin dead-
line extended.
Page 11


Police reports.
Page 12



What to do and when
to do it. Page 17


Islander takes second
in National Senior
Games. Page 18


By Paul Roai
Water quality, from
nearshore to taps.
Page 20

Fishing: September
brings snook season.
Page 21

Island Biz: New
starts, new honors.
Page 22


Sidewalk to


improve safety


at intersection
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Residents near the intersection of Cortez
Road and Gulf Drive recall seeing baby car-
riages bump along on the grass.
Walkers recall seeing vehicles swerve
too close to pedestrians for comfort.
And city hall officials recall many calls
for a sidewalk along the north side of Cortez
Road west of the bridge, and an improved
sidewalk along the east side of Gulf Drive
from Cortez Road south to Second Street
North.
Safety issues drove the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation to plan sidewalk
improvements near the busy intersection.
"Pedestrians would often utilize the right-
hand turn lane on northbound Gulf Drive for
eastbound Cortez traffic and the hope is this
project will alleviate this safety concern," said
DOT spokesperson Cindy Clemmons.
Last week, a crew with Loving Con-
struction, contractor for the Florida Depart-
ment of Transportation, began constructing
a new sidewalk along Cortez Road.
Work will continue on Gulf Drive from
Cortez Road to Second Street North.
"It's going to be beautiful," said Mayor
Michael Pierce, who began lobbying for side-
walk improvements about two years ago.
Width of the sidewalk will vary, based
on available right of way, from 3 feet to 6
feet.
"On Cortez it is 6 feet and on Gulf Drive
it varies from 3 feet to 6 feet," Clemmons
said.
The work, estimated to cost $78,000,
will be completed in mid-October, weather
-permitting.


Mom Sonya Light of Bradenton pushes
Elisha, 2, while Kailee, 7, and Ava, 3, power
themselves on a new swing set at Manatee
Public Beach. The playground equipment
was installed Aug. 18. By Aug. 19, it had
been tested repeatedly. Islander Photos:
Lisa Neff


Ava Light, 3, swings on the newly installed
swing set at Manatee Public Beach.


Race for HB


commission


begins
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Five people are vying for Holmes Beach
City Commission.
The election will play like a game of musi-
cal chairs two people will be left standing,
with no seat at the dais. Voters on Nov. 3 will
elect three people from the field of five to two-
year terms.
To qualify, candidates paid a filing fee
of $60 for a commission seat and collected
15 voter signatures on a petition, along with
providing a residency affidavit.
The qualifying period for the Nov. 3 elec-
tion in Holmes Beach opened Aug. 24 and
closed at noon on Aug. 28. The qualifying
periods do not open until September in the
other Island cities.
Incumbents Pat Geyer, Pat Morton and
David Zaccagnino qualified. In the Novem-
ber 2007 election, they were returned to office
unopposed.
Andrew E. Sheridan of Key Royale is a
fourth candidate, a newcomer in municipal
elections, but a frequent attendee at commis-
sion meetings who said he is interesting in
improving city government.
Sheridan, vice president of the Key Royale
Resident Owners Association, has lived in
Holmes Beach six years and is in training to
sell insurance. He has been an auto sales and
a limo company manager, as well as worked
as a pool technician and for Publix.
And Al Robinson, a fifth candidate,
describes himself as a thrifty person who
thinks city government spends too much.
Robinson, a former owner of D Coy Ducks
who now works in the real estate/investment
market, unsuccessfully ran for a seat on the
West Manatee Fire Rescue District Commis-
sion in 2008.
Before moving to the Island in 1993,
Robinson, who earned a master's degree in
safety from West Virginia University, was a
coal mine owner/operator in West Virginia.
Geyer, the owner of Duffy's Tavern and a
PLEASE SEE ELECTION, NEXT PAGE


JInside this week:
The Islander guide

to vacationing ...


AhkMaiaMan


A construction crew Aug. 25 readies the ground along the north side of Cortez Road in
Bradenton Beach for a new sidewalk. Islander Photo: Lisa Neff


VOLUME 17, NO. 43


SEPT. 2, 2009




2 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 THE ISLANDER


Qualifying in September for other Island cities


The qualifying dates for those seeking to run in
Bradenton Beach are from noon Sept. 14 to noon
Sept. 18.
In addition to the mayoral post held by Michael
Pierce, two commission seats are open the Ward
3 seat held by Janie Robertson, who plans to seek

Election qualifying ends in 1 city
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
resident of Holmes Beach for more than four decades,
has held repeated terms as commissioner and as
mayor from 1990 to 1994.
In 2006, after losing a campaign for the commis-
sion, she was appointed to fill a vacancy on the board
created by Rich Bohnenberger's resignation from the
commission and his election to mayor. In 2007, Geyer
ran unopposed.
Zaccagnino, who works for Morgan Stanley as a
financial advisor, is seeking a third term on the com-
mission.
He currently serves as the commission liaison to
the city parks and beautification committee, as well
as the police pension board.
In addition to serving on the commission, he is
involved in a number of local groups, including the
Island Democratic Club and the Rotary Club of Anna
Maria Island.
Morton, the campus manager for Crosspointe
Fellowship in Holmes Beach, is seeking a fourth
term on the commission. He lives in Holmes Beach
with his wife and has been on the Island for about 15
years.
Morton has served as the liaison for the commis-
sion to Waste Management Inc., the company con-
tracted to haul garbage and recyclables from Holmes
Beach.
He also is the city liaison to the Island committee
established to promote the state-supported Communi-
ties For a Lifetime initiative.


re-election, and the Ward 1 seat held by John Shaugh-
nessy, who cannot run due to the city-established term
limit. Gay Breuler of the 2600 block of Gulf Drive is
an active candidate in Ward 1.
Pierce will run for mayor and former Commis-
sioner Bill Shearon is planning to run also.
The qualifying dates for those seeking to run for
office in Anna Maria are from noon Sept. 1 to noon
Sept. 15.
Commission seats currently held by John Quam,
Christine Tollette and Dale Woodland are up, and all


three incumbents have announced plans to run again,
while Mark Alonso and David Gryboski plan also to
run for a seat.
In Anna Maria and Bradenton Beach, a candidate
can qualify for commission by payment of an elec-
tion assessment fee equal of $48 and collecting 10
signatures of voters residing in the city, as well as
filing a candidate's residency affidavit. A candidate
may also file an "undue burden" oath to eliminate the
fee, then file 10 petition signatures of voters residing
in the city and a residency affidavit.


FISH expansion
Florida Institute For Saltwater Heritage members unanimously agreed to purchase four lots belonging to
the Cortez Church of God on 123rd Street Court West, near the Cortez Community Center/Firehouse. The
property has a price tag of $245,000. According to Cortez Historic Sites Manager Roger Allen, the par-
sonage on the land will continue to be rented to tenants, the Sunday school space will become a multi-use
area and the general space used for weddings and other general-use facilities. The parking lot was the gem
of the acquisition, Allen said. Manatee River Community Bank was instrumental in the FISH purchase.
Islander Photo: Paul Roat


Weekly Wine Tastings Every Thursday in Our Garden Courtyard on the Bay


Now Accepting Reservations for Inside Seating
V VI
Norhen ip fi nn- Mri Ilad unh:EvryDa 1:3am4:0
Acos rmTh iy irDinr SnTur :0p-p


2008 Ben Gullett


Mullet Invitational


Sept. 11-12





Two-person team: Entry fee $150

Juniors $50.
Mandatory Captain's Meeting: 6pm, Sept. 10
at Star Fish Company Restaurant.
Tournament Sept. 11-12
Awards Dinner 6pm, Sept. 12
at Star Fish Company Restaurant.
Sponsored by the Gullett Family







and
The Islander

Register at www.cortezvillage.org

info: 813.633.0442 or

941.779.6693





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 3


Anna Maria surprise: commissioners can't agree


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Like the political football it is, an ordinance
allowing duplexes in Anna Maria to be allowed some
expansion just can't seem to pass muster when pre-
sented to the city commission.
The issue has been passed back and forth between
the commission and the planning and zoning board
more times than Brett Favre's pass completions last
week.
The commission wanted suggestions, the board
gave suggestions, the commission wanted more sug-
gestions and the board responded in kind.
At the commission's Aug. 27 meeting, commis-
sioners again could not agree on all the latest P&Z
board suggestions, which include allowing expansion
of duplexes from 35 percent of lot coverage to 40
percent, allowing expansion of kitchens, living rooms
and bathrooms, but not allowing any additional bed-
rooms.
Any expansion would be on a one-time basis,
according to the proposed ordinance prepared by city
planner Alan Garrett.
If approved, the additional footage would be 250
square feet for a 5,000 square-foot lot and 325 square
feet for a 7,500 square-foot lot.
Commissioner Chuck Webb, however, suggested
the commission simply allow vertical expansion.
Because of Federal Emergency Management Agency
restrictions on upward expansion of existing single-
family structures, building upward is limited, Webb
indicated.
But Commissioner Jo Ann Mattick was concerned
about not allowing an additional bedroom. She said
permanent residents in duplexes should be allowed
to add another bedroom. Any single-family home in
the Residential-1 zone is allowed to add additional
bedrooms, as long as the expansion meets city code,
she said.
"I don't favor the 40 percent rule, but I would
favor vertical expansion because of the limitations,"
she said.
Commissioner Dale Woodland also was opposed
to horizontal expansion. He said that an expanded
living room or television room could easily become
a bedroom.
Commission Chairman John Quam said allow-
ing any duplex expansion might be "opening a can
of worms."
"How can you enforce the rules?" he asked.
City planner Alan Garrett responded that the city
would have a difficult time with enforcement.
"But remember, these are just starting points in
the ordinance," he said.
Commissioner Christine Tollette favored keeping
the duplexes "on the ground," but said she also wants
to "keep our city the way it is and keep our one-story
cottages."
The problem with that, said developer Mike
Coleman, is that speculators will wait until the value
of a one-story duplex falls so low that he or she can
buy it cheap, scrape it off the foundation and build a
house that is three stories high two livable floors
over parking.
When Quam suggested the ordinance be for-
warded for a second public hearing, Woodland said


