Group Title: Research report - University of Florida Agricultural Research Center ; RC-1975-3
Title: Use of Troleneª 40 in loose or block mineral mixtures for horn fly control
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074275/00001
 Material Information
Title: Use of Troleneª 40 in loose or block mineral mixtures for horn fly control
Series Title: Research report ;
Physical Description: 6 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Chapman, H. L ( Herbert L. ), 1923-
Agricultural Research Center, Ona
Publisher: Agricultural Research Center,
Agricultural Research Center
Place of Publication: Ona, FL
Publication Date: 1975
Copyright Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subject: Horn fly -- Control -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Cattle -- Diseases and pests -- Control -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: H.L. Chapman, Jr.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "February, 1975."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074275
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 85850975

Full Text



S Ona Agricultural Research Center *-
Research Report RC-1975-3 February, 1975

Use of Trolene(R) 40 in Loose or Block Mineral Mixtures
for Horn Fly Controll/
2/
H. L. Chapman, Jr.-

This study was conducted to determine the effeciveness of a mineral
mixture containing six percent ronnel from Trolene 40 for controlling
horn flies when incorporated into either a loose mineral or a mineral block.

Experimental Procedure

Two experiments were conducted during the summer of 1974. The first
trial was conducted for 98 days at the Ona Agricultural Research Center (ARC).
Sixty-nine crossbred yearling heifers and steers wereadivided into three equal
groups of 23 animals each on the basis of sex, breed and weight. The groups
were randomly allotted to the control mineral mixture, a loose mineral mixture
containing Trolene(R) 40 or a block mineral mixture containing Trolene(R) 40.
The composition of the mineral mixtures are shown in Table 1. The mineral
mixtures were fed free choice in covered feeders. The cattle grazed native
range pastures during the experiment. The pastures were about one mile apart
from each other. No fly control measures were used during the experiment
accept for the experimental minerals mixtures. Fly counts were made on 10
animals in each group before treatment began and at 14 day intervals, using
wide angle 7.5x-15x40 binocular field glasses. The counts were made by
counting one side of randomly selec ed animals, multiplying by two and using
the average for 10 animals. Control waT expressed as a percentage based on
the number of flies found in the .sa s. All animals were weighed
at the beginning and end of the rial. 7

The second trial was cond ted f 98 day per Ranch, located
approximately four miles fronmthe Onaw v and inv 2 Charolais x Brahman
cows and bulls. There were /tee herds o ?t le used n the study. The
cattle were about six years i and weigh a'in est ated 445 kg. It was not
possible to weigh the cattle. le grazed Pan. lagrass pastures and the
groups were widely separated from eOthe experimental procedures
were the same as in the first trial. /0 /_

Samples of the experimental minerals were t in a covered mineral
trough and samples taken as 0, 14, 28, 56, 76 and 105 days and analyzed
for ronnel residues.





I/ Trolene(R) 50 was furnished by Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan.

2/ Animal Nutritionist and Center Director, University of Florida,
Agricultural Research Center, Ona, Florida 33865.








2.

Table 1. Composition of mineral mixtures used in trolene(R) 40 trials. (%)


Mineral mixture
2/ 2/
I, Loose- Blockl
Ingredient Control- medicated medicated

Dicalcium phosphate 60.00 50.00 50.00
Salt 25.00: 10.00 10.00
'Vitamin A (30000 USP) 1.50 0.10 0.10
Cottonseed meal 3.75- --- --
Trace elements 3 --- -
Cane molasses 6.00 5.00 10.00
EDDI'. .025 0.05 0.65
Trolene 40 --- 15.00 15.00
Dolomite --- 15.25 '4'00
Dry molasses --- .2.50 2.00
Trace element premix #3 --- *. -. 1.50 1.50
Bentonite --- -r- 3.75
Masonex --- --- 3.00
Khroma red oxide --- .50 .50
Vitamin D2 --- : .05 .05
Anise Oil --- : .05 .05


1/ Control mixture was Ona #2 Mineral Mixture
Cash Feed Mills, Lakeland, Florida.


manufactured by Lakeland


2/ Experimental mineral mixtures were manufactured by V. M. S., Inc.,
Montgomery, Alabama.

Results


As shown in Table 2, there was no positive effect of the medicated
mineral mixtures on the weight gain of the experimental cattle in Trial #1.
The mineral intake was 130, 74 and 43.5 mg/Kg of body weight for the cattle
fed the control, loose-medicated and block-medicated mineral mixtures. The
intake of the medicated mineral mixtures was adequate to- reduce the horn
fly population. As shown in Table 3 the population was reduced up to
67 percent in the group fed the loose-medieated mineral and from 32 to 75
percent for the group receiving the block-medicated mineral;,as compared
to the control group.











