Group Title: NFES mimeo report - University of Florida Experiment Station ; 62-1
Title: Yields and characteristics of peach varieties and selections at Quincy, Florida in 1961
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074373/00001
 Material Information
Title: Yields and characteristics of peach varieties and selections at Quincy, Florida in 1961
Series Title: NFES mimeo rpt.
Physical Description: 2, 3 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Young, H. W ( Harold William ), 1930-
North Florida Experiment Station
Publisher: North Florida Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1961
 Subjects
Subject: Peach -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (leaf 2).
Statement of Responsibility: by H.W. Young.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "July 11, 1961."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074373
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 85774039

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NORTH FLORIDA EXPERIMENT STATION
Quincy, Florida
July 11, 1961

NFES Mimeo Rpt. 62-1

YIELDS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF PEACH VARIETIES AND
SELECTIOlN AT QUINCY, FLORIDA IN 1961

By H. W. Young


Yields

The 1961 each records (summarized in Table 1) were taken on tree ripe
fruit. When comparing yields of any two varieties, age of tree must be
considered. The age of tree listed in the table is the number of years in the
orchard and includes 1961. As an example a tree planted in February of 1956
would be listed as six years in the orchard.

Fruit Characteristics

At each harvest ten representative sound fruit were measured and these
records were averaged at the end of the season for each tree and variety (Table 2).

Red overcolor was difficult to measure in 1961 as several varieties had
very little red color at the early harvests, yet were more normal later. In
several cases this resulted in a considerably less red overcolor than reported in
1960.

The beak or point at the end of the fruit is listed because several
varieties such as Mavgold and Sunhigh exhibited a more prominent beak than in
1960. Beak lengths (Table 2) were not large enough to seriously distract from
the appearance of the fruit.

Split pits were found in a number of varieties; however, the external
appearance of the fruit was not seriously affected. Of the very early varieties,
Junegold had the most split pits, but this did not distract from the overall
favorable appearance of the fruit.

Table 3 includes observations by Mrs. Marjorie Gregory on fruit
processing characteristics.

Chilling hours

The numbers of hours of temperature at or below 450 F in the winter of
1960-61 were 864 before February 15; 878 before February 28; 912 befoql5;
and 920 before March 31.- Apparently there was sufficient cold te
satisfy the chilling requirements of all varieties.

Thinning o S

Hand thinning was done to remove excessive fruit from t trees. Som
varieties drovDed more fruit after thinning in 1961 than in 1960 h result. '
in some lower yields. .--. ---











Spring Freezes

Sufficient cold temperatures prior to February 15 fulfilled the chilling
requirements for all varieties. Warm weather the latter part of February and
early March resulted in their early flowering. Fortunately freeze damage did not
occur and all trees produced some fruit.

Fertilization and Cultivation

On February 16 one pound of 8-8-8 per year of tree age was applied in
bands around the tree in the feeding root area.

In July one-quarter pound of ammonium nitrate per year of tree age will
be applied in the same manner.

Because of the slope involved in this orchard, a native cover, consisting
chiefly of grass and weeds, is retained to prevent erosion. Effort is made to
keep this cover mowed to facilitate orchard operations.

Diseases, Insects and Srray Program

Scab was the most prevalent disease in 1961. Although a slight varietal
difference was noted, very few fruit were affected. Bacterial spot was not
identified. Brown rot was present in July after a week of daily rains.

Stink bugs were present but very little damage was observed. A few
misshapen fruits, probably caused by sucking insects, were observed.

Erratic rainfall necessitated a total of seventeen sprays from February
1 to June 30. These sprays consisted either of parathion and wettable sulphur
or wettable sulphur alone. (See spray schedule in NFES Mimeo Rpt. 61-6). A total
of eleven sprays were adequate for the avygold variety. Three late summer trunk
sprays will be applied in July, August, and September.

