• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of bureau publications
 Sale of bureau publications
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Chapter I: Historical sketch
 Chapter II: Physical and geographical...
 Chapter III: Geology and miner...
 Chapter IV: Government, finances,...
 Chapter V: Agricultural resour...
 Chapter VI: Railroads and...
 Chapter VII: Commerce
 Chapter VIII: Reciprocal commercial...
 Chapter IX: Tariff-customs...
 Chapter X: Cities and towns
 Chapter XI: Bibliographical...
 A: Commercial directory of Santo...
 B: Mines and mining laws of Santo...
 C
 Index






Group Title: Bulletin - Bureau of the American Republics - no. 52. 1892. ""
Title: Santo Domingo
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00074007/00001
 Material Information
Title: Santo Domingo a handbook
Series Title: Bulletin
Physical Description: vi, 202 p. : front. (fold. map) plates. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: International Bureau of the American Republics
Dominican Republic -- Congreso Nacional
Publisher: Govt. Print. Off.
Place of Publication: Washington D.C
Publication Date: 1895]
 Subjects
Subject: Tariff -- Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Dominican Republic   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: "Bibliographical notes": p. 178-179.
General Note: At head of title: Bureau of the American Republics, Washington, U.S.A.
General Note: "Import duties" (p. 112-175) in English and Spanish.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00074007
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000587806
oclc - 22866703
notis - ADB6520

Table of Contents
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    List of bureau publications
        Page iii
    Sale of bureau publications
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    List of Illustrations
        Page vi
    Chapter I: Historical sketch
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 2a
        Page 2b
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 4a
    Chapter II: Physical and geographical features
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
    Chapter III: Geology and minerals
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Chapter IV: Government, finances, religion, and public instruction
        Page 12
        Page 12a
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Chapter V: Agricultural resources
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 22a
        Page 23
    Chapter VI: Railroads and telegraphs
        Page 24
        Page 24a
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Chapter VII: Commerce
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Chapter VIII: Reciprocal commercial arrangement betweeen the United States and Santo Domingo
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    Chapter IX: Tariff-customs regulations
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
    Chapter X: Cities and towns
        Page 176
        Page 176a
        Page 176b
        Page 177
    Chapter XI: Bibliographical notes
        Page 178
        Page 178a
        Page 179
    A: Commercial directory of Santo Domingo
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
    B: Mines and mining laws of Santo Domingo
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
    C
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Index
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
Full Text




















































~I.',', ,,jOEI .... ,, .......... ;-h .l
PRTAU PRINCE J



00-7. .gi

lODOD .L iJJ _I .' .
..

/_ m V II' 0] L O L PO.M


71~-. sU~--~- -.







BUREAU OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLICS,
WASHINGTON, U. S. A.


SANTO DOMINGO.


1892.


BULLETIN NO. 52.
[Revised to March I, 1894.J




















LATIN
AMERICA












BUREAU OF THE ARFRICAN REPUBLICS,
NO. 2 LAFAYETTE SQUAt, WASHINGTON, U. 8. A.




Director.-CLlION FURBISH.
Secretary.-FR4)ERIC EMORY.















While the utmost care is taken to insure accucy in the publications of the Bureau of the American
Republics, no pecuniary responsibility is assumnean account of errors or inaccuracies which may occur
therein.
By official notification to the United States Dartment of State in April, 1892, the Dominican Repub-
lic became a party to the support of the Bureau the American Republics.
;i


WASHINGIN. D. C., U. S. A.:
GovERNMI PRINTING OFFICE.




















LIST OF BUREAU PUBLICATIONS.


i. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. x.
2. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. a.
50. Hand Book of the American Republics, No. 3.
7. Hand Book of Brazil.
9. Hand Book of Mexico.
31. Hand Book of Costa Rica.
32. Hand Book of Guatemala.
33. Hand Book of Colombia.
34. Hand Book of Venezuela.
51. Hand Book of Nicaragua.
52. Hand Book of Santo Domingo.
55. Hand Book of Bolivia.
6r. Hand Book of Uruguay.
62. Hand Book of Haiti.
67. Hand Book of the Argentine Republic.
5. Import Duties of Mexico.
8. Import Duties of Brazil.
so. Import Duties of Cuba and Puerto Raeot'
Iz. Import Duties of Costa Rica. ,
as. Import Duties of Santo Dqpir.go ,,
so. Import Duties of Nicaraj. ,.
1I. Import Duties of Merxio (revised).
22. Import Duties of Bbiv~ .
23. Import Duties of Salvador.
24. Import Duties of Honduras.
25. Import Duties of Ecuador.
27. Import Duties of Colombia.
36. Import Duties of Venezuela.
37. Import Duties of the British Colonies.
43. Import Duties of Guatemala.
44. Import Duties of the United States.
45. Import Duties of Peru.
46. Import Duties of Chile.
47. Import Duties of Uruguay.
48. Import Duties of the Argentine Republic.
49. Import Duties of Haiti.
13. Commercial Directory of Brazil.


14. Commercial Directory of Venezuela.
1S. Commercial Directory of Colombia.
x6. Commercial Directory of Peru.
17. Commercial Directory of Chile.
x8. Commercial Directory of Mexico.
xg. Commercial Directory of Bolivia, Ecuador,
Paraguay, and Uruguay.
26. Commercial Directory of the Argentine Re-
public.
28. Commercial Directory of Central America.
29. Commercial Directory of Haiti and Santo Do-
mmgo.
58. Commercial Directory of Cuba and Puerto
Rico.
39. Commercial Directory of European Colonies.
Commercial Directory of Latin America.
'i. Newspaper Directory of Latin America.
3., Patent Ared Trade-Mark Laws of America.
4. Money, Weights, and Measures of the Amer-
ican Republics.
6. Foreign Commerce of tneAn.erican Republics.
3o, First Annual Report, x89i. ,
Si Scoad AAnual P.eport,s892.
35. B~reistUffsinn Latin America.
4o. Mines and Mining Laws of Latin America.
4x. Commercial Information Concerning the Amer-
ican Republics and Colonies.
53. Immigration and Land Laws of Latin America.
63. How the Markets of Latin America may be
reached.
Manual de las Repdblicas Americanas,x89t.
Monthly Bulletin, October, 1893.
Monthly Bulletin, November, x893.
Monthly Bulletin, December, 1893.
Monthly Bulletin, January, 1894.
Monthly Bulletin, February, x894.
Monthly Bulletin, March, x894.


The above list includes publications of the Bureau from its organization to April 15, 894. No requests
based upon the above will e noticed.
On the following page will be found a list of publications issued by the Bureau, of which a limited
number remain for distribution.


Y//74-

















SALE OF BUREAU PUBLICATIONS.



The following monthly bulletins have been published by the Bureau of American
Republics: Coffee in America," October, 1893; Coal and Petroleum in Colombia,"
etc., November, 1893; "Minerals and Resources of Northeastern Nicaragua," etc.,
December, 1893; "Finances of Chile," etc., January, 1894; "Costa Rica at the World's
Fair," etc., February, 1894, and Reciprocity Treaties and Trade," etc., March, 1894.
Of the other publications of the Bureau, the following will be furnished to applicants at
the prices named in the list. All orders for these publications must be addressed to
"The Public Printer, Washington, D. C.," and must be accompanied with the money
for same. No money will be received by the Bureau or its officers:

PRICE LIST.

Cents. Cents.
3. Patent and Trade-mark Laws of AmeriL. 5 36. Import Duties of Venezuela...... ....... 5
4. Money,Wei-htsand Measuresof theAmer- 38. Commercial Directory of Cuba and Puerto
ican Republi .s ........................ 5 Rico................................
6. Foreign Commerce of the American Re- 39. Commercial Directory of European Colo-
publics............................... 20 nies................................... to
8. Import Duties of Brazil ................... 1o 42. Newspaper Directory of Latin America... 5
to. Import Duties of Cuba an, PuL-ft [LU'p .., '5 ; 43; Ipport Duties of Guatemala ............. 25
ii. Import Duties of Costa 'Itc. .....<....,'... o 4f Mqoort Duties of the United States........ 5
r3. Commercial Diretdry of, Brazil...'........ 5 45. plippQDr Dutis of Peru ................... 25
14. Commercial Dindtory of Venezuela ...... 5 46. Import .Dviek ofcChile................... 25
xs. Commercial Eet.'orv of Colombia....... 5 47. Import Dities of Uriguay ............... 25
16. Commer.iad ;i'ectory ofPeu ,.... ...., 5. 48. Import Duties of tiheArgen'ine Republic 25
17. Commprcial 18. Comiherikl Directory of ?(exi'o. .... a!;5* -S. 44and Book of the Amcriian Republics,
9g. Commercial Directoryof Bolivia,Ecuador, No.3..... ............................. 50
Paraguay, and Uruguay ................ 5 51. Land Book of Nicaragua................. 50
2o. Import Duties of Nicaragua .............. o 52. Hand Book of Santo Domingo ........... 50
21. Import Duties of Mexico(revised) ........ 15 53. Immigration and Land L.aws of Latin
22. Import Duties of Bolivia ................ o2 America ............................... 4
23. Import Duties of Salvador ......... ....... 5 55. Hand Book of Bolivia ........... ....... 40
24. Import Duties of Honduras ............... to 61. Hand Book of Uruguay.................. 50
25. Import Duties of Ecualor ............... 5 62. Hand Book of Haiti...................... 5o
z6. Commercial Directory of the Argenti.:e 63. How the Markets of Latin America maybe
Republic............................... 5 Reached ............................... 40
27. Import Duties of Colombia............... 5 67. Hand Book of the Argentine Republic.... 50
28. Commercial Directory of Central America. zo
29. Commercial Directory of Haiti and Santo PUBLICATIONS NOT NUMBERED.
Domingo .............................. 5
30. First Annual Report of the Bureau, 189 .. to Commercial Directory of Latin America...... 40
32. Hand Book of Guatemala................. 35 Second Annual Report of the Bureau, 1892.... 5
33. Hand Book of Colombia .................. 30 Third Annual Report of the Bureau, 1893 ..... 5
34. Hand Book of Venezuela ................ 35 Manual de las Republcas Americanas, 189a... 50
IV
























CONTENTS.



Page
Chapter I. H historical Sketch ........................................... I
II. Physical and Geographical Features .......................... 5
III. Geology and Minerals ....................................... 9
IV. Government, Finances. Religion, and Public Instruction....... 12
V. Agricultural Resources........................... ......... 15
VI. Railroads and Telegraphs .................................. 24
VII. Commerce ................ ...... ..... .. .......... ..... 30
VIII. Reciprocal Commercial Arrangement between the United States
and Santo Domingo .................. .... ............... 44
IX. Tariff-Customs Regulations ........................ ...... 104
X Cities and Towns ........................................... 176
XI. Bibliographical Notes .................. ............ .. 178
Appendix A. Commercial Directory ..................................... 180
B. Mines and Mining Laws .................................... 183
Index ........................ ........... .............*.. .............. 191
V


























ILLUSTRATIONS.




Page.
Map of Santo Domingo and Haiti .................................. Frontispiece.
Ruins of Convent San Francisco, Santo Domingo City ...................... 2
House of Don Diego, Colon, Santo Domingo ....................... ...... 3
Typical Scene in Santo Domingo City-Casa del Cord6n.................... 5
View near Banks of Ozama River ................................... .. 8
Statue of Columbus, Santo Domingo ......... ................ ............. 12
Cocoa Palms ..... ............... .................... ........ 22
Citadel of Santo Domingo ....................... ........................ 24
Cathedral of Santo Domingo ....................... .................. .. 176
Interior of Cathedral.......... ... ....................... ... 177
Little Chapel, Santo Domingo ........................... ............... 178
VI












Chapter I.


HISTORICAL SKETCH.
The early history of Santo Domingo is identified with that of
Haiti. The two political divisions of the island, now known as
the Republics of Santo Domingo and Haiti, originated naturally
in the settlement of different portions of the island by Spanish and
French colonists. Lines of demarcation, growing out of the
differences of language, race, and political institutions, were thus
laid down and are much clearer than the physical boundaries,
which are, in fact, still a matter of discussion between the two
Republics.
The settlement of the island was made by the Spaniards, and the
greater part of the territory is still occupied by a Spanish-speaking
population. Peculiar interest attaches to the Republic of Santo
Domingo for the reason that within its limits was established the
first civilized settlement in the new world, and because its territory
is closely associated with the career of Christopher Columbus. The
first landing of Columbus on that island was made on December
6, 1492, on the coast of what is now a part of the Republic of Haiti,
a few miles west of the Dominican boundary, and here he lost his
flagship, the Santa Maria, with whose timbers he constructed a
stockade called La Navidad. Leaving a garrison of thirty men,
he returned to Spain to carry the news of his great discovery. The
garrison was slain by the Indians shortly after his departure, and
upon his return in 1493 with a large number of colonists, he built
a town to the eastward of the ill-fated settlement, within the pres-
Bull. 52- 1






SANTO DOMINuO.


ent limits of the Republic of Santo Domingo. This town he
called "Isabela" and it was the first settlement by white men in
America.
The natives called the island "Haiti" (mountainous country)
and "Quisquica" (vast country). Columbus named it "Espa-
fiola" (Spanish), which was corrupted by English-speaking people
into Hispaniola.
The effect of the Spanish rule was to reduce the natives to
servitude so oppressive as to cause them to diminish rapidly in
numbers, and to engage in an insurrection against the Spaniards,
which was not quelled until 1533, and then only by a treaty which
granted the Indian chief, Enriquillo, and 4,000 of his followers,
a considerable tract of land for their own exclusive use.
The importation of negro slaves began about 1505, and soon
proved to be disastrous. One of the greatest troubles which Diego
Colon had to go through, between 1520 and 1523, was a negro
uprising of considerable strength and magnitude, which ominously
inaugurated the scenes of turmoil and bloodshed of three centuries
afterwards.
About 1630, a colony of French and English, which had estab-
lished itself on the Island of Tortuga, obtained a footing on the
mainland of Haiti. By the treaty of Ryswick (1697) the part
of the island which they held was ceded to France. The treaty
of Bale, July 22, 1785, transferred to the latter nation the sover-
eignty over the whole island, which was formally abandoned by
the Spanish Government on January 27, 1801, in the two hundred
and fifty-seventh year of their rule. The Haitian general, Tous-
saint l'Ouverture, took possession on that date, in the name of
France, of the ceded colony.
After the assassination (in 1806) of Dessalines, who had pro-
claimed himself Emperor, the Spaniards reestablished themselves in
the eastern part of the island, which they called Santo Domingo. On
the st of December, 182 1, the people proclaimed their independence












































RUINS OF CONVENT SAN FRANCISCO AT SANTO DOMINGO.










































HOUSE OF DON DIEGO COLON, SANTO DOMINGO.






SANTO DOMINGO.


of Spain, and constituted themselves into a Republic, under the
flag and authority of Colombia. But Boyer, President of Haiti,
which in the meantime had also become a Republic, taking advan-
tage of the civil strife, invaded it. In the following year, the
dominion o he whole island fell into his hands. Boyer held the
Presidency c the new Government, which was called the Republic
of Haiti, until 1843, when he was driven from the island by a
revolution.
In 1844 (February 27), the people of the eastern end of the
island again asserted their independence and established the Re-
public of Santo Domingo, or Repfblica Dominicana (Dominican
Republic), as it is officially designated. From that date to the
present time, the two political divisions have been maintained.
In 1861, the Spanish Government succeeded, by means of
diplomatic arrangements with President Santana and a plebiscite,
in reistablishing its authority in Santo Domingo for over four
years, but by a resolution of the Spanish Cortes, dated March 3,
1865, and executed July 11, in the same year, all claims of sov-
ereignty on the part of Spain were withdrawn. Since then, Santo
Domingo has not been seriously disturbed by aggressions from
without, although the boundary question has, at times, caused
friction with Haiti.
Not only was the first permanent settlement of Columbus made
upon Dominican territory, but it is claimed that the dust of the
great discoverer is preserved in the cathedral of the city of' Santo
Domingo, instead of the cathedral at Havana, as was long be-
lieved.
The Dominican Republic was watched for many years with
special interest on account of the relations of its labor to labor in
the West Indies and the rest of America, and the attention which
it excited was not lessened when its reincorporation with Spain
in 1861 took place, or when it was visited by the commission
which the Government of the United States of America, under a






SANTO DOMINGO.


resolution of Congress, approved January 12, 1871, sent out to
inquire into its condition and resources. This commission had its
origin in an almost unanimous vote by the inhabitants of the Re-
public in favor of annexation to the United States. Three com-
missioners were appointed by President Grant and made a visit to
and examination of the country. Their report was favorable to
annexation, but Congress took no action upon it. On January
10, 1873, the bay and peninsula of Samana were ceded to a com-
pany formed in the United States, but on March 25, 1874, all
rights of the company were recalled because of non-payment of
the stipulated rent.
The part that Santo Domingo has taken in the quadricentennial
celebrations in honor of Columbus, and the claim that it possesses
among its treasures the remains of the famous navigator, have
brought it into prominence of late under other aspects.
The Republic of Santo Domingo was founded in 1844. Its
constitution bears the date of November 18, 1844, but it was
reproclaimed and amended on November 14, 1865, and again in
1879, 1880, 1881, and 1887.
The population of Santo Domingo was officially estimated in
1888 at 61o,ooo. It is mainly composed of a mixed race of the
original Spanish settlers and the Indian inhabitants, of mulattoes
and negroes, and of whites or European-descended inhabitants,
who are comparatively numerous. The Spanish language pre-
vails, though in the towns both French and English are spoken.





































U ~U1 IN


TYPICAL SCENE IN SANTO DOMINGO CITY-CASA DEL CORD6N.













Chapter II.


PHYSICAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES.
The Republic of Santo Domingo comprises the eastern and
by far the larger part of the island originally called La Espafiola.
It lies in the Atlantic Ocean at the entrance of the Gulf of Mexico,
between about 680 40' and 720 30' longitude west of Greenwich,
and between latitude 170 36' and 190 58' north. With the excep-
tion of Cuba, it is' the largest of the West India islands. The
whole island has an area of 28,249 square miles, of which 18,045
are comprised in the Republic of Santo Domingo and 10,204
belong to Haiti. The Dominican Republic includes all the terri-
tory east of the boundary which extends from the mouth of the
River Perdenales, on the south coast, to that of the River Mas-
sacre, which flows into the Bay of Manzanillo on the north coast.*
Santo Domingo is a beautiful and fertile country, with a great
variety of climates, depending on the altitude of the ground, and
with no less variety in the character of the soil and vegetation. Its
greatest length from Cape Engaio to the Haitian frontier, is about
260 miles, and its greatest breadth from Cape Isabella to Cape
Beata, is 165 miles. It has a coast line of about 940 miles, on
which there are several good ports. Prior to 1880, only five of
these ports, namely, Santo Domingo and Azua in the south,
Samana in the east, and Puerta Plata and Monte Cristi in the
The dividing line between the two countries was established by treaty in 1777, and
carefully surveyed and marked by monuments. But subsequent to the occupation of
the whole island by President Boyer, of Haiti, and the revolution of 1844, which secured
the independence of the Republic of Santo Domingo, a portion of this boundary, which
covers an extent of about I,ooo square miles, has been disputed.






SANTO DOMINGO.


north, had been opened to foreign commerce; but in 1882 the
establishment of new sugar plantations necessitated the opening of
the port of Macoris on the north coast, and what was then a small
village, containing only a few fishermen's huts, became, in a short
time, a thriving place of from 2,000 to 3,000 inhabitants, and the
chief town of a maritime district. The same increasing produc-
tion and commerce caused, shortly afterwards, the port of Barhama
on the south coast to be also opened. In 1886, the port of San-
chez on the magnificent bay of Samana, became likewise a port
of entry, and it is rapidly growing to be a place of importance, as
it is the terminus of the railroad now in operation to La Vega, a
distance of 62 miles. This makes a total of eight ports of entry.
There are some other harbors which may be made available as
outlets of the commerce of the country which surrounds them as
the demands of an increasing trade necessitates their use; but the
great bay of Samana rises above all in importance, requiring
special mention because it is indisputably the most advantageous
position in the West Indies, whether commercially or from any
other point of view. Samana Bay is 30 miles long by about
to miles wide, and is capable of accommodating the largest
fleets and ships of the greatest draft of water. It is well sheltered,
generally, against all winds, and especially against those from
the north and northeast, which are the most prevalent, by the
mountains of the peninsula. Its entrance is somewhat narrow,
but it is free from rocks and shoals. The harbor commands the
most important avenue from the Atlantic to the Gulf of Mexico.
The construction of the Nicaragua Canal, which would open a
new route by these shores for the world's commerce, would greatly
enhance the commercial importance of Samana Bay.
As seen from the sea, Santo Domingo appears to be very moun-
tainous; but in fact, the mountains consist principally of two
chains stretching through the entire length of the island with a gen-
eral direction from east to west, from which many secondary ridges






SANTO DOMINGO.


run in different directions, dividing the country into valleys and
plains which vary in shape and extent. The largest of the two
main ranges of mountains is known as the "Cordillera" or Cibao
Range." It commences at the eastern extremity of the island
and runs nearly through its center, ending near Dondon in Haitian
territory, and dividing the Doriinican portion into two districts
lying north and south of the range. Nearly parallel to it, on the
north, is the range known as the Monte Cristi Mountains. It
commences near the bay of that name and runs almost in a line
with the north coast toward the peninsula of Samana. The
highest points on the island are Loma Tina and Pico del Yaqui,
both of which are more than 9,000 feet in height.
With very few exceptions, these mountains are covered with
vegetation, andwooded to the summits. They form the reservoirs
for the rainfall, distributing the waters by innumerable streams
and rivers in every direction, thus beautifying and fertilizing the
lovely valleys which abound in elements of prosperity for ten
times the number of inhabitants that they now contain.
The largest and finest of these fertile plains is the famous "Vega
Real" or royal plain, so called by Columbus, which lies between
the middle part of the Cibao and the Monte Cristi ranges.
This valley is now commonly called the Cibao, the name La
Vega being confined to the eastern half, while the western is dis-
tinguished as the Valley of Santiago. It stretches from the bay
of Samana to Manzanillo Bay, and is about 140 miles long, with
an average breadth of 14 miles. The best agricultural lands, and
the principal interior towns of the island, are situated on this
plain. The plain of Seylo is another great valley which stretches
eastward about 95 miles from the river Ozama, with an average
breadth of 16 miles.
The principal river is the Yaqui, which rises in the Pico del
Yaqui, and running northwestward, falls into the Bay of Manzan-
illo. Its mouth, however, is obstructed by shoals, and it is only






8 SANTO DOMINGO.

navigable by canoes. The Neyba, which follows in importance, is
formed from several streams which have their source in the main
mountain range and flows south into the Bay of Neyba. The
Yuna river, which rises on Loma Tina and flows eastward to
Samana Bay, is navigable by vessels of light draft as far as its
junction with the Camu, and above that point by boats and loaded
canoes. The Ozama River, which flows into the sea at the city
of Santo Domingo, is about 24 feet deep for a distance of about
3 miles from its mouth, where it receives the waters of the Isabella.
It needs some improvement to become accessible to the large
vessels which now receive and discharge their cargoes in the outer
roadstead of the port of Santo Domingo at considerable risk
and expense.



















































VIEW NEAR BANKS OF OZAMA RIVER.