Table 2. Average weight change and mineral intake per animal in trial
number one.

Mineral mixture
Loose- Block-
Control medicated medicated


Animals per group 23 23 23
Initial weight (kg) 283 283 291
Final weight (kg) 335 327 329
Total gain (kg) 52 44 38
Total mineral intake/animal (grams) 3949.8 2210.0 1322.7
Daily mineral intake/animal (grams) 40.3 22.6 13.5
Daily mineral intake (mg/kg body wt.) 130 74 43.5


Table 3. Average fly count, per animal,
of 10 animals.)


trial one. (Each figure is an average


Mineral mixture


Loose medicated
No. Percent
flies reduction


69
638
141
84
83
50
45
81


Block medicated
No. Percent
flies reduction


*0
59
44
34
51
64..
67


Results obtained in the second trial were more variable than in the first.
Mineral intake was higher than in the first trial (Table 4). Horn fly popul-
ation was lower for the groups receiving the medicated mineral mixtures but
the reduction was not as much as in trial one. The horn fly population was
reduced from 2 to 43 percent on the cattle eating the loose-medicated mineral
and from 0 to 27 percent for the group eating the block-medicated mineral.


Days
on
test


Control
No.
flies


69
374
346
150
126
103
126
244








.4.


Table 4. Average mineral intake and fly population per cow, trial #2. (Each figure is an avera-e of
10 animals.)


Mineral mixture


Loose-medicated


Block-medicated


Animals per group (gm)
Total mineral intake (gm)
Daily mineral intake (gm)
Daily mineral intake (mg/kg body wt.)
Average fly counts (each figure is an


30
5357.2
54.7
123
average of 10 animals)


Ho.
flies


Days on test


U0
302
246
127
101
132
327
206


29
5311.0
54.2
122


No. Percent
flies reduction


89
non
141
125
100
100
233
238


Control


25
2724.0
27.0
63


No.
flies


Percent
reduction


91
306
131
54
120
122
308
225












Analytical data for the samples of mineral mixtures are presented in.-
Table 5. These tables show there was no significant loss of TroleneR 40
from the experimental rations during the course of the experiment.


Table 5. Average ronnel content of experimental minerals (%).1/


Days
on
test


Mineral mixture
Loose Block medicated
medicated Surface Core


0 5.89 5.11 5.70
14 6.34 5.64 6.12
28 5.72 5.34 5.66
,56 5.74 5.74 5.84
77 5.54 5.98 5.90
106 5.86 5.15 5.42


1/ Trolene" 40
Michigan.


analyses were done by Ag-Organics Department, Midland,


The animals involved in trial 1 were observed for 65 days after the
experiment ended. The cattle in trial 2 were in breeding groups during the
test and remained at the conclusion of the test, were returned to their regular
mineral mixture and observed. At no time during the trial or during the
observation periods were any adverse reactions noted.

Insecticidal mineral blocks remaining at the termination of these trials
were destroyed by burying in non-cropland, away from water.

Horn fly control with the experimental material depends on ronnel being
eliminated in the feces of cattle. Microbial activity in the feces and soil
rapidly decompose the ronnel to phenol and phosphorus. It is not a persistent
compound and should not present a problem or build-up in the soil.

Summary

Two trials of 98 days each were conducted concurrently to evaluate
the efficiency of a six percent ronnel mineral mixture for the control of
horn flies and to determine if there were differences between the'loose or
block form of the medicated jineral mixtures. Trial number 1 was done at the




MAR 6 1978



6.


Ona ARC on unimproved range and trial number 2 with a cooperator not far
from the research center on pangolagrass pastures. The consumption of the
control mineral was higher than the medicated mixtures until the animals were
trained to eat the latter. Consumption of the block was less than the loose
mineral mixtures. There was not a positive effect of mineral formulation
on weight change of experimental animals. However, in both trials there
were less horn flies on the cattle receiving the medicated mixtures as
compared to the control mixtures. Results of fly counts were more variable in
trial number 2 than in trial number 1.


Acknowledgements

This research was supported in part by a grant-in-aid from Dow Chemical
USA, Midland, Michigan. Additional assistance was provided by Mr. Howard Hopper,
Ona, Florida, who furnished cattle for the second trial. Much of the
experimental data was collected by Mr. Rodney Harn, Laboratory Technician II,
This assistance made the study possible and is gratefully acknowledged.






























ARPC, Ona
2/7/75 100




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