that's "not a good idea when we can't make up our
minds on anything in the ordinance."
Indeed. If no horizontal expansion is allowed,
there's no need for an ordinance as "we are right back
to where we started," said Woodland.
Under the land development regulations for the
R-1 district, one-story homes, including duplexes,
are allowed to expand upward.
Garrett pointed out that the 2007 comprehensive
plan encouraged single-family homes, but eliminated
the zoning for duplexes. The city eventually com-
bined the Residential-2 zone with the R-1.
The 65 duplexes currently developed in the city
are "grandfathered," but considered non-conforming
by the comp plan and the new R-1 zone, he said. Prior
to passage of the comp plan, those duplexes were
conforming structures.
"We have a comp-plan policy issue," Garrett
said.
The public seemed divided on the issue.
City resident Ray Sackett, who lives in a duplex
unit with his wife and five children, favored allow-
ing duplexes to expand upward, but Robin Wall of
Palmetto Avenue said she was opposed to any expan-
sion.
Commissioners eventually agreed to have the
ordinance brought to its September workshop for
more discussion.

Boat slips
The commission passed the first reading of an
ordinance allowing boat slips that are accompanied
by platted lots to be allowed water and electricity
hookups.
Six such lots near the Anna Maria Island Com-
munity Center were platted in the 1950s as boat slip
lots, but not accompanied by a single-family resi-
dence.
The city ordinance passed in the 1980s requires
a boat slip to be accompanied by a single-family
home.
Attorney Scott Rudacille, representing a client
who owns four unplatted lots near Galati Marine on
South Bay Boulevard, asked that the commission
include those four lots in the ordinance, but Wood-
land said he wanted to "just stick with platted lots"
for the present.
"I don't want to go there. We'll deal with that at
a later time," he said.
In other business, commissioners approved the
first reading of an ordinance revising the city's flood-
plain restrictions. Building official Bob Welch said
the revisions are needed for the city to maintain its
current level of discounts for flood insurance. The
city at present has a Level 5 rating, which gives hom-
eowners a 25 percent discount on flood insurance
premiums.

Bayfest
The Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce
requested a special event permit for Bayfest, a two-
day event.
The chamber asked for the permit for the event
dates of Oct. 16-17.
Chamber president Mary Ann Brockman said
the application was late to the city because she and

Butt out
Anna Maria Mayor Fran
Barford, left, presents a proc-
lamation to Ingrid McClellan
of Keep Manatee Beautiful
and Carol Angiolilo, right, of
the Manatee County Parks
and Recreation Department,
announcing that August is
Cigarette Litter Prevention
Month. KAIIB and the depart-
ment recently installed bins for
cigarette butts at beach loca-
tions on the Island, including
16 at Bayfront Park in Anna
Maria. Islander Photo: Rick
Catlin


the organizing committee had to pre-arrange quali-
fied volunteers to sell alcohol and have the required
alcoholic beverage permits.
The commission approved the request.

City pier
Mayor Fran Barford said engineers last week
completed a structural inspection of the city pier and
she'll present the report as soon as it is available.
In addition, Barford said she will meet with the
city pier operators in October to discuss renegotiation
of the contract, which expires in the near future.

City boundary
Barford said she expects to have a new boundary
agreement between Anna Maria and Manatee County
just as soon as a boundary survey is completed.
The county commission has agreed to change
the boundary to allow some of the waters adjacent
to Anna Maria to be within the city limits.
Those include the waters around the city pier,
Rod & Reel Pier, Bean Point and Bimini Bay, among
others.



Meetings

Anna Maria City
Sept. 9, 6:30 p.m., budget hearing.
Sept. 10, 7 p.m., city commission work ses-
sion.
Sept. 15, 6:30 p.m., planning and zoning
board meeting.
Sept. 22, 5:30 p.m., final budget hearing.
Sept. 24, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Anna Maria City Hall, 10005 Gulf Drive, 941-
708-6130, www.cityofannamaria.com.

Bradenton Beach
Sept. 3, 1 p.m., pier team meeting.
Sept. 3, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Sept. 9, 7 p.m., budget hearing.
Sept. 14, 3 p.m., ScenicWAVES meeting.
Sept. 17, 1 p.m., city commission meeting.
Sept. 23, 7 p.m., budget hearing.
Sept. 29, 1 p.m., city commission work meet-
ing.
Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive N.,
941-778-1005, www.cityofbradentonbeach.org.

Holmes Beach
Sept. 9, 6 p.m., city commission budget hear-
ing.
Sept. 9, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Sept. 17, 10 a.m., code enforcement board
meeting.
Sept. 22, 7 p.m., city commission meeting.
Sept. 24, 9 a.m., board of adjustment meeting.
Holmes Beach City Hall, 5801 Marina Drive,
941-708-5800, www.holmesbeachfl.org.

West Manatee Fire Rescue District
Sept. 17, 6 p.m., district commission meeting.
WMFR Station No. 1, 6001 Marina Drive,
Holmes Beach, 941-741-3900.

Of Interest
Through Sept. 15, noon, qualifying period
for city commission candidates in Anna Maria.
Sept. 2, 9 a.m., Communities For a Lifetime
Meeting at the Anna Maria Island Community Cen-
ter, 407 Magnolia Ave., Anna Maria.
Sept. 7, Labor Day, with most government
offices and many businesses closed for the holiday.
Sept. 14, noon-Sept. 18, noon, qualifying
period for city commission candidates and mayoral
candidates in Bradenton Beach.
Sept. 16, 2 p.m., Barrier Island Elected Of-
ficials meeting, Bradenton Beach City Hall.
Sept. 21, 2:30 p.m., Island Transportation
Planning Organization meeting, Holmes Beach
City Hall.- CANCELED
Send notices to Lisa Neff at lisaneff@islander.
org.





4 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 THE ISLANDER


Island population stable, homesteads down


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
Anna Maria Mayor Fran Barford was somewhat
surprised recently to learn a University of Florida
study found the population of Anna Maria declined
between 2008 and 2009.
The study said Anna Maria lost 42 people this
year compared with 2008, while Bradenton Beach
gained nine and Holmes Beach seven.
Barford questioned the study, noting the number
of building permits issued in 2008 was up from 2007,
and 2009 permits are ahead of last year.
"I was surprised by the figures. They don't match
ours. If there's been a decline, we haven't seen it out
here," she said.
Barford said she also questioned the study
because it is at odds with the official U.S. Census
Bureau's 2008 population statistics for the city.
The Census Bureau reported Anna Maria had a
2008 population of 1,829, up just 14 from the official
2000 census figure of 1,814.
The current Census Bureau figures also show
both Holmes Beach and Bradenton Beach have
gained population since 2000.
Holmes Beach had a population of 4,966 in
2000 compared with 5,017 recorded by the bureau
in 2008. Bradenton Beach had 1,482 people in the
2000 census, while 1,553 were recorded as living in
the city at the end of 2008.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Anna
Maria Island gained 137 people between 2000 and
2008, an increase of 1.5 percent. The 2000 census
recorded an Island population of 8,262, and 8,399 at
the end of 2008.
"The population of our city and the Island has
been fairly stable for a number of years," said Barford.
"I have to question the accuracy of that study."
Figures available from the U.S. Census Bureau
appear to indicate the Island's population has been
stable since 2002.
A story in the Nov. 26, 2003, issue of The Islander
reported the U.S. Census Bureau had 2002 population


figures for Island cities with 2008 figures in paren-
thesis, as follow:
Holmes Beach 5,008 [5,017].
Anna Maria 1,829 [1,838].
Bradenton Beach 1,500 [1,553].
Based on the 2002 Census Bureau figures,
Holmes Beach gained nine people in seven years,
while Anna Maria lost nine people and Bradenton
Beach gained 53 people.
Barford has good reason to question the study's
population figures, particularly with the 2010 census
due next year.
Many federally funded projects are based on popu-
lation numbers. A decline in population means a drop
in federal dollars, while an increase could mean more
federal money. Official population figures are derived
by the U.S. Census, which is done every 10 years.

