Group Title: Quincy AREC research report - University of Florida Agricultural Research and Education Center ; NF 79-2
Title: Field evaluation of insecticides and plant tolerances for control of insects attacking peanuts in 1979
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074370/00001
 Material Information
Title: Field evaluation of insecticides and plant tolerances for control of insects attacking peanuts in 1979
Series Title: Quincy AREC research report
Physical Description: 3 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tappan, William B., 1928-
Gorbet, Daniel W ( Daniel Wayne ), 1942-
Agricultural Research and Education Center (Quincy, Fla.)
Publisher: Agricultural Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Quincy Fla
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subject: Peanuts -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Peanuts -- Effect of pesticides on -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: William B. Tappan and D. W. Gorbet.
General Note: Caption title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074370
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 85809883

Full Text


F6 36
At FEC
1"'`L AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
Quincy, Florida

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER
Marianna, Florida

Quincy AREC Research Report NF 79-2

Field Evaluation of Insecticides and Plant Tolerances for Control of
Insects Attacking Peanuts in 1979

William B. Tappan, Entomologist, Quincy, and
D. W. Gorbet, Associate Agronomist, Marianna

Materials and Methods

Four granular soil and 14 insecticidal spray treatments were field tested on
Florunner peanuts for insect control, phytotoxicity, and effect on crop performance.
In a second experiment, certain peanut breeding lines and varieties were studied
to determine if any tolerance to insect attack could be detected.

A boom-type CO2 pressurized hand sprayer that covered 2 rows with 3 nozzles
per row was used to make all spray applications. The sprayer was calibrated to
deliver approximately 26 gallons of spray at 26 p.s.i. at normal walking speed.
The granular materials were broadcast by hand over the soil surface prio o
planting and immediately incorporated with the soil to dept-l- i e with
a rotary tiller.. "

Treatments listed in Table 1 were replicated 3 times icop l iBrando. zed
blocks. Each plot was 4 rows wide, and rows were 30 feet ]dfg p anted on 3- ot
centers. The 2 center rows constituted the experime tal plot, and thS
on either side acted as buffers between plots. Alle bepenpi1Wesa
were 10 feet wide. Plots treated with various granul rter lswere12 x 34
feet in size, and were reduced to 12 x 30 feet after planting. Treatments listed
in Table 6 were replicated 3 times in complete randomized blocks. Each plot
was 1 row wide, and the rows were 20 feet long planted on 3-foot centers. The 1
row was the experimental plot, and there were no buffers between plots within
blocks. Alleys between blocks of plots were 10 feet wide. The test areas vere
located in the northwest portion of the farm at the Agricultural Research Center
in Marianna, Florida. The insect spray experiment was near the north hedge row,
while the insect tolerance experiment was near the bottom of the hill southeast
of the insect spray experiment.

All cultural practices in preparing the test area for planting were performed
in the usual manner. Beds for planting were prepared and fertilizer applied in
April. Herbicides; Balan, 1 gallon + Vernam, 2.5 pints per acre were applied on
April 19, 1979, and Lasso, 2 quarts + Dyanap, 1.5 gallons per acre were broadcast
at cracking on May 7. The latter 2 herbicides were applied at cracking on the
insect tolerance experiment on June 18. The insect spray experiment was planted
on April 30 and harvested on September 10, and the peanuts were picked on September 14.
The insect tolerance experiment was planted on June 12 and harvested on October 26.

The dates treatment applications were made are given in a footnote in Tables
1 through 5. Sprays were applied generally as needed for thrips and worm control.
The broadcast granular applications were made the same day of planting.

Tobacco thrips counts were made from natural infestations by counting the
number of adult and immature thrips collected in 25 cc. bottles from 10 terminal
foliage buds per plot at weekly intervals beginning on May 14 and ending August 27.
In the insect tolerance experiment, the thrips counts were made from 3 terminal
foliage buds per plot taken weekly beginning on June 28 and ending July 19. Counts
were made in the laboratory after the thrips had been washed from the buds with
alcohol and collected on 9 cm. filter paper in a Buchner funnel under vacuum. A
binocular microscope with 15X magnification was used to make the counts. Ratings
of foliage damaged by thrips were made on the same dates that thrips were counted.
The rating system used was based on a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 being no damage
and 10 being 100 percent of the foliage showing some feeding damage.

Counts of corn earworm, fall armyworm, velvetbean caterpillar, and other
Lepidoptera larvae were made from natural infestations by counting the number of
live larvae in 3 feet of row per plot at weekly intervals beginning on July 23
and ending August 30. Worm counts were made weekly beginning on August 21 and
ending October 9 in the insect tolerance experiment, except 5 counts could not be
made owing to flooding fran rain water. (See footnote "a" in Table 6.)