Recommendations

ay(rold appears to be satisfactory for the early shipping market.
Earligold and June:old which are earlier than Maygold seem promising as low-
chilling varieties. Hiland and Sunhigh performed satisfactorily in 1961, however,
they require about 100 more hours of chilling than Maygold and after mild winters
may not perform as well as in 1960 and 1961. The majority of the FV (Fort Valley)
lines produce exceptionally fine quality fruit, but their relative lateness makes
them unsuitable for the very early shipping market.



REFERENCES

Peach results at Quincy, Florida in 1960 NFES Mimeo Rpt. 61-3

Suggestions for Peach Growers in the North Florida Experiment Station
Area NFES Mimeo Rpt. 61-6.






Table 1: Peach Yield, Bloom, Foliage Break and Fruiting at Quincy, Florida in
1961. Varieties Listed in Order of Ripening.

: Age : No. : : First : Average per tree
: of : of : Full : Foliage i Ripe : No. of :Wt.in :Ave.wt.
Variety or Line : Tree : Trees : Bloom : Break : Fruit : fruit :lbs. :/peach

Earligold 4 2 2-23 2-20 5-2 233 26.1 .111
3-13 3 1 2-24 2-21 5-12 120 18.4 .153
Junegold 4 2 3-1 2-25 5-14 224 46.2 .205
Robin 4 1 3-1 3-5 5-15 13 2.0 .153
Mavgold/OK 5 10 3-5 3-1 5-22 357 57.3 .160
Maygold/234 5 10 3-5 3-1 5-22 258 44.2 .154
Hiland 5 1 3-2 3-5 5-22 177 39.8 .224
13-54 3 2 2-21 2-20 5-22 231 45.8 .197
B3-777 5 4 3-5 3-5 5-22 224 42.4 .182
2-10 3 2 2-14 2-9 5-23 158 27.7 .175
B7-45 5 2 2-27 2-28 5-23 115 23.9 .207
2-6 5 2 2-20 2-16 5-30 649 145.9 .224
Flordaqueen 6 1 2-27 3-2 5-31 11 3.4 .309
Flordaqueen 3 8 2-26 2-28 5-31 21 5.4 .251
B9-647 5 3 3-10 3-8 6-1 49 10.5 .215
Meadowlarlr 3 2 2-28 2-24 6-1 280 22.6 .080
Flordahome 3 1 2-24 2-20 6-2 16 3.7 .231
Saturn 4 2 3-1 2-23 6-5 183 40.1 .218
F55-74 4 2 2-20 2-16 6-5 392 81.1 .206
FV 220-99 4 4 3-5 3-1 6-9 209 43.8 .209
9-10 3 1 2-9 2-9 6-9 529 81.5 .154
F 62-77 4 2 2-21 2-20 6-9 406 80.5 .198
Valigold 4 2 3-1 3-7 6-9 49 14.6 .294
FV 166-79 6 6 2-28 2-28 6-9 351 78.3 .222
FV 166-79 5 5 2-27 2-27 6-11 148 38.4 .258
FV 240-1 4 4 3-1 3-2 6-11 475 112.7 .237
FV 178-79 6 7 2-28 2-28 6-12 350 80.9 .230
B 7-1059 5 3 3-2 3-2 6-13 78 24.3 .311
Goldrush 5 2 3-3 3-2 6-16 330 54.7 .164
Sunhigh 6 5 3-5 3-5 6-20 671 145.6 .215
Panamint (Nectarine) 6 1 2-27 3-5 6-21 362 39.3 .108
FV 243-64 5 4 2-24 2-27 6-28 181 56.6 .311
Fortyniner 5 2 3-5 3-5 6-29 354 99.7 .281
L-10 6 2 2-29 2-15 7-3 308 46.6 .122
4-14 6 1 2-23 2-15 7-3 103 22.3 .216
1-17 6 2 2-28 2-9 7-10 733 138.8 .189






Table 2: Fruit Characteristics of Peaches at Quincy, Florida, in 1961. Varieties
Listed in Order of Ripening.