Island homesteads shrink
While Anna Maria Island's population appears
to have increased slightly since 2003, the percent-
age of homestead exemptions compared with the
number of residential units has decreased during
that period, possibly indicating more are being
built or sold as either rental property or a part-
time residence.
According to the Manatee County property
appraiser's office, the 2008 number of home-
steaded properties in Island cities and the number
of available single-family residences are:


According to the data, Holmes Beach gained
the most rental and part-times residences the past
six years with 469 more single-family residences in
the city since 2003, but an increase of just 13 home-
steads.
Islandwide, only 31.6 percent less than
one in three single-family residences are cur-
rently occupied by a full-time resident that claims a
homestead exemption. In 2003, the ratio of home-
stead exemptions to single-family homes was 33.4
percent.
Anna Maria City Commissioner Dale Wood-
land, who grew up in the city, said he's not really
concerned for now that more and more residences
are apparently becoming rental units or vacation
homes.
"Even when I was a kid, we had people from
Lakeland who bought homes for part-time use," he
said.
But Woodland agreed that, considering the
economy, more residences than ever are being con-
verted to rental homes. And investment homes have
always been a large part of the city's economy and
the Island's.
"People want to buy in Anna Maria and on the
Island. They always have," Woodland said.
While he's not concerned for the "short-term,"
Woodland said he'd like to hear if residents are wor-
ried about a trend in the home market.
"We're still more than 40 percent homesteaded
and we're not losing population," he said.
Holmes Beach Mayor Rich Bohnenberger
said that as the city's population ages, more
homes are being converted to investment prop-
erties rather than homesteaded. That's an indi-
cation that homes built in the past five years
have been purchased as investments, not for
residency.
"We're in a state of flux. We're losing home-
steaded homes, but we've gained a little in popula-
tion. Considering the economy, it's just the nature
of real estate," he said.


Island tourism defying national trends


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
At a time when the national economy is still in a
recession and tourism nationally and at many Florida
destinations is down as much as 20 percent, Anna
Maria Island is bucking the trend.
Accommodation occupancy on the Island was up
in July and expected to be better this August than last
year. And at least one restaurant owner's business is
booming.
"Our country is in its worst recession in years,
yet Anna Maria Island is defying the odds," said res-
taurant owner Ed Chiles.
Chiles, who owns the Sandbar Restaurant in
Anna Maria, the Mar Vista on Longboat Key, and
the BeachHouse in Bradenton Beach, said he's not
surprised that the Island is doing well, while destina-
tions such as Orlando are suffering.
"People realize the value they get here, and what
they get. They no longer want the Ritz-Carlton or the
Marriott. They want the real Florida at a decent price
and value and that's what they get on the Island.
"It's been an amazing summer," he said. All three
restaurants did a "phenomenal business," he said, and
indications are the fall and winter season will con-
tinue that trend.
National and international publicity about the
Island is having its effect, he said, and the wedding
business, virtually unknown on the Island a few
years ago, has grown to become a market segment
of its own that's bringing in visitors with disposable
incomes.
"It's good business for everyone on the Island,"
he said.
Manatee County Tourist Development Council
member David Teitelbaum, who owns the SeaSide,
Tradewinds and Tortuga resorts in Bradenton Beach,
agreed that the wedding industry has really aided the


Island economy.
He also observed that Island tourism this past
summer has been boosted by the Florida market,
which accounts for nearly 30 percent of all Island
visitors.
"Times are tough nationally," said Teitelbaum.
"The Island has been very lucky. Nationwide,
tourism is down, but Anna Maria Island has survived
because this is the real Florida and very convenient
for people from Orlando and Tampa. They can drive
here in a few hours. We're seeing more and more
bookings from those areas."
And, while September might be considered a
"breather" month before the winter season, many
accommodation and property managers are reporting
that reservations are ahead of last year at this time.
"It's looking very good," said Angela Rodocker
of the BridgeWalk Resort on Bridge Street in Bra-
denton Beach.
"We had a very good August and September is
ahead of last year. I'm very optimistic. And don't
forget our European visitors. They will be here in
September and October."
Likewise for the vacation rental market, said
Susan Brinson of Anna Maria Island Accommoda-
tions.
"We're ahead of last September and we've
already gotten some good reservations for October
and November. It's true that September is tradition-
ally the slowest month of the year, but people are still
coming. We are definitely busier than last year at this
time," she said.
With September looking bright for the Island, it
comes on the heels of August, which might have set
a record for Island tourism.
"I expect the August occupancy figures to be very
good," said Anna Maria Island Chamber of Com-
merce president Mary Ann Brockman.


"We've had no complaints. The first half of
August was great. Everyone was booked. There was
no drop-off in business. The families were back," she
said.
When Florida public schools reopened in late
August, however, the market slowed, she said.
But the start of the winter season is just around
the corner.
"We'll start seeing familiar people in early to
mid-October," Brockman said. "It will be good to
see them return."
She agreed that visitors from Florida are "dis-
covering" the Island, particularly during the summer
months.
A recent survey for the Bradenton Area Conven-
tion and Visitors Bureau reported that 28.4 percent of
visitors to the Island are from Florida, and the number
of Florida visitors is increasing in every BACVB
survey.
"We're getting a tremendous number of visitors
from Orlando, Tampa, St. Petersburg and Lakeland,"
Brockman said.
But one segment of the visitor market is really
booming, and that is weddings.
Rodocker said a few years ago, the resort did
not even market to weddings, there were so few of
them.
"Now, it's a different story," she said.
"We've gotten so many wedding parties that we
market BridgeWalk to brides and grooms. And it's
working. The wedding business is really helping us
and benefits the entire Island."
Teitelbaum also sees the wedding market expand-
ing on the Island.
From maybe 100 weddings annually a few years
ago, Teitelbaum estimated that there will be more
than 700 Island weddings in 2009, and the figure
PLEASE SEE TOURISM, NEXT PAGE


2008:
City
Anna Maria
Bradenton Beach
Holmes Beach

2003:
City
Anna Maria
Bradenton Beach
Holmes Beach


SFR
1,560
1,796
4,096


SFR
1,472
1,491
3,627


Homesteads
653
315
1,387


Homesteads
629
203
1,374


Percent
41.8
17.5
33.9


Percent
43
17.6
37





THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 5


Island pace quickens


on Net


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
The going is slow on Anna Maria
streets, but the city rates among the
highest in Manatee County for Internet
connection speeds.
So do the rates for Holmes Beach
and Bradenton Beach.
The ratings were provided with
the release of a national report from
Communication Workers of America
called "Speed Matters: Affordable
High Speed Internet for America."
Anna Maria's download speed, 6.7
megabits per second, is better than the
state average and the national aver-
age.
The rates for Holmes Beach and
Bradenton Beach also are 6.7 mega-
bits.
The report puts Florida at No. 18 in
a ranking of states for Internet access
download speed. The Sunshine State
ranked 13th a year ago.
The average Internet download
speed in Florida is 5.7 megabits per
second compared to the national aver-
age of 5.1 megabits per second.
Delaware ranked No. 1, averaging
9.9 megabits per second, and Alaska
ranked No. 50.
From an international perspective,
the United States ranks 28th.
"The results of this third annual
speedmatters.org survey of Internet
speeds show that the U.S. has not
made significant improvement in the
speeds at which residents connect to
the Internet. Our nation continues to
fall far behind other countries," the
report stated.
Higher speeds mean the casual
Internet user can ship files, including
photographs, faster, or higher quality
display for streaming videos.
But, according to the report, higher
speeds also lead to economic growth
and technological innovation.
"We need high-speed Internet
for our homes, schools, hospitals and
workplaces," the report stated. "Speed
defines what is possible on the Inter-
net. It determines whether we will have
the 21st century networks we need to
create the jobs of the future, develop
our economy, and support innovations

Tourism
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4

could top 1,000 in 2010.
And wedding parties plan ahead.
"We' re getting a lot of bookings
for weddings in January and early
February and that's unusual," he said.
"January is normally very slow, but not
this coming year."
Teitelbaum credited the success of
the annual wedding festival with the
increase in bookings for January and
February.
The next festival is Feb. 28 and
Teitelbaum expects more than 1,000
people to attend. The 2009 event drew
about 750 people."
"I think the Island is now a very
hot market for weddings, especially for
couples from Florida," he said.
Anna Maria Island has been fea-
tured as a vacation destination in a
number of national media stories the


in telemedicine, education, public
safety, e iK. i .' conservation and public
services to improve our lives and com-
munities.
\lo,' U.S. Internet connections
today are not fast enough in both direc-
tions to permit interactive home-based
medical monitoring, multi-media dis-
tance learning or to send and receive
data to run a home-based business."


past year and wedding Web sites and
publications have praised its amenities
and scenery.
"It's all been good for the Island,"
said Teitelbaum, "but the wedding
market looks like it's becoming a key
segment of our business. And wed-
dings benefit everybody."
Chiles said the increase in wed-
dings surely has helped the Island
through the economic hard times.
"Our wedding numbers continue
to go up, as have everyone else's. The
weddings keep a lot of people in busi-
ness and I'm positive we are going
to have a great winter season and the
wedding parties will be a significant
portion of that business."
Chiles said as long as the Island
maintains its old Florida look, the wed-
ding parties will keep coming.
"We have what nobody else in
Florida has," he said. "We've got the
real Florida."


Island hot

spots for

computer

users
The surfing is free and easy
on the Internet at The Islander,
5404 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.
Other free hot spots on the
Island:
Melinda's Cafe & Cater-
ing, 5315 Gulf Drive, Holmes
Beach.
Island Branch Library,
5701 Marina Drive, Holmes
Beach.
Ginny's and Jane E's at
the Old IGA, 9807 Gulf Drive,
Anna Maria.
Feeling Swell, 9903 Gulf
Drive, Anna Maria.
Tingley Memorial Library,
111 Second St. N., Bradenton
Beach.
Back Alley Cafe, 121
Bridge St., Bradenton Beach.
The Islander is compil-
ing a list of locations offering
free wireless Internet service to
computer users on the Island.
If you offer this convenience,
please, e-mail reporter Lisa
Neff at lisaneff@islander.org,
and include a name and tele-
phone number with the location
of the hot spot and a password
if needed.