Chapter III.


GEOLOGY AND MINERALS.*

In the course of such geological inspections as have been made
in Santo Domingo, no rocks have been discovered of earlier than
secondary origin. The northern range of mountains is composed
of the most ancient rocks, consisting of slates, conglomerates, and
limestones which have been disturbed and intersected by intru-
sive masses of syenitic character. Flanking these, both on the
north and south, are developments of tertiary formations merging
into gravels and limestones on the north coast. The central
mountain chain, which runs through the Republic from the Haitian
frontier and forms the core of the peninsula of Samana, is com-
posed of metamorphic rocks, chiefly hornblendic slates, with some
mica slate and patches of serpentine, much uptilted and in many
places strongly folded. In the western part, they are much disturbed
and broken by dikes; where this is the case, the outcroppings of
quartz veins, which appear through the talcose slates, are mostly
auriferous. Gold is also found in the sands of all the rivers and
streams that have their source in these mountains, and has been
washed with more or less success on the banks of the rivers Jaina,
Verde, Nigua, and the Yaqui and its tributaries. On the banks
of the Jaina, from Cuello to Cattarrey or Basimo, as well as on
the banks of its tributary streams, there are vestiges of ancient
placer mining operations and small quantities of gold are still
For additional information, see Appendix B, Mines and Mining Laws of Santo
Domingo, page 183.






SANTO DOMINGO.


often obtained by the native women by washing the gravel in
bateas.
Serpentine is a very abundant rock in the interior and forms the
basis of many of the pine-covered ridges and grassy hills.
From the slopes of the central chain of mountains, the older
rocks are succeeded by stratified argillaceous beds, by more recent
tertiary formations and the coralline limestones which skirt the
island in horizontal beds, forming the basis of the terrace-like
slopes from the mountains. This is a very interesting formation,
abounding in corals in various degrees of change by mineraliza-
tion.
In the Neyba valley, to the north and east of Lake Enriguillo,
are two remarkable hills, composed entirely of rock salt, one of
which is over two miles long at the base. The salt is of the
purest crystallized variety and can be quarried out in large trans-
parent blocks. Chemical analysis has proved it to be of sufficient
purity for commercial purposes. It is merely covered by a super-
ficial layer of earth, easily removable, and not more than three feet
in thickness.
Petroleum has also been found in the neighborhood of Azua.
Copper ores are abundant in several localities, particularly on the
southern flank of the mountains between Azua and the River
Jaina, where they can be mined to advantage whenever the means
of transportation are supplied.
Iron ore is very plentiful over considerable areas of the interior
in the shape of limonite, as well as hematite and magnetic iron.
The extensive deposits of Maymon, in the northern mountain
range, are composed of the latter, and are remarkably pure. These
fine masses of ore are, however, at too great a distance from any
port, and can not be worked profitably until they are reached by
railroads.
The other mineral products include silver, platinum, manga-
nese, tin, antimony, marble, opal, and chalcedony. There are also







SANTO DOMINGO. 11

many mineral springs, both ferruginous and sulphurous. Of the
latter, some are hot, and are much frequented for the cure of
rheumatism and cutaneous diseases.
Discoveries of coal have been reported at various times, but on
examination they have all proved to be lignites of little value for
fuel when compared with true bituminous coal.










Chapter IV.


GOVERNMENT, FINANCES,* RELIGION, AND PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.
The Government of Santo Domingo is popular, representative,
and republican. Its administration is intrusted to three coirdi-
nate branches, called "powers," viz: Legislative, executive, and
judicial.
The legislative functions are vested in a body called "The Na-
tional Congress," consisting of only one chamber, and consisting of
22 deputies, who serve for two years. These deputies are elected
by the people, under a law of restricted suffrage, in the ratio of
two for each province or district.
The executive authority is vested in the President of the Re-
public, who is chosen by an electoral college, and serves for four
years. He is assisted by a cabinet, or ministry, consisting of six
members, who are called Secretaries of State for their own respec-
tive departments, as follows: (i) Foreign Relations (Relaciones
Exteriores); (2) Commerce and the Treasury (Hacienda y Co-
mercio); (3) Justice and Public Instruction (Justicia e Instruccion
Publica); (4) War and the Navy (Guerra y Marina); (5) In-
terior and Police (Lo Interior y Policia); (6) Promotion of Gen-
eral Welfare and Public Works (Fomento y Obras Pdblicas).
There is also a Vice-President of the Republic, who succeeds
the President in case of death or inability.
For the purposes of administration, the territory of Santo Do-
mingo is divided into eleven districts, six of which are called
"provinces," while the other five are known as "maritime dis-
tricts," or simply districts. The provinces are: Santo Domingo,
La Vega, Azua, Santiago, El Seibo, and Espaillat. The dis-
For additional information relating to Finances, Coinage, Railways, Export and
Import Duties, see Appendix C.













































STATUE CF COLUMBUS, MAIN PLAZA, SANTO DOMINGO.






SANTO DOMINGO.


tricts are Puerto Plata, Samana, Monte Cristi, Barahona, and San
Pedro de Macoris.
These provinces and districts are subdivided into communes,
the communes into cantons, and the cantons into sections.
At the head of each province, or district, there is a governor,
appointed by the President of the Republic. Each commune
has a prefect, each canton a subprefect, and each section a local
executive magistrate, appointed, as are the prefects and subpre-
fects, by the governor of the province or district.
The judicial power is vested in a tribunal called the Supreme
Court-of Justice, consisting of a chief justice and four associate jus-
tices, all of them appointed by the National Congress. An officer
known as Fiscal," appointed by the President of the Republic,
and serving only for the same period of time as the President him-
self, forms part of this tribunal. His functions are similar in many
respects to those of Attorney-General of the United States.
Judicially, the territory of Santo Domingo is divided into
eleven districts," each one provided with a tribunal of first instance.
The judicial districts are, in their turn, subdividad into "com-
munes," having each one a local judge, called "alcalde," with a
secretary and a bailiff or sheriff (alguacl1).
The revenue for the support of the Government is mainly
derived from customs duties. The revenue for 1890 was
$3,829,329, and the expenditure $3,837,300.
The national debt, or the portion called "internal" (interior),
was returned in 1889 as amounting to $1,282,952. Another
portion, also internal, called "the public debt" (deuda publica, is
calculated at $1,648,423. The "international debt," on January
1, 1891, amounted to $213,295, and the "foreign debt," accord-
ing to the official statement of the Council of Foreign Bond-
holders, represented, at the end of 1890, the sum of Z714,300, or
$3,571,500, with unpaid interest amounting to 680,ooo, or
$3,400,000. Under a decree issued in September, 1890, a new






SANTO DOMINGO.


6 per cent loan was contracted for 900,000, or $4,500,000, out
of which $2,700,000 was to be taken to meet the cost of con-
struction of a railroad from Puerto Plata to Santiago, and $540,000
for a sinking fund for the internal debt. The balance was to be
used for other treasury purposes, including the service of the loans
of 1888 and 1890.
The army consists of several regiments of infantry, cavalry, and
artillery, one of which is stationed at each capital of a province.
Military service is compulsory for all in case of foreign war.
The religion of the state is the Roman Catholic, but other
forms of worship are allowed under certain restrictions.
Primary instruction is gratuitous and obligatory. The schools,
divided into primary, superior, technical, normal, and professional,
are supported, respectively, by the communes and by the General
Government.
It is estimated that there are at present in the whole territory of
the Republic about 300 schools, with an attendance of about
10,000 pupils.
The professional school has the character and functions of a
university.
There are several literary societies in the capital and other towns,
and about forty newspapers are published in the Republic.
Santo Domingojoined the Postal Union in 1880. In 1889,
there were, besides the general post-office in the capital, twelve
central and forty-six subordinate post-offices. In 1889, the inland
letters, printed packets, etc., numbered 204,546, and the interna-
tional, 182,015.
The monetary unit, as fixed by law, is what is called "domin-
icano," a silver coin of the value of one franc, or twenty cents.
But the money in use is mainly that of Spain, the United States,
Mexico, and France.
The French system of weights and measures is gradually com-
ing into use and replacing the Spanish system prevailing for cen-
turies.














Chapter V.


AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES.
While the geographical position of Santo Domingo insures the
successful production of all the tropical fruits and vegetable growths,
including the commercial staples, the differences of elevation,
climatic influences, and character of soils render particular districts
adaptable to different branches of agricultural industry. Under
a law of July 8, 1876, private citizens may, under certain condi-
tions, receive grants of unoccupied State lands for agricultural pur-
poses, and special inducements are offered to immigrants.
SUGAR.

The extent and fertility of the lands suitable for the production
of sugar are unsurpassed by any of the West India islands; in
fact, the plains of La Vega and the rich valleys and lowlands,
where this industry has been introduced, give wonderfully profita-
ble returns. In many parts of the island, the canes do not need
replanting for many years. It is quite common to find plantations
that have yielded fifteen annual cuttings from the original roots,
and, in many that are located on the richest lands, excellent cane
of much greater age, abounding in saccharine matter, may be found.
The production of sugar is at present the most important
industry in the Republic, having quadrupled in quantity during
the past ten years. In addition to a large number of small plan-
15







SANTO DOMINGO.


stations, there are at present twenty-one large estates, with factories
in full activity, located as follows:

Estates and V
sugar houses. value

Dollars.
Province of Santo Domingo ............................ I 6, ooo,ooo
District of San Pedro de Macoris....................... 6 3. 700,000 ooo
District of Puerto Plata.... ............................ 3 500, ooo
Province of Azua..................... .... .. .......... 2 600,ooo
Total ............................................ 21 I, oo, ooo


These establishments expend annually $1,600,000 for labor and
working expenses; they therefore form a very important element
in the prosperity of the country.
The principal market for Dominican sugar is the United States,
where it is now admitted free of duty under the terms of the
reciprocity treaty. The following table shows the quantities of sugar
exported during the nine years from 1881 to 1889 and will dem-
onstrate the rapid strides that this industry is making:
[Quintals of I22 p:uM-nls.]
ISSi .................................... ... .. ......... 114,604
1882 .................................... ............ 235, 322
18S3 ................................................. 204, 250
1884 ................................................. 361, 856
1885 .................................................... 4 6, 578
1886 .................................................... 405,977
1887.............................. ... ............... 406,142
IS88 ................ ................................. 388, 103
1889 ................................................... 450,855
This showing is the more remarkable from the fact that this
industry is almost entirely the growth of the past fifteen years.
The United States Commissioners, in 1871, after commenting on
the wonderful natural advantages possessed by the Republic, say
in their report:
As an evidence of the present undeveloped condition of Dominican agricul-
ture, may be cited the fact that the commission, during their expeditions through
the interior of the island, often met with beet sugar raised and refined in France,
but with little of native manufacture.







SANTO DOMINGO.


The contrast between this state of affairs and that presented by
the year 1889 with its exportation of over 5o,ooo,ooo pounds is a
striking evidence of the wonderful progress already made in devel-
oping the resources of the country. When we take into considera-
tion that this quantity was the product of less than 9,000 acres of
land, which is all that was then devoted to the growth of the
cane, and that there is at least ten times that area of land that is
especially adapted to the purpose, and which can be devoted to
it without prejudice to other industries, it is not difficult to esti-
mate the brilliant prospect for this branch of agriculture.
The distillation of rum from the waste products of the manu-
facture of sugar has also kept pace with the improvement of the
parent industry, as, in addition to the numerous small distilleries,
eight of the large sugar mills are provided with complete distil-
ling apparatus with a combined capacity of producing 4,000
gallons daily during the sugar making season. The total quantity
of rum now made in the Republic is from 500,000 to 6oo,000
gallons annually.
CACAO.

The cultivation of cacao is another industry in which remark-
able progress has been made within the past few years. It is very
attractive to men of small means, as it does not require so great
an expenditure for labor or the erection of costly machinery as do
sugar plantations. It is only within a few years that the value of
this product has been appreciated in Santo Domingo, and that
foreigners with capital have entered into the business of raising it,
but already it is assuming great importance. The following table
of exports will indicate its progress:
[Quintals of x12 pounds].
1881.......................... ..................... .... 3,459
1882..; .... ........ ............ .......................... 3,619
1883..................................................... 5,249
1884 ................................................. 6,315
1885 ..................................................... 7,262
Bull. 52--2






SANTO DOMINGO.


1886......... ..................... ........... .. .... 7, 834
887 ..................................................... 9,731
1888..................................................... 14,582
1889..................................................... 13,191
The decrease in the quantity exported in 1889 was not caused
by any diminution of the production, which was, in reality,
largely in excess of the previous year, but was the effect of the
rapid extension of the manufacture of chocolate and the great
increase of local consumption, which is very large. The great
improvement that has taken place in methods of cultivation, and,
consequently, in the quality of the cacao, is largely due to the
example of foreigners who have established plantations which
might be justly termed model farms, from the vast difference
between their operations and the primitive methods of agriculture
which had been previously in use. The principal among these
new plantations, are La Evolution, near Sabana la Mar, the owners
of which are Swiss, who have a flourishing farm with about
loo,ooo plants, of which about 60,000 are just coming into bear-
ing; La Mercedes, at San Pedro de Macoris, which is the property
of a Spaniard who is well skilled in the management of coffee
and cacao plantations; La Condessa, on the bank of the river
Ozama, providing cheap transportation for its products, which
has now about 35,000 plants approaching the productive age, and
the proprietor, a Frenchman, intends to extend the number to
about 150,000; La Fundacion, at San Cristobal, which is also a
French enterprise, with about 1oo,ooo plants, 50,000 of which
are approaching condition to yield a return. Besides the above
named, there are on various smaller plantations, in the plains of
Seybo, in the eastern part of the Republic, 200,000 plants; in
the commune of San Cristobal, 160,000; and between Moca, San
Francisco de Macoris, and La Vega, in the Cibao, 250,000,
which are approaching maturity. The amount of production
will, therefore, rapidly increase and will form a correspondingly
important feature in the commerce of the country.







SANTO DOMINGO.


COFFEE.

The mountain regions of Santo Domingo are especially suited
to the culture of coffee. These highlands form at least one-half of
the area of the island. To persons who are unacclimated, or com-
ing from a northern climate, these regions will prove very attractive
not only from their salubrity and the beauty of the scenery, but
also from the fact that the soil is usually very rich. Even where
too steep to be plowed, it can be cultivated with the hoe. The
establishment of coffee plantations on these hills will be a very
remunerative undertaking.
The exports of coffee from 1881 to 1889 have been:
[Quintals of 112 pounds.
1881 .............................. ..................... 12,993
1882..................... ................... .... ......... 6,940
1883........... ... ............. ..................... 5, 475
1884 ....................................... .............. 2, 223
1885 ........... .. ......................... .. ...... 2, 315
886 ............ ......... ........................ 2,392
1887............... ......................................... 2, 553
1888 .................................................. 13,217
1889 .. .................................................. 9, 15
The reduction in the quantity exported during the years 1884-
1887, inclusive, was caused by the great demand for labor for the
establishment of new sugar plantations, which during those years,
brought about the transfer of field hands from the coffee planta-
tions. Once established, the sugar estates have required a smaller
amount of labor. This fact, together with the higher prices pre-
vailing for coffee, has caused a revival in this important branch of
agriculture.
Although nature has provided the necessary elements for the
production of as fine coffee as can be found anywhere in the
world, the lack of knowledge and skill among the inhabitants
who have engaged in the culture of the berry, and carelessness
in picking and preparing it for the markets have caused the
Dominican coffee to be quoted at low prices; but the efforts of







SANTO DOMINGO.


the Government and private individuals have within the past few
years been directed toward the improvement of this industry.
Within recent years, a large landowner from Porto Rico has
been engaged in establishing a large plantation in the neighbor-
hood of San Pedro de Macoris and has imported for the purpose
skilled laborers from that place. This is an important movement,
as it will diffuse a knowledge of improved methods among the
people, and his plantation will be a valuable object lesson to the
community which can not fail to produce important results.

TOBACCO.

The country is everywhere well adapted to the culture of tobacco.
The garden of almost every native home contains sufficient for
the use of the family, and tobacco has furnished a principal article
of export, but it has suffered, as the coffee industry has suffered,
from a lack of skill and industry. It was for years raised care-
lessly, cured imperfectly, packed roughly in cervons of palm leaf
and transported over the mountains upon the backs of donkeys
to the sea-board, where it was sold at very low prices to foreign
merchants and exported principally to Germany.
The following statement shows the amount of exportations of
the leaf in different years:

[Quintals of 1xs pounds.]
1881 .................................................... 62, 68
1882................................. ...... ..... ... ......... 8 379
1883............................ ................. ..... .. 127,386
1884 .......................... .... ...................... Iog, 624
1885 ................. ......................... .......... 112,523
1886 ..................................... ............ II4,621
1887 ........... ......................................... 175,637
1888...................................... ....... ..... 118, 173
1889 .................................................. 52.415

The great falling off in the exports in 1889 was due to an
exceptionally rainy season, and, although the official figures have not






SANTO DOMINGO.


been received, it is known that over 150,000 quintals were exported
in 1890.
Fortunately for the future of such an important branch of com-
merce, the Government has taken energetic measures for its devel-
opment, and already, gratifying results have been obtained.
A concession has been granted to a Dutch company for the
establishment of model plantations, two of which are in operation-
one near Santiago, in the Cibao, and the other at San Cristobal,
near the city of Santo Domingo.
As the value of the privileges granted by the concession is based
upon the prices obtained for the tobacco in foreign markets, no
effort has been spared by the company to improve the quality of
the product. One of the directors is from Sumatra and the other
from Porto Rico, where they have had large experience in the
raising of tobacco. All the laborers are foreigners, selected espe-
cially for their knowledge of the best methods of culture and
curing of the leaf; and seed has been imported from localities which
produce the most celebrated qualities. With these provisions to
insure success, combined with the advantage of the splendid cli-
mate and soil of the Dominican Republic, the results have been
most favorable. Some shipments have been recently made to
Holland of tobacco raised on these plantations, which, in quality,
left nothing to be desired.
These results have been so striking that the Government has
decided to create other similar plantations, one of which has been
located in the province of Azua and a second in the district of
Barbona. The prospects of this industry are, therefore, very
bright, but the results of the action of the Government in thus
fostering it are not confined to the production of tobacco, but
improved methods of culture and preparation of the soil will be
imitated in other branches, and agriculture in general will profit
by the example.






SANTO DOMINGO.


FRUITS.

Tropical fruits of all kinds are abundant and excellent in
quality, many species being found growing wild in the forests.
Among those that are extensively cultivated may be found
oranges, bananas, limes, citrons, shaddocks, pineapples, mangoes,
tamarinds, guavas, melons, papaws, pomegranates, nisperos, cheri-
moias, and cocoanuts. It is only recently that any attention has
been paid to the establishment of an export trade in fruits. The
first shipments of bananas were made in 1889 by an American
company which had purchased land and established plantations
upon the shores of the bay of Samana. The demand for tropical
fruits is growing into such large proportions in the United States
that there can be no doubt that they will, in the near future, con-
tribute very largely to the Dominican foreign commerce.

FOREST PRODUCTS.

One of the most striking characteristics of Santo Domingo is
the luxuriance of its forests, which, on examination, reveal a great
variety of products, the export trade in which has reached large
proportions. This trade cannot, however, be expected to reach a
much greater extension until the forest regions are more exten-
sively penetrated by railroads. Adding together the exportations
of the various products of the forests, such as cabinet and other
timber, dyewoods, and tan bark, the aggregates present the fol-
lowing results in the years designated:
Tons.
1881......................... .......................... I5,382
1882........................ ........................... 16,285
1883. ........... ............ .......................... 18,248
1884............................... ........ ........... : 20, 351
1887...................................... .............. 23,483
8S8. .................................................. 26,245
1889... ................................................ 37,122

The railway from Sanchez to La Vega reaches a high region,
where there is an abundance of resinous pine which will be ren-
























































COCOA PALMS.





SANTO DOMINGO.


dered available for building purposes in the Republic, and for
sale in the other islands of the Antilles, where this variety of
timber is not found. To show what can be done even by private
enterprise, it may be mentioned that a firm of merchants at Monte
Cristi a few years ago, at their own expense, improved the
Yaqui River and built some short lines of railroad to bring log-
wood from the distant forests, which resulted in the year 1889 in a
shipment of 30,422 tons of that article from that port alone.
The forests of San Juan, Neyba, and Baboruco, and those of
the entire chain of mountains which form the source of the Yaqui,
and end in the plains of Higuey, and the parallel and secondary
chain from Monte Cristi to the peninsula of Samana, all densely
wooded, are waiting for the first stroke of the ax of the lumber-
man and for railroads to transport the products to the ports of ship-
ment. On these mountain slopes, may be found in abundance not
only the choicest cabinet woods, such as mahogany, satinwood,
cedar, etc., but a great variety of timber especially valuable for
house and ship building, and many other woods which enter into
manufactures, such as lignum vits, lancewood, etc.; logwood, fustic,
and other dyewoods, while in the low lands, two species of palms
abound, the cocoanut and the palma real (royal palm), both of
which supply many wants of the natives. There is no lack of
labor to prepare the trees for the market, as all the inhabitants of
the interior are skillful woodmen and are more expert in this than
in any other kind of labor.
When it is considered that all these forests abound in medicinal
herbs and plants and fiber-producing plants of many varieties, it
is evident that a vast mine of wealth which will have an impor-
tant influence on the future prosperity of the country lies almost
untouched.