-2-


Potato leafhopper damage ratings were made in the insect tolerance experiment
beginning August 23 and ending October 11. As was the case in the worm counts, 5
counts were omitted due to rain flooded plots. The rating system was similar to
that used for thrips damage. A scale of 0 to 10 was used with 0 being no damage
and 10 being 100 percent of the foliage showing some feeding damage.

Visual phytotoxicity ratings were begun on May 14 and continued at weekly
intervals until August 27. Plots were rated according to severity of phytotoxicity
observed. The ratings were based on the following system;

0 None
1 = Slight leaf deformity or spotting
2 = Moderate leaf deformity or spotting
3 Heavy leaf deformity or spotting with some necrosis
4 = Severe leaf deformity or spotting with considerable necrosis

Yield was calculated in pounds per acre from the total weight of dried
peanuts picked from the 2 center rows of each plot. The insect tolerance
experiment planting was not picked for yield. No crop value was calculated for
any of the experiments.

Duncan's multiple range test was applied to all means analyzed to obtain
statistical comparisons for data interpretation.

Rainfall data expressed in inches for the duration of the experiments from
April 30 through October 26 were as follows:

May June July August September October
2-0.04 1-0.11 1-0.05 1-0.46 2-0.95 1-0.47
5-0.02 7-0.01 4-0.42 2-0.69 3-0.01 5-0.06
7-0.07 15-0.03 7-0.22 11-0.02 13-1.25 24-T
8-0.34 21-0.14 10-0.36 12-0.01 14-0.03 Total-0.53
9-0.22 22-0.48 12-1.56 23-1.25 16-T
10-0.92 23-0.32 13-0.82 24-0.13 17-2.63
11-0.13 25-0.22 15-1.36 25-1.22 18-0.02
14-1.74 Total-1.31 16-0.01 27-0.98 21-0.85
23-0.63 17-0.07 28-1.54 22-0.88
24-1.47 18-0.01 30-T 25-0.33
31-0.64 19-0.76 Total-6.30 26-0.20
Total-6.22 20-0.48 27-2.90
21-0.15 28-1.36
22-0.16 29-0.10
23-0.02 30-T
24-0.42 Total-11.51
25-0.02
26-0.39
27-0.10
30-0.11 T = Trace
Total-7.49 Grand Total 33.36 inches

Results and Discussion

Populations of tobacco thrips were the heaviest recorded in terminal foliage
buds since 1975. Foliage damage from thrips became apparent about 3 weeks after
planting and reached its peak about 4 weeks after planting and began declining
about 2 weeks later. Populations in the buds began declining about 4 weeks after
planting as has been the pattern for the last 4 years. Worm populations occurred
earlier than in 1978 and were primarily composed of corn earworm. The economic
threshold level was reached on July 23, and an accidental spray of Lannate on all
plots on July 28 ruined the experiment for the remainder of the experimental
period. Populations of corn earworm reached the economic threshold level on
August 21 in the insect tolerance experiment, but declined thereafter. The decline
in the corn earworm was enhanced by rain flooding the plots during late August and
again in September and early October. Velvetbean caterpillar populations reached
the economic threshold level on September 4 and 11, but the flooding made counts
impossible thereafter. Lesser cornstalk borer populations never reached damaging
numbers in either experiment during the entire experimental period. Dry weather
during August was not extensive enough to enhance lesser cornstalk borer populations.
The corn earworm and velvetbean caterpillar were the most numerous of the worm pests
that occurred during the experimental period. An infestation of potato leafhopper
occurred in the insect tolerance experiment, and reached the economic threshold
level on August 23. Again, flooding hampered observations on the leafhopper, and
indications were that excessive rainfall reduced the amount of damage caused by the
pest. (See Tables 2 through 6.)








