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The Gainesville iguana ( May - June 2013 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Gainesville iguana
Alternate Title:
Iguana
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28-29 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Creation Date:
May - June 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1986.
General Note:
Editors: Jenny Brown and Joe Courter, <1991-1996>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 10 (July 1991).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 25027662
lccn - sn 96027403
lccn - sn 96027403
System ID:
UF00073860:00058

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Gainesville iguana
Alternate Title:
Iguana
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 28-29 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Creation Date:
May - June 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1986.
General Note:
Editors: Jenny Brown and Joe Courter, <1991-1996>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 10 (July 1991).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 25027662
lccn - sn 96027403
lccn - sn 96027403
System ID:
UF00073860:00058


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INSIDE ...From the Publisher . . . . 3 Stetson Kennedy Papers . . 6 Gay Pride ............... 7 CMC Events . . . . . . . 9 Directory . . . . . . 10-11 Event Calendar . . . . 12-13 Oral History Program ... 14-15 GROW Radio schedule . . 23 See FLORIDA ORGANIC, p. 19 See CHOMSKY p. 2 by Jenni Williams, Florida Organic Growers, Inc (FOG). In March 2011, 75 family farmers, seed businesses and agricultural organizations representing over 300,000 individuals and 4,500 farms brought a pre-emptive case against Monsanto in the Southern District defend themselves from nearly two dozen of Monsantos most aggressively asserted patents on GMO seed. In Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association (OSGATA) et al v. Monsanto, the plaintiffs were forced to sue preemptively to protect themselves from being accused ever become contaminated by Monsantos genetically engineered seed, something Monsanto has done to others in the past. In an attempt to sidestep the challenge, Monsanto moved to have the case dismissed, saying that the plaintiffs concerns were unrealistic. In February 2012, the district court took Monsantos side and dismissed the case, ridiculing the farmers in the process. Gainesvilles FOG part of national challenge to MonsantoChomsky to speak Oct. 15Despite the fact that the plaintiffs are at risk for being contaminated by genetically infringement by Monsanto, Judge Naomi Buchwald of the Southern District of New York dismissed the case because she didnt it is clear that these circumstances do not amount to a substantial controversy and defendants. In an effort to reverse the lower courts brief with the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington on July 5, 2012. In the brief, the plaintiffs pointed out numerous errors in the district court decision that warrant reversal. Among them are the lower courts failure Illustration by Dan Wasserman, Tribune Content Agency by Joe Courter The Civic Media Center is proud and delighted to present author, linguist and political dissident Noam Chomsky at the Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on Tuesday evening, Oct. 15. Doors will open at 7:15, and the speech is at 8 p.m. Advance tickets (free) can be picked up from the CMC (Thurs., Fri., Sat., noon to 6 p.m., and Tues., noon up through the event or when they run out). There will be outside video and sound on the lawn, and hopefully there will be live webcast. demand as a speaker from around the world. In late June he spoke in Lebanon and Germany, and will be in Canada shortly after his Gainesville speech. The GainesvilleIguanaOctober 2013 Vol. 27, Issue 10