6 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 THE ISLANDER



1111011


What's a number?
Numbers are up. Numbers are down. Numbers
are important.
The economy, based on the numbers is down.
AMI tourism, by the math, is up. And some say it's
weddings that are pushing it up, up, up. From meager
numbers of nuptials 10 years ago Island family
events, mostly at churches and homes to today's
trend in beachfront festivities.
Now it's a come-from-afar affair in which bride
and groom, wedding party members, friends and family
all stay on the Island, sometimes sharing large rental
accommodations, while the parties are on the Island, the
vows are recited on the beach and the wedding celebra-
tion is a cherished memory and a vacation in one one
that nearly everyone wants to repeat.
It's kicked up a notch the resort atmosphere to
cater to these one-time, sometimes mega-produc-
tion events. Of course, some are small, discreet and
unnoticed. But others avail of Island businesses and
services and have contributed greatly to maintaining
what could have been a fragile business environment
if not for this influx of spending.
Lest we forget, long before there was a city of
Anna Maria, some enterprising individuals envi-
sioned a tourist Mecca here, bringing potential buyers
by ferry from Tampa for a sample of their vision.
The marriage of AMI and tourism started with
the Anna Maria Beach Company in the early 1900s.
This week, The Islander contributes its take on
vacationing in paradise, with the hope to increase
the numbers of visitors, help them see AMI "like a
native" and regain what our Island economy lost in
real estate dollars.
Yes, on the other side of numbers that are grow-
ing, growing, growing, are the figures that disappoint.
We have a loss of homestead residences in spite of
a growing number of homes and condos a net
loss of voters, full-time taxpayers and students at the
elementary school.
After the swell and crash of the real estate market,
however, we now have something positive to rely on.
The census may say our numbers are down, but
we strive to maintain the reasons we came here.
So let's all toast the new economic engine: the
beachfront wedding capital of the world. And thank
photographer Jack Elka for lighting the spark.
We all share one common thread.
One. Just a number?
One thing we agree on: We love Anna Maria
Island. And that's "a marriage made in heaven."

f l ^ ^ "' I i-._ |j. .. -ii,- -


V Publisher and Editor
Bonner Joy, bonner@islander.org .:
V Editorial .-t
R Diana Bogan, diana@islander.org
Kevin Cassidy, kevin@islander.org
Kimberly Kuizon, kimberly@islander.org
Rick Calin, rick@islander org .
Jack Egan "
JacKEElka "
Molly S. McCartney
-- Lisa Neff. copy editor, lisaneff@islanderorgf
Y Contributors
Jesse Brisson
I Edna Tiemann
Mike Quinn, NewsManatee.com
S,479Advertising Sales
SRebecca Barnett, rebecca@islander.org
Toni Lyon, toni@islander.org
S Accounting Services
Courtney Call, courtney@islander.org
V Production Graphics
Jon Sachtjen, ads@islander.org
S Classifieds & Subscriptions
Lisa Williams, classifieds@islanderorg
subscriptions@islander.org
S Distribution "AF ,
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts -Q' .
Lisa Williams. ,
Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
O 1992-2009 Editorial, sales and production offices:.
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217*=
WEB SITE: www.islander.org
PHONE 941-778-7978 toll-free fax 1-866-362-9821


p


"Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"















I.I R





^Opnio0_


Pipeline opposition
I wish to go on record as opposing the natural gas
pipeline proposed by Port Dolphin Energy LLC off the
coast of Anna Maria Island in the Gulf of Mexico.
There has been a substantial amount of hype
being generated by the requester and its supporters
to generate favorable public opinion through touting
of all the financial benefits to the state of Florida that
this project will generate.
However, nowhere are the specifics detailed it
is all smoke. The construction and operations jobs
are not guaranteed to go to state residents nor are the
grandiose income and revenues that they project for
the State guaranteed by Dolphin iEnc i.'. They can
speculate all they want, but that does not produce
one red cent for the state.
They also proposed providing sand for renourishing
our beaches sooner than planned, but this is one time
only. Does this mean we will never need to renourish the
beaches again, ever? Hardly! We require a compatible
sand source forever, not one time only. This is critical to
the local communities and shorefront residents, as well
as to the threatened 1 '~ ili. id sea turtles that nest on
these beaches annually.
They downplay the possibilities of spills or con-
tamination from their project or subsequent opera-
tions, but will they commit to pay for any and all
cleanup required in the event of such occurrences?
Hardly!
Will they agree to make restitution to the State
and local communities for any lost revenue or income
from loss of tourists to our now pristine beaches in
the event of a spill or contamination caused by their
project and subsequent operations? Hardly!
Until we can receive legal and binding com-
mitments from Port Dolphin to step up to both their
claims of financial benefits and their future liabilities,
this project should not be considered for approval.
The "LLC" alone gives me great pause in expecting


this to ever occur. You bet their liability is limited,
but not their hype, or the damage they can do to the
state and to Anna Maria Island and our environs.
Pete Gross, Holmes Beach
Island of 'old'
As organizer of a benefit for my friend and former
co-worker at the Rod & Reel Pier Restaurant, I want to
thank everyone who donated, contributed and attended
the event held Aug. 11 to benefit Jenifer Chapman, who
is battling cancer with all her might.
Your generosity was overwhelming. Jen was over-
whelmed and speechless. The music was great, the
prizes were awesome, the staff at D.Coy Ducks were
terrific. The generosity of those attending was great.
So many people have commented to me since
the party that it brought back that "good old Island
feeling" of camaraderie and the support we have for
one another.
I'm deeply grateful, and I know Jen is, too.
Beth Reilly

Trashy acts
In these days of going paperless, going green and
being efficient, folks are losing their perspective on
just being kind and neighborly.
I guess this comes to trash, too.
People are looking out for themselves and what
works for them. Government, taxes and fees are not
to blame for their bad behavior.
Here in my neighborhood in Tampa, several
houses are empty. There are folks who take advantage
and leave discards in front of these empty houses for
trash pickup.
It is sad to hear this behavior is present on Anna
Maria Island. I wish you folks well in dealing with
this problem.
It's still my favorite, affordable trip, when I just
want to get away from Tampa.
Ricky Cooke, Tampa





6 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 U THE ISLANDER




1111011



What's a

number?
Numbers are up. Numbers are down. Numbers are
important.
The economy, based on the numbers, is down. AMI
tourism, based on the math, is up. And some say wed-
dings are pushing it up, up, up. From meager numbers
of nuptials 10 years ago family events mostly at
churches and homes to today's trend in beachfront
festivities.
Now weddings are come-from-afar affairs in which
the bride and groom, friends and relatives stay on the
Island, the parties are on the Island, the vows are recited
on the beach. The celebration is a cherished memory and
vacation in one.
Some of these weddings are small, discreet and go
unnoticed. Others rely on Island businesses and services
and have contributed gI .tl, 1 L maintaining the business
environment.
Lest we forget, long before there was a city of Anna
Maria, some enterprising individuals envisioned a tour-
ist mecca here, bringing potential buyers by ferry from
Tampa to see their vision.
The marriage of AMI and tourism started
with the Anna Maria Beach Company in the early
1900s.
This week, The Islander offers its take on vacation-
ing in paradise, hoping to increase the number of visi-
tors by helping them see AMI "like a native" and, in so
doing, regaining what our Island economy lost in real
estate dollars.
Yes, on the other side of numbers that are grow-
ing, gi'l, in'. gi'\ ing. are the figures that are dis-
appointing, disappointing, disappointing. We have
a loss of homestead residences in spite of increase
in the number of homes and condos. And a loss of
voters, full-time taxpayers and students at the elemen-
tary school.
After the swell and crash of the real estate market,
however, we now have something positive to rely on.
Some statistics may say our numbers are down, but
we strive to maintain the reasons we came here.
So let's toast the new economic engine: The beach-
front wedding capital of the world. And thank photog-
rapher Jack Elka for lighting the spark.
We share one common thread.
One. Just a number?
One thi ng u ; agree on: We love Anna Maria Island.
And that's a marriage made in heaven.


7.. & '. ,. .-.