-3-


The thrips count on May 21 indicated that the spray application on May 15 was
made while a majority of the thrips eggs had not closed, therefore, the sprays
were not as effective in reducing the population as they should have been. (See
Table 2.) The count on May 28 indicated that all of the sprays had taken effect,
and significantly reduced the thrips population. Timing of spray applications for
thrips control is difficult to determine, since the proper period covers an interval
from 10 to 19 days after sowing of seed. Weather conditions that affect thrips egg
laying activity would naturally affect the timing of spray applications. A spray
application at 17 days after sowing will produce a significant reduction in popu-
lations, but as indicated by the damage count in Table 3 on May 21, foliage damage
from thrips will be quite heavy. In order to reduce foliage damage most effectively,
two sprays applied at 10 and 17 days after sowing would produce best results.
However, considering the economics of thrips control, spraying for thrips control will
not result in a significant yield increase, therefore, control measures are not
warranted. (See Table 4.) Immature thrips apparently caused the majority of the
feeding damage on the foliage, since adults comprised only a small percentage of
the total number found in the terminal foliage buds during the growing season. (See
Table 2.) The initial population was composed of primarily adults, which apparently
migrated to the peanut plant from wild host plants in the area. The apparent
function of the adult seemed to be to lay eggs and maintain a population of immatures
for the entire life of the plant. After the decline of the initial adult population,
the plant apparently lost its attractiveness for the adult as well as the immature.
Therefore, the decline of both morphological stages (adult and immature) continued
until harvest. The decline in thrips populations was also accompanied by a decline
in foliage damage. (See Table 3.) The data recorded over the past 4 years clearly
showed that thrips were not an economic pest of peanuts, and emphasis on control
should be removed from the control recommendations.

Control of corn earworm, velvetbean caterpillar and other Lepidoptera and
the effect on yield are presented in Table 4. The economic threshold level was
reached on July 23, but an inadvertent spraying of all plots with 0.45 lb. AI/acre
of Lannate on July 28 ruined the experiment. None of the treatments had any signifi-
cant effect on yield.

Bolstar, Curacron, and Lorsban were the only treatments that caused any visible
phytotoxicity. Furadan, which generally causes chlorotic and necrotic spotting of
leaf edges, caused no discernible symptoms. Bolstar and Curacron caused dark
greasy spots in the lamina, and some of the spots later became necrotic. As was
the case in 1978, the injury from Bolstar and Curacron was not noticed until after
the second spray application. Lorsban injury spymtoms also began appearing after
the second spray application, and were manifested as deformed leaves and greasy
spotting with some of the spots later turning necrotic. The leaf deformity seemed
to be confined to young growth. (See Table 5.) Yield was reduced slightly by
Bolstar, but a greater reduction was noted with Lorsban. Neither Bolstar nor Lorsban
caused a significant reduction in yield. (See Table 5.)

The insect tolerance experiment indicated little tolerance of the experimental
materials to thrips attack. (See Table 6.) Although there were significant
differences between some of the materials regarding number of thrips per bud and
damage indices, the amount of foliage damage that cocurred on the best material
(72 X 42-6-1-2-3-b3) was considered to be too great for grower acceptance. Since
thrips cannot influence yields, the insect must be considered lightly when
searching for plant tolerance. There does not appear to be any relationship between
thrips tolerance and worm or leafhopper tolerance. The breeding line
72 X 41A-6-1-2-2-b3 showed some tolerance to both corn earworm and velvetbean
caterpillar, but the tolerance observed was not significantly different from that of
Florunner. This is the second selection from 72 X 41A-6-1-2 that has given similar
results regarding worm tolerance. Some breeding crosses should be made with
72 X 41A-6-1-2-2-b3 to determine if the tolerance can be transferred to lines that
possess tolerance to other insects and diseases. NC-10247, NC-15729, and NC-15745
showed significant tolerance to potato leafhopper when compared to Florunner. NC-6
even though showing some tolerance to the leafhopper, was not significantly different
from Florunner. The data indicated that NC-6 and Florunner were also similar in
tolerance to thrips and the Lepidoptera pests studied.





AREC, Quincy and ARC, Marianna


Table 1: Broadcast Granular Soil and Foliar Spray Treatments Applied for Insect Control on Florunner Peanuts. ARC, Marianna 1979.

Lbs. or Gals. Lbs. AI
No. per Acre per per Acre per
Treatment Applicationsb Application Application


Furadan, 10%G
Di-Syston, 15%C
Temik, 15%G
TD-5032, 2.5%G
Curacron, 0.24%S(EC)
Pounce, 0.05%S (EC)
Pounce, 0.025%S(EC)+
Orthene, 0.25%S(SP)
Orthene, 0.35%S(SP)
Penncap-M, 0.5%S(F)
Pounce, 0.025%S(EC) +
Penncap-M, 0.25%S(F)
Pydrin, 0.05%S(EC)
Lannate, 0.25%S(L)
Bolstar, 0.5%S(E3)
Monitor, 0.25%S(WN)
UC-51762, 0.24%S(IJP)
RH-0994, 0.24%r(EC)
R--0308, 0.24%b(EC)
Lorsban, 0.35%S(EC)


60.0
40.0
40.0
10.0
32.0
29.3
28.2
28.2
27.2
26.6
27.3
27.3
27.9
27.8
29.2
28.6
26.8
26.7
28.9
28.0


6.00
6.00
6.00
0.25
0.63
0.12
0.05
0.58
0.78
1.11
0.05
0.57
0.12
0.58
1.21
0.59
0.53
0.53
0.58
0.83


EC = Emulsifiable Concentrate,
Granular treatments applied on
CTreatments were tank mixes.