Chapter VI.


RAILROADS AND TELEGRAPHS.
As in all countries of tropical America, the great element needed
for the material progress and prosperity of the Dominican Republic
is easily accessible and economical means of transportation. This
is so evident that the Government, as well as private individuals,
is disposed to make every sacrifice to arrive at a solution of the
problem. The Government has taken no direct part in the con-
struction of railroads, but it is doing all in its power, by liberal
concessions and guarantees, to aid private enterprise in that direc-
tion. It has also created a Department of Public Works, the chief
duty of which is to attend especially to the development of every
enterprise having in view the improvement of and opening of new
ways of communication.
There is but one line of railroad completed and now in opera-
tion, that connecting La Vega, the capital of the province of that
name, with Sanchez, on the bay of Samana, which was constructed
by an English company. It follows the course of the river Yuna
on its left bank, necessitating the building of one large.bridge and a
great number of small bridges over the tributaries of that stream.
This line has proved very expensive to construct in consequence of
the engineers having adhered in its location too closely to the river
bottoms. Consequently, it has suffered considerably from inunda-
tions and washing away of uncompleted work, but it is now solidly
constructed and in good condition. It is 62 miles in length, of
3%-foot gauge, laid with rails weighing 34 pounds to the yard.
24


















































__I

-~--~-

~iI- ; ;;,
~C~-~;~--~----
~.------


~- -~s--


CITADEL OF SANTO DOMINGO.





SANTO DOMINGO.


The locomotives weigh 25 tons. The mixed trains that are reg-
ularly in use make the trip in four and a-half hours, thus averag-
ing about 14 miles an hour, although special passenger trains are
sometimes run at a speed of 25 miles an hour.
After leaving Sanchez, the road passes through Arenoso, Alma-
cen, Rivas, Barbero, and Bairol, and reaches, by an easy grade,
the great table lands of La Vega, which lie at an average height
ff about 280 feet above the sea level. This road has opened up
a magnificent agricultural region, and its stimulating influence is
already visible throughout the whole district. La Vega, which
was formerly a mere country village, is rapidly growing in wealth
and importance, while Sanchez, which consisted of only a few
miserable huts, is now fast becoming an important town and
seaport. The custom-house buildings, the workshops, depots, and
offices of the railroad company, and the large warehouses which
have been erected by private firms, give to the rising city a
refreshing appearance of modern activity which promises well for
the importance of the region for which the railroad has formed an
outlet and for the future of the port, which is already making a
good showing. During the year 1889, 47 vessels arrived there,
and the total of exports and impqrrts amounted to $459,759.22.
There is another railroad, now, in coursot construction, called
"The San Domingi, $&6e Line Railroad," whih. s, intended to
connect Santo .Domiingo,.the capital, wit Azua, passing through
San Cristobat and Bani, a gtilsnce of 90 miles. Toesurveys,
plans, and'estimates have been made for the first section of
25 miles from Santo Domingo to San Cristobal, and the grading
on the most difficult part of the line has been begun. This sec-
tion will reach the table land of the commune of San Carlos,
where are situated the three largest sugar mills, La Caridad, La
Fe, and La Encarnacibn. On this part of the line, the grade
rises 145 feet in a distance of about il miles, and the cuts in
some places will be 45 feet deep in calcareous rock of various
degrees of hardness. Native laborers are employed on this work,





SANTO DOMINGO.


and they are found to be entirely satisfactory. The gauge
adopted for this road is 3g feet, rails 45 pounds per yard, and 25-
ton locomotives. There will be three iron bridges on this first
section-one of 300 feet long over the Jaina River; the second,
150 feet, over the Niqua, and the third, 75 feet, over the Yuvaso.
The concession for this road is in the hands of citizens of the
United States, and the Government has guaranteed 6 per cent
per annum interest on the cost of construction. The road is
expected to become very remunerative, as the district of San
Cristobal is thickly settled, which fact, together with the large
sugar estates on the line, will insure a considerable traffic. Con-
cessions have also been granted for three other railroads, as follows:
(1) A railroad to start from Barahma, passing by way of Neyba
and San Juan, and terminating between Savanita, and Dejab6n, on
the bay of Manzanillo, west of Monte Cristi. This line will be
about 186 miles in length, and will pass through a large extent
of very fertile lands, which need only means of transportation to
enable them to be profitably cultivated. It will also reach great
forests abounding in mahogany, guiac wood, logwood, and fustic,
which, by its aid, can be made a source of la!ge revenue. This
concession is in the hands of a Dominican citizen.
(2) A railroad known as the "Dominican Eastern Railway."
Beginning at La Romana, a natural and well-p otected port about
65 miles east of Santo Domingo, it will run in a direct line north
to Seybe, the capital of the province, about 30 miles, from which
it will be extended over the mountains to the Bay of San Lor-
enzo, a seaport on the southern shore of the Bay of Samana,
while a branch, running easterly, will terminate at Higuey. The
total extent of the road will be about 200 miles. The gauge
will be three and one-half feet. This concession is in the hands
of English capitalists, and a company has been formed in Eng-
land, under the title of "The London and West Indian Company,
Limited," to provide the necessary funds for its construction, the
Government guaranteeing 6 per cent interest on the cost, which is






SANTO DOMINGO.


calculated at f4,000 per mile. This road will also open up a
very fertile and productive region, where there are numerous plan-
tations of coffee, cacao, and tobacco, and a finely timbered forest
region. The ports of La Romana and San Lorenzo are not yet
open to commerce, but, by the terms of the concession, that will
be done whenever the traffic demands it.
(3) A road, to be called "The Central Santo Domingo Rail-
road," to run from Puerto Plata, on the north coast, to Santiago,
a distance of about 49 miles. A contract has been entered into
with a Dutch firm to construct this line. The Government ,
agrees to issue first-mortgage bonds to the amount of 540,000
sterling, bearing 6 per cent interest, upon the road, buildings, and
rolling stock, redeemable in fifty years, the payment of interest
and the redemption of the bonds to be effected by means of a
fixed charge in the custom-house receipts, immediately after pro-
vision has been made for the obligations of the foreign loan of
1888. The contractor agrees to construct the line with the pro-
ceeds of that issue and to pay all expenses incurred in the sale of
the bonds, that financial operation having been placed in the
hands of Westendorp & Co., of Amsterdam. The Government
has also made a contract with the same parties to operate the line
for a term of fifty years, whereby it guarantees a minimum annual
income of 33,000, any amount received in excess of that rev-
enue to be divided in the proportion of three-fifths to the Govern-
ment and two-fifths to the contractor, who is to pay all expenses
for maintenance and operating the line. After the construction of
the road to Santiago, it is to be extended to the city of Santo
Domingo, making a total length of about 155 miles.
The first section, from Puerto Plata to Santiago, will be expen-
sive to construct, as it passes through a very uneven country, with
a succession of deep ravines and ranges of high hills crossing each
other in every direction, but it will be of immense benefit to the
country, as the district of Cibao, of which Santiago is the chief
town, is one of the richest and most favored localities on the






SANTO DOMINGO.


island. That city and Puerto Plata are both places of consider-
able commercial importance, where there are business firms of
high standing, having connections with the markets of Europe
and the United States, necessitating considerable traffic between
the two places. Near Santiago, a Dutch company has established
a model tobacco plantation, which explains the interest taken in
Holland in the improvement and development of this district.
The amount that will be required to meet the obligations of the
Government toward these several concessions will form a heavy tax
on the custom-house receipts, but the outlay will be small at first,
increasing in the process of construction, and it is fair to conclude
that the enlarged trade and increased prosperity that will be the
result of the improved means of transportation will yield a suffi-
cient enlargement of revenue to the Government to enable it to
fulfill all its engagements without undue strain upon its resources
and income.
TELEGRAPHS.
The telegraph lines throughout the Dominican Republic are, in
virtue of a concession from the Government, in the hands of The
Telegraph Company of the Antilles, which commenced its opera-
tions in 1886. The first line constructed was from Puerto Plata
to the city of Santo Domingo, passing through Santiago, Moca,
La Vega, and Cotui. By agreement with the railroad company,
their line from La Vega to Sanchez was also opened to the public.
Another line was constructed connecting Santiago with Monte
Cristi, having intermediate stations at Mao and Guayubin. These
several lines bring four of the principal ports in direct communi-
cation, viz, Monte Cristi and Puerto Plata on the north; Sanchez,
on the bay of Samana, on the east, and Santo Domingo, the cap-
ital, on the south.
At the end of 1890, the lines in operation were:
Miles.
From Santo Domingo to Puerto Plata .............. ....... 148
From La Vega to Sanchez ................................. 62
From Santiago to Monte Cristi.......................... 84
Total ............................................... 294







SANTO DOMINGO.


Another line is about to be constructed from Santo Domingo
to Macoris, about 40 miles in length, which will be of great ad-
vantage to the commerce of that port.
The Republic of Santo Domingo is also in communication with
the submarine cable systems and telegraphs of the world by means
of the French Submarine Telegraph Company, which has landed
its cables and established stations at Puerto Plata on the north
side of the island, and at the city of Santo Domingo on the south.
From the latter city, the cable runs to Curagao; thence to La
Guayra, on the coast of Venezuela. On the north side, the cable
is laid to the Mole St. Nicholas, in the Republic of Haiti, and
from thence to Santiago de Cuba, where it connects with lines which
put it in communication with the telegraph systems all over the
world.
During the short time that it has been in existence, the land and
submarine telegraph has proved in Santo Domingo, as it has done
everywhere else, of inestimable service to the commercial interests
of the country, and it has afforded, as nothing else could do, the
most effective aid for the administration of the Government. The
only objection to it is that the tariff of charges is too high, but, as
the business of the lines increases, that complaint may be met by
a corresponding reduction in the rates.
To complete the system, the following lines are urgently needed
and will probably be constructed.
Miles.
From city of Santo Domingo to Macoris and Seybo .......... 93
From city of Santo Domingo to Bani and Azua.............. 90
From Azua to Barahona ................................. 37
From Sanchez to Samana................................ 22
Total ........................................... ..- 242
When these lines are completed, all the most important points
on the island will be placed in communication.















Chapter VII.



COMMERCE.

The commerce of Santo Domingo is showing a healthy and
steady increase. This favorable condition is chiefly the growth
of the last ten years, and with the completion of the railroads now
in course of construction or projected there is no doubt that, year
by year, a greater development in the commerce of the country
will be witnessed.
The foreign commerce of Santo Domingo is mainly with the
United States, Spain, Great Britain, France, the Danish Antilles,
and Germany. According to the report submitted to the President
of the Republic on February 20, 1892, by the Secretary of the
Treasury and of Commerce (Secretario de Estado en los Despachos
de Hacienda y Comercio), the imports into Santo Domingo in 1891
were:


Through the custom-house
of-
Santo Domingo ......
Puerto Plata.........
Monte Cristi..... ...
Sanchez .............
SamanA ..............


Through the custom-house
Dollars. of- Dollars.
1,548,580,89 Macoris..... ........ 179,398.94
570, 123 96 Azua................. 33, 898. 06
166,414,57 Barahona ............ .........
250,567.891 Total.......... 2,687,558.33
28,574.04


According to the same report, the exports during the same year
were:


Through the custom-house
of-
Santo Domingo........
Puerto Plata..........
Monte Cristi..........
Sanchez...............
Samani ...............


Through the custom-house
Dollars. of- Dollars.
656,376.77 Macoris............... 716,776.43
612,056.oo Azua ................ 164, 793.20
455,105.25 Barahona ............ 21,062. oo
296, I2i. 44
3, 1748.ox Total........... 2, 926,039. o1
3, 748.01








SANTO DOMINGO.


The following is the list of the articles of merchandise exported
from Santo Domingo in 1891, and the quantity thereof, as offi-
cially given in the report above mentioned:


Rum ..............gallons..
Cedar wood............feet..
Cowhorns.........number..
Pitch................tons..
Campeachy wood......do...
Beeswax ..........pounds .
Mahogany ............feet..
Turtle shell........pounds..
Dry cocoanuts.........do...
Coffee ...............do..
Cowhides ........ number..
Sheepskins ............do...
Cacao............ pounds..
Divi-divi .............do...
Espinillo wood........feet..
Guaiacum (wood)...... tons..
Honey.............gallons..
Goatskins......... dozens..


26, 808
6,200
I,500
9,020
25,164
209,283
945,528
503
40,900
290,781
23,067
26,469
480,434
22,145
155, 967
5,653
23,070
7,314


Mulberry............tons..
Molasses...........gallons..
Gum guaiac........pounds..
Tobacco ..............do...
Yaya rods........ ....do...
Yellowwood ..........tons..
Fustic............ pounds..
Orange peels...... ...do...
Quiebra hacha wood...do...
Achiote, or annotto.... do...
Maple wood...........feet..
Hfiscaro.... ......pounds..
Sole ..................do...
Rosewood ............feet..
Beans............pounds..
Managle .............. do...
Sugar................do...


The report explains that in 1891 the production of the coun-
try had been smaller than in 1890, on account of a protracted
drought and other calamities which had afflicted a section of the
country.
The following statement, based upon official figures, shows the
steady increase of exports in previous years:
Dollars.
1880 .............................................. 1,328,083
1884 .................................................2 2,526, 903
1887.................. ........................... 2,660,471
1889.................... ...................... 2,957,764

A large proportion of the commerce of Santo Domingo is with
the United States. According to the latter's official returns for
six fiscal years, that commerce has been as follows:

Imports from Santo Domingo into the United States.
Dollars. Dollars.
x885............... 46419 1889 ..........461,419 89.. .............. 1,454,261
1886........................ 656, 131 1890....................... 1,951,013
1887....................... 1,380,126 1891....................... 1,699,935
1888 ....................... 459, 392


1,o88
1,373,559
S22,145
7,624,648
905,232
636
10,000
3,700
36,ooo
290
4,ooo
12,000
I,940
980
2,000
2,000
36, 361,468







SANTO DOMINGO.


Domestic exports from the United States to Santo Domingo.
Dollars. Dollars.
1885........................ 962,428 89 ....................... 1,150,651
i886 ....................... I,I017,285 1890........................ 926, 651
1887........................ I,o014,414 1891....................... I,006,388
1888........................ 792, 560
The leading imports of Santo Domingo into the United States
were, in 1890-'91: Sugar, $1,282,631; hides and skins, $95,503;
dyewoods, $81,014; coffee, $51,972; and woods, unmanufactured,
$66,345.
The exports from the United States to Santo Domingo were,
in the same year, principally: Ijon and steel and their manufac-
tures, $205,011; flour, $206,239; wood and its manufactures,
$103,706; cottons, $52,917; meat and dairy products, $147,460,
and fish, $60,858.
In the report submitted on June 13, 1892, to the President of
the United States by Mr. William F. Wharton, Acting Secretary
of State, and transmitted to Congress by the President (Ex. Doc.
No. 119, 52d Congress, Ist session), the following is said in regard
to the effect of the reciprocal commercial arrangement entered into
between the two countries:

COMMERCE WITH SANTO DOMINGO.

"The commercial arrangement with Santo Domingo was con-
cluded on the 4th of June, was proclaimed on the Ist of August,
and went into effect on the Ist of September, 1891, so that it had
been in operation eight months on the 30th of April last, the latest
date for which the statistics of trade are obtainable. *
The following statement from the Bureau of Statistics of the
Treasury Department shows the exports of domestic merchandise
from the United States to Santo Domingo during the seven
months ending March 31, 1892, compared with the correspond-
ing period of the previous year:








SANTO DOMINGO.


Exports to Santo Domingo for seven months ending March 3t, z89! and z892.

Seven months ending March 31-
Articles.
x89x. 1892. Increase. Decrease.


Breadstuffs: Dollars.
Wheat flour............................. 132, 323
All other................................ 10,419
Bricks ....................... .............. 5,027
Carriages and horse cars, and parts of......... 6, 441
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines........ 12, 528
Coal ..................................... .. 839
Cotton, manufactures of:
Cloths, colored and uncolored............ 26,004
All other ................................ 6,699
Fish:
Codfish, including haddock, etc., dried,
smoked, or cured ..................... 20, 749
A ll other................................ 4,291
Flax, hemp, and jute, manufactures of........ 5,379

Iron and steel, and manufactures of:
Machinery, not elsewhere specified.......... 88, 567
Steam engines, and parts of............... 2, o66
W ire.............. ..................... 11, 747
All other................................ 37,097

Total ................................. 139 477

Oils, mineral, refined......................... 17,434
,Paper, and manufactures of ................... 3, 763

Provisions, comprising meat and dairy prod-
ucts:
Beef products ........................... 28,046
Pork products:
Bacon and hams................. ... 7, 719
Pork, pickled ....................... 6, 584
Lard ................................ 29, 726
All other................................ 19, 6o8

Total ................................. 91, 647


Sugar, refined .............................. 6, 774
'Vegetables ................................ 9,055
Wood, and manufactures of :
Boards, deals, and planks ............... 38, 851
Other lumber, and timber ................ Io, 589
Household furniture..................... 5,523
Other manufactures of................... 2,867

Total ............................ .... 57, 830

All other articles........ .................... 73, 150


Dollars.
84 048
8,913
6,586
3, 875
11,629
2,645

29,933
3,409


21,267
12,356
4,238


Dollars.


I, 559


x, 806


518
8,065


Dollars.
48,239
1, 506

2, 566
899
........


3,929 .....
....... 3,290


, 141


83, 743 ........ 4,824
13,427 11,36i .......
5,041 ........ 6,706
23,617 ........ 13,480

125,828 ....... 13,649

23,3II 5,877 .....
4,229 466 ........



8,695 ....... 19,351

7,928 209 ........
4,942 ........ 1,6o6
24,843 ........ 4,883
14,686 ....... 4,922


61,094


30,553


_______________ I I _____________


6,094
4,499

46,214
4,278
6,586
13,451


--**-


7,363

I, 63
1o,584


68o
4,556


6,311
.... .**
.... ,.*o


70,529 12,699 ........


49,707


I I : 1


Total value of domestic merchandise... 629, 829


534, 226


23,443


95,603


Total value of domestic exports to Santo Domingo during seven months ending
March 31, 1890, $538,913.
Bull. 52--3









34 SANTO DOMINGO.

Exports to Santo Domingo for eight months ending April o3, 189i and 1892.


Eight months ending April 30-
Articles.
1891. 1892. Increase. Decrease.


Breadstuffs:
Wheat flour..............................
A ll other................................
Bricks .....................................
Carriages and horse cars, and parts of.........
Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines........
C oal.......................................
Cotton, manufactures of:
Cloths, colored and uncolored ...........
A ll other ... ...........................
Fish :
Codfish, including haddock, etc..........
Dried, smoked, or cured ................
A ll other...............................
Flax, hemp, and jute, manufactures of ........

Iron and steel, and manufactures of:
Machinery not elsewhere specified.........
Steam engines and parts of...............
W ire ..................................
A ll other........... ...................

Total ............................

Oils, mineral, refined .......................
Paper, and manufactures of .................

Provisions, comprising meat and dairy products:
Beef products ...........................
Pork products ........................
Bacon and hams.....................
Pork, pickled .....................
Lard..... ..........................
All other........... ....................

Total ............. ................. ..

Sugar, refined ..............................
V egetables............. ................... ..

Wood and manufactures of:
Boards, deals, and planks .............
Other lumber and.timber...............
Household furniture ....................
Other manufactures of ................

Total ...............................

All other articles.................... ........

Total value of domestic merchandise...


Dollars.
144, 342
11, 867
5,027
6,483
13,806
1,559

30,674
6,773


23,004
18,339
5,980


'89,852
2,866
12,801
40,903


Dollars.
104,392
13,300
6,919
4,045
13,966
2,657

41,433
5, 128


25,456
15,504
II,192


132,742
13,427
8,477
28,722


Dollars. Dollars.
....... 39,950
1,433 | ........
8)2 ........
........ 2,438
I6o ........
1,098 ......
10, 759 .......
.o,.. 759 645
........ 1,645


2,452

5,212


42,890
io, 561


2,835





4,324
12,181


146,422 183,368 36,946 .......


18,996
4,042


29,699 1 0,703
5,217 I 1,175


28,083 11,408 ........ 16,675

8,109 9,971 1,862 ........
6,602 6,073 ........ 529
32,734 29,517 ........ 3,217
20,554 19,645 ....... 909

96,082 76,614 ........ 1.9,468

7,014 7,329 315 ........
9,638 5,924 ........ 3.74


42,583 56,253 13,670 ........
12,079 11,334 ........ 745
5,812 5,694 ........ 118
2,948 18,049 15,101 .....

63,422 91,330 27,908 ..

61,769 50,591 ........ 11,178

675,239 694,064 18,825 ........







SANTO DOMINGO.


"This statement shows only a slight increase in our exports to
Santo Domingo since the reciprocity arrangement went into effect,
which is due to the financial depression that has affected that Re-
public during the past year; but it is more satisfactory than the
decrease shown in the exports of Great Britain, which amounted
to only $186,270 during the first three months of the current year,
against $380,945 for the first three months of 1891."

TRADE UNDER THE RECIPROCITY TREATIES.
Under the above heading, the Chief of the Bureau of Statis-
tics, United States Treasury Department, in his report on foreign
commerce for the year ending June 30, 1893, says:
Under the tariff act of 1890 commercial agreements were entered into with
certain countries of South America and colonies of European nations. Some
of these agreements have been in force for a period sufficient to gauge the effect,
and they have been in force during two very exceptional years-1892, when
the exports of domestic produce from the United States were the largest in its
history, and 1893, when the imports of the United States also touched high-
water mark. Whatever adverse influences could therefore apply to these agree-
ments did not arise from conditions in the United States, but from conditions.
purely local to the countries with which it had entered into these commercial
agreements. So far, therefore, as the United States is concerned the experience
of the last four years should be taken as conclusive upon the policy of these
arrangements. It is also possible to gauge relatively the effect of the conces-
sions contained in them by comparing the imports and exports into and from
the United States of certain lines of articles with the commerce in similar lines
of articles of other nations, nations enjoying no special privileges or concessions
in these South American and West Indian markets. The policy can be judged
only as any other natural force can be measured by its results. Premising that
the returns of imports into the United States for 1892 were overvalued in
many important lines, I submit the following tables showing the trade of these
reciprocity countries with the United States, United Kingdom, France, and
Germany. Comment is unnecessary.
Under the reciprocity clause of the tariff act Presidential proclamations were
issued imposing duties upon the imports of sugar, hides, and coffee from coun-
tries the customs regulations of which were believed to discriminate unduly
against products of the United States. I need only refer to the decreased
imports from the countries so affected, namely, Venezuela, Colombia, and
Haiti, as evidence of their disastrous effect upon imports from those countries.
The figures for Santo Domingo are:










SANTO DOMINGO.