: : Frit M$edrserents in In.: : Cling : Beak
: Red :: Flesh : or : length
Variety or Line : Overcolor : Diameter Length : Color : Free : in mm.

Earligold 75 1.948 1.924 1.909 Yel. Cl 4.0
3-13 55 2.039 2.075 2.031 Yel. Semi 1.0
Junegold 66 2.426 2.387 2.532 Yel. Cl 4.0
Robin 70 1.525 1.512 1.537 White Semi 1.5
Mavzold/OK 78 2.096 2.153 2.349 Yel. Cl 5.0
Mavold/234 76 2.152 2.234 2.374 Yel. C1 5.4
Hiland p1 2.370 2.420 2.420 Yel. C1 6.0
13-54 50 2.266 2.328 2.209 Yel. C1 0.5
B3-777 76 2.157 2.298 2.313 Yel. Cl 4.4
2-10 75 2-084 2.1 4 2.169 White Semi 0.5
B7-45 51 2.249 2.502 2.373 Yel. Cl 2.8
2-6 65 2,298 2,351 2.317 White Free 2.0
Flordaqueen 40 2,450 2.537 2.600 Yel. Semi 1.0
B9-647 74 2,260 2.379 2.324 Yel. Semi O.6
Meadowlark 57 1.796 1.884 1.256 Yel. Free 1.5
Flordahome 25 2 200 2.312 2. 12 White Free 4.0
Saturn 42 2.356 24384 2-493 Yel. Free 2.2
F55-74 62 2.130 2,280 2.274 Yel. Free 1.9
FV 220-99 50 2,229 2.347 2.484 Yel. Free 3.5
9-10 18 2.150 2.156 1.896 Yel. Free 0.0
F 62-77 37 2.155 2.164 2.239 Yel. Free 2.5
Valiold 66 2.366 2.464 2.545 Yel. Semi 4.8
FV 166-79 84 2.418 2.529 2.613 Yel. Free 4.8
FV 240-1 65 2,204 2.313 2.402 Yel. Free 4.6
FV 178-79 70 2.4-0 2.470 2.673 Yel, Free 5.8
B7-1059 75 2.554 2.568 2.797 Yel. Free 7.5
Goldrush 72 2.224 2.331 2.493 Yel. Free 3.5
Sunhigh 84 2.367 2.402 2.659 Yel. Free 8,0
Panamint (Nectarine) 98 1.850 1.825 1.787 Yel. Free 0.0
FV 243-64 71 2,637 2.713 2.837 Yel. Free 4.0
Fortvniner 7q 2.568 2.602 2.815 Yel. Free 6.2
4-10 52 2.018 2.087 2.006 Yel. Semi 1.5
4-14 60 2.325 2.337 2.387 Yel. Free 5.0
3-17 80 2.237 2.231 2.293 Yel. Free 2.5


* Diameter at riot angle to the suture.


** Diameter through the suture.










Table 3: Processing Observations (Made by Mrs.
Grown at Quincy, Florida in 1961.


Mariorie Gregory, Home Demonstration Agent, Gadsden County) of Peaches


Variety :: Processing


or Line : Flavor : Quality :


Maygold

Hiland

Earigold

Junegold

Sunhigh

Flordaqueen

FV 178-79

FV 240-1


Good

Good

Fair

Good

Good

Fair

Very Good

Excellent


Excellent

Excellent

Fair

Excellent

Good

Excellent

Excellent

Good


Best Use* : Discoloration**

CFP 3

P 2

P 1

CFP 5

CFP 6

CF P 4

CF P 8

CFP 7


: Other Comments

Very juicy

Flesh clings closely to seed

Small size

Split pits present

Soft mellow texture

Flesh holds shape well

Nice size

Excellent tart flavor
Best for canning


* C canning, F freezing P pickling

" How rapidly the flesh turns brown when exposed to air 1 rated the slowest.





HWY
7/11/61
400 cc




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