F = Flowable, G = Granules, L = Liquid, SP =
4/30 and sprays on 5/15, 6/26, and 7/26/79.


Soluble Powder, S = Spray, M1 = Water Miscible, and WP = Wettable Powder.
Seed sown on 4/30 and crop harvested 9/10/79.





AREC, Quincy and ARC, Marianna


Table 2: Effects of Broadcast Granular Soil and Foliar Spray Treatments on Thrips Control on Florunner Peanuts. ARC, Marianna 1979.


Treatment and
Lbs. AI per Acre
oer Aclicationa


Furadan, 6.00
Di-Syston, 6.00
Temik, 6.00
TD-5032, 0.25
Curacron, 0.63
Pounce, 0.12
Pounce, 0.05 +e
Orthene, 0.580
Orthene, 0.78
Penncap-M, 1.11
Pounce, 0.05 +e
Penncap-M, 0.57e
Pydrin, 0,12
Lannate, 0.53
Bolstar, 1.21
Monitor, 0.59
UC-51762, 0.53
RH-0994, P.53
ZR-0308, 0.58
Lorsban, 0.83
Check (Untreated)


Mean Number Thrips per Budb


2.50
0.4a
0.4a
2.1bc
1.5abc
1.3ab

1.7bc
2.3bc
2. Cbc

1 3ab
1.2ab
1.8bc

1 7bc
2.2bc
1.6bc
2.0bc
1.7b c
2.2bc
2 2


15.4bcd
7.0ab
3.4a
30.1fg
26.7efg
26.3efg

12.7abc
13.3bc
18.7cde


30.85
21.8cdefg
19:9cdef
319.9
31.69


5/28


11.2gh
3.5abc

14.8iJ
8,9fgh
11.1gh
4.3abcd
2.3ab
5.0bcde

8.7efgh
5.5bcdef
7.sdefg
3.2efgh
3.3abc
12.0hi
9.3fgh
8.lefgh
6.3cdef
15.7J


6/4


3. bcde
1.4ab
1.2a
2. Iabcd
3.8de
3.3cde

1.7abc
I..1a
4. Be

3.0bcd
2.3abcd
3. bcd
3.9de

2.4abcd
2.5abcd
2.6abcd
3.9 de
2.2abcd


/11


6.9def
2.0ab
1.7a
4.0ab c
4.1abc
5.4cde

4.6cde
4.0abc
7.2ef

6. 1cdef
7.0ef
8.2f
4.8cde
6.2cdef
4.3bc
5.8cdef
5.0cde
5.9cdef
4.4cd


Alil 6A/9


3.4a
2.5a
1.6a
3.1 a
2.6a
3.3a

2.9a
3.18
3.7a

3.7a
3.8a
3.4a
2.8
3.7a
3.9a
3.7a
3.1a
3.1a
3. a
3.4a


2.2a
1.8a
0.8a'
0.7a
l.Oa
1.5a

1.8a
1.8a
2.4a

1.3a
2.0a
1.6a
2.1a
2.28
1.7a
1.3a
1.4a
2.5a
1.6a


7/1


1.6efg
1.7fg
1def
1.78
1.0bcdefg
0.6abc

0.3ab
08abcd
0.2a

0.2a
0.5abc
1.2cdefg
0.7 abc
1.0bcaefg
o9abcde
0.9 abcdce
0.9
o'abcde
0.9abcee

1.5defg


7/16


2.3ef
1 6abcdef
1. 2abde
2.ocdef
24ef
f
2.7

1.0abcd
0. 8abc
0.6ab
.4abcde
1.4abcde
1.5abcdef
1.7abcdef


2.7abcde
1.7abc
1.7abc
2.2abcd
3.8cdef
4.4def

1.3ab
4.ef

5.5f
3.2bcde
3.5cdef
3.2bcde
0.9a
3.7cdef
3.7cdef
4.1def
4.2def
1.1 ab


7/23 7/30d 8/6 8/13 8/20 8/27

0.4a 0.2 0.3a 0.7abcd 0.4a 0.4abcd
1.4a 0.1abc 0.1a 0.3a 05a 0.2a
1.1a 0.2c 0.0a 0.6abcd 0.5a 0.4abcd
0.3a 0.1abc 0.4a 0_5abcd 0.68 0abcd
0.8 0.0a 0.2a 0 .bcd 0.4a 0. a
0.8a 0.1abc 0.3a 0.3abcd 1.0a 0.4abcd