Imports of coffee, hides and skins,


Articles. 1889. 18go.

Free of duty : Pounds. Dollars. Pounds. Dollars.
Coffe ............................. 823,920 oo, 868 242,954 49,443
Hides and skins, other than fur skins-
Goat skins ................ .............. 27,640 .......... 34,220
All other .... .................... ........ 33,857 .......... 43,059
Sugar and molasses-
Molasses ................ ......- ..........* .......... ..........* ..........
Sugar not above No.i6,Dutch stand-
ard in color, and tank bot-
toms, melada, etc.-
Cane and other ................................. .............. .......
Dutiable :
Sugar and molasses- Gallons. Gallons.
Molasses ......................... 4, 540 679 400 96
Sugar, Dutch standard in color-
Not above No. 13, and tank bot-
toms, sirups, melada, etc.- Pounds. Pounds.
Cane and other ..................36,905,443 1,142 844 47,033,940 1,715,364
Above No. 16 .................... -. .** -. --........... ...............

Domestic products exported from the
I


Agricultural implements..............
Cars, passenger and freight for steam
railroads .............number..
Cotton manufactures of :
Cloths, colored and uncolored .yds..
All other............................
India rubber and gutta percha, manu-
factures of ............ ........
Fish, canned, other than salmon........
Iron and steel, manufactures of :
Car wheels ..............number..
Cutlery................ .............
Firearm s...................... ....
Machinery, not elsewhere specified...
Nails and spikes-
Cut............... ........ lbs..
Wire, wrought, horseshoe, and all
other, including tacks .... lbs..
Railway, bars of rails of iron or
steel..................tons.
Saws and tools ...................
Steam engines and parts of-
Stationary engines...... number..
W ire.......................... lbs..
Leather and manufactures of:
Leather............................
Manufactures of-
Boots and shoes ...........pairs..
Harness and saddles .............
All other ........................
All other articles ....................
Total domestic exports to Santo
Domingo ..................


...........

. .........

1,760,817
...........




32

...........
...........

182,750

11,058

Io
...........

...........
215,639



14,406

...**......
,:.... .. ....


2

I, 048, 0o66
..........


921 .........


I,710

63,890
2,635

, 329
1,646


339
4,846
87,771

6,475

873

2,488
9,245

3,395
II,501

964

6,860
1,169
327
718,471


.1 I I----


119,416
6,910

811
1,251

327
357
io8, 945
30,258

4,323

921

343
8,467

..........
7,266

883

12,249
1,313
9,082
836, 6o8


.... .....
.........
..........


277,400

1, 081

73


4
328,750



7,511
..........
..........
..........


926,651


......... 1I, 150,651









SANTO DOMINGO.


and sugar from Santo Domingo.


1891. x8g. 1893.

Pounds. Dollars. Pounds. Dollars. Pounds. Dollars.
263,683 51,972 200,147 38, 041 553,584 111, 823

............. 45,424 ............. 44, 178 ............ 44,288
.......... 50,079 .............. 37,469 ..... ..... 36,783
Gallons.

.............. ........... ........... ...... 565 2, 334

Pounds.
21,035,400 689,463 62, 615, o68 2,017,739 64,035,840 2,054, 201







19, 853, 724 593, 168 .... ..... .. ........................ .. ........
.. ........ ........ .. ................ .. I,120 42

United States to Santo Domingo.


45,268 950,831
7,649 .............

854 .............
2,563 ..............


221
7,221
128,308

4,215

325

9,075
6,641

I, 300
15,813

I,181

7,755
714
261
746,516


3S
..............
..............


151,500

i8,810o

II0


I
387, 484


.. 60....
6,089
..............,
..............
..............


439 1...........


...........

56, 853
5,748

933
931

360
486
482
208, 242

3, 109

103

3, 803
6,593

560
12, 130

375


4,599
8o6
I,310
675,326


I

r, 618, 085
............


2





315,498

40,005

187


I
836,939


...6,.171....
6, 171
............
............
............


.............. 986,826 ............. 984,188 .......... .. I1,108,733


710,195
..............


.............

..............


185,250

4,910

254


3
478, 418


9,87......
9, 870
..............
..............
..............


432

225

95,478
5,858

5, 358
I,052

i8
88o
21,113
146, 853

6,435

1,936

6, 099
II, 705

900
22, 766

170

5, 81ri
1,223
1,488
722,933








SANTO DOMINGO.


Imports into the United Kingdom

Articles. 1889.


Cocoa........................................ s..
Coffee.......................................cwt.. 4
Dyewoods ...... ...........................tons.. 2,027
Fertilizers: Phosphate of lime and rock.......tons.. 4,094
Wood, furniture woods, and hard woods:
Mahogany .............................. tons. 517
All other................................ tons.. 256
A ll other articles .................................................

Total.............--......----...........
T otal ............................... ....... ..............




16
12,739
8,928

5,096
813
18,531

47,123


Imports into France from


Cocoa ..........................................
Coffee ................................ ............
Cotton, unmanufactured...........................
Hides and skins, undressed.........................
Medicinal barks............................ .......
Tobacco, unmanufactured .........................
W ax.................................... ...........
Wood.......... ...............................
All other articles...................................

T otal ...................... .................


Kilos.
I, 256, 477
24, 007, 6oi
807, 783
..............
119,342
122, 351

37,758,909
..............

..............


Francs.
I, 972, 669
53,296, 874
I, 171, 285

120,329
149, 268

7, 246,780
291, 831

64, 249,036


Imports into Germany from

zoo kilos. x,ooo marAs.
Cocoa ............................. .............. 2,960 400
Coffee ................,.... ........... .......... 52, 859 9,303
Cotton, unmanufactured................... ........ 733 192
Dyewoods:
Redwood ................................ ..... 7, 339 117
Logwood ...................................... 90, 841 1,544
Hides and skins, undressed....................... 406 53
Tobacco, unmanufactured ......................... 37,400 6, 358
W ood .......................................... ., 654 32
A ll other articles.................................. .............. 132

Total .......... .......................... .. ........ .. 18, 131


Exports from the United Kinlgom


4,508

144, 341
r8. 349


Quantities.
Bags and sacks, empty ........................doz.. 14, 863
Cotton, manufactures of:
Entered by the yard.........................yds.. 12, 286,400
Entered at value.......... ...................... ... ....


Quantities








SANTO DOMINGO.


from Haiti and Santo Domingo.

189o. 1891. x892.


Quantities. Quantities. & Quantities.
23,978 422 169,330 2,991 .......................
942 3,383 5 19 ..... ...............
8, 446 54, 131 1, 300 7,117 I, 328 7. 520
992 2,260 639 4,588 .......................

1,409 12, 899 I, 022 9,901 2,289 20,622
1,633 o1, 183 3,342 19,547 -2,270 12,658
.............. 6,315 ...... ........ 594 6.. .8...... 568

.............. 89,593 .............. 44,757 ........... 40,975


Haiti and Santo Domingo.

Kilos. Fran-s. Kilos. Francs. Kilos. Francs.
2,036,426 3,079,076 1,585,600 2,381,571 I, 460, 554 2,404,039
24, 358, 671 56,024, 943 28, 444, 915 -60,445,449 23, 016, 399 46, 378, o44
1,179,003 1, 709, 554 383,529 460, 235 511, 700 542, 402
510,267 714, 374 ..................................................

173, 185 225,141 ......................... 375,058 450,070
............. .............. 80,441 257,411 33,971 108,707
47, 718, 328 8,754, 155 31, 951, 736 5, 644,581 35,073,285 6, 692, 831
...... ... ..... 504,961 .............. 945,539 ............ 254,527

!.............. 71,012,204 .............. 70,134,786 ............ 56,830,620

Haiti and Santo Domingo.

zoo kilos. x,ooo marks. aoo kilos. 1,o00 marks.
4, 359 567 5, 393 728 .......................
70,919 13,191 96,430 16,875 ............ ...........
1,531 172 553 48 .......................

............... ... .. 116 2 ............ ...........
92, 709 1,483 79, 781 1, 197 ................. ......
117 13 224 24 .......................
39, 898 6,982 47,554 7,704 ........................
2,497 54 6,739 136 .....................
.............. 134 .............-. 137 ........................

..... ......... 22,596 ............... 26,851 ........................

to Haiti and Santo Domingo.


3,035

116, 508
23, 167


Quantities. & Quantities. Z Quantities.
22, 045 6, 662 20, 298 6, lo8 9, 206

26, o48, 100 312, 703 II, 321, 300 137, 8o6 o1, 591, ooo
.............. 43, 375 ............... 26, 582 ............








SANTO DOMINGO.


Exports from the United Kingdom

Articles. 1889.

Quantities.
Earthen and china ware............................. .............. 3, 3 5
Iron and steel, and manufactures of:
Hardware and cutlery .................... .................... 3, 544
M achinery .... .... .......................... ............... 3,203
All other.............. .................. tons. 1, 566 21,667
Linens....................... ................. ... .. ..............13, 20
Wool, manufactures of........................ds.. 212, 700 7,426
A ll other articles...................... .......................... 30,071

Total ................. ............. .... ... .............. 249,624

Exports from France to
Quantities. Francs.
Cotton, manufactures of................... ....kilps.. 38, 288 197, 818
Furniture, and musical instruments ............do... 35, 223 73, 261
Furs and skins, dressed .......................do... 49,197 1, 208, 896
Glassware and porcelain .......................do... 508, 273 197,427
Hats, of fur or straw ... ... ...................... .............. 39, 820
Iron and steel, and manufactures of:
Machines .............................. kilos.. 99,413 107, 207
Tools ....................................do... 193,096 117,324
All other, and castings ....................do.. 47,969 5,9o6
Linen, manufactures of, and clothing ...........do.. 145,681 674,843
Medicines and medicinal preparations ..........do... 34,083 166, 336
Oil, olive......................................do.. So, 352 230, 852
Paper, books and paints .......................do... 48,493 118, 667
Spirits distilled, brandy and liquors...........liters.. 51,449 107 953

Toys.................................... .... ............ .............
Wines .................................... .liters.. 680,900 906,965
Wool, and manufactures of ..................kilos.. 9, 154 149, 242
All other a.ticles................ .............. .................. 950, 409

Total ....................................... ............... 5,252,926

Exports front Germany to
xoo kilao. I,ooo marks.
Chemicals, medicines, etc .......................... 828 66
Cotton, manufactures of............................ 3o01 65
Earthenware........ ............................... 1, 637 74
Instruments, machines, etc ........................ 696 117
Iron, manufactures of ............................... 587 155
Leather, and manufactures of ....................... 57 61
Linen and linen goods .............................. 451 59
Paper, and manufactures of........................ 309 21
Soap and perfumery. .............................. 56 17
Wearing apparel......................................... 87 o9
Wine ......................................... .12 1
W ool, manufactures of.............................. 143 102
All other articles.................... ...... ..................... 301

Total.......................................... ............. 1,234








SANTO DOMINGO. 41

to Haiti and Santo Domingo-Continued.

1890. i89g. 1892.

Quantities. Quantitie. Quantities.
............. 9,440 .............. 6,489 ........ ..... 4,684

.............. 6,074 .............. 4,080 ............ 3,542
.............. 8,487 ............... 8,417 ............ 9, 283
2,696 41,201 1,875 28, 114 2,028 29,696
... .......... 22, 248 .............. 19,276 ............ 14, 522
749,900 27,426 356,800 I8,750 204,000 11, 149
............. 50, 741 .............. 65,376 ............ 3 332,385

.... ......... 528,357 .............. 320,998 ........... 247,971

Haiti and Santo Domingo.
Quantities. Francs. Quantities. Francs. Quantities. Francs.
88,128 489,874 45,697 257,775 52,428 355,033
141,812 273,374 75,595 116,460 ............ 195,107
105. 634 2, 760, 245 83, 447 2, 305, 186 89, 105 2,043, 791
1,147,768 567,791 503,762 217,993 865,576 278,473
............. 273, 270 .............. 181,281 ............ 177,114

89,447 I53, 11 48,761 73,266 50,093 137,530
526,727 337,035 1,577,999 805,961 218,612 221,338

147, 745 1, 850, 634 22, 530 I, 162, 207 83, 303 1, 040,029
66,708 312,429 43,824 214,628 ............ 199,877
423, 103 537, 341 123, 423 128, 360 336, 826 357, 036
95,682 289,920 73, 048 270,644 93,349 255,538
99 100 212, 869 129, 800 173, 098 85, 000 192,441
191,203 203, 522 ...................................................
88, 041 792, 369 28, 488 256, 392 40, 964 368, 676
1,634,000 2, 265,925 919, 800 1, 354, 685 1, 258,900 1, 746, 300
35,367 495,955 11,887 168,383 32,219 540,225
.............. 1,658, 513 ............ I, 104,557 ............ 1,095,953

...... ....... 13,474, 176 .............. 8,790,876 ............ 9,204,461

Haiti and Santo Domingo.
zoo kilos. z1,00ooo marks. zoo kilos. z,ooo marks.
1,802 163 1, 379 117 ........................
689 358 261 123 .... ...................
2, 513 141 1,824 96 ........................
1,057 145 462 57 .......................***
3,091 274 6,787 405 .... ....................
36 141 1oo 91 .................... ....
231 19 176 i6 ............. ... .....
429 33 303 23 ........................
199 73 45 19 .............***** ...........
155 185 27 36 .......................
30 4 12 1 ...............
364 267 157 104 ........... ............
.............. 565 .............. 350 ...... .................

...... .... 2,368 ..... ..... ... 1,438 ............ I ............






SANTO DOMINGO.


From the same report, we obtain comparative figures of the
trade with Santo Domingo for the fiscal years 1892 and 1893:

Imports from Santo Domingo into United States.

Year. Free. Dutiable. Total

Dollars. Dollars. Dollars.
1892 ........ ............................. 2,279,267 14, 481 2, 293,748
1893 .............. ........ ................... 2,368,620 27,695 2,396,315

Exports from the United States to Santo Domingo.

Year. Domestic. Foreign. Total.

Dollars. Dollars. Dollars.
1892 ........................................ 984, 188 35, 262 1,019,450
1893 ......................................... I, o8, 733 34, 746 I, 143,479

Making the total trade between the two countries, in 1893,
$3,539,794-
The official statistics of exports from Santo Domingo do not
include the merchandise sent to Haiti. As that Republic is a
large consumer of Dominican products, the country does not thus
obtain credit for all the trade it is doing. As an illustration of this
fact, it may be mentioned that while in the statistics the exports
of rum in the year 1889 appear as amounting to only 20,162
gallons, over 200,000 gallons, in addition to that quantity, were
sent to Haiti. The exportation of cattle to that Republic is very
large, as is also that of sugar, wax candles, and soap. Thus, if
calculation is made of all the goods that find an outlet in that
direction, there is no doubt that they will amount to four or five
per cent of the total of the external commerce of Santo Domingo,
but they make no showing in the statistics.
Considering all the disadvantages against which the Dominican
Republic has had to contend, the position to which its commerce
has attained is highly creditable to the people. The following






SANTO DOMINGO.


table shows the amount of trade per capital of the population
compared with that of countries on the South American continent
during the year 1889:

Commerce, Approximate
Countries. Population. imports and amount per
exports, inhabitant.
Dollars. Dollars.
Argentine Republic ................... 4,200,000 325, ooo,00oo 77
Chile ................................. 2, 60,000ooo 125,000,000 48
Brazil ................................. .. 14, ooo, oo0 242, 000oo, oo 17
Santo Domingo....................... 400,000 5,300,000 13
Bolivia................................ 1,200,000 15,000,000 12
Peru ................................. 2,600, ooo 17,400, ooo 6


One of Santo Domingo's greatest needs is An influx of indus-
trious and progressive people. With such an increase of produc-
tive power and improved means of interior communication, which
railroads will afford, Santo Domingo will be able to demonstrate
to the world the correctness of the estimate formed by the United
States commissioners, who visited the country in 1871, when they
said in their report that, taken as a whole, Santo Domingo is one
of the richest and most fertile regions on the face of the earth.
In 1891, 175 vessels of 104,342 tons entered,. and the same
number and tonnage cleared the port of Santo Domingo. In
1890, 148 vessels of 125,390 tons entered and cleared at the port
of Puerto Plata.












Chapter VIII.


RECIPROCAL COMMERCIAL ARRANGEMENT BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES AND SANTO DOMINGO.


BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA.
A PROCLAMATION.
Whereas, pursuant to section 3 of the Act of Congress approved
October 1, 1890, entitled "An Act to reduce the revenue and
equalize duties on imports, and for other purposes," the Secretary
of State of the United States of America communicated to the
Government of the Dominican Republic the action of the Con-
gress of the United States of America, with a view to secure
reciprocal trade, in declaring the articles enumerated in said sec-
tion 3, to wit, sugars, molasses, coffee, and hides, to be exempt
from duty upon their importation into the United States of
America;
And whereas the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo-
tentiary of the Dominican Republic at Washington has communi-
cated to the Special Plenipotentiary of the United States the fact
that, in reciprocity and compensation for the admission into the
United States of America free of all duty of the articles enume-
rated in section 3 of said Act, the Government of the Dominican
Republic will, by due legal enactment, admit, from and after Sep-
tember 1, 1891, into all the established ports of entry of the Do-






SANTO DOMINGO.


minican Republic, the articles or merchandise named in the fol-
lowing schedules, on the terms stated therein, provided that the
same be the product or manufacture of the United States and
proceed directly from the ports of said States:
SCHEDULE A.

Articles to be admitted free of duty into the Dominican Re-
public:
1. Animals, live.
2. Meats of all kinds, salted or in brine, but not smoked.
3. Corn or maize, corn meal and starch.
4. Oats, barley, rye and buckwheat, and flour of these cereals.
5. Hay, bran, and straw for forage.
6. Trees, plants, vines, and seeds and grains of all kinds for
propagation.
7. Cotton-seed oil and meal cake of same.
8. Tallow in cake or melted and oil for machinery, subject to
examination and proof respecting the use of said oil.
9. Resin, tar, pitch and turpentine.
10. Manures, natural and artificial.
11. Coal, mineral.
12. Mineral waters, natural and artificial.
13. Ice.
14. Machines, including steam engines and those of all other
kinds, and parts of the same, implements and tools for agricultural,
mining, manufacturing, industrial, and scientific purposes, includ-
ing carts, wagons, handcarts and wheelbarrows, and parts of the
same.
15. Material for the construction and equipment of railways.
16. Iron, cast and wrought, and steel, in pigs, bars, rods, plates,
beams, rafters, and other similar articles for the construction of
buildings, and in wire, nails, screws, and pipes.
17. Zinc, galvanized and corrugated iron, tin and lead in sheets,
asbestos, tar paper, tiles, slate, and other material for roofing.






SANTO DOMINGO.


18. Copper in bars, plates, nails, and screws.
19. Copper and lead pipe.
20. Bricks, fire bricks, cement, lime, artificial stone, paving
tiles, marble and other stones in rough, dressed or polished, and
other earthy materials used in building.
21. Windmills.
22. Wire, plain or barbed, for fences, with hooks, staples, nails,
and similar articles used in the construction of fences.
23. Telegraph wire and telegraphic, telephonic, and electrical
apparatus of all kinds for communication and illumination.
24. Wood and lumber of all kinds for building, in logs or
pieces, beams, rafters, planks, boards, shingles, flooring, joists,
wooden houses, mounted or unmounted, and accessory parts of
buildings.
25. Cooperage of all kinds, including staves, headings and
hoops, barrels and boxes, mounted or unmounted.
26. Materials for shipbuilding.
27. Boats and lighters.
28. School furniture, blackboards, and other articles exclusively
for the use of schools.
29. Books, bound or unbound, pamphlets, newspapers and
printed matter, and paper for printing newspapers.
30. Printers' inks of all colors, type, leads and all accessories
for printing.
31. Sacks, empty, for packing sugar.
32. Gold and silver coin and bullion.

SCHEDULE B.
Articles to be admitted into the Dominican Republic at a
reduction of duty of 25 per centum:
33. Meats not included in Schedule A and meat products of
all kinds, except lard.
34. Butter, cheese, and condensed or canned milk.






SANTO DOMINGO.


35. Fish and shellfish, salted, dried, smoked, pickled or pre-
served in cans.
36. Fruits and vegetables, fresh, canned, dried, pickled or pre-
served.
37. Manufactures of iron and steel, single or mixed, not included
in Schedule A.
38. Cotton, manufactured, spun or twisted, and in fabrics of all
kinds, woven or knit, and the same fabrics mixed with other veg-
etable or animal fibers in which cotton is the equal or greater
component part.
39. Boots and shoes in whole or in part of leather or skins.
40. Paper for writing, in envelopes, ruled or blank books, wall
paper, paper for wrapping and packing, for cigarettes, in card-
board, boxes and bags, sand paper and pasteboard.
41. Tin plate and tinware for arts, industries and domestic
uses.
42. Cordage, rope and twine of all kinds.
43. Manufactures of wood of all kinds not embraced in Sched-
ule A, including wooden ware, implements for household use,
and furniture in whole or in part of wood.
And that the Government of the Dominican Republic has fur-
ther provided that the laws and regulations, adopted to protect its
revenue and to prevent fraud in the declarations and proof that
the articles named in the foregoing schedules are the product or
manufacture of the United States of America, shall place no
undue restrictions on the importer, nor impose any additional
charges or fees therefore on the articles imported.
And whereas the Special Plenipotentiary of the United States.
has, by my direction, given assurance to the Envoy Extraordinary
and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Dominican Republic at
Washington that this action of the Government of the Dominican
Republic, in granting exemption of duties to the products and
manufactures of the United States of America on their importa-






SANTO DOMINGO.


tion into the Dominican Republic, is accepted as a due reciprocity
for the action of Congress as set forth in section 3 of said Act:
Now, therefore, be it known that I, BENJAMIN HARRISON,
President of the United States of America, have caused the above
stated modifications of the tariff laws of the Dominican Republic
to be made public for the information of the citizens of the United
States of America.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused
the seal of the United States to be affixed.
Done at the City of Washington, this first day of August,
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-one, and of the
[SEAL.] Independence of the United States of America the one
hundred and sixteenth.
BENJAMIN HARRISON.
By the President:
WILLIAM F. WHARTON,
Acting Secretary of State.