V Publisher and Editor
:" Bonner Joy, bonner@islander.org
V Editorial -t .. .."-"
R Diana Bogan, diana@islander.org .
Kevin Cassidy, kevin@islander.org
Kimberly Kuizon, kimberly@islander.org
Rick Carlin, rick@islander org .
Jack Egan "
Jack Elka .'
Molly S. McCartney
--. Lisa Neff, copy editor, lisaneff@islanderorgf
V ". Contributors
Jesse Brisson
Edna Tieman
Mike Quinn, NewsManatee eom0
Y 7 *Advertising Sales a
SRebecca Barnett, rebecca@islander.org
Toni Lyon, toni@islander.org
S Accounting Services
Courtney Call, courtney@islander.org
V Production Graphicsl
Jon Sachtjen, ads@islander.org
S Classifieds & Subscriptions
Lisa Williams, classifieds@islandeorg
subscriptions@islander.org
V Distribution ", B ,
Urbane Bouchet
Ross Roberts .1.
Lisa Williams a i, t. l
Single copies free. Quantities of five or more: 25 cents each.
o 1992-2009 Editorial, sales and production offices:.
Island Shopping Center, 5404 Marina Drive
Holmes Beach FL 34217
WEB SITE: www.islander.org
PHONE 941-778-7978 toll-free fax 1-866-362-9821


Slick By Egan


Pipeline opposition
I wish to go on record as opposing the natural gas
pipeline proposed by Port Dolphin Energy LLC off the
coast of Anna Maria Island in the Gulf of Mexico.
There has been a substantial amount of hype
being generated by the requester and its supporters
to generate favorable public opinion through touting
of all the financial benefits to the state of Florida that
this project will generate.
However, nowhere are the specifics detailed it
is all smoke. The construction and operations jobs
are not guaranteed to go to state residents nor are the
grandiose income and revenues that they project for
the State guaranteed by Dolphin En~.i .,.'. They can
speculate all they want, but that does not produce
one red cent for the state.
They also proposed providing sand for renourishing
our beaches sooner than planned, but this is one time
only. Does this mean we will never need to renourish the
beaches again, ever? Hardly! We require a compatible
sand source forever, not one time only. This is critical to
the local communities and shorefront residents, as well
as to the threatened 1 ', ,. ilik.id sea turtles that nest on
these beaches annually.
They downplay the possibilities of spills or con-
tamination from their project or subsequent opera-
tions, but will they commit to pay for any and all
cleanup required in the event of such occurrences?
Hardly!
Will they agree to make restitution to the State
and local communities for any lost revenue or income
from loss of tourists to our now pristine beaches in
the event of a spill or contamination caused by their
project and subsequent operations? Hardly!
Until we can receive legal and binding com-
mitments from Port Dolphin to step up to both their
claims of financial benefits and their future liabilities,
this project should not be considered for approval.
The "LLC" alone gives me great pause in expecting


this to ever occur. You bet their liability is limited,
but not their hype, or the damage they can do to the
state and to Anna Maria Island and our environs.
Pete Gross, Holmes Beach
Island of 'old'
As organizer of a benefit for my friend and former
co-worker at the Rod & Reel Pier Restaurant, I want to
thank everyone who donated, contributed and attended
the event held Aug. 11 to benefit Jenifer Chapman, who
is battling cancer with all her might.
Your generosity was overwhelming. Jen was over-
whelmed and speechless. The music was great, the
prizes were awesome, the staff at D.Coy Ducks were
terrific. The generosity of those attending was great.
So many people have commented to me since
the party that it brought back that "good old Island
feeling" of camaraderie and the support we have for
one another.
I'm deeply grateful, and I know Jen is, too.
Beth Reilly

Trashy acts
In these days of going paperless, going green and
being efficient, folks are losing their perspective on
just being kind and neighborly.
I guess this comes to trash, too.
People are looking out for themselves and what
works for them. Government, taxes and fees are not
to blame for their bad behavior.
Here in my neighborhood in Tampa, several
houses are empty. There are folks who take advantage
and leave discards in front of these empty houses for
trash pickup.
It is sad to hear this behavior is present on Anna
Maria Island. I wish you folks well in dealing with
this problem.
It's still my favorite, affordable trip, when I just
want to get away from Tampa.
Ricky Cooke, Tampa




THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 7


$8.5 million WMFR district

budget approved


By Rick Catlin
Islander Reporter
The West Manatee Fire Rescue District board of
commissioners at its Aug. 27 public hearing unani-
mously approved Chief Andy Price's $8.573 million
budget proposal for 2009-10.
Of that amount, $5.204 million is the district's
operating budget, while $3.369 million is capital
reserve funding.
The total debt in the operating budget was esti-
mated to be $264,784, as of Oct. 1, 2009.
Capital reserve spending will include $82,500
for new equipment and facilities, $530,420 is allo-
cated to current facilities, including construction, and
$380,000 is scheduled for debt service.
Revenues are projected to decline $640,000 or
10.95 percent in 2009-10, resulting in cut backs in
several areas, including wages and benefits.
The $4.514 million allocated in the budget for
wages and benefits is down 5.24 percent from the
2008-09 figure of $4.764 million. To make up the
difference, Price said WMFR staff must pay a portion
of certain health care costs.
In other business, Price said the company hired
to study the district's facilities found "a few things
we didn't like" during its facilities inspection.
The report is still in process and Price said as
soon as the final product is completed and delivered
to him, he' 11 bring it to the board for in-depth discus-
sion.
The study is also looking at the needs of the dis-
trict for the next 20 years, Price said.
"We want to make sure you have relative infor-
mation to make a decision" on what facilities need
repairing or replacement.
Price also said that the motor on the WMFR fire


boat is out of service and cannot be repaired. Until
a new motor is purchased and installed, WMFR will
rely on backup response from Longboat Key and
Bradenton in the event a fire boat is needed for an
incident.

Cortez Bridge lane

closures coming in

September
Motorists who routinely use the Cortez Bridge
may want to plan a detour to and from Anna Maria
Island beginning Sept. 14.
The Florida Department of Transportation said
it will paint portions of the Cortez Bridge beginning
Sept. 14.
A DOT press release said the planned mainte-
nance will require some single-lane traffic with flag-
ging operations and short closures. To minimize the
impact on traffic, the DOT said lane closures will
occur between Sept. 14 and Oct. 5, while the entire
project is slated to finish in December.
FLi ,,, in operations will take place between 8
p.m. and 6 a.m., while bridge closures will be limited
to 11 p.m. to 5 a.m.
"The short closures will be required in order
to access certain areas of the moveable bridge. No
vehicular traffic delays will occur past Oct. 5, weather
permitting," the DOT pledged in the release.
"Imposed traffic delays are limited to approxi-
mately 5 minutes," the DOT said, along with a
reminder that drivers are "encouraged to drive safely
through the work zone."


We'd love to mail

you the news!
We mail The Islander weekly for a nominal $54 per year. It's the best way
to stay in touch with what's happening on Anna Maria Island. We've been pub-
lishing and mailing successfully since 1992!
We bring you all the news about three city governments, community happen-
ings, people features and special events ... even the latest real estate transactions
.. di w. il ing you need if your "heart is on the Island."
The Islander is distributed free locally. If you don't live here year-round, use
this form to subscribe for yourself or someone else. (Sorry, we do not suspend
mail subscriptions you get the news free while you're here!)
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THE BEST NEWS ON ANNA MARIA ISLAND SINCE 1992
Island Shopping Center 5404 Marina Drive Holmes Beach FL 34217
CHARGE BY PHONE 941.778.7978
ONLINE (secure server) www.islander.org
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STATE


In the Sept. 1, 1999, issue of
The Islander, headlines announced:
Holmes Beach police said they were looking for a
suspect who assaulted two young females in separate inci-
dents and burglarized their apartments. The first incident
took place July 9 in the 7100 block of Gulf Drive, while the
second occurred Aug. 7 in the 5600 block of Gulf Drive.
Neither female was injured in the incidents.
An engineer report said it would cost Anna
Maria $800,000 to completely restore the struc-
tural integrity of the city pier. The estimate included
replacement of decking, pilings, pier sub-structure
and the restaurant and bait shop.
Anthony Defeo, the former operator of the Anna
Maria Oyster Bar on the city pier, pleaded guilty to mail
fraud charges in federal court. Prosecutors said Defeo
used fraudulent financial statements to convince Oyster
Bar owner Phil Seay that he was worth $11 million. Those
statements allowed Defeo to take over restaurant opera-
tions at the Oyster Bar, the Anchorage Restaurant in Anna
Maria, and the Quay in Sarasota. Defeo never made any
rent payments and owed vendors more than $50,000.

TEMPS AIND) DROPS ON AMI
Date Low High Rainfall
Aug. 23 77 91 0
Aug. 24 77 92 0
Aug.25 74 '91 1.10
Aug. 26 74 91 .20
Aug. 27, 74 91 .20
Aug.28 75 89 1.10
Aug. 29 77 89 .50
Average Gulf water temperature 860
24-hour rainfall accumulation with reading at approximately 5 p.m. daily


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Live shrimp at the bait shop!


FA 1-3 Months: $54





8 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 THE ISLANDER


City to send waterfront policy to state


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
The Bradenton Beach City Commission approved
a series of waterfront-related policies to be folded
into the future land-use element in the city's com-
prehensive plan.
The commission approved the policies during
a single-item meeting Aug. 27. The planning and
zoning board recommended the policies Aug. 18.
The policies will be sent to the Florida Depart-
ment of Community Affairs for review as part of the
amendments in the city's evaluation and appraisal
report.
The policies affirm that "waterfront lands pro-
vide a link between land and water that is critical to
sustaining a diverse and ihi i ing coastal economy."
Noting a decline in working waterfronts in the
state, the proposal continues, "Loss of commercial
and recreational waterfront to residential develop-
ment and the relative diminishing access to boat
launch facilities may have a long-term adverse
impact on the quality of life. In addition, escalating
prices for coastal property make it difficult for local
governments to purchase new access points to meet
this growing demand."
The proposal also details a series of objectives
and policies to protect commercial and recreational
waterfronts, including:
Continuing to participate in the Waterfronts
Florida Partnership Program.
Partnering with Holmes Beach and Anna Maria
to protect and preserve existing marine-dependent
sites.
Preserving waterfront property through the pur-
chase of property or the purchase of development
rights.
Encouraging redevelopment that maintains or
expands commercial and recreational marine water-
front uses.
Creating a marine waterfront commercial land-
use category or overlay district.
Creating a commercial waterfront zoning dis-
trict.
Promoting a "no net loss" policy to make sure
the total amount of land devoted to commercial
marine services is not reduced.
Conditioning waterfront residential develop-
ers to preserve a portion of their sites for marinas or
public access.
Building official Steve Gilbert said a waterfront
element is required in the comp plan because the city
is a state-designated waterfront community.