1. 0a
0.58
0.8a

0.9a



0.8a
0.8a
0. 3a
0.6a
0.9a
0.7a"


0.abc
0.0a


0.1a lc
0.2c
0.0a
0.0a
0.2c
0.0a
0.1abc

0.2c


0.18
0. ia
0.1

0. la
0.2a
OIa
O. i

0.1a


0.2a
0.4a
0.38


0.2a
0.3a
0. 3a

0.9cd
0.5abcd
0.9cd
0.4abcd
0.4abcd
O. abcd
. 7abcd
1.0d
. 4abcd
0.3a


0.5a
0.5a
0.78

0.7a
0.8a
0.4a
0.6a
0.5a
1. 0a
0.7a
0.9a
> 7
0.7a
0.3a


Percent
Adults
Immaturcs


0.3ab
0. 3ab
0.6abcd

O 5abcd
0.7bcd
0.5 ed
O. 5abcd
0.2a
0. 38d
0.4abcd
rh7bcd
0.6abcd
0.4ab cd


Granular treatments applied on 4/30 and sprays on 5/15, 6/26, and 7/26/79. Seed sown on 4/30 and crop harvested on 9/10/79.
bTen terminal buds per plot were examined. Means followed by the sane letter are not significantly different at the 5% level.
Cpretreatment count for sprays.
dLannate at 0.45 lb. AI/acra inadvertently sprayed on all plots on 7/28/79.
eTreatments were tank mixes.


12
88


'16


n
n ------.


--


c;IC/. 5/21








AREC, Quincy and ARC, Iarianna


Table 3: Effects of Broadcast Granular Soil and Foliar Spray Treatments in Reducing Thrips Danage on Florunner Peanuts


ARC, Marianna 1979.


Treatment and Mean Thrips Foliage Damage Indicesb
Lbs. AI per Acre
per Applicationa 5/14e 5/21 5/28 6/4 6/11 6/18 6/25 7/2 7/9 7/16 7/23 7/30d 3/6 8/13 8/120 8/27


Furadan, 6.00
Di-Syston, 6.00
Temik, 6.00
TD-5032, 0.25
Curacron, 0.63
Pounce, 0.12
Pounce, 0.05 +c
Orthcne, 0.58e
Orthene, 0.78
Pcnncap-M, 1.11
Pounce, 0.05 +e
Penncap-M, 0. 57e
Pydrin, 0.12
Lannate, 0.58
Bolstar, 1.21
monitor, 0.59
UC-51762, 0.53
PH-0994, 0.53
RE-0308, 0. 58
Lorsban, 0.83
Check (Untreated)


0.0
0.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
C.O


7.0def
5.3b
2.7a
8.0fg
7.3defg
7.0def

5.7bc
6.3cd
7.3defg


7 3def
7.3defg


6.7de
7. defg
7.3defg
7.3def8
7 7efg
7.7:efg
8.3g


7.7efg
3.3b
1.7a
9.0gh
7.7efg
8.0efg

3.7b
3.3
6.7cde

6.7cde
7.3def
.3cdef
6.7cde
5.7c
8.3fgh
8.7fgh
7.7efg
6.0cd
9.7h


8.0efg
3.3bc
1.7a
10.0
7.3def
8.3fg

3.0abc
2.3ab
6.0d

6.7de
6.7de
7.0def
7.0def
4.3c
9.0gh
8.0 f0
8.0efg
6.0
9.7h


7.7efg
3.7bc
2.0a
8.3gh
7.0def
7.7efg

3.0abc
2.7a
7.0doef

7.0def
6.3d
6.3d
7.0def
4.0C
8.0fgh

7.3defg
6.3d
9. h


5.7efgh
2.7ab c
1.7a
6.3gh
5.0ef
6.0 fgh

3.0bc
2.3a8b
5.0ef

5.3efg
5.0ef
5.0ef
4.7de
3.7cd
6.0fghI
5.7efgh
5.7efgh
5.3efg
6.7h


5.7ef
3.0ab
2.3a
5.0def
4.7cde
5.7ef

3. 7bc
3.7bc0
5.7ef

5.ndef
5:def
5.3
5.3def
4.7cde

5.3def
5.3def
5.3def
5.7ef
6.0


4.7e
2.7ab
2.0a
3.3bc
3.7cd
3.7cd
3.7d
2.7ab
2.7b

4.3de

4. (cde
4.3da
4.3de
4.3de
4.Cede
4.0cde
4.7e
4.3de
4.7e
4.7e


4.7e
3.3abcd
2.3a
3.0abc
3:7 bcde
3.7bed
3.3ab ced

2.7ab
3.0abc

4.0cde
4.0cde
3.7beft,
4.0cde
4. cde
4.0cde
3.7bcde
4.0cde
3. 7bcde

4.3de
.bcde
3 .