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PAGE 2, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 CHOMSKY, from p. 1 The CMC invited him to Gainesville to mark its 20th anniver sary; he came in 2003 for its 10th, speaking to over 6,000 in the OConnell Center, and he was in Gainesville in 1993 and helped dedicate the brand new CMC on its opening day. We hoped to present Chomsky in the OConnell Center again, and as soon as the new ACCENT (UFs well-funded, student-run made to have them host the event. Initial positive response did Islam on Campus then stepped up to do it, but bureaucracy and time ended that effort, so the Civic Media Center is presenting the event on its own. Well, thats not accurate, because with $7,000 to raise (the Phillips, its staff and tech, plus airfare and lodging; and not counting an honorarium) and no monetary reserves to draw from, it will take fund raising from friends and allies in the campus and community to make it happen. Its a big leap, but it was felt that the support would come through. (If you, dear reader, want to help and or honor the CMC for 20 years of service to the community, they would certainly appreciate it. There is Paypal at the website , or snail mail or hand delivery to the CMC at 433 S. Main St., Gainesville, FL 32601.) For anyone not familiar with Chomsky, there is a wealth of his writings and speeches available online. His analysis at times has been called maddeningly simplistic, but for many his views bounds of the accepted mainstream debate and cut to the heart of an issue. Consider this from the October 2013 issue of The Progressive, in an interview with David Barsamian. When asked about peoples frustration with Democrats and Republicans, he responded: It used to be said, kind of sardonically, that the United States has only one party, the business party, with two factions. Thats no longer correct. It still has one party, the business party, but it only has one faction. That faction consists of moderate Republicans. Theyre called Democrats, but theyre in fact what used to be moderate Republicans, as everything has shifted to the right. The Republican Party is in lock step service to wealth and power. To get votes, it mobilizes sectors of the population with irrational appeals. Even conservative commentators like Norman Ornstein describe it as some sort of radical extremist organization. So were essentially down to one party, the business party, with moderate Republicans as the sole faction, and a kind of a radical obstructionist group trying to block anything from happening and making things worse. The population is extremely confused and demoralized. People really mind-boggling. Theyre tapping elements of irrationality country thats become overwhelmed with propaganda, beginning with commercial advertising, up to national policy. Whats commercial advertising? Its a means to undermine mar kets. Business doesnt want markets, since markets are supposed to be based on informed consumers making rational choices. Take a look at a television ad. Its trying to create an uninformed consumer who will make a totally irrational choicebuy a Ford Motors car because some football player is standing next to it and its the same ideas and techniques to undermine democracy, to make sure that you have uninformed voters making irrational choices. We have a population thats very much atomized, so people dont get together. They dont interact in ways that are politically Solidarity is gone? Barsamian asked. I dont want to exaggerate. There are plenty of people, including young people, who are very motivated by solidarity with others, mutual support, struggling against the dangers, including global warming. Were facing a complete environmental disaster. Both of the so-called parties are euphoric about what they call years of energy independence. But what they mean is, Lets enthusiastically get every drop of hydrocarbons out of the ground and burn it, and that will be wonderful. Except that what are we going to do to the world? Thats somebody elses business. Chomskys critical views of U.S. foreign policy go back to being an early outspoken critic of the U.S. war in Vietnam in the early sixties. He is an outspoken critic of the increasing surveillance by the NSA, the National Defense Authorization Act, drone warfare, and attacks on press freedom. He is a fearless defender of Palestinian rights. It will be an honor to have him here in Gainesville. D