Laurie Higgins:
Local Insurance Agent Willing to
Work Hard for Your Business
"My goal is to lower your insurance
premiums on health and life insurance.
I've saved many island families
thousands of dollars and I desire to d.:,
the same for you. I want your busire-::
and will go the extra mile to get it,
Please call for a fast, free, no-
obligation quote,"
Laurie Higgins
941-778-8303 Call til 9pm!
Seabreeze Insurance LLC
315 58th St. Suite F, Holmes Beach
www.seabreezeinsuranceonline.com


Additionally, Gilbert said the DCA wanted the
city to clarify some of its waterfront goals in the
EAR.
"A good deal of this document answers questions
regarding the mooring field," Gilbert said. He added,
"The other big thing that DCA wants us to do is to
protect access to the waterfronts."
Eventually the city will hold at least two hearings and
then transmit the EAR amendments to the comp plan.


Then the planning board will incorporate the
waterfront policies and other provisions into the land-
development code.
"I'm anticipating there will be some significant
discussions," Gilbert said.
Earlier this year, the city commission agreed to
hire a consulting firm, Wilson Miller, to help with
rewriting passages in the LDC in partnership with
the planning and zoning board.


Panel reviews draft floodplain plan


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Holmes Beach city officials are working to mini-
mize the minor inconveniences and major damages
that water can cause on a barrier island.
City officials are developing a floodplain man-
agement plan that could be adopted by October.
In addition to providing ideas to protect property
from flood waters, the drafting of the plan may result
in reduced flood insurance premiums for property
owners.
Holmes Beach participates in the National Flood
Insurance Program, which in part conducts a com-
munity scoring system that leads to discounts on pre-
miums.


PLANET STONE
Morblie & Gronite Inc


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All three Island cities participate in the national
program. On a scale of 1-10, Anna Maria's rating is
5, with a 25 percent discount for properties in what
FEMA designates a Special Flood Hazard Area, or the
100-year floodplain, and Bradenton Beach's rating is
6, with a 20 percent discount for SFHA properties.
Holmes Beach's current rating or class is 7, with a
15 percent discount.
City public works superintendent Joe Duennes
said the city has taken a number of steps to improve
its rating in the next audit by the Federal Emergency
Management Agency, which is scheduled for Octo-
ber.
One step still to take is the completion of a flood-
plain management plan.
On Aug. 25, city officials met with planning
PLEASE SEE FLOODPLAIN, NEXT PAGE


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The moor-
ing area in
Bradenton
Beach. City
commission-
ers on Aug.
27 approved
a waterfront
proposal as
part of a series
of amend-
ments to the
comprehensive
plan. Islander
Photo: Lisa
Neff






Floodplain plan under review
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

consultant Bill Brisson to review a first draft of the
plan.
Brisson said several sources make it "clear that
the hazards are all storm-related" in Holmes Beach.
A map in the plan shows the locations of 46 struc-
tures identified as repetitive loss properties due to
flooding, including 12 that have been demolished.
The many locations of repetitive loss properties
led Brisson to write in the document, "The entire
city, except for the Key Royale area, is considered
potentially subject to repetitive losses."
To address flood hazards, the city already has
implemented a master plan to improve drainage.
Brisson, in the plan, offered some other actions
the city might take, including using vacant lots for
water retention and reducing impervious-surface cov-
erage in the city's commercial district.
"The total coverage in the commercial district
is pretty high," Brisson said. "One possible alterna-
tive would be to look at reducing impervious-surface
coverage. For all practical purposes, you have about
100 percent coverage now."
Brisson said any reduced coverage would apply
to new developments or redevelopment.
Another possible action would be to increase the
amount of water retained on residential property, said


Mayor Rich Bohnenberger.
"You require retention of the first half-inch,"
Brisson said. "Other communities have increased
retention to the first inch.... Again, that's only with
development or redevelopment."
The installation of duckbill devices on city outfall
drainage pipes to prevent backflow was eliminated
as a possible action in the plan.
They are ineffective, said Bohnenberger, adding,
"I think we had a couple at one time down in the boat
basin and they sealed up."
The draft document also contains an overview
of past incidents that caused flooding in the city -
mostly slow-moving storms in the Gulf.
In September 1955, for example, a small slow-
moving hurricane made landfall on Florida's Gulf
Coast and flooded much of the Island, washing out
the beach road and eroding the beaches. In 1985,
Hurricane Elena stalled in the Gulf about 80 miles
off shore, causing severe erosion and high tides.
The list included 17 specific events. Brisson
asked city officials whether other incidents should
added, prompting City Commission Chair Sandy
Haas-Martens and Bohnenberger to recall a no-name
storm in March 1993 that sent salt spray as far as the
interstate highway.
Brisson said he would provide plan revisions to
the panel later this month and that he hoped to submit
the plan to the commission for approval in October.


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 9



Working


against water

All property in Holmes Beach falls within
a special flood hazard area.
With heavy rainfall in a short period along
with high tide, saltwater backs up in the city's
storm sewers and canal outfall pipes causing
flooding.
During this type of flooding, furniture and
other items generally suffer more damage than
structures.
Homeowner insurance policies do not
cover flood damage.
Federally backed mortgages must carry
flood insurance, and, the city advises, even
properties without a mortgage should be
insured for flooding.
Holmes Beach participates in the National
Flood Insurance Program, which presently pro-
vides city property owners with a 15 percent
discount on insurance premiums.
Tenants can buy content insurance cover-
age.


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A bald eagle rescued by a volunteer with Wildlife
Education and Rehabilitation Inc. of Bradenton
Beach is released in Sarasota.

Rescued eagle

released in Sarasota
Former state Sen. Lisa Carlton joined representa-
tives from the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey to
release a rescued and rehabilitated bald eagle Aug. 27.
The release took place at the Carlton Preserve in
Sarasota, with wildlife officials praising Carlton for
her support of the Florida Forever program.
"Audubon and eagles in Florida owe Ms. Carlton a
debt of gratitude for her great efforts toward conserva-
tion in Florida," a press statement on the release said.
Damen Hurd, a volunteer with Bradenton Beach-
based Wildlife Education and Rehabilitation Inc., res-
cued the eagle in April from the Sara Bay Golf and
Country Club in Sarasota.
Audubon EagleWatch volunteers monitoring the
nest at the club reported two sick eaglets that month.
The eaglets suffered avian pox, a viral infection spread
by mosquitoes. Pox is a naturally occurring infection,
so the volunteers let nature take its course.
Both eaglets fledged, but one was later found
dead on the golf course. The surviving fledgling then
was rescued and taken to the Audubon Center for
Birds of Prey, where months of treatment included
laser surgery by Dr. Robert Hess of Winter Park Vet-
erinary Hospital.


Tampa tops Sarasota

on scallop count
It was neck and neck in the great scallop race, but
Tampa took a significant lead in the end and passed
Sarasota by a ... bucket?
Tampa Bay Watch conducted a scallop search in
Tampa Bay waters last week, where more than 190
volunteers donned snorkels and searched the lower
bay for the blue-eyed mollusks. The count: 674, 50
more than 2008's total.
Sarasota Bay Watch, meanwhile, conducted a
scallop search a few weeks earlier in the bays from
the tip of Anna Maria Island to Venice. In Sarasota,
170 people counted 131 scallops, down from the
2008 total of 900.
No one is upset about the outcome, though.
Importance of the race lies in the fact that there
are actually scallops in our bays.
"Scallops are an effective indicator of the overall
health of Tampa Bay," Tampa Bay Watch officials
said, "since they require clear water and lush seagrass
meadows to thrive.
"Scallops were once prolific in the bay, but pol-
lution and overfishing devastated scallop stocks, and
the tasty mollusks were completely wiped out by the
late 1960s. With improving water quality in Tampa
Bay beginning in the 1980s, scientists embarked on
a restocking program that included raising scallops
in laboratories and placing adult scallops in protected
cages in the bay to keep predators, such as stone
crabs, away long enough for them to spawn."
Tampa Bay waters saw single- or double-digit
numbers since TBW started is scallop count in 1996.
Numbers remained puny until 2007, when volunteers
spotted 555. Numbers in the southern part of that bay
have increased annually.
For Sarasota Bay, Florida Marine Fisheries
Research Institute in St. Petersburg said counts in
Sarasota Bay for 2008 indicated the largest spike in
mollusks in the entire Western Florida shore: two in
2007 to 2,499 in 2008, all within the area known as
the "Kitchen" off Cortez.