PRECEDING CORRESPONDENCE.

Senor Galvan to Mr. Foster.
LEGATION OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC,
Washington, fune 4, 189g.
Mr. MINISTER: The Government of the Dominican Republic
having been officially informed of the action of the Congress of the
United States of America in the enactment of the tariff law of
October 1, 1890, authorizing the admission through the custom-
houses of said United States, free of all duty, of the articles
enumerated in section 3 of said law, with a view to secure recip-
rocal trade with countries producing the articles named, I am
pleased to be able to state to you that the Dominican Government,






SANTO DOMINGO.


likewise animated by the desire to maintain the relations of sincere
friendship which happily exist between the Dominican Republic
and the United States of America, and especially recognizing that
the close proximity of the two countries suggests the good policy
of establishing the reciprocal commerce upon such a basis as shall
encourage the development of trade and strengthen friendly feeling
between their respective peoples, has resolved to respond in the
most liberal manner within its power to the legislation above
referred to of the Congress of the United States.
I have, therefore, the honor to inform you that the Government
of the Dominican Republic, in reciprocity for, and in consideration
of, the free admission into all the ports of the United States exempt
from the payment of duties, whether national, state, or municipal,
of the products of the Dominican Republic enumerated in section
3 of said law, is prepared, by virtue of the legislative resolution of
the national Congress of March 23 last, to decree the admission into
all the established ports of entry of the Dominican Republic, on
and after the 1st day of September, 1891, free of all customs duty
and any other national or port charges, of the articles or merchan-
dise named in the following Schedule A, provided that the said
articles of merchandise are exported directly from, and are the
product or manufacture of, the United States of America:
[Here follows Schedule A, as heretofore given.]
It is understood that the packages or coverings in which the
articles named in the foregoing schedule are imported shall be free
of duty if they are usual and proper for the purpose.
The Government of the Dominican Republic is, further, pre-
pared to decree the admission into all the established ports of entry
of the said Republic, at a reduction of 25 per cent of the duty
designated in the customs tariff now in force or which may here-
after be adopted in said Republic (which reduction shall likewise
apply to all duties which are imposed on these articles by authority
of the national Government), of the articles or merchandise named
Bull. 52--






SANTO DOMINGO.


in the following Schedule B, provided that said articles or mer-
chandise are exported directly from, and are the product or man-
ufacture of, the United States of America:
[Here follows Schedule B, as heretofore given.]

The Government of the Dominican Republic gives the assur-
ance that no increase whatever shall be made in the export duties
of any character now in force on the articles enumerated in section
3 of the said tariff law of the United States, nor upon any article,
the product of said Republic, now on the free list of the tariff of
said United States, so long as such article continues to be admitted
free of duty; and, further, that if the Dominican Republic makes
any reduction in the export duty on any of its products, such
reduction shall immediately apply to said products when exported
to the United States.
The Government of the Dominican Republic also gives the
assurance that no greater municipal taxes than those now in force,
nor than those levied upon national products, shall be imposed
upon articles imported from the United States.
The Government of the Dominican Republic reserves the right
to adopt the necessary laws and regulations to protect its revenue
and prevent fraud in the declarations and proof that the articles
enumerated in the foregoing schedules are exported directly from,
and are the product or manufacture of, the United States; but the
laws and regulations to be adopted shall place no undue restric-
tions upon the importer, nor occasion any additional charges or
fees therefore upon the articles imported.
For the better application of the foregoing schedules by the
custom-houses of the Dominican Republic, it would be mutually
convenient that a repertory or classification of articles or merchan-
dise should be compiled before the present commercial arrange-
ment goes into operation, under the joint supervision of the lega-
tion of the Dominican Republic and the Department of State in
Washington.






SANTO DOMINGO.


I have confidence that the President of the United States will
duly regard the present proof that the Government of the Do-
minican Republic has met the legislation of the Congress of the
United States in a spirit of friendly accord and wise reciprocity;
and, in that event, I shall hold myself ready to agree with you
upon a time when the decree of the Dominican Republic and the
proclamation of the President of the United States may be simul-
taneously and officially published in both countries, with the under-
standing that the commercial arrangement, when it shall have been
thus promulgated, shall remairi in force so long as it shall not be
modified by the legislative action of either Government or by
mutual agreement of the Executive Power of the two countries.
Be so kind as to accept, Mr. Minister, the assurances of my
most distinguished consideration.
(Signed) MANUEL DE J. GALVAN.
Honorable JOHN W. FOSTER,
Special Minister Plenipotentiary of the
United States of America, Washington.


Mr. Foster to Senor Galvan.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
Washington, June 4, 1891.
SIR: I have great pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of
your note of this date, in which you inform me that the Govern-
ment of the Dominican Republic, in due reciprocity for, and in
consideration of, the admission into the ports of the United States
free of all duty, whether national, State, or municipal, of the prod-
ucts of said Republic, enumerated in section 3 of the tariff law of
the Congress of the United States of October 1, 1890, is pre-
pared by legal enactment to authorize the free or privileged admis-
sion, on and after the 1st day of September, 1891, of the articles
directly imported from, and the product or manufacture of, the






SANTO DOMINGO.


United States of America named in your note; that your Govern-
ment gives the assurance that no increase shall be made in the
export tax on the articles admitted free into the United States;
that all future reduction in the export tax shall immediately apply
to such articles when sent to the United States; -that no greater
municipal taxes than those now in force, nor than those which
national products pay, shall be imposed on articles imported from
said States; and that the laws and regulations adopted by the
Dominican Republic to prevent fraud shall not impose any addi-
tional charges or fees therefore on the articles named in your note
imported from the United States.
I am directed by the President to state to you that he accepts
this action of the Government of the Dominican Republic, in
granting exemption of duties to the products and manufactures of
the United States, as a due reciprocity for the action of the Con-
gress of the United States, as contained in section 3 of the tariff
law above cited.
I am also pleased to reciprocate the assurances contained in
your note, and to state that no export tax, whether national, State,
or municipal, can or will be imposed in the United States upon
the products or manufactures enumerated in schedules A and B
of your note of this date sent to San Domingo.
It may be further understood that, while the Government of
the United States reserves the right to adopt the laws and regula-
tions necessary to protect its revenue and prevent fraud in the
declarations and proof that the articles enumerated in section 3 of
the law cited are the product or manufacture of San Domingo,
the laws and regulations to be adopted shall place no undue
restrictions upon the importer, nor impose any additional charges
or fees upon the articles imported.
It is also understood that, for the better application of said sched-
ules in the custom-houses of San Domingo, a repertory shall be
compiled before the present commercial arrangement goes into






SANTO DOMINGO.


operation, under the joint supervision of the Department of State
and the Dominican Legation in Washington.
I have, therefore, to request that you will meet me at the
Department of State 'at your early convenience, to agree upon
the time and manner of making public announcement of this
commercial arrangement, which, it is understood, shall remain in
force so long as it shall not be modified by the legislation of
either Government or by the mutual agreement of the Executive
Power of the two countries.
I improve the occasion, Mr. Minister, to convey to you the
assurances of my high consideration and esteem.
JOHN W. FOSTER,
Special Plenipotentiary for the United States.
The Honorable MANUEL DE J. GALVAN,
Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary
of the Dominican Republic.



AGREEMENT AS TO DECREE OF JULY 4, 1887-
Senor Galvan to Mr. Foster.
[Translation.]
LEGATION OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC,
Washington, June 4, i89g.
Mr. MINISTER: In confirmation of the assurances, given in
advance, during the course of the negotiations which resulted in
the commercial arrangement concluded this day, I now have the
honor to inform you that, in consideration of the aforesaid arrange-
ment, and as one of the conditions thereof, the Government of the
Dominican Republic pledges itself to endeavor, during the next
legislative session, to secure the repeal of the law of June 26,
which was promulgated July 4, 1887, declaring the importation
into the Republic of the articles mentioned in the said law to be






SANTO DOMINGO.


free or subject to a reduced duty; and that the Executive will
take the initiative, as he is privileged to do by the constitution, to
the end that the effects of the aforesaid law cease on the 31st day
of March, 1892, or sooner if possible, so far as they relate to the
said articles, and to the end that the articles in question be sub-
jected to the tax required by the tariff and to the payment of
import duties on and after the day aforesaid; it being, however,
understood and stipulated that all the articles enumerated in sched-
ules A and B, referred to in my note of this date, that shall have
been produced in, and imported directly from, the United States
shall be exempt from the payment of such duties, as provided in
the aforementioned commercial arrangement.
It is further understood that, if the above-mentioned law of
July 4, 1887, shall not be repealed, as above stipulated, before the
31st day of March, 1892, the United States Government shall
have the right to declare the aforesaid commercial arrangement
annulled at any time subsequent to the date designated, if it shall
think proper so to do.
I reiterate to you, Mr. Minister, the assurances of the consider-
ation and respect with which I am your most obedient and faithful
servant,
MANUEL DE J. GALVAN.
Honorable JOHN W. FOSTER,
Special Minister Plenipotentiary
of the United States of America,
Washington, D. C.


DECREE OF THE NATIONAL CONGRESS OF JULY 4, 1887.
[Translation.]
ARTICLE 1. From the date of this decree until the 31st of December, 1890,
and from the latter date until the enactment ot another decree repealing the
present, the following-named articles shall be exempted in this Republic from
all fiscal duty, to wit:
All kinds of machinery to be used in the sugar and other estates and in the







SANTO DOMINGO. 55

agricultural and industrial establishments, and the pieces accessory or sent extra
to replace those worn out or damaged; crude tallow and oil, when, upon careful
investigation at the custom-house, it is ascertained that it is to be used exclu-
sively for the said machinery; phosphatic and ammoniacal guanos, zinc, galvan-
ized and corrugated iron, hand and steam water pumps, windmills; hogshead
staves, heads, and shooks; box shooks and bags for sugar, rails and spikes, rail-
road cars axles and boxes for carts and wagons, barbed wire for fences, coal;
plows, hoes, axes, spades, hand rakes, short machetes for agricultural purposes,
and, generally, all instruments exclusively applicable to the cultivation of the
soil or the clearing of forests.
The exemption provided for in this article for such pieces as are considered
accessory to engines or machinery does not apply to screws, screw nuts, nails,
bars or sheets of iron or of other metals which can be used for other purposes.
ART. 2. The following-named articles, by whomsoever imported, shall be
subject only to the payment of to per cent ad valorem, to wit: Boards, planks,
and scantlings of pine, pitch pine, or any other lumber; shingles, roofing tiles,
roofing slates, tarred roofing paper, and all other kinds of roofing; bricks, flag-
stones of the Canary Islands; iron, steel, and copper in bars or sheets; nails
and screws of iron or copper, whether galvanized or not; Portland Roman
cement, manilla rope; iron, copper, or lead pipes; lighters, whether large or small;
iron tanks; wheelbarrows, picks, mattocks, and shovels of all shapes; and ox
carts and wagons and the wheels therefore.
ART. 5. Panama hats and revolvers and cartridges shall only pay to per cent,
to be assessed, in the case of hats, upon the tariff valuation, and in the case
of revolvers and cartridges upon appraisement; and the duty thus collected
shall be used for the same purposes as were set forth in the preceding article.
Pianos, organs, and all other musical instruments, safes, and all pieces of furni-
ture or articles imported free from duty, unless mentioned in article 1 of this
decree, shall be subject to the provisions of the present article.



ABROGATION OF DECREE OF JULY 4, 1887.
[Translation.]
Ulises Heureaux, General of Division, Commander in Chief of the National
Army, Pacifier of the Country, and Constitutional President of the Republic.
Whereas the decree of the National Congress relating to the free entry of agri-
cultural supplies, dated the 4th of July, 1887, was fixed to remain in force until
the 31st of December, 1890, and after that date until other dispositions should
be substituted for or abrogate it.







56 SANTO DOMINGO.

Whereas the commercial arrangement recently concluded between the Gov-
ernment of the Dominican Republic and that of the United States of America
allows to agricultural industries, for whose benefit the decree of free entry was
made, to enjoy equally the advantages of its protectionist character.
Having heard the views of the members of the cabinet,
Resolved, The decree relating to the free entry of agricultural implements of
the 4th of July, 1887, is hereby abrogated.
Given in the National Palace in Santo Domingo, capital of the Republic, the
5th of August, 1891, the forty-eighth year of the independence and the twenty-
eighth of the restoration.
(Signed) U. HEUREAUX,
President of the Republic.
Countersigned:
(Signed) A. W. Y GIL,
Minister of Fomento and of Public Works:
(Signed) SANCHEZ,
Minister of Finance and of Commerce.



DECREE AS TO NEW DUTIES.

[Translation.]
Ulises Heureaux, General of Division, Commander in Chief of the National
Army, Pacifier of the Country, and Constitutional President of the Republic.
The law relating to the free entry of agricultural implements, which was to
cease to be in force on the 3oth of December, 1890, having been abrogated by
a previous resolution,
Considering that the commerce of revolvers, cartridges for the same, Panama
hats, and musical instruments, including pianos and harmoniums, had been
favored by said law by a duty of only to per cent on the invoice value;
Considering that it is necessary to again regulate the commerce of said articles,
among which are some prohibited by the law above mentioned,
Resolved, (1) From and after the date of the publication of the present reso-
lution the custom-houses throughout the territory of the Republic shall collect
duties of importation upon the following articles:
(1) Revolvers, each, fixed duty, $2.
(2) Caps for revolvers, per loo, fixed duty, $z.
(3) Pianos, large and small, harmoniums, organs, and every kind of musical
instruments for bands or orchestras, to per cent upon the invoice value. Accor-







SANTO DOMINGO.


dions are excepted from this remission, which shall pay the 60 per cent ad
valorem levied upon other merchandise.
(4) Panama hats in the proportion established by the tariff in force.
Given at Santo Domingo, in the National Palace of the Government, capital
of the Dominican Republic, on the 5th of August, 1891, the forty-eighth year
of the independence and the twenty-eighth of the restoration.
(Signed) U. HEUREAUX.
(Signed) SANCHEZ,
Minister of Finance and Commerce.



REPERTORY.

Repertory of schedules A and B of the reciprocity arrangement.

The undersigned, John W. Foster, representing the Depart-
ment of State of the United States of America, and Francisco de
P. Suarez, representing the Dominican legation in Washington,
hereby agree that, in conformity with the provisions to that end in
the commercial arrangement concluded June 4, 1891, between
the Governments of the United States and of the Dominican
Republic, the annexed repertory shall be observed in the custom-
houses of the Dominican Republic in the application of schedules
A and B, in accordance with the stipulations of said commercial
arrangement.
This repertory, adopting the nomenclature used in the tariff of
the Dominican Republic, is intended to embrace the- names of
merchandise most commonly and frequently appearing in com-
merce as among those enumerated in schedules A and B. It
shall be understood, however, that articles or merchandise which
are properly embraced in the numbers of schedules A and B shall
enjoy the benefits stipulated in said coIrmercial arrangement,
although this repertory does not mention them.
The number put at the side of each name in the alphabetical
repertory is the number in the schedule in which the merchandise
is embraced.









SANTO DOMINGO.


SCHEDULE A.-ARTICLES TO BE ADMITTED FREE OF DUTY INTO THE DOMINICAN
REPUBLIC.

No. r.-Animals, live.


I. Animales vivos.


I. Live animals.


No. 2.-- feats of all kinds, salted or in brine, but not smoked.


Carne salada de puerco.
Carne salada de vaca.
Carne salada de otros animals.
Carne en salmuera.


2. Salt pork.
3. Salt beef.
4. Other salt meats.
5. Meats in brine.


No. S.-Corn (or maize), corn meal, and starch.


Almidon.
Harina de maiz.
Maiz en grano.


6. Starch.
7. Corn meal.
8. Indian corn.


-No. 4.-Oats, barley, rye, and buckwheat, and flour of these cereals.


Avena.
Cebada.
Centeno.
Trigo sarraceno.
Harina de avena.
Harina de cebada.
Harina de centeno.
Harina de trigo sarraceno.


9. Oats.
Io. Barley.
11. Rye.
12. Buckwheat.
13. Oatmeal.
14. Barley meal.
15. Rye flour.
16. Buckwheat flour.


No. 5.-Hay, bran, and straw for forage.


Afrecho 6 salvado.
Heno.
Paja para forraje.


17. Bran.
18. Hay.
19. Straw for forage.


No. 6.- Trees, plants, vines, and seeds and grains of all kinds for propagation.


Arboles. 20.
Plantas. 21.
Sarmientos. 22.
Semillas y granos para propagaci6n. 23.


Trees.
Plants.
Vines.
Seeds and grains for propagation.


No. 7.-Cotton-seed oil and meal cake of same.


24. Aceite de semillas de algod6n. 24.
25. Harina de semillas de algod6n en 25.
panes. 26.
26. "Cottolene."


Cotton-seed oil.
Cotton-seed cakes.
Cottolene.








SANTO DOMINGO. 59

No. 8.- Tallow in cake or melted and oil for machinery, subject to examination and proof
respecting the use of said oil.


Aceite para maquinaria.
Sebo en pasta.
Sebo derretido.


Aguarr.s.
Alquitran.
Brea.
Colofonia.
Pez-rubia.
Resina de pino.
Trementina.


27. Machinery oil.
28. Tallow in cake.
29. Melted tallow.


No. q.-Resin, tar, pitch, and turpentine.

30. Spirits of turpentine.
31. Tar.
32. Pitch.
33. Colophony.
34. Rosin.
35. Pine resin.
36. Turpentine.

No. 7o.-Manures, natural and artificial.


Abonos naturales y artificiales.
Guano.
Huesos molidos.
Huesos disueltos en acidos.
Nitrates de cal, soda 6 potasa.
Yeso (sulfato de cal).
Sangre preparada para abonos.


37. Fertilizers, natural and artificial.
38. Guano.
39. Ground bones.
40. Bones dissolved in acids.
41. Nitrates of lime, soda, or potash.
42. Gypsum.
43. Blood fertilizers.


No. rr.-Coal, mineral.


44. Antracita.
45. Carb6n bituminoso.
46. Carb6n de tierra 6 piedra.
47. Carb6n prensado en panes.
48. Cok.


44. Anthracite coal.
45. Bituminous coal.
46. Mineral coal.
47. Coal dust pressed in cakes.
48. Coke.


No. s1.-Mirral waters, natural and artificial.


49. Aguas minerales riaturales.
50. Aguas minerales artificiales.


49. Mineral waters, natural.
50. Mineral waters, artificial.


No. z3.-Ice.

51. Ice.


51. Hielo.


No. 14.--Machines, including steam engines and those of all other kinds, and parts of the
same, implements and tools for agricultural, mining, manufacturing, industrial, and
scientific purposes, including carts, wagons, handcarts, and wheelbarrows, and parts of
the same.


52. Almireces de hierro.
53. Anafes.
54. Anclas.
55. Anzuelos.


52. Mortars, iron.
53. Heaters.
54. Anchors.
55. Fishhooks.









SANTO DOM INGO.


Arados.
Azadas y azadones.
Arcos de hierro.
Argollas.
Azuelas.
Bar6metros y term6metros.
Barrenas..
Bigornias.
Bombas.
Buriles.
Cabrestantes.
Cadenas de hierro.
Calderas.
Carretas.
Carretillas.
Carretones.
Cepillos de carpintero.
Compases 6 brfljulas.
Destornilladores.
Ejes de hierro.
Fondos de hierro para trapiches.
Formones.
Garlopas.
Gubias.
Hachas.
Hachuelas.
Hormas para botas y zapatos.
Hormas para sombreros.
Instrumentos y herramientas de artes.
Instrumentos de cirujia.
Instrumentos de matematicas y cien-
cias naturales.
Lesnas para zapateros.
Limas.
Machetes.
Maquinas de todas classes.
Morteros.
Motones.
Pailas.
Palas.
Picos.
Pinzas de todas classes.
Planchas para ropa.
Planas de albanil.
Poleas.
Pesa licores.
Rejas de arado.


56. Plows.
57. Spades and hoes.
58. Hoops, iron.
59. Staples.
60. Adzes.
61. Barometers and thermometers,
62. Augers.
63. Anvils.
64. Pumps.
65. Burins.
66. Capstans.
67., Chains, iron.
68. Boilers.
69. Carts.
70. Wheelbarrows.
71. Wagons.
72. Planes.
73. Compasses.
74. Screw-drivers.
75. Axles, iron.
76. Bottoms, iron, for sugar mills.
77. Chisels,
78. Planes.
79. Gouges.
80. Axes.
81. Hatchets.
82. Lasts for boots and shoes.
83. Blocks for hats.
84. Instruments and tools for the arts.
85. Instruments, surgical.
86. Instruments, mathematical and scien-
tific.
87. Awls, shoemakers'.
88. Files.
89. Cane knives.
go. Machinery of all kinds.
91. Mortars.
92. Pulley blocks.
93. Pans.
94. Shovels.
95. Picks.
96. Pincers of kinds.
97. Sadirons.
98. Trowels.
99. Pulleys.
Ioo. Liquor weighers.
Ioi. Plowshares.








SANTO DOMINGO.


102. Romanas.
103. Ruedas para carretas, carretillas y
carretones.
ro4. Serruchos.
105. Sierras de todas classes.
io6. Tenazas.
107. Tijeras ordinarias.
io8. Yunques.
iog. Todos los demis instruments, uten-
silios y herramientas para la agri-
cultura, la mineria, las manufactu-
ras; y otros objetos industriales y
cientificos.


102. Steelyards.
103. Wheels for carts, wheelbarrows, and
wagons.
104. Handsaws.
105. Saws of all kinds.
io6. Tongs.
107. Shears and scissors, common.
o18. Anvils.
og9. All other implements, instruments,
and tools for agriculture, mining,
manufacture, and other industrial
and scientific objects.


No. i5.-Material for the construction atndiCquipment of railways.