3.3a
3.0a
2.3a'
2.3a
2.7"
2.7a

2.0a
2.0a
3.7a

2.7a
3.0
2.7a
3.0a
2.7a
2.7a

3.00
2.7a
3*23'
3.3a
2.7a


2.7a
2.3a
2.3a
2.0a
2.78
2.3a

2.0a
2.0a
2.7a

2.7a
2.0a
2.38
2.7a
2.3a
2.7a
2.7a
2.7a
3.0a
2.7a


2.0a.
2.0a
1.7a
1.0a
2.0a
2.Ca

1.78
1.3a
2.0a

2.0a
1.3a
2.0a
2.0a
1.7a
2.0a
2.0a
2.3a
2.0a
2.3a


1.70"
1.3a
1.7a
1.0a
1.0a
1.0a
1 na
1.0 a
1.0a
l.3

1. 3a
1.08
1. 3'
1.0a
1.0a
1.3a
1.30
1.70
1.3
1.7a


1.08
1.0a
1.0a
1.08
1.0a
1.0a

1.0a
1.0a
1.0a

l. O8
1.00
1.0a
1. 0a
1.0a
1.0a
1.0a
1.0a
1.0a8
1.0a


1.0a
1.33
1. o
1.0
1.0a
1.0a

1.08
1.0a
1.08

1.0
1.0a
1.0"
1.0a
1.0a

1.0a

1.0
1.0
1.0a


1.0a
1.0a
1.08

1. (a
1.0a

1.0a
1.0a

1.0a
1.08

1.0a
1.0a
1.08
1.0a
1.0a
1,0a
1.08

1.08
1 0
I--5


aGranular treatments applied on 4/3C and sprays on 5/15, 6/26, and 7/26/79.
PRating System: 0 = none to 10 = 100% of foliage showing some damage. Means
5Pretreatment count for sprays.
GLannate at 0.45 lb. AI/acre inadvertently sprayed on all plots on 7/28/79.
eTreatments were tank mixes.


Seed sown on 4/30 and crop harvested on 9/10/79.
followed by the same letter are not significantly different at the 5% level.


-- --





AREC, Quincy and ARC, Marianna


Table 4: Effects of Broadcast
Marianna 1979.


Granular Soil and Foliar Spray Treatments on Control of Lepidoptera Complex and Yield of Florunner Peanuts. ARC,


Treatment and
Lbs. AI per Acre
1 -; 1- -;nTI


m/23 Lls:


Hean Nuraber Worms Per Foot of Row-U


7/23c


8/9e


8/16f


3/30h


I --'Ieari


mean b
Yield/Acreb
Ibs.


Furadan, 6.00
Di-Syston, 6.00
Temik, 6.00
TD-5032, 0.25
Curacron, 0.63
Pounce, 0.12
Pounce, 0.05 +i
Orthene, 0.581
Orthene, 0.78
Penncap-M, 1.11
Pounce, 0.05 +
Penncap-M, 0.57
Pydrin, 0.12
Lannate, 0.58
Bolstar, 1.21
Monitor, 0.59
UC-51762, 0.53
RI-0994, 0.53
RH-0308, 0.58
Lorsban, 0.83
Check,(Untreated)


aGranular treatments applied or 4/30 E
bMeans followed by the same letter are
cPredominantly corn earworn !2% and
dPredominantly corn earworm 56% and
ePredominantly corn ear~nrn !0% and
fPredoninantly corn earwcrm ~5% and
hPredominantly corn earworm 53% and
Predominantly velvetbean caterpillar
iTreatments were tank mixes.


md sprays on 5/15, 6/26, and
not significantly different
fall armyworm 6%.
lesser cornstalk borer 33%.
velvetbean caterpillar 10%.
fall armyworm 3%.
velvetbean caterpillar 43%.
79% and corn earworm 13%.


7/26/79. Seed sown
at the 5% level.


on 4/30 and crop harvested on 9/10/79.


Lannate at 0.45 lb. AI/acre inadvertently sprayed on all plots on 7/28/79.