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 3 From the publisher ...Wanted: cooler, more sensible heads Joe Courter It is hard for me to wrap my mind around the events in the world at this moment in October 2013. Here I am in Gainesville, Fla., a city I came to exactly 38 years ago, under the premise of taking a winter away from snow. Within a year or two, Id found three circles of people whose successors (and the same people themselves) I am still around today. There was the anti-war crowd, the feminist crowd and the acoustic musician and solidarity, but within them they represent, at least for me, the best of human endeavors, and relief and refuge from what has become an increasingly crass and commercialized culture. October is full of anniversaries for me. October 1969, my freshman year of college, was the national student Moratorium Day when campuses all across the country went on strike and held teach-ins on the Vietnam Waran unforgettable baptism into the anti-war movement. It was October 1986 that Jenny Brown and I started this little paper in your hands (or on your screen, Internet readers), the Gainesville Iguana. And in October 1993, as written about elsewhere in these pages, was when the Civic Media Center opened its devoted to now for 20 yearsa fantastic evolving community resource. That said, I look at the world today and cant believe how many things are so screwed up. You young people out there, my generation is leaving you a big freakin mess. We pink monkeys (its been mostly the pink ones, tho the darker ones are contributing) altered. Our corporate-driven mass society has made us a threat to ourselves through a breakdown in cultural traditions (empathy, community, education) and has given us a dependency on electronic stimulation and constant trivial information. Time spent computers and electronic media devices. And that we are so distracted and manipulated has contributed to we here in the USA having a government so dysfunctional that the We have the resources to do better. Those same computers and electronic devices could be helping us educate and organize for a better world. Im sure some of you are. But zone out and abdicate our role as functional participants in building the future. Im no martyr; at times I do it myself. Life is short, and you gotta keep the fun in it, too. heads in the world. D Editorial Boards picks for additional reading Trade Pact, Would Rewrite Swath of U.S. Laws -http://www.democracynow. Black Agenda Report -News, commentary & analysis from the black left, http://www. blackagendareport.com. In particular, check out Obama Reeks of Sulfur at the UN by BAR executive editor Glen Ford RootsAction.org -An online initiative dedicated to galvanizing Americans who are committed to economic fairness, equal rights, civil liberties, environmental protection, and defunding endless wars. http://rootsaction.org Jon Stewart Skewers Ted Cruzs 21-Hour Obamacare Speech: Youre F*cking With Us, Right? Imposters ruin pipeline companys campaign of lies by Andy Bichlbaum Sept. 30 -http://yeslab.org/sanstranscanada. Subscribe! The Gainesville Iguana is Gainesville's progressive events calendar & newsletter.Individuals: $15 (or more if you can) Low/No income: What you can Groups: $20 Iguana, c/o CISPLA P.O. Box 14712 Gainesville, FL 32604Comments, suggestions, contributions list your event or group, contact us at: (352) 378-5655GainesvilleIguana@cox.net www.gainesvilleiguana.org facebook.com/gainesvilleiguana The Iguana has been published monthly or bimonthly by volunteers for 25 years. Circulation for this issue is 5,000. Publisher: Joe Courter Editors Emeritus: Jenny Brown Mark Piotrowski Editorial Board: Pierce Butler Joe Courter Beth Grobman Jessica Newman Production work & assistance: Justine Mara Andersen Joye Barnes Linda Bassham Scott Camil Robbie Czopek Marty Mesh Paul Ortiz Distribution: Joe Courter Marcus Dodd Bill Gilbert Jack Price Anita SunduramAuthors & photographers have sole credit, responsibility for, and rights to their work. Cover drawing of iguana by Daryl Harrison. Printed on recycled paper.

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PAGE 4, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 by James Thompson, Advocacy Director, Gainesville Cycling Club calming bike lane test on NW 8th Ave., you would think the great front in the battle to improve our city is taking place on the street. Indeed, bike lanes on paved roads have been the enduring and traditional approach to improving multimodal transit in Gainesville since the ear-ly 1980s. But the global bike-ped advocacy movement has caused us to rethink approaches to politics and urban plan-ning. -ing more lanes, but about getting people out of their cars, changing percep-tions about safety, and urging our community leaders and government to make progressive de-cisions about multi-mod-al transit. Jeff Mapes Pedaling Revolutions: How Cyclists are Changing American Cities catalogues these trends across our nation. They are be-ginning to emerge in our own community. While thought of as an island of peace in a dangerous cycling state, Gainesville is actually only one of nine bike-friendly cities in Florida designated by the League of American Bicyclists (LAB). While we no longer own the only LAB Silver Star designation in the State (Venice, FL has one), we are by far the most bicycle-rich community in the Southern United States. The 2010 U.S. census put us in seventh place nationally, ahead of cycling mecca Portland, Oregon, for percentage of com-muters that use pedal power (about 7 per-cent, versus the national average of 0.6 percent). The census counts permanent res-idents, so the actual number is likely higher given our student-heavy demographic. Aside from actually riding your bike, which is step one to becoming a pedal advocate, there are many organized (and not so or-ganized) groups and activities that provide an avenue into getting involved with this community. The Gainesville Cycling Club (GCC, www. though its formal advocacy program is less than three years old. At 1,100 members, we are the largest dues-paying organization of any kind in North Central Florida. The club that