Agujas cambiavias.
Aparejos de choque.
Aparejos de tracci6n.
Carritos de mano.
Carros para passajeros.
Carros para carga.
Carriles 6 rieles..
Durmientes.
Ejes de carros.
Ejes de locomotoras.
Frenos.'
Locomotoras.
Plataformas giratorias.
Puentes para ferro-carriles.
Ruedas para carros y locomotoras.
Todos los demis objetos ymateriales
paraconstrucci6n y equipode ferro-
carriles.


Iio. Switches.
III. Buffers.
II2. Traction apparatus.
113. Hand cars.
114. Cars, passengers.
115. Cars, freight.
116. Rails.
I17. Cross-ties.
118. Car axles.
119. Locomotive axles.
12o. Brakes.
121. Locomotives.
122. Turntables.
123. Bridges, railroad.
124. Car and locomotive wheels.
125. All other objects and materials for the
construction and equipment of rail..
ways.


No. i6.-Iron, cast and wrought, and steel in pigs, bars, rods, plates, beams, rafters, and
other similar articles for the construction of buildings, and in wire, nails, screws, and
pfiies.


126. Acero en barras.
127. Acero en lingotes.
128. Alambre de hierro y acero.
129. Balaustres de hierro.
130. Barras de hierro y acero.
131. Clavos de hierro y acero.
132. Hierro colado.
133. Hierro en barras.
134. Hierro forjado.
135. Hierro batido.


Steel in bars.
Ingot steel.
Iron and steel wire.
Railings, iron.
Iron and steel bars.
Iron and steel nails.
Iron, cast.
Iron in bars.
Iron, wrought.
Hammered iron.








SANTO DOMINGO.


Hierro en lingotes.
Planchas de hierro y acero.
Tachuelas de todas classes.
Tornillos de hierro y acero.
Tubos de hierro y acero.
Varillas de hierro y acero.
Vigas de hierro y acero.
Viguetas de hierro y acero.
Otros articulos semejantes de hierro 6
acero para construcci6n de edificios.


136. Pig iron.
137. Iron and steel plates.
138. Tacks of all kinds.
139. Iron and steel screws.
140. Iron and steel pipes.
141. Iron and steel rods.
142. Iron and steel beams.
143. Iron and steel rafters.
144. Other similar articles of iron or steel
for the construction of buildings.


A-.. 77.-Zinc, galvanized and corrugated iron, tin and lead in sheets, asbestus, tar paper,
tiles, slate, and other material for roofing.


Amianto para techumbre.
Fieltro de techumbre.
Hierro acanalado para techumbre.
Hierro galvanizado para techumbre.
Hoja de lata.
Hoja de plomo.
Papel alquitranado.
Pizarra.
Planchas de zinc, hierro galvanizado
y plomo.
Plomo en Idminas 6 planchas.
Pizarra.
Zinc.
Todos los demis materials para
tech umbre.


145. Asbestus roofing.
146. Roofing felt.
147. Corrugated iron for roofing.
148. Galvanized iron for roofing.
149. Roofing tin (sheet).
150. Roofing lead (sheet).
151. Tarred roofing paper.
152. Roofing slate.
153. Plates of zinc, galvanized iron, and
lead.
154. Lead in sheets or plates.
155. Roofing tiles.
156. Zinc for roofing.
157. All other materials for roofing.


No. IS.-Copper in bars, plates, nails, and screws.


158. Barras de cobre.
159. Clavos de cobre.
160. Planchas de cobre.
161. Tornillos de cobre.



162. Tubos de cobre.
163. Tubos de plomo.


158. Copper bars.
159. Copper nails.
i60. Copper sheets.
161. Copper screws.

No. 19.-Copper and lead pipes.

162. Copper pipes or tubes.
163. Lead pipes or tubes.


No. 20.-Bricks, fire bricks, cement, lime, artificial stone, paving tiles, marble and other
stones in rough, dressed, or polished, and other earthy materials used in building.


164. Cal.
165. Cimento.
166. Columnas de piedra 6 marmol.


164. Lime.
165. Cement.
166. Pillars of stone or marble.








SANTO DOMINGO.


167. Ladrillos.
168. Ladrillos refractarios.
169. Losas para pavimento.
170. Losas para enclosar pisos.
171. Mirmol en bruto.
172. Mirmol labrado 6 pulido.
173. Mesas de marmol.
174. Otras piedras en bruto.
175. Otras piedras labradas 6 pulidas.
176. Piedra artificial.
177. Piedra para pisos.
178. Terra cotta.
179. Yeso.
18o. Todos los demis materials terreos
para construcci6n de edificios.


167. Bricks.
168. Fire bricks.
169. Paving tiles (or blocks).
170. Flooring tiles.
171. Marble in the rough.
172. Marble, dressed or polished.
173. Marble tables.
174. Other stones in the rough.
175. Other stones, dressed or polished.
176. Artificial stones.
177. Stones for floors.
178. Terra cotta.
179. Plaster of Paris.
18o. All other earthy materials used in the
construction of buildings.


No. aY.- Windmills.


181. Molinos de viento.


181. Windmills.


No. 22.- Wire, plain or barbed, for fences, with hooks, staples, nails, and similar articles
used in the construction of fences.

182. Alambre liso 6 con phas para con- 182. Fencing wire, smooth or barbed.
strucci6n de cercas.
183. Alambre galvanizado para construc- 183. Galvanized fencing wire.
ci6n de cercas.
184. Clavos para cercas. 184. Nails for fencing.
185. Garfios para cercas. 185. Hooks for fencing.
186. Grampas para cercas. 186. Staples for fencing.
187. Todos los demis tiles semejantes 187. All other like articles for the con-
para construcci6n de cercas. struction of fences.

No. 23.- Telegraph wire and telegraphic, telephonic, and electrical apparatus of all kinds
for communication and illumination.


188. Alambre para tel6grafos.
189. Alambre para telefonos.
19o. Alambre cubierto de cualquier tejido
para telegrafos, tel6fonos 6 luz el6c-
trica.
191. Aparatos el6ctridos de todas classes.
192. Aparatos telef6nicos de todas classes.
193. Aparatos telegrificos de todas classes,
para comunicaci6n y alumbrado.


188. Telegraph wire.
189. Telephone wire.
190. Wire covered with any texture for
telegraphs, telephones, or electric
light.
191. Electric apparatus of all kinds.
192. Telephonic apparatus of all kinds.
193. Telegraphic apparatus of all kinds for
communication and illumination.









SANTO DOMINGO.


No. 24.- Wood and lumber of all kinds for building, in logs or pieces, beams, rafters, planks.
boards, shingles, flooring, joists, wooden houses, mounted or unmounted, and accessory parts


of buildings.
194. Accesorios de madera para edificios.

195. Alfarjias 6 cuartones.
196. Cabrios.
197. Casas de madera armadas 6 en piezas.

198. Contraventanas.
199. Listones.
200. Marcos de puertas y ventanas.
201. Persianas.
202. Piezas de madera.
203. Puertas.
204. Tablas.
205. Tablas para pisos.
206. Tablones.
207. Tejamanil 6 tejamanl.
208. Tozas.
209. Vigas.
210. Viguetas.
21z. Todas las demrs piezas, parties, y ac-
cesorios de madera 'para construc-
ciones.


194. Accessory parts (wooden) of build-
ings.
195. Floor beams.
196. Rafters or cross beams.
197. Wooden houses, put together or in
parts.
198. Shutters.
199. Laths (strips).
200. Door and window frames.
201. Blinds.
202. Pieces of lumber.
203. Doors.
204. Boards.
205. Flooring.
206. Planks.
207. Shingles.
208. Logs.
209. Beams.
210. Joists and scantling.
211. All other wooden pieces, parts and
accessories, for the construction of
buildings.


No. 25.-Cooperage of all kinds, including staves, headings, and hoops, barrels and boxes,
mounted or unmounted.


212. Aros, arcos 6 flejes de madera para
toneleria.
213. Baldes de madera.
214. Barriles nuevas 6 usadas.
215. Barricas nuevos 6 usados.
216. Bocoyes nuevos 6 usados.
2'17. Cubos de madera.
218. Cuinctes.
219. Pipas.
220. Toneles.
22I. Tapones.
222. Duelas.
223. Fondos.

224. Tinas de madera.
225. Toneleria armada 6 sin armar.
226. Cajas de madera armadas 6 sin ar-
mar.
227. Todos los demas efectos de toneleria.


212. Hoops (wooden) for cooperage.

213. Buckets or pails, wooden.
214. Barrels, new or old.
215. Casks, new or old.
216. Hogsheads, new or old.
217. Tubs, wooden.
21S. Kegs.
219. Pipes.
220. Tuns.
221. Bungs.
222. Staves.
223. Heads for barrels, casks, hogsheads,
etc.
224. Tubs, wooden.
225. Cooperage, set up or in shooks.
226. Boxes, wooden, or box shooks.

227. All other articles of cooperage.








SANTO DOMINGO.


No. 26.-M aterials for shipbuilding.


228. Anclas.
229. Arboles 6 mistiles de madera 6
hierro.
230. Argollas.
231. Barras y varas de metal.
232. Bombas para buques.
233. Cabrestantes.
234 Cobre, el llamado de composici6n
para buques.
235. Cordaje para buques.
236. Cables de hierro para buques.
237. Curvas de madera, hierro 6 acero.
238. Estopa.
239. Garruchas.
240. Jarcia.
241. Materiales para construcci6n de bu-
ques.
242. Papal para forrar buques (i otros usos
andlogos.
243. Pernos de hierro 6 cobre para buques.
244. Piezas de cobre y lat6n para buques.
245. Planchas de cobre para forrar buques.
246. Planchas de hierro y acero para bu-
ques.
247. Remos para embarcaciones.
248. Vergas.
249. Vigas.
250. Todos los demas efectos yjmateriales
para construcci6n de buques.


228. Anchors.
229. Masts of wood or iron.


230. Rings.
231. Bars and rods of metal.
232. Pumps for vessels.
233. Capstans.
234. Copper (composition) for sheathing
of vessels.
235. Cordage for vessels.
236. Wire rope for vessels.
237. Knees of wood, iron, or steel.
238. Oakum.
239. Cringles.
240. Rigging.
241. Materials for shipbuilding.

242. Sheathing paper for vessels and sim-
ilar uses.
243. Bolts of iron or copper for vessels.
244. Copper and brass pieces for vessels.
245. Copper sheathing for vessels.
246. Iron and steel plates for vessels.

247. Oars.
248. Yards.
249. Beams of wood, iron, or steel.
250. All other articles and materials for
the construction of vessels.


, No. 27.-Boats and lighters.


251. Botes de remos 6 de vapor.
252. Lanchas de remos 6 de vapor.


251. Boats, oar or steam.
252. Launches, oar or steam.


No. 28.-School furniture, blackboards, and other articles exclusively for the use of schools.


Bancos de escuela.
Globos para escuela.
Mapas para escuela.
Mobiliario para escuela.
Pizarrones para escuela.
Pupitres para escuela.
Sillas para escuela.
Todos los demds objetos aplicables
exclusivamentes al uso de las escu-
elas.
Bull. 52-5


253. School benches.
254. School globes.
255. School maps.
256. School furniture.
257. Blackboards.
258. School desks.
259. School chairs.
260. All other articles exclusively for the
use of schools.








SANTO DOMINGO.


No. 29.-Books, bound or unbound, paamhlets, newspapers and printed matter, and paper
for printing newspapers.


Cuadernos de mfisica.
Folletos.
Impresos.
Libros A la ristica.
Libros encuadernados.
Papel para impresi6n de peri6dicos.
Peri6dicos.


Music books.
Pamphlets.
Printed matter.
Books, unbound.
Books, bound.
Paper for printing newspapers.
.Periodicals.


No. 30.-Printers' inks of all colors, type, leads, and all accessories for printing.


Cajas de imprenta.
Componedores.
Formas.
Galeras.
Mesas de imponer.
Piedras de imponer.
Prensas de imprimir.
Reglas.
Regletas.
Tipos.
Tintas de todos colors para imprimir.
Todos los demis accesorios y tiles
de imprenta.


267. Cases for printing.
268. Composing sticks.
269. Forms for printing.
270. Galleys.
271. Imposing tables.
272. Imposing stones.
273. Printing presses.
274. Rules.
275. Leads.
276. Types.
277. Inks of all colors for printing.
278. All other tools and accessories for
printing.


No. 3s.-Sacks, empty, for packing sugar.


279. Sacos vacios para embalar azfcar.


279. Empty sugar sacks.


No. 32.-Gold and silver coin adl bullion.

280. Monedas y barras de oro y plata de 280. Gold and silver coin and bullion of
los Estados Unidos. the United States.
281. Oro acuflado de los Estados Unidos. 281. Gold, coined, of the United States.
282. Plataacuifadade los Estados Unidos. 282. Silver, coined, of the United States.

SCHEDULE B.-ARTICLES TO BE ADMITTED INTO THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AT A
REDUCTION OF 25 PER CENT.

No. 33.-Meats not included in Schedule A and meat products of all kinds, except lard.


283. Aceite de pezufia. 283.
284. Carne de vaca fresca. 284.
285. Carne de puerco fresca. 285.
286. Carnes frescas de otros animals. 286.
287. Care de vaca ahumada. 287.
288. Carne de puerco ahumada. 288.
289. Carnes ahumadas de otros animals. 289.


Neat's-foot oil.
Beef, fresh.
Pork, fresh.
Meats, fresh, of other animals.
Beef, smoked.
Pork, smoked.
Meats, smoked, of other animals.









SANTO DOMINGO.


290. Carnes conservadas en latas.
291. Carnes conservadas en vinagre.
292. Carnes conservadas por extraccion
del aire.
293. Cecina.
294. Chorizos.
295. Costillar 6 costillon.
296. Embuchados.
297. Embutidos.
298. Jamones.


290. Meats preserved in cans.
291. Meats preserved in vinegar.
292. Meats preserved by extraction of air.


Hung beef.
Sausages, pork:
Bacon sides, rib sides.
Sausages, large.
Stuffed meats.
Hams.


No. 34.-Butter, cheese, and condensed or canned milk.


299. Mantequilla.
300. Oueso.
301. Leche condensada 6 en latas.


299. Butter.
300. Cheese.
301. Condensed or canned milk.


No. 35.-Fish and shellfish, salted, dried, smoked, pickled, or preserved, in cans.


302. Almejas frescas y en latas.
303. Anchoas en conserve, en escabeche,
ahumadas, frescas, salpresadas y
secas.
304. Arenques, ahumados y salados.
305. Atun en conserve, en escabeche,
fresco, salpresado.
306. Bacalao, seco, salado, en salmuera.
307. Buches de pescado.
308. Caballa en conserve, fresca, salada,
ahumada, escabechada.
309. Camarones.
310. Caracoles.
311. Pescado en conserve.
312. Pescado en escabeche.
313. Huevas de pescado.
314. Langostas, frescas, saladas, en latas.
315. Lenguas de pescado, saladas, con-
servadas.
316. Lisa.
317. Macarelas.
318. Mariscos.
319. Morros de bacalao.
320. Ositones, en conserve.
321. Ostiones, frescos.
32-2. Ostiones en latas.
323. Papadas.
324. Pescada.
325. Pez palo.


302. Clams, fresh and canned.
303. Anchovies, preserved, pickled,
smoked, fresh, salted, dried.

304. Herring, smoked, salted.
305. Tunny, preserved, pickled, fresh,
salted.
306. Codfish, dried, salted, in brine.
307. Fish sounds.
308. Mackerel, preserved, fresh, salted,
smoked, pickled.
309. Shrimps.
310. Periwinkles.
311. Preserved fish.
312. Pickled fish.
313. Fish roe.
314. Lobsters, fresh, salted, canned.
315. Fish tongues, salted, preserved.


Skates.
Mackerel.
Shellfish.
Codfish lips.
Oysters, preserved.
Oysters, fresh.
Oysters, canned.
Fish necks.
Hake.
Stockfish.









SANTO DOMINGO.


Salmon, en conserve.
Salmon, ahumado.
Salmon, fresco.
Salmon en latas.
Sames.
Sardinas, saladas.
Sardinas en latas.
Tripas de bacalao.
Truchas.


326. Salmon, preserved.
327. Salmon, smoked.
328. Salmon, fresh.
329. Salmon, canned.
330. Haddock.
331. Sardines, salted.
332. Sardines, canned.
333. Codfish tripes.
334. Trout.


No. 36.-Fruits and vegetables, fresh, canned, dried, pickled, or preserved.


335. Aceitunas frescas.
336. Aceitunas in latas.
337. Aceitunas encurtidas.
338. Aceitunas en conserve.
339. Achicoria.
340. Ajos.
341. Albaricoques frescos.
342. Albaricoques in dulce.
343. Albaricoques en latas.
344. Albaricoques secos.
345. Alcaparras.
346. Almendras sin cascara.
347. Almendras con cascara.
348. Apio.
349. Avellanas.
350. Cacahuetes (mani).
351. Calabacitas.
352. Cafiamones.
353. Castafas.
354. Cebollas 6 cebollines, frescos.
355. Cebollas encurtidas.
356. Cerezas frescas.
357. Cerezas en conserve.
358. Cerezas en dulce.
359. Cerezas en latas.
360. Cerezas secas.
361. Chicharos.
362. Ciruelas frescas.
363. Ciruelas en dulce.
364. Ciruelas in latas.
365. Ciruelas secas.
366. Coles.
367. Cominos.
368. Conservas de frutas y legumbres.
369. Encurtidos en vinagre 6 salmuera.


335. Olives, fresh.
336. Olives in cans.
337. Olives, pickled.
338. Olives, preserved.
339. Chicory.
340. Garlic.
341. Apricots, fresh.
342. Apricots in sirup.
343. Apricots in cans.
344. Apricots, dried.
345. Capers.
346. Almonds, shelled.
347. Almonds, unshelled.
348. Celery.
349. Filberts.
350. Peanuts.
351. Pumpkins.
352. Hemp seed.
353. Chestnuts.
354. Onions, fresh.
355. Onions, pickled.
356. Cherries, fresh.
357. Cherries, preserved.
358. Cherries in sirup or candied.
359. Cherries, canned.
360. Cherries, dried.
361. Chick-peas.
362. Plums, canned.
363. Plums in sirup.
364. Plums, canned.
365. Plums, dried.
366. Cabbage.
367. Cumin.
368. Preserved fruits and vegetables.
369. Pickles in vinegar or brine.








SANTO D(


370. EspArragos.
371. Frijoles frescos.
372. Frijoles en latas.
373. Frijoles secos.
374. Frutas de todas classes y nueces con
cascara 6 sin cAscara, frescas, con-
servadas en su propio jugo, secas,
verdes, en conserve.
375. Frutas en pasta.
376. Frutas en almibar.
377. Frutas en latas.
378. Garbanzos.
379. Guisantes verdes.
3So. Guisantes en latas.
381. Guisantes en conserve.
382. ;Guisantes secos.
383. Habas.
384. Higos.
385. Ilongos 6 setas en conserve.
386. Ilongos 6 setas en latas.
387. Hongos 6 setas secas.
388. Hlortalizas y legumbres, frescas.

389. Hortalizas y legumbres, concentradas
al vapor.
390. Hortalizas y legumbres conservadas
de cualquier modo.
391. Hortalizas y legumbres encurtidas.

392. Hortalizas y legumbres en vinagre.

393. Hortalizas y legumbres preparadas
con sal.
394. Hortalizas y legumbres en latas.

395. Hortalizas y legumbres secas.


Judias.
Lentejas.
Limas.
Limones.
Manzanas frescas.
Manzanas en conserve.
Manzanas secas.
Manzanas en latas.
Melocotones frescos.
Melocotones en conserve.


)MINGO. 69

37o. Asparagus.
371. Beans, fresh.
372. Beans, canned.
373. Beans, dried.
374. Fruits of all kinds and nuts, shelled
or unshelled, fresh, preserved in
their own juice, dried, green, pre-
served.
375. Fruits in paste.
376. Fruits in sirup.
377. Fruits, canned.
378. Chick-peas.
379. Peas, green.
380. Peas, canned.
3S8. Peas, preserved.
382. Peas, dried,
383. Lima beans.
384. Figs.
385. Mushrooms, preserved.
386. Mushrooms, canned.
387. Mushrooms, dried.
388. Vegetables and garden products,
fresh.
389. Vegetables and garden products con-
centrated by steam.
390. Vegetables and garden products pre-
served in any way.
391. Vegetables and garden products,
pickled.
392. Vegetables and garden products in
vinegar.
393. Vegetables and garden products pre-
pared with salt.
394. Vegetables and garden products,
canned.
395. Vegetables and garden products,
dried.
396. French beans.
397. Lentils.
398. Limes.
399. Lemons.
400. Apples, fresh.
40o. Apples, prserved.
402. Apples, dried or desiccated.
403. Apples, canned.
404. Peaches, fresh.
405. Peaches, preserved.








SANTO DOMINGO.


Melocotones en dulce.
Melocotones secos.
Melocotones en latas.
Melones.
game.
Nabina.
Nabos.
Nueces.
Papas 6 batatas.
Pasas.
Peras frescas.
Peras en conserve.
Peras secas.
Peras en latas.
Piment6n.
Pimientos secos.
Sandias.
Tomates frescos.
Tomates en latas.
Uvas frescas.
Uvas en conserve.
Todas las demas frutas, hortalizas y
legumbres, frescas, conservadas,
en almibar, en dulce de cualquiera
clase, encurtidas, en vinagre, secas
y en latas.


Peaches in sirup.
Peaches, dried or desiccated.
Peaches, canned.
Melons.
Yams.
Rape seed.
Turnips.
Nuts.
Potatoes, Irish or sweet.
Raisins.
Pears, fresh.
Pears, preserved.
Pears, dried or desiccated.
Pears, canned.
Red pepper.
Dried peppers.
Watermelons.
Tomatoes, fresh.
Tomatoes, canned.
Grapes, fresh.
Grapes, preserved.
All other fruits, vegetables, and gar.
den products, fresh, preserved in
sirups, in sweets of any kind, pick-
led, in vinegar, dried, and canned.


No. 37.--Manufactures of iron and steel, single or mixed, not included in Schedule A.