2.7a
3.2a
3.9a
3.2a
4.0a
3.2a

5.3a
5.4a
3.7a
3
3.48
a


3.9a
3.8a
2.7a
3.0a
2.4a
2.1a


0.2a
0. 2a

0.0a
0.0a
0.0a
o. Ca


0.1a
0.0a
0.0a

0.0a
0.0a

0.0a
0.1a
0.0a
0.0a
0.0a

0.2a


0.3a
0.6a
0.7a
0.8a
0.3a
0.4a

0.3a
0.48
0.2a

0.6a
0.1a
0.3a
0.3a

..3a
0.3a
0.38
0.6 a
0.7a
0.6a


0.1a
0.2a
0.2a
0.28
0. 1a

0.7a7

0.2a

0.1
0.1a
0.2a
0. a
0.2a
0.2a
0.0a
0.4a
0.3a
0.2a


0.8a
1.1a
1.6a
1.4a
0.3a
0.3a

0.98
1.1a
0.3a

0.9a
04a
0.4a
0.4a
0.4a
0.9a
0. 3
0.9a
0.4a
1.3a


1.4c
I 1,c
1bc
1.0 c
0.9abc
0.3ab
l.0bc

0.4ab
G.9abc
0. 7abc

0.4ab
.6ab
0.6
0.1
0.2ab
0.4
C.9abc
'ab
0.3a
0. i
1.1


3,8508
3,964a
3,927a
3,749a
3,5738
3,663a

3,870a
3,6368a
3,593

3,749a
3,883a
3,708a
3,422
4,001a
3,591a
3,765a
3,511a
3,170a
3,426a


- -- --- -- -----




AREC, Quincy and ARC, Marianna


Table 5: Phytotoxic Effect of Broadcast Granular Soil and Foliar Spray Treatments on Florunner Peanuts. ARC, Marianna 1979.


Treatment ana
Lbs. AI per Acre
per Applicationa


iMean Phytotoxicity Indices0


5/14 5/21 5/28 6/4 6/11 6/18 6/25 7/2 7/9 7/16 7/23 7/30c 8/6 8/13 8/20 8/27


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


Furadan, 6.00
Di-Syston, 6.00
Tenik, 6.00
TD-5032, 0.25
Curacron, 0.63
Pounce, 0.12
Pounce, 0.05 +d
Orthene, 0.58d
Orthene, 0.78
Penncap-M, 1.11
Pounce, 0.05 +d
Penncap-M, 0.57
Pydrin, 0.12
Lannate, 0.58
3olstar, 1.11
Monitor, 0.59
UC-51762, 0.53
H!-0994, 0.53
Qi-0308, 0.53
Lorsban, 0.83
Check (Untreated)


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
3.7
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.03
0.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
3.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0C
3.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0.
0.C
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
3.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0


aGranular treatments applied or 4/30 and sprays on 5/15, 6/26, and 7/26/79. Seed sown on 4/30 and crop harvested on 9/10/79.
beating System: 0 = None, 1 = Slight leaf deformity or spotting, 2 = Moderate leaf deformity or spotting, 3 Heavy leaf deformity
necrosis, and 4 = Severe leaf deformity or spotting with considerable necrosis.
cLannate at 0.45 lb. AI/acre inadvertently sprayed on all plots on 7/28/79.
dTreatments were tank mixes.


or spotting with some


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.0
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0
3.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
3.7
0.0


0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
3.7
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0

0.0
0.0
0.0
3.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
3.0
0.0







AREC, Quincy and ARC, 1arianna


Table ?: Tolerance of Certain breeding Lines and Varieties to Insect Attack and Damage as Compared to Florunner Peanuts. ARC, Marianna 1979.

Mean Number Mean Thrips Foliaga Mean Number Worms Mean Leafhopper
Thrips Per Buda'b Damage Indicesac Per Foot of Pow8 Damage Indicesa
Treatment 6/28 7/5 7/12 7/19 6/28 7/5 7/12 7/19 8/21d 9/48 9/1f 8/23 9/6 9/13