Senator seeks


balance


for turtles,


fishers
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson is fishing for compromise
in the federal effort to protect marine turtles in their
habit and fishers working for a living.
"Protecting Florida jobs, while conserving native
wildlife and protecting our shoreline from the ravages
of oil and gas development, are critical to the long-
term economic and sustainable future of our state,"
Nelson stated in a release last week. "Nowhere is this
more evident than in our coastal communities that
depend not only on tourism but also on commercial
and recreational fishing."
Loggerheads are the most abundant marine turtle
in U.S. waters, but populations are on the decline. In a
review of the nine populations of loggerheads around
the world, researchers reported that all but two of the
populations are at risk of extinction.
To address the species concerns, the federal gov-
ernment earlier this year instituted a temporary mora-
torium on long-line fishing in the Gulf of Mexico.
The ban targeting shallow-water fishing for grouper
was intended to protect sea turtles from being captured in
or killed by fishing gear, but has perilous consequences
for another species commercial fishers, including
those who operate out of the Cortez fishing village.
In mid-August, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Man-
agement Council announced a possible compromise
on the ban. Under new restrictions proposed to the
National Marine Fisheries Services, the ban on long-
line fishing for grouper in shallow Gulf waters would
lift, but the commercial fishing fleet would be reduced
substantially by about half.
Additionally, waters shallower than 210 feet
would be protected from June through August, when
turtles tend to be closer to shore.
Nelson, D-Florida, along with others in the
state's congressional delegation, weighed in on the
issue with a letter to U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary
Locke that called for "balanced action to protect our
fishermen and our turtles."
Nelson, also released a statement last week,
saying, "We should return our Florida fishermen to
work immediately, while at the same time increasing
our efforts to protect sea turtles using more balanced
conservation measures."
Nelson recommended that rather than closing
areas to fishers for six months at a time, the gov-
ernment consider a "time-area closure period during
summer months ... since it is during the summer
when the majority of sea turtles have been observed
taking the baited fishing hooks meant for grouper."
Nelson also recommended that the government
analyze efforts to curb turtle bycatch in other fisher-
ies, specifically in the Pacific Ocean by the commer-
cial tuna fleet.
"In addition, we could require, and help, our
fisherman convert their long-line fishing gear to ver-
tical-line fishing gear, which would certainly have a
positive long-term conservation benefit to the log-
gerhead," stated Nelson, who sits on the Senate Com-
merce Committee. "I've set aside $250,000 in federal
funds to help do exactly that."


Nesting by the numbers
Anna Maria Island Turtle Watch reported
167 loggerhead sea turtle nests on the beach as
of Aug. 28.
AMITW also reported 125 false crawls and
102 hatched nests. A reported 8,891 hatchlings
have crawled to the sea.
Nesting season continues through Oct. 31.








Port Dolphin deadline extended


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
A deadline for public comment on a proposed
natural gas pipeline and deepwater port was extended
to Sept. 11.
The deadline had been Aug. 27 for people to
respond to the federal government's environmental
impact statement on the Port Dolphin Fin 'y LLC
project, which involves a deepwater natural gas port
about 28 miles off the coast of Anna Maria Island in
the Gulf of Mexico.
The government cited errors in the EIS as the
reason for extending the comment period.
While the public comment deadline was changed,
the government did not push back the deadline for
Florida Gov. Charlie Crist to weigh in on the project.
That date remains Sept. 11.
Port Dolphin plans to have ships carrying lique-
fied natural gas from other areas anchor next to buoys
at the deepwater port, where the liquefied natural gas
would be converted into gas and fed into a pipeline
running from the deepwater port into Tampa Bay to
Port Manatee. The pipeline would continue several
miles inland, where it would connect with other gas
pipelines.
Since March 2007, the Port Dolphin applica-
tion has been under review by federal agencies, in
cooperation with Florida departments. The principal
reviewer is the U.S. Coast Guard.
In mid-July, the Maritime Administration and the
Coast Guard released a final environmental impact
statement that explores whether the project impacts
air quality, cultural and historic resources, fish habi-
tat, threatened or endangered species, navigation and
transportation and land use.
At a public hearing in late July on the EIS, a
number of people spoke in favor of the project, focus-
ing on its economic significance and its addition to
the e ni.i _.' supply in south Florida.
In the weeks since the hearing, a number of com-
ments have been filed online at www.regulations.gov,
most of them supporting the project or not objecting
to the plan.
Glenn Compton of the environmental group
Manasota-88 posted one of the most recent state-
ments on the project, calling for disapproval.
"Disapproval of the preferred pipeline route is
the type of relief appropriate for ManaSota-88 to
request on behalf of its members," Compton wrote.
"A large number of ManaSota-88's members own


Planning commission OKs code changes


By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
The Holmes Beach Planning Commission Aug.
25 accepted a series of proposed changes to city code,
sending the amendments back to the city commission
for consideration.
The changes deal with a range of issues off-
street parking, commercial vehicle parking, tempo-
rary storage unit placement and the appeals procedure
for floodplain management decisions.
The planning commission reviewed the changes to
guarantee consistency with the city comprehensive plan.

Parking changes
For businesses lacking enough parking under the city's
code and in commercial zones, the planning commission
approved a proposal to allow businesses to buy or lease
offsite parking within 500 feet of the business.
The planners also approved a change to close a loop-
hole and clarify the city's intent to prohibit overnight park-
ing of commercial box trucks in residential areas.
Under the proposed change, minivans, full-size
pickup trucks and multi-purpose vehicles and trucks that
do not exceed 20 feet in length, from bumper to bumper,
would not be considered commercial vehicles.
Trucks exceeding 20 feet in length with racks
in use for business are considered commercial vehi-
cles, as are Class 2-8 vehicles, such as step vans,
box trucks and walk-in vans, buses, refuse trucks and
heavy equipment.
To assist with identifying commercial vehicles,


the proposed ordinance would contain graphics of the
types of vehicles prohibited from parking overnight
in residential neighborhoods.
Other proposed changes would allow an RV, boat
or trailer in a front yard or front portion of a side
yard and would eliminate a requirement for a 3-foot
setback to park a trailer, boat or RV in a side yard.

Floodplain appeals
The planning commission approved a proposed change
requested by the city commission that sends appeals of a
building official ruling on floodplain matters to the circuit
court rather than the city commission.
City planning consultant Bill Brisson said the
city commissioners felt they lacked the expertise to
decide such issues.

Temporary storage
Another house-cleaning change involves the place-
ment of temporary portable storage units or PODS.
The proposed change would allow for the issu-
ance of a temporary-use permit for builders to place
a POD in front yards in residential districts.
PODS can be used for a sales office, storage, tem-
porary housing, model homes and temporary radio
transmitting.
The planning commission approved the proposal,
which contained an addition recommended at the
group's last meeting. Brisson added the requirement
that the use of the POD must end with the completion
of the project or the expiration of the building permit.


real property and reside in Manatee County and will
be substantially adversely affected if the proposed
deepwater port license Application is accepted....
"ManaSota-88 has reviewed the final environ-
mental impact statement ... and continues to recom-
mend the no action alternative. Under the no action
alternative, the maritime administrator should deny
and disapprove the project under the Deepwater Port
Act."
Manasota-88 maintains:
Port Dolphin failed to adequately address
adverse impact from construction and operation or
safety and operational issues associated with the
onshore, pipeline route.
Construction, pipe-laying, cooling water dis-
charges, accidental spill and routine offshore opera-
tions will increase water pollutants and turbidity.
Unavoidable adverse impacts are expected on
threatened and endangered marine mammals, includ-
ing sea turtles, fish and migratory birds.
"There will be significant unpermittable foresee-
able adverse cumulative impacts on water quality,
conservation and protection of fish and wildlife result-
ing from the project," Compton said. "Long-term,
adverse, cumulative impacts on biological resources,
including marine mammals, benthic communities,
migratory birds, sea turtles, fisheries resources ...
are expected with operation of the port."
He concluded, "ManaSota-88 finds the adverse
cumulative impacts associated with the project unac-
ceptable."
The Maritime Administration is scheduled to
release its decision on the Port Dolphin project Oct.
26.


For the record
Details of Port Dolphin iEn i.'y LLC plans
for a deepwater port in the Gulf of Mexico and
a pipeline into Tampa Bay are online at www.
regulations.gov. The docket number is USCG-
2007-28532.
The public also can post comments regard-
ing the plan on the Web site until Sept. 11.
People with questions about the docu-
ment or the process can call Ray Martin of
the Coast Guard at 202-372-1449, or e-mail
raymond.w.martin@uscg.mil.


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12 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 THE ISLANDER

Streeetlife


Islander pleads not guilty, charges reduced


Island police reports
Anna Maria City
Aug. 26, 8600 Gulf Drive, driver's license. Depu-
ties stopped a vehicle for speeding and determined
the driver did not have a driver's license. He was
arrested.

Bradenton Beach
No new reports.

Holmes Beach
Aug. 21, 2900 block Avenue E, theft. The com-
plainant said someone took various items valued at
$595 from the porch of his rental unit.
Aug. 22, 3900 East Bay Drive, Publix, shoplift-
ing. The store manager called police on an alleged
shoplifting matter. Officers located the suspect and,
after conflicting information, brought him back to the
store, where it was determined that he had taken items
without paying for them, according to the report. He
was arrested.
Aug. 26, 56th Street beach, theft. The complain-
ant said someone took her son's $200 bicycle from
the beach.
Aug. 26, 100 block 36th Street, criminal mis-
chief. The complainant, the property manager for the
house, said two television sets valued at a total of
$300 were stolen.