428. Alcallatas de hierro 6 acero, no in-
cluidas en la Lista A.
429. Aldabas de hierro 6 acero.
430. Alfileres de hierro 6 acero.
431. Anafes de hierro 6 acero.
432. Anillos de hierro 6 acero.
433. Anzuelos de hierro 6 acero.
434. Arandelas de hierro 6 acero.
435. Arafias de hierro 6 acero.
436. Argollas de hierro 6 acero.
437. Arpones de hierro 6 acero.
438. Asadores de hierro 6 acero.
439. Badilas de hierro 6 acero.
44o. Balanzas de hierro 6 acero.
441. Baldes de hierro 6 agero.
442. Barbadas de hierro 6 acero.
443. Bisagras de hierro 6 acero.
444. Bocados de hierro 6 acero.


428. Hooks, staples, iron or steel, not in-
cluded in Schedule A.
429. Door knockers, iron or steel.
430. Pins, iron or steel.
431. Heaters, iron or steel.
432. Rings for curtains, iron or steel.
433. Fishhooks, iron or steel.
434. Washers, iron or steel.
435. Chandeliers, iron or steel.
436. Rings, iron or steel.
437. Harpoons, iron or steel.
438. Spits, iron or steel.
439. Fire shovels, iron or steel.
440. Scales, iron or steel.
441. Buckets, pails, iron or steel.
442. Curb chains for bridles, iron or steel.
443. Hinges or butts, iron or steel.
444. Bridle bits, iron or steel.








SANTO DOMINGO.


445- Bocallaves de hierro 6 acero.
446. Botones de hierro 6 acero.
447. Brocas para zapatas, de hierro 6 acero.
448. Cabezones de hierro 6 acero.
449. Cacerolas de hierro 6 acero.
450. Cadenas de todas classes no incluidas
en la Lista A.
451. Cafeteras de hierro 6 acero.
452. Cajas, areas 6 cofres, de hierro 6
acero.
453. Calderas y calderos de hierro 6 acero.
454. Camas de hierro 6 acero.
455. Canapes 6 sofis de hierro 6 acero.
456. Candados de hierro 6 acero.
457. Candeleros de hierro 6 acero.
458. Cazos 6 cazuelas de hierro 6 acero.
459. Cedazos de hierro 6 acero.
460. Cerraduras de hierro 6 acero.
461. Cerrojos de hierro 6 acero.
462. Charnelas de hierro 6 acero.
463. Corchetes de hierro 6 acero.
464. Corta-plumas de hierro 6 acero.
465. Cuchilleria de todas classes, de hierro
6 acero.
466. Cunas de hierro 6 acero.
467. Curios de hierra 6 acero.
468. Despabiladeras de hierro 6 acero.
469. Ejes para carruajes de todas classes.
470. Escopetas de hierro 6 acero.
471. Eslabones.
472. Espadas y espadines.
473. Espuelas de hierro 6 acero.
474. Estribos de hierro 6 acero.
475. Flejes 6 arcos no incluidos en el No.
25.
476. Floretes.
477. Fusiles.
478. Ganchos de hierro 6 acero.
479. Goznes de hierro 6 acero.
480. Grifos de hierro 6 acero.
481. Hebillas de hierro 6 acero.
482. Hojas de hierro 6 acero, para cuchi-
llos.
482a. Hornillos de hierro.
483. Horquillas para prendido de sefloras,
de hierro 6 acero.


445. Keyhole guards, iron or steel.
446. Buttons, iron or steel.
447. Shoe nails, iron or steel.
448. Cavessons, iron or steel.
449. Stewpans, iron or steel.
450. Chains of all kinds not included in
Schedule A.
451. Coffeepots, iron or steel.
452. Boxes, chests, safes, iron or steel.

453. Boilers and kettles, iron or steel.
454. Bedsteads, iron or steel.
455. Sofas or lounges, iron or steel.
456. Padlocks, iron or steel.
457. Candlesticks, iron or steel.
458. Saucepans, iron or steel.
459. Sieves, sifters, bolters, iron or steel.
460. Locks, iron or steel.
461. Bolts, iron or steel.
462. Hinges, iron or steel.
463. Hooks and eyes, iron or steel.
464. Penknives, iron or steel.
465. Cutlery of all kinds, iron or steel.

466. Cradles, iron or steel.
467. Wedges, iron or steel.
468. Candle snuffers, iron or steel.
469. Axles for carriages of all kinds.
470. Muskets, iron or steel.
471. Steels for flints.
472. Swords.
473. Spurs, iron or steel.
474. Stirrups, iron or steel.
475. Hoops not included in No. 25.

476. Foils, fencing.
477. Guns.
478. Hooks, iron or steel.
479. Hinges, iron or steel.
480. Faucets or cocks, iron or steel.
481. Buckles, iron or steel.
482. Knife blades, iron or steel.

482". Ovens, iron.
483. Hairpins and lace pins, iron or steel.








SANTO DOMINGO.


484. Llantas para ruedas de carruajes de
todas classes.
485. Llaves de reloj, de hierro 6 acero.
486. Llaves de hierro 6 acero de todas
classes.
487. Morrillos de chimen6a.
488. Navajas.
489. Ollas de hierro.
490. Ojetes para zapatos, etc., de hierro 6
acero.
491. Ornamentos de hierro 6 acero de todas
classes.
492. Parrillas.
493. Pernos de hierro 6 acero, los no in-
cluidos en la Lista A.
494. Pesas de hierro 6 acero.
495. Pistolas de todas classes.
496. Planchas para ropa.
497. Plumas de acero.
49S. Prensas para copiar.
499. Quincalleria, lanoincluidaen la Lista
A.
500. Ratoneras de hicrro 6 acero.
501. Redoblones de hierro 6 acero.
502. Remaches de hierro 6 acero.
503. Rifles de todas classes.
504. Sables de todas classes.
505. Sacacorchos de hierro 6 acero.
506. Sartenes.
507. Sellos para seller cartas.
50S. Tela de hierro 6 acero.
509. Tenazas, las no incluidas en el No. 14.
51o. Tijeras, las no incluidas en el No. 14.

511. Tinteros de hierro 6 acero.
512. Tuercas de hierro 6 acero.
513. Tiles de cocina de hierro 6 acero.
514. Visagras.
515. Todos los demis articulos 6 manu-
facturas de hierro 6 acero no inclu-
idos en la Lista A.


484. Tires for carriage wheels of all kinds.

485. Watch or clock keys, iron or steel.
486. Keys of all kinds, iron or steel.

487. Andirons.
488. Razors.
489. Pots,. iron.
490. Eyelets for shoes, etc., iron or steel.

491. Ornaments of all kinds, iron or steel.

492. Gridirons.
493. Bolts, iron or steel, not included in
Schedule A.
494. Weights, iron or steel.
495. Pistols of all kinds.
496. Sadirons, smoothing irons.
497. Steel pens.
498. Copying presses.
499. Hardware not included in Schedule
A.
500. Rat and mouse traps, iron or steel.
50o. Rivets, iron or steel.
502. Rivets, iron or steel.
503. Rifles of all kinds.
504. Sabers of all kinds.
505. Corkscrews, iron or steel.
506. Fry pans.
507. Letter seals.
5oS. Wire cloth, iron or steel.
509. Tongs not included in No. 14.
510. Shears and scissors not included in
No. 14.
511. Inkstands, iron or steel.
512. Nuts, iron or steel.
513. Kitchen utensils, iron or steel.
514. Hinges, iron or steel.
515. All other articles or manufactures of
iron or steel not included in Sched-
ule A.


No. 38.-Cotton, manufactured, spun, or twisted, and in fabrics of all kinds, woven or knit,
and the same fabrics mixed with other vegetable or animal fibers in which cotton is thu
equal or greater component part.

516. Alemanisco. 516. Damasks.
517. Algod6n hilado. 517. Spun cotton.








SANTO DOMINGO.


518. Algod6n torcido.
519. Algod6n en hilo para coser.
520. Bramante de algod6n.
521. Bretarias de algod6n.
522. Calcetines.
523. Camisas interiores de algod6n.
524. Camisas interiores, si tienen algod6n
hasta la mitad.
525. Carpetas de algod6n.
526. Chales de algod6n.
527. Colchas de algod6n.
528. Correaje de algod6n de todas classes.
529. Cortes de vestido de algod6n.
530. Cotin de algod6n.
531. Crea de algod6n.
532. Cresp6n 6 velillo de algod6n.
533. Dril Americano.
534. Encajes de algod6n.
535 Encerados de algod6n.
536. Felpas de algod6n.
537. Fieltro de algod6n.
538. Flecos de algod6n.
539. Frazadas de algod6n.
540. Gasa de algod6n.
541. Guantes de algod6n.
542. Guinga de algod6n.
543. Holandas de algod6n.
544. Irlanda de algod6n 6 de algod6n
hasta la mitad.
545. Lin6n de hilo mezclado con algod6n
hasta la mitad.
546. Listados de algod6n.
547. Lona de algod6n.
548. Madapolanes de algod6n.
549. Mantas de algod6n de todas classes.
550. Manteles de algod6n.
551. Mantillas.
552. Mantos.
553. Mosquiteros.
554. Medias de algod6n.
555. Muselinas.
556. Pana de algod6n.
557. Patio fino de algod6n.
558. PafRuelos de algod6n.
559. Punto de algod6n.
560. Raso de algod6n.
561. Servilletas de algod6n.


518. Thread, cotton.
519. Sewing cotton.
520. Pack thread, cotton.
521. Brittany cloths, cotton.
522. Stockings, cotton.
523. Undershirts, cotton.
524. Undershirts, if as much as one-half
cotton.
525. Table covers, cotton.
526. Shawls, cotton.
527. Counterpanes.
528. Cotton belting of all kinds.
529. Dress patterns, cotton.
530. Ticking, cotton.
53t. Cambric, fine, cotton.
532. Crape or veiling, cotton.
533. Drills.
534. Laces, cotton.
535. Oilcloths, cotton.
536. Shag, cotton.
537. Felt, cotton.
538. Edgings, cotton.
539. Bedspreads, cotton.
540. Gauze, cotton.
541. Gloves, cotton.
542. Gingham, cotton.
543. Hollands.
544. Irish cloth, of cotton or of as much as
one-half cotton.
545. Lawn, linen, with mixture of at least
one-half cotton.
546. Stripes, cotton.
547. Canvas, duck.
548. Modapolana.
549. Coverings of all kinds.
550. Tablecloths, cotton.
551. Mantillas.
552. Shawls.
553. Mosquito netting.
554. Stockings (cotton), socks.
555. Muslins, cotton.
556. Corduroy, cotton.
557. Fine cloth, cotton.
558. Handkerchiefs, cotton,
559. Knit goods, cotton.
560. Satin.
561. Napkins, cotton.







SANTO DOMINGO.


562. Tejidos de algod6n afelpados, crudos
6blancos, entoallasturcasyobjetos
Analogos; teriidos 6 estampados en
otra clase de felpas; alfombras,
crudas, blancas, teflidas 6 estampa-
das; mallas de algod6n mantas de
algod6n panas y veludillos, piqu6s,
crudos, blancos, tenlidos 6 estampa-
dos; puntillas, encaje y entredoses,
claros 6 diafanos, lisos 6 labrados,
crudos, blancos, teflidos 6 estampa-'
dos.
563. Tejidos de algod6n, tupidos, llanos,
asargados, cruzados y arrasados,
crudos, blancos tefiidos 6 estampa-
dos ; tupidos, lisos, labrados, flore-
ados, espolinados, crudos, blancos,
teflidos 6 estampados.
564. Tejidos de punto de crochet de punto
de malla; de punto de media en
piezas; de punto de media en ca-
misetas, calzoncillos, medias, cal-
cetines y objetos anAlogos; tules.
565. Los demis tejidos y manufactures de
algod6n, puro, 6 de algod6n mez-
clado con otras fibras vejetales y
animals en los cuales el algod6n
entire como component igual 6
mayor.
566. Terciopelo de algod6n.
567. Tiras bordadas.
568. Torzal de algod6n.
569. Zaraza.
5691. Velos de todas classes de algod6n,


562. Fabrics, cotton-shagged,unbleached
or bleached, in Turkish towels or
similar articles; dyed or printed,
in other forms of shag; carpetings,
raw, bleached, dyed, or printed;
netting (cotton) cotton covers or
blankets, corduroys, and velveteen;
pi.que, unbleached, bleached, dyed,
or printed; edgings, laces, and in-
sertions, fabrics, clear or translu-
cent, plain or worked, unbleached,
dyed, or printed.
563. Fabrics, cotton, close woven, smooth,
twilled, diagonal, or satined, un-
bleached, bleached, dyed, or print-
ed; close woven, plain, worked,
flowered, relief work, unbleached,
bleached, dyed, or printed.
564. Crochet work, network; knit goods
in the piece; knit goods in under-
shirts, drawers, socks, stockings,
and similar articles; tulle.

565. All other fabrics and manufactures of
cotton alone, or of cotton mixed
with other vegetable and animal
fibers when cotton forms the equal
or greater component part.

566. Cotton velvet.
567. Embroidered stripes.
568. Cotton floss.
569. Chintz or calico.
569". Veils, cotton, of all kinds.


Ao. 39.--Boots and s/hes in whole or in part of leather or skin.


570. Balmorales.
571. Borceguies.
572. Botas de cochero.
573. Botas de charol.
574. Botas de montar.
574a. Botas de todas otras classes.
575. Botinas.
576. Botines.
577. Broquies.


570. Balmorals.
571. Buskins.
572. Coachmen's boots.
573. Boots, patent leather.
574. Riding boots.
574". Boots of all other kinds.
575. Ladies' boots.
576. Gaiters.
577. Laced gaiters.








SANTO DOMINGO.


578. Calzado para hombres, muieres y ni-
fios; de fieltro con suela de cuero;
de piel con suela de madera; de
cualquier tejido con suela de cuero;
de cualquiera otra clase de piel 6
cuero en todo 6 en parte.
579. Chanclos.
580. Chinelas.
581. Zapatos.
582. Zapatillas.
583. Zapatones.


578. Boots and shoes for men, women,
and children, of felt with leather
sole; of leather with wooden sole;
of any woven fabric with leather
sole; of any other kind wholly or
partly of leather.
579. Overshoes.
580. Slippers.
581. Shoes.
582. Slippers.
583. Brogans.


No. 4o.-Paperfor writing, in envelopes, ruledor blank books, wallpaper, paper for wrapping
and packing, for cigarettes, in cardboard, boxes, and bags, sandpaper .itd pasteboard.


584. Cajas de papel.
585. Carpetas.
586. Cartulina.
587. Carteras.
588. Cart6n.
589. Libros en blanco.
590. Libros rayados.
591. Libritos de papel para cigarrillos.
592. Libros de copiar.
593. Papel aterciopelado para entapizar.
594. Papel pintado.
595. Papel de lija.
596. Papel en sobres.
597. Papel para escribir.
598. Papel de estraza.
599. Papel para embalar 6 empaquetar de
todas classes.
600. Papel para cigarrillos.
601. Papel para entapizar de todas classes.
602. Sacos de papel.


584. Boxes, paper.
585. Memorandum books.
586. Cardboard, fine.
587. Pocketbooks.
588. Cardboard.
589. Books, blank.
590. Books, ruled.
591. Books, small, of cigarette paper.
592. Books, copying.
593. Paper, wall, satin-faced.
594. Paper, painted.
595. Sandpaper.
596. Envelopes, paper.
597. Paper, writing.
598. Paper, wrapping.
599. Paper wrapping, and packing, of all
kinds.
600. Paper for cigarettes.
60. Paper, wall, of all kinds.
602. Bags, paper.


No. 41.- Tin plate and tinware for arts, industries, and domestic uses.


Hoja de lata charolada.
Hoja de lata estampada.
Hoja de lata lisa.
Hojade latalabradaen cualquier ob-
jeto 6 articulo para artes, industries
y usos dom6sticos.


Tin plate, japanned.
Tin plate, stamped.
Tin plate, plain.
Tin plate, manufactured in any ob-
ject or article for the arts, indus-
tries, and domestic uses.









SANTO DOMINGO.


Aro. 2.--Cordage, rope, and twine of all kinds.


607. Acarreto.
608. Cables de cualquier fibia vegetal no
incluidos en el No. 26.
609. Cordeles de pescar.
61o. Cordage de todas classes.
611. Hilo bramante de todas classes.
612. Hilo de zapatero.
613. Jarcia no incluida en el No. 26.


607. Pack thread.
608. Cables of any vegetable fiber not in-
cluded in No. 26.
609. Fishing lines.
61o. Cordage of all kinds.
611. Twine of all kinds.
612. Thread, shoemakers'.
613. Cordage for vessels not included in
No. 26.


No. 43. -Afanufacturers of wood of all kinds not embraced in Schedule A, including wooden
ware, implements for household use, and furniture in whole or in part of wood.
614. Areas. 614. Chests.
615. Arcos y aros no para toneleria. 615. Hoops and rings not for cooperage.
616. Armarios. 616. Cupboards, clothes presses.
617. Asientos (bidets). 617. Bidets.
618. Banastas de madera. 618. Baskets, wooden.
619. Banquetas. 619. Stools or benches.
620. Bales. 620. Trunks.
621. Butacas. 621. Chairs, arm, reclining.
622. Caballos de madera para niflos. 622. Rockinghorses,wooden,forchildren.
623. Cajas de madera de todas classes no 623. Boxes, cases, wooden, of all kinds
incluidas en el No. 25. not included in No. 25.
624. Cajas para carruajes. 624. Carriage bodies.
625. Ganapes 6 sofas. 625. Sofas or lounges.
626. Catres de madera. 626. Cots, wooden.
627. Camas de madera. 627. Bedsteads, wooden.
628. Cestos y cestas de madera. 628. Baskets, wooden.
629. Clavijas de madera. 629. Pegs or pins, wooden, formusical in-


C6modas.
Consolas.
Cortinas de madera.
Cuadros de madera.
Cubos para carruajes.
Cunas.
Efigies de madera.
Escaleras de madera.
Fustes de madera para sillas de
montar.
Horcates de madera.
Jaulas de madera.
Lechos.
Mangos de madera, los no incluidos
en la Lista A.


struments.
Bureaus.
Consoles.
Venetian blinds.
Frames, wooden, for mirrors.
Hubs for carriages.
Cradles.
Images, wooden.
Ladders, wooden.
Saddletrees, wooden.

Hames, wooden.
Cages, wooden.
Couches, wooden.
Handles, wooden, not included in
Schedule A.








SANTO DOMINGO.


643. Marcos de madera, los no incluidos
en la Lista A.
644. Mesas de todas classes.
645. Muebles en todo 6 en parte de ma-
dera.
646. Ornamentos de madera de todas class
no incluidos en la Lista A.
647. Palas de madera.
648. Palitos para hacer f6sforos.
649. Palitos para tender ropa.
650. Perambuladores.
651. Pinas para carruajes.
652. Puertas de cercado.
653. Rayos para carruajes.
654. Ruedas para carruajes.
655. Sillas de todas classes en todo 6 en
parte de madera.
656. Tabaqueras de madera.
657. Todos los demis objetos, articulos y
utensilios de madera, de uso domes-
tico, nocomprendidosen laListaA.
658. Todos las demas muebles en todo 6
en parte de madera.


643. Frames, wooden, not included in
Schedule A.
644. Tables of all kinds.
645. Furniture wholly or in part of wood.

646. Ornaments, wooden, of all kinds not
included in Schedule A.
647. Shovels, wooden.
648. Splints for making matches.
649. Clothespins.
650. Perambulators.
651. Felloes for carriages.
652. Gates, wooden.
653. Spokes for carriages.
654. Wheels for carriages.
655. Chairs of all kinds wholly or partly
of wood.
656. Tobacco or snuffboxes, wooden.
657. All other objects, articles, and uten-
sils of wood for domestic uses not
embraced in Schedule A.
658. All other furniture wholly or partly
of wood.


Signed in duplicate at the city of Washington, this eleventh

day of August, A. D. 1891..
JOHN W. FOSTER.

FRANCO. DE P. SUAREZ.




Alphabetical repertory.


No. in
sched-
ule.


Articles


Accessory parts, wooden, of buildings ...........................
A dzes .... ........................................................
Almonds, shelled ..................................................
Alm onds, unshelled ................................................
Anchors ...........................................................
A nchors ... ......................................................
A nchovies ................... .... ................................
Andirons ............. ..................................
Animals, live......................................................
Anthracite coal................. ........ ............ .............
Anvils............................................................
A nvils .... ........................................................


No. of
para-
graph.

24
14
36
36
14
26
35
37
I
II
14
14


I,









78 SANTO DOMINGO.

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.

No. in No. of
sched- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

403 Apples, canned .................................................... 36
402 A pples, dried ...................................................... 36
400 Apples, fresh .................................. .......... ......... 36
401 Apples, preserved .................................................. 36
343 A pricots, canned ........... ....................................... 36
344 A pricots, dried ..................................................... 36
341 A pricots, fresh ................................ .. ................. 36
342 A pricots in sirup .................................................. 36
176 A artificial stone ..................................................... 20
145 Asbestos roofing................................................... 17
370 Asparagus .................................................. ...... 36
62 A ugurs ............................................................ 14
87 A w ls ........... .................................... ........ .. 14
80 Axes ............................................................. 14
469 Axles for carriages ................................................. 37
75 Axles, iron .. ........................................... ............ 14
119 Axles, locom otive .................................................. 15
295 Bacon sides, rib sides............................................... 33
602 Bags. paper ......................................................... 40
570 Balm orals ......................................................... 39
to B arley ............................................................. 4
14 Barley meal ...................................................... 4
61 Barometers and thermometers..................................... .. 14
214 Barrels, new and old................................................. 25
231 Bars and rods of metal ..................................... ........ 26
618 Baskets, wooden .................................... ............. 43
628 Baskets, wooden .................................................. 43
209 Beam s......................... ......................... ........ 24
249 Beams (wood, iron, or steel) ........................................ 26
372 Beans, canned ............................................. ......... 36
373 Beans, dried .......................... ... ....................... 36
396 Beans, French.................... ................................. 36
371 B means, fresh.............. ............. ........................... 36
539 Bedspreads, cotton ............. ..................... ........... 38
454 Bedsteads, iron or steel ............................................. 37
627 Bedsteads, wooden ............................... ................. 43
284 Beef, fresh ........................................................ 33
287 Beef, sm oked ...................................................... 33
617 B idets .................... ....... ............... .... ........ .. .. 43
45 Bitum inous coal ............................................... .... II
257 Blackboards ....................................................... 28
201 Blinds .......................... ................................ 24
83 Blocks for has .......................................... ....... 14
43 Blood fertilizers .................................................... o
204 Boards ............................................................. 24
251 Boats, oar or steam .............. ...................... ........ .. 27
68 Boilers ........................................................... 14
453 Boilers and kettles.......................... ....................... 37
461 Bolts, iron and steel ...................................... .......... 37
243 Bolts, iron or copper, for vessels .................................... 26
493 Bolts, iron or steel, not in Schedule A ............................... 37
40 Bones dissolved in acids ............................................ 10
589 Books, blank ...................................................... 40








SANTO DOMINGO. 79

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.