72 Z 41A-1-1-4-b2-b3 15.7b 18.0b 5.0a cd 8.7cd 9.3 9.0 8.7cd 4.cd 3.3a 24.3a 5.7 1.7b 1.bed
.0, 3.7bcd 3a3a 243. .7h .7
72 X 41A-G-1-1-1-b3 21.9 13.0ab 8.0a 3.2abc 8.0bd 10.0b i0.Cd 9.0 3.7bde 5.3 23.0 6.7gh 3.3f 1.7df
72 Z 41A-6-1-1-2-b3 32.1 8.7 7.9a 3.8abc 8.7cd 10.0b 9.3bcd 8.7c 2.3abcd 4.7 28.0a 8. 3.7 2.3f
cd 9 a 37d 7a bid bcd, 'Ibc
72 X 41A-6-1-2-1-b3 24.30C 11.6 4.7a 2.8a 7.7bcd 9.7b d 9.0d 3.7de 3.78 24.7a 6.7h 1.7 0.7
72 X 41A-6-1-2-2-b3 233bc 9.1a 2.98 1.7 8.0bcd ~ 9.0c 8.3c 07 1.3 13.3a 6.0 1.00 0.7
72 1 42-4-1-1-b3-b2 22.0 17.1ab 8.4a 4.1ab 7.3c .7 9.3bc 8.7cd 4.3cde 5.3a 27.0a 4.3def 1.0abe 0.7a
72 X 42-6-1-1-1-b2 1. qbe 14.2ab 5.6a 3.8abc 8.0 b.1 8 .7c 8.7cd 1.0a 40 28.0 3.3 0a 0 .3
8.U i 9.0b a.7cc 1.0aed 4d 2a a bcde --I
72 X 42-6-1-2-1-b3 0.3a 12.6ab 6.2a 2.7b 6.7 9.0 9.0 8.7 2.7ad 2.3 21.3 2.3a 0.3c 0.3
72 X 42-6-1-2-2-b2 11.2abc 11.7a 68 2.6abc 9 .O bd 8.3 3.3 26.7 3.3de .7 abc 0.3
72 X 42-6-1-2-3-b3 6.7 20.3bc 4.7 3.0aQC 5.0a 7.0 7.3a 7.0a 2.7abcdc 3.0 22.3 3.7c 0.3 0.3ab
72 X 87A.-8-1-1-b3-b3 12.9abD 12.9ab 5.7a 1.78 8.0bd 9.7 9.0bd 8.0c 1.7ac 4.0a 30.0a 5.7 2.0cde 1.0b
AC-17367 21.0cd 17.0abc 4.0a 4.7bc 8.0 cd 10.L 9.3bed 8.3cd 5.0de 4.7a 24.3a 4.7f 2.3def 1.3cde
C-343 16.9 234 1.7 8.3d 9.0 .3 7.3 3.3abcd 2.0 26.7 2.7abcd 1 d 0.7ab
NC-10247 117abc 11.7ab 5.7 3 3.3a8 8.3c 9. 8.7c 8.c 2.7acd 4.3 16.0e 1.3a 0.0 0.0
NC-10272 15.9c 19.7Dc 5.3 3.8b 9.0 10.0 9.7cd g 2.7abde 1.3 18.68 3.7cde 0.3 0.
TC-15729 10.3ab 20.7C 8t.8 1.8ab 5.0a 7.7 8.3 7.70 4.0 a 1.7i 22.7" 1.7. ab 0.7 0.0a
NC-15745 20.4bcd 12.8a 4.0 1.2a 8.7cd 9.3 9 3,be 8.7 3.3a 5.0 36.0a 1.7a 0.3a 0.3a
-6 120 21.8 5.0a 26ab 7.3c 9. 8.7 7.3 3.3ad 3.3 26.7a 2.7abd 0.3a 0.0
SE runner 56-15 16.3 18.2 c 7.0a 3.0at 9.0d 9. 97d 9.0 3.7 4.7 167a 7 h 3.3f 20
a Valenci 21.b
Valencia 21.9 18.3b 8.6a 5.6 9.0 10.0b 0.0 9.0 5.3 1.3 22.3a 6.7gh 4.3 2.7
cCheck (loru ) 11. 1.8bc .6 2.4ab 9.7b 9.bd cd 3.3bde 4.7 22.0 3.7cde 3df 3cde
Check (Florunner) 11. 19. 8c 9.6 2.4a 87cd 97b 90bcd .3c 3.3abcde 4.7 22.08 3.7 2.3 1.3c


a
Means followed by t'he
bThree terminal buds p<
Rating Systemn 0 = NI
Predominantly corn ea
ePredominantly velvet
fPredominantly velvetbc


same letter are not significantly different at the 5% level.


er plot examined
one to 10 = 100%
rorn- 89% and
ean caterpillar
ear caterpillar


1. Seed sown on 6/12 and crop harvested on 10/26/79.
of foliage showing some damage.
rednecked peanutworm 7%.
- 82% and corn earwom 16%.
- 97% and corn carworm 2%.


Rain flooded plots on 8/28, 9/18, 9/25, 10/2, and 10/9/79.




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