Promoted
West Manatee
Fire Rescue
firefighter Ben
Rigney was
promoted to fire-
fighter first class
at the WMFR
district board
meeting Aug. 27.
Islander Photo:
Rick Catlin


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By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
A Holmes Beach man pleaded not guilty in
connection with a disturbance in the 6000 block of
Holmes Boulevard.
Daniel Mercak, 33, pleaded not guilty to felony
aggravated domestic assault and misdemeanor domes-
tic battery and violation of a no contact order.
But also last week, the state attorney's office
decided not to pursue the felony assault charge in
the case, resulting in the transfer of the file to misde-
meanor court.
Mercak, who now faces charges of battery and
violation of pretrial release, was arrested at about 10
p.m. Aug. 7.
The Holmes Beach Police Department reported
that upon arriving to a residence on Holmes Boule-

Burglary suspect f<
One of two men accused in a series of burglaries to
local businesses is scheduled for a trial in December.
Patrick S. Banker, accused of committing multiple
burglaries on Anna Maria Island, Longboat Key and in
Bradenton, is set for trial at the end of this year.
A second man, John O'Keefe, 18 of Sarasota,
also faces charges of burglary and is scheduled to go
to trial next February.

Holmes Beach boil-water
notice lifted
The Manatee County Utilities Department on Aug.
27 lifted a boil-water notice in Holmes Beach for resi-
dents in Seaside Gardens, including 61st Street and 59th
Street between Marina Drive and Holmes Beach.
Bacteriological samples collected from several
locations in the affected area have been free of con-
tamination, indicating the water is safe to drink, a
MCUD press release said.
The precautionary notice to boil water was issued
on Aug. 26.
If residents have any questions, they can call the
department at 941-792-8811, ext. 5268.

Gloria Dei Lutheran Church
Pastor Rosemary W. Backer
Saturday 5pm Celebrate!
Sunday 9:30am Traditional Worship
v Fellowship follows
^ iSunday Service
Celebrate with us!

778-1813 6608 Marina Drive, Holmes Beach www.gloriadeilutheran.org



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vard, an officer heard banging in a bedroom, went to
a sliding-glass door at the back of the residence and
heard Mercak shouting at a woman.
A report stated that police could see Mercak
slamming the woman into a door and broken furni-
ture scattered about.
Also, the report indicated that Mercak held a
metal padlock in his left hand that an officer feared
might be used as a weapon.
Manatee County court records indicate that
Mercak was arrested under similar circumstances in
the past, most recently in March in a case that also
involved an arrest by HBPD.
In that case, a report from HBPD said Mercak
committed "domestic battery by strangulation," but
the charge was reduced from a felony battery to a
misdemeanor.

ces December trial
Both men were released from jail pending trial
months ago.
They were arrested May 19 after MCSO Deputy
Alan Judy observed signs of a break-in at the Water-
front Restaurant. Both men were arrested fleeing
from the area, according to authorities.
Police said Banker confessed to a number of
burglaries, including break-ins at the Beach Bistro
in Holmes Beach, the City Pier Restaurant in Anna
Maria and Rotten Ralph's in Bradenton Beach.
Authorities also said Banker implicated O' Keefe
in some of the burglaries.
Recently filed documents with the Manatee
County Circuit Court list evidence in the case
the state attorney's office is building against
Banker.
Evidence includes witness statements, war-
rants, police investigation reports, property, video,
a taped statement from Banker and a paper signed
by Banker waiving his right to refuse to talk with
police.
Potential witnesses for the state attorney include
local law enforcement officers, as well as owners and
employees of the burglarized businesses.

ERier luemorial (Inmmunitt (Eturci
A Non-Denominational Christian Church
Rev. Gary A. Batey Serving the Community Since 1913
Come Celebrate Christ
Worship Service: 10am
h, Adult Church School: 9am
Children's Church School: 10am
Youth Church School: 10am
A ITransportation & Nursery Available
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By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Superior Asphalt crews have been at work in
Holmes Beach the past month, resurfacing a number
of streets.
The contract, approved by the commission in
July, provided for $123,686 in spending to resur-
face:
85th Street from the 200 block to Gulf Drive.
81st Street from Marina Drive to the beach.
79th Street from Palm Drive to the beach.
78th Street from Gulf Drive to the beach.
75th Street in the 500 block.
74th Street from Marina Drive to Holmes Bou-
levard and in the 100 block.
40th Street from Gulf Drive to Second
Avenue.
Fourth Avenue from 48th to 50th streets.


Church to host
religion classes
St. Bernard Catholic Church will begin
hosting its religious education classes at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 8.
For the first session, instructors will meet
children at Anna Maria Elementary School to
walk them to the church, 248 S. Harbor Drive,
Holmes Beach.
The classes are for children in grades kin-
dergarten through 11th.
A meeting for parents will take place at 5
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 1.
For more information, call Liz Espinet at
941-778-4769.


Center offers
parenting help
The Anna Maria Island Community Center will
offer parenting workshops beginning Sept. 9 and
meeting on alternating Wednesdays.
The sessions at the Center, 407 Magnolia Ave.,
Anna Maria, will begin at 6 p.m.
The cost to attend is $5 per parent.
The Center will offer childcare at a cost of $2 per
child.
For more information, call the Center at 941-778-
1908, ext. 9209.


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Anna Maria
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48th Street.
Fourth Avenue from 39th to 38th streets.
37th Street and Fifth Avenue cut-through.
Fifth Avenue at 37th heading north.
38th Street from the beach to the pocket park.
36th Street from Sixth Avenue to Gulf Drive.
Avenue F from 31st Street North.
30th Street from Avenue C to E.
Avenue B from 28th to 30th streets.
29th Street from the beach to Avenue B.
59th Street from Flotilla Drive to Marina
Drive.
Superior also was contracted for work on cross-
walks in Holmes Beach, as well restriping the city
hall parking lot.

Market move

proposed
By Lisa Neff
Islander Reporter
Organizers of the Bridge Street Market are seek-
ing city permission to relocate the Saturday event to
the Historic Bridge Street Pier parking lot.
The city commission is expected to consider an
application to hold the market at the pier complex,
home to Rotten Ralph's on the Pier, on Sept. 17.
The market, sponsored by the Historic Bridge
Street Merchants Association, took place this past year
in a lot owned by James Toomey, who has informed
group members that he has plans to develop a busi-
ness complex at his property on on Bridge Street.
The loss of the lot left association members to
explore other options.
"The best, and to me, a perfect option was the
Rotten Ralph's parking lot and driveway," said
Nancy Ambrose, who coordinates the market for the
HBSMA.
The owners of Rotten Ralph's pier location also
endorsed the relocation of the market in a letter to
city officials.
"I have notified the vendors from the past year so
they are aware," Ambrose said. "It sounds like some
of them are going to write letters to the city, as this
is their livelihood and they really want to see [the
market] continue."
If the commission approves a new location and
a schedule of markets, the first of the 2009-10 tourist
season would take place Nov. 7.


City streets get new coats


THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 13


Obituaries

Bette Kae Mortimore Buckley
Bette Kae Mortimore Buckley, 56, of Anna Mafia
Island, died Aug. 29.
Born in Pontiac, Ill., Mrs. Buckley moved to
Florida 18 years ago. She owned
and operated "Sew What" in both
Bloomington, Ill., and Anna Mafia
Island. She received a master's
degree in foods and nutrition at
Illinois State University. Her pas-
sion of sewing and alterations
began when she started custom-
Buckley izing and making her own clothes.
She had a soft voice, but a huge heart. She loved her
family, her husband and friends. She will be sorely
missed by all that knew her and loved her.
A celebration of her life will be held at 7 p.m. Tues-
day, Sept. 1, at 525 75th St., Holmes Beach,
She is survived by husband Mike; sisters Bonnie
Smith and husband Lynn, Alice Testa and husband
Tony; brother Dr. Robert Mortimore and wife Barbi;
step-children Tyler of Bloomington, Tina Buckley Cox
of Union Beach, N.J., and Lisa Mikus of Austin, Texas;
and grandchildren Colton Alan, Emerson Michelle, Will
Mikus and Matt Mikus.

William Patton Reed
William Patton Reed, 85, of Beaver, Pa., and for-
merly Bradenton, died Aug. 26.
Mr. Reed was a retired superintendent of Key
Royale Housing Development in Holmes Beach, co-
owner of Reed Brothers Construction in New Castle
and Bradenton, and a locksmith. He was a veteran of
the U.S. Army, having served during World War II. He
was a member of the Meridian Lodge No. 411, 32nd
degree Mason, American Legion Kirby Stewart Post
24, and a former member of Bradenton Lions Club. He
loved NASCAR racing.
Noll Funeral Home Inc., Beaver, was in charge of
arrangements.
He is survived by daughter Julia "Jody" Shugert and
husband Guy; grandsons Guy "Skipper" and Douglas
Reed Shugert; sister Eileen and husband Robert Byers
of Enon Valley; brother Keith Reed of New Castle; Lacy
and Joanne Baldy; Jim and Jodi Baldy; sister-in-law
Myma Salmon; niece and nephew Dorian and Dr. Bill
Guyton; nephew and niece Trey and Anne Baldy; and
many close friends, including Phil and Leah Wells and
Jenny and Ben Sabo of Bradenton, Bob Singo, Rebecca
Nowakowski, Duane and Carol Lee Douglas, and Jim
and Donna Douglas as well as many nieces, nephews
and cousins.



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14 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 THE ISLANDER

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THE ISLANDER 0 SEPT. 2, 2009 0 15


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