No. in No. of
sched- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

265 Books, bound ......... ............................... ... ......... 29
592 Books, copying. ............... .... ... ... .... ............. ... ... 40
585 Books, memorandum .............................................. 40
591 Books of cigarette paper ........................................... 40
587 Books, pocket ..................................................... 40
590 Books, ruled.... .................................................. 40
264 Books, unbound ............................................... 29
578 Boots and shoes, for men, women, and children, of felt, leather, or
woven fabrics ...................................... ........ ....- 39
575 Boots, ladies'............. ......... ...... ..... ............... 39
574e Boots of all other kinds ............................................ 39
573 Boots, patent leather .................................. ..... ........ 39
76 Bottoms, iron, for sugar mills ...................... ............... 14
623 Boxes, cases, wooden, not in No. 25 ................................ 43
452 Boxes, chests, safes, iron or steel.................................... 37
584 Boxes, paper ......................................... ........... 40
226 Boxes, wooden, or box shooks.............. ................ ...... 25
12o Brakes .......... ... ...... ................... .... .. .................. 15
17 Bran ....................................... .... .................. 5
167 Bricks ........... ......................... ........................ 20
123 Bridges, railroad ................................ ........... ...... 15
444 Bridle bits, iron or steel .......................................... 37
521 Brittany cloths .................................................. 38
583 Brogans ......................... .......... ..... ... ..... .. ...... 9 39
213 Buckets or pails, wooden .......................................... 25
441 Buckets, pails, iron or steel ......................................... 37
481 Buckles, iron or steel.......................................... .... .. 37
12 Buckwheat .................. .... ... .... .......................... 4
16 Buckwheat flour ............................................ ....... 4
iii Buffers ................................................ .......... 15
221 Bungs.............................. ................. .............. 25
630 Bureaus........................................ ............ ... 43
65 Burins ............................ ...... ........................ 14
571 Buskins............................................ .......... .... 39
299 Butter............................................................ 34
446 Buttons, iron or steel............................... .. .......... 37
366 Cabbages ............................... .. .................... 36
6o8 Cables.......................................... ................ 42
64o Cages, wooden................................... ................ 43
531 Cambric, fine, cotton ...... ........ ..... ....... ....... .... .... .. 38
468 Candle snuffers ................................................... 37
457 Candlesticks. .......................................... ....... ... 37
89 Cane knives .... ............................... ... .... .......... 14
547 Canvas (duck).................................. ........ .......... 38
345 Capers ...... ........................................ .......... 36
233 Capstans ............................... .. ................... 26
66 Capstans ......................................... ............ ...... 14
124 Car and locomotive wheels ........................................ 15
118 Car axles ............................................... .......... 15
588 Cardboard .................... ............... ..................... ... 40
586 Cardboard, fine ............. ...... ............................... 40
624 Carriage bodies .......... ............................. ... .. 43
II5 Cars, freight........................... ............. .............. 15








80 SANTO DOMINGO.

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.

No. in No. of
schetl- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

114 Cars, passenger .................................................. 15
69 Carts .............................................................. 14
267 Cases for printing...................................... ........... 30
215 Casks, new or old .............................................. ... 25
448 Cavessons, iron or steel .............................. ............. 37
348 C elery .................... ........................................ 36
165 C em ent .......................................... ................. 20
67 Chains ........................................................... 14
450 Chains not in Schedule A .................. ..................... ... 37
621 Chairs, arm reclining ............... ........................... 43
655 Chairs, wholly or partly wood ............................ ......... 43
435 Chandeliers, iron or steel ........................................... 37
300 Cheese ....................................................... .... 34
359 Cherries, canned .............................................. 36
360 Cherries, dried ..................................................... 36
356 Cherries, fresh .................................................... 36
358 Cherries in sirup ................................................ 36
357 Cherries, preserved ................................................ 36
353 C hestnuts .................. ............................. ........ 36
614 C hests............................ ................................ 43
361 Chick-peas ......................... .............................. 36
378 Chick-peas ....... ......... ..................................... 36
339 Chicory.. ...................................................... 36
569 Chintz or calico ............ ...................................... 38
77 C hisels .................................... .................. .... 14
302 Clams, fresh and canned............................................ 35
649 Clothespins ....................................................... 43
557 Cloth,fine, cotton .............................. .. ................ 38
572 Coachm en's boots .................................................. 39
44 Coal, anthracite .... ............................................ .. II
45 Coal, bituminous .................................. ......... .. I
47 Coal dust pressed n cakes ......................................... II
46 Coal, mineral ... ................................................. II
306 Codfish, dried, salted, in brine ...................................... 35
319 Codfish lips............... ........ ............................... 35
333 Codfish tripes .......... .... ....................................... 35
451 Coffeepots, iron or steel ............................................ 37
48 Coke........................................................... .. .
33 Colophony ....................................................... 9
7 C Com passes ................................... .............. ..... 14
268 Composing sticks................................................... 30
631 Consoles........................................................... 43
225 Cooperage ........... ............................................ 25
244 Copper and brass pieces for vessels ...... ......................... 26
158 Copper bars.......................................... ........... IS
159 Copper nails ..................................................... 18
161 C opper screws ................. ................... ............ .. 18
234 Copper sheathing, composition, for vessels..........................I 26
245 Copper sheathing for vessels ......................................... 26
16o I Copper sheets .................................................. 18
162 Copper tubes or pipes ......... .................................... 19
498 Copying presses......... ........... .............................. 37
6io Cordage .................................................... ....... 42








SANTO DOMINGO. 81

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.

No in No. of
sched- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

235 Cordage for vessels............................... ................ 26
613 Cordage for vessels not in paragraph 26............................. 42
556 Corduroy .......................................... ............... 38
505 Corkscrews................ ....................................... 37
7 C orn m eal ............ ........................................... 3
147 Corrugated iron for roofng......................................... 17
626 Cots, wooden .............. ........................... ........... 43
26 Cottolene .......................................................... 7
528 Cotton belting.............. ..................... ................. 38
568 Cotton floss......................................................... 38
25 Cotton-seed cake........................................ .......... 7
24 Cotton-seed oil.............. ...................................... 7
566 Cotton velvet ............................ .......................... 38
641 Couches ......................................... ...... ... ... 43
527 Counterpanes ...... .. ............... ... ....... ..... ..... 38
549 Coverings of all kinds .............................................. 38
635 Cradles ............................................................ 43
466 Cradles, iron or steel ........................ ............... ... 37
532 Crape or veiling, cotton .......................... ............... 38
239 C ringles .................................. ....................... 26
564 Crochet work, network, knit goods in the piece, knit goods in under-
shirts, etc ............................. ......................... 38
117 Cross-ties .................... ..................................... 15
367 C um in ........................................... ..... ........ .. 36
616 Cupboards, clothes presses ........................................ 43
442 Curb chains for bridles, iron or steel .... ........................... 37
465 Cutlery, iron or steel ............................................... 37
516 D am asks.......................................................... 38
200 Door and window frames............................................ 24
429 Door knockers, iron or steel .................. ................... 37
203 D oors ........... ................................................. 24
529 D ress patterns, cotton ............................................. 38
533 Drills............................................. ................ 38
538 Edgings................................. ...... .. .............. 38
191 Electric apparatus ................... ...... ........... .......... 23
279 Empty sugar sacks ................................................. 31
596 Envelopes, paper ...................................... ..... ..... 40
490 Eyelets, iron or steel............................................. 37
562 Fabrics, cotton ................................ .................... 38
563 Fabrics, cotton ............................................ ..... 38
480 Faucets or cocks, iron or steel ............................. ......... 37
651 Felloes for carriage wheels ....................... ................. 43
537 Felt, cotton ........................................................ 38
182 Fencing wire, smooth or barbed .................................... 22
37 Fertilizers, natural or artificial ........................................ Io
384 Figs .......................................... .... .............. 36
349 Filberts............................................................ 36
88 Files .................................................... ......... 14
168 Fire bricks........................................ ......... 20
439 Fire shovels, iron or steel ...... ........................... ........ 37
55 Fishhooks ........................... ............................ 14
433 Fishhooks, iron or steel............................................. 37
609 Fishing lines ....................................................... 42
Bull. 52---6







82 SANTO DOMINGO.

Alpkabetical repertory-Continued.

No. in No. of
sched- Articles. para-
ule. I graph.

323 Fish necks....................................... ........ ...... 35
313 Fish roes................. ........................... 35
307 Fish sounds ........................ 35
315 Fish tongues............ ..... .... .. .35
195 Floor beams ................................ ................... 24
205 Flooring ........................................................... 24
170 Flooring tiles...................... ....................... ........ 20
476 Foils, fencing ... ...... ........ ...................... 37
269 Forms for printing....................... ........................ 30
633 Frames, wooden, for mirrors ....................................... 43
643 Frames, wooden, not in Schedule A ....................... 43
374 Fruits, all kinds, and nuts........................................ 36
377 Fruits, canned ........ ............ ..... 36
375 Fruits in paste ..................................................... 36
376 Fruits in sirup ....................... ............. ...... ... ... 36
506 Frying pans........... ............ ... ..... .... ............... 37
658 Furniture, all other, wholly or partly of wood...................... 43
645 Furniture, wholly or partly of wood................................ 43
576 G aiters ......................... ................................ 39
577 Gaiters, laced ..................................................... 39
270 G alleys ....................... .................................... 30
183 Galvanized fencing wire........ .............. ..................... 22
148 Galvanized iron for roofing ....................................... 17
340 G arlic ..................................................... ....... 36
652 Gates, wooden .................................................... 43
540 Gauze, cotton .. ..................... ........................... 38
542 Ginghams, cotton........................................... ...... 38
541 Gloves, cotton..................... .. .......................... 38
280 Gold and silver coin and bullion of the United States ................. 32
281 Gold, coined, of the United States .................................. 32
29 Gouges .............................. ......... ............. ....... 4
425 Grapes, fresh.................... .......................... ...... 36
426 Grapes, preserved .............................................. .. 36
492 G ridirons ................................................. ...... .. 37
39 Ground bones ................... ........................ 10
38 Guano ......................... ........... .......... .. ......... 10
477 Guns ............................ ............................... 37
42 Gypsum ............................... ........ .... .. .... ... 10
330 H addock ......... .. .. ....... ..... .... ..** ** ...* ..* .* 35
483 Hairpins and lace pins................................. ... .... 3
324 Hake ............................................................ 35
639 H am es........................................................ 43
298 Hams ......................................................... 33
113 Hand cars............................................. ........ 15
558 Handkerchiefs, cotton ........................... .. ....... 40
642 Handles, wooden, not in Schedule A ......................... .. 43
Io4 Handsaws .................................................... .. 14
499 Hardware, not in Schedule A..................................... .. 37
437 Harpoons, iron or steel ............................................ 37
81 H atchets.............. ................................. ........ 14
18 Hay ...................... ..... ............................... 5
223 Heads for barrels, casks, etc ...................................: 25
53 Heaters................. ................... ...... ........... ... 14








SANTO DOMINGO.

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.


No. in No. of
s-hed- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

431 Heaters, iron or steel ............... ............... .. ............ 37
352 H em p seed ................................ ....... ...... ... ... 36
304 Herrings .......................................................... 35
462 Hinges, iron or steel ............................................... 37
514 Hinges, iron or steel ............................................. 37
479 Hinges, iron or steel.......................................... ....... 37
443 Hinges or butts, iron or steel .................................. 37
216 Hogsheads, new or old...................................... ..... 25
543 Hollands.......................................................... 38
463 Hooks and eyes, iron or steel........................................ 37
185 Hooks for fencing ................................................. 22
478 Hooks, iron or steel ........... .......................... .... .. 37
428 Hooks, staples, iron or steel, not in Schedule A ...................... 37
615 Hoops and rings not for cooperage ................................. 43
58 Hoops, iron .................... .......... .... ........ 14
475 Hoops not included in paragraph 25 ................................. 37
212 Hoops, wooden, for cooperage ................................................... 25
634 Hubs for carriage wheels.......................................... 43
293 Hung beef ........ .................................. ............... 33
51 Ice ....................................... ......................... 13
636 Images, wooden ................................................... 43
272 Imposing stones.................... ................... ............ 30
271 Im posing tables ............................... .................... 30
8 Indian corn ........................................................ 3
127 Ingot steel ......................................... ............... 16
277 Inks for printing ................................................... 30
511 Inkstands, iron or steel .................. ...................... ... 37
567 Insertions ........................ ................................. 38
84 Instruments and tools for the arts..................................... 14
86 Instruments, mathematical .......................................... 14
85 Instruments,,surgical ..................................... ....... .. 14
544 Irish cloth ................................................ ........ 38
130 Iron and steel bars. ................................... ............ 16
142 Iron and steel beams ............................................ 16
131 Iron and steel nails ................................................. 16
140 Ilon and steel pipes ................................................ 16
137 Iron and steel plates ................................ ............... 16
246 Iron and steel plates for vessels .................................... 26
143 Iron and steel rafters ............................................ .. 16
141 Iron and steel rods ................................................. 16
139 Iron and steel screws ................................. ............ 16
128 Iron and steel wire ................................................. 16
132 Iron. cast......... ......................... ................... 16
135 Iron, hammered ......... ........................................... 16
133 Iron in bars.......... .. ........................................ 16
134 Iron, w brought ........................... .......................... 16
2I1 Joists and scantling................................................. 24
218 Kegs ............................................................. 25
445 Keyhole guards, iron or steel ....................................... 37
486 K eys of all kinds ............ ...................................... 37
513 Kitchen utensils, iron or steel ........................................ 37
237 Knees of wood, iron, or steel ....................................... 26








84 SANTO DOMINGO.

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.

No. in No. of
sched- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

482 Knife blades, iron or steel .................. ...................... 37
559 K nit goods, cotton ................................................. 38
534 Laces, cotton................................................... 38
637 Ladders, wooden ................. ............... .................. 43
82 Lasts for boots and shoes ................... ...................... 14
199 Laths (strips) wooden ........................ ....................... 24
252 Launches, oar or steam ............. .............................. 27
545 Lawn, linen, mixed with cotton ...................................... 38
154 Lead in sheets or plates .................. ...................... ... 17
163 Lead pipes or tubes ................................................ 19
275 Leads..................................... ....................... 30
399 Lemons..................................................... ... 36
397 Lentils .. ........................................ ............... 36
507 Letter seals...... ................... .......................... 37
383 Lima beans ........... .......... .................................. 36
164 Lim e ................................................... .......... 20
398 Lim es ......................................................... .... 36
Ioo Liquor weighers .................... ............................... 14
314 Lobsters ... ....... ... ......................................... 35
460 Locks, iron or steel .............................................. 37
121 Locom otives ....................... .................... ..... ... 15
208 Logs.. .. .............. ................... ............................. ...... 24
go Machinery of all kinds ............................................ 14
27 Machinery oil ...................................................... 8
317 Mackerel ......... ................................................. 35
308 Mackerel, preserved, etc ............... .. ..................... ....... 35
548 Madapolam ..................................... ................. 38
551 M antillas ......................................................... 38
172 Marble, dressed or polished ...................................... 20
171 Marble in the rough ................................................ 20
173 M arble tables .................................... ... ..... .... ... 20
229 M asts, wooden or iron ...................................... ....... 26
241 Materials for shipbuilding..................................... ..... 26
286 Meats, fresh... ............................ ...... .............. .. 33
5 Meats in brine ..................................................... 2
292 Meats preserved by extraction of air ................................. 33
290 Meats preserved in cans............................................. 33
291 Meats preserved in vinegar ........... .............................. 33
289 M eats, sm oked ................................................ .... 33
409 M elons ............................ ............................... 36
301 Milk, condensed or canned.......................................... 34
5o M ineral waters, artificial ............................................. 12
49 M ineral waters, natural .............................................. 12
91 Mortars ........................................................... 14
32 Mortars, iron.................................. ................... 14
553 M osquito netting .................... ............................. 38
386 Mushrooms, canned ............................................... 36
387 Mushrooms, dried ............................................... 36
385 Mushrooms, preserved.............................................. 36
261 M usic books .................................. ........... ....... 29
470 M uskets, iron or steel................................ .... ........ 37
555 M uslins, cotton ................................................ ... 38
184 Nails for fencing .............................. .................... 22








SANTO DOMINGO. 8$

Alphabetical repertory-Continued.

No. in No. of
sched- Articles. para-
ule. graph.

561 Napkins, cotton ................................................... 38
283 Neat's-foot oil............................................. ...... 33
41 Nitrates of lime, potash, and soda.................................. 10
413 N uts ............................................................. 36
512 N uts, iron or steel ...................................... ........... 37
238 Oakum ............................................. ........... 26
247 Oars..... .......................................... .. .. ......... 26
13 O atm eal........................................................... 4
9 O ats ....... .................. ........................... ....... 4
535 O ilcloths, cotton......................... .................... 38
336 Olives, canned ................................................. 36
335 Olives, fresh .................................................... 36
337 Olives, pickled...... ............................ .............. ....... 36
338 Olives, preserved.................................. ................ 36
354 Onions, fresh ........................... .......... .......... .. 36
355 Onions, pickled .. ........................................ ........ 36
491 Ornaments, iron ............................ .. .. .............. 37
646 Ornaments, wooden ................ .. ................ .......... 43
482a O vens, iron ....................................... .............. 37
579 Overshoes.................................. ...... ................ 39
322 Oysters, canned .......................................... ....... .. 35
321 Oysters, fresh ............. ................................... 35
320 Oysters, preserved ....... ..... .. ........................ 35
607 Pack thread...................................................... 42
520 Pack thread, cotton............... ........ ........ .... ... .... 38
456 Padlocks, iron or steel .............. ....... ........ .. ............ 37
262 Pamphlets ................................................. ... 29
93 Pans ...................... ....... ........................ 14
6oo Paper for cigarettes........ ...................................... 40-
266 Paper for printing newspapers................................ ... 29
594 Paper, painted ................................................... 40
6or Paper, w all ..... .......................... .. .................. 40
593 Paper, wall (satin-faced) ............................. .............. 40
598 Paper, wrapping ....................... ........................... 40
599 Paper, wrapping and packing ..................................... 40
597 Paper, writing. ............................. .. ................ 40
169 Paving tiles or blocks ............................. ............. .. 20
408 Peaches, canned............ ............. .... ............. 36
407 Peaches, dried or desiccated ... ....................... ........ 36
404 Peaches, fresh .......... .... ... ........ ................... .... ... 36
419 Peaches in sirup................................ ............... 36
406 Peaches, preserved .................. ................... 36
405 Peanuts ..... ...................................... .............. 36
350 Pears, canned ........................................... ... .. 36
418 Pears, dried or desiccated ........................................ 36
416 Pears,fresh. .................................................... 36
417 Pears, preserved ................................................... 36
380 Peas, canned......... .......... ................................... 36
382 Peas, dried ...................................... ......... ... .... 36
379 Peas, green .................................................... .. 36
381 Peas, preserved ................................................... 36
629 Pegs or pins, wooden, for musical instruments ....................... 43
464 Penknives, iron or steel .................................... .. 37








86 SANTO DOMINGO.

Al4phaetical repertory-Continued.

No. in] No. of
sched4 Articles. para-
ule. I graph.

420 Pepper, red ...................................................... 36
421 Peppers, dried ..................................................... 36
650 Perambulators. ..................................................... 43
266a Periodicals. ....................................................... 29
310 Periw inkles ................................. ........ .. ............ 35
312 Pickled fish......................................... ..... 35
369 Pickles in vinegar or brine ......................................... 36
95 Picks ........................................................ ..... 14
202 Pieces of lumber ................................................... 24
136 Pig iron ........................................ .................. 16
166 Pillars of stone or marble ........................................... 20
96 P incers .................................. ......... ............. 14
35 Pine resin ............................. ............ ........ ....... 9
430 Pins, iron or steel .................................................. 37
219 Pipes ....... ................................. ................. .... 25
495 Pistols, all kinds ................................ ................... 37
32 Pitch .......................... .... ....... .................. .. 9
72 Planes.......................... .................................. 14
78 Planes ................................... ......................... 14
206 Planks ...................................................... .... .. 24
21 Plants .................................................. .......... 6
179 Plaster of Paris .................................................... 20
153 Plates of zinc, galvanized iron, and lead .............................. 17
56 Plows ............................................................... 14
zor Plowshares ........................................................ 14
364 Plums, canned ..................................................... 36
365 Plum s, dried .................................. .................... 36
362 Plum s, fresh ............ ...................................... ... 36
363 Plums in sirup .................................................... 36
285 Pork, fresh ....................................................... 33
288 Pork, smoked ......................................... .. ...... 33
414 Potatoes, Irish or sweet ............................................. 36
489 Pots, iron .......................................... ............... 37
311 Preserved fish ..................................................... 35
368 Preserved fruits and vegetables..................................... 36
263 Printed matter .......................... ....................... 29
273 Printing presses................................ .................. 30
92 Pulley blocks ................. ................. .................. 14
99 Pulleys ........................................................... I4
351 Pumpkins ................................. ............ .... ... 36
64 Pum ps ........................... ..................... .......... 14
232 Pumps for vessels ......................... .................... 26
196 Rafters or crossbeams............................................. 24
129 R ailings, iron .......................................... ......... 16
116 Rails............................................................. 15
415 Raisins ................................................... ......... 36
411 Rape seed ....................................................... 36
500 Rat and mouse traps .............................................. 37
488 Razors ........... .......................... ............... .... 37
574 Riding boots..................................................... 39
503 Rifles of all kinds ................................................. 37
240 Rigging............................................................ 26
230 Rings.............................................................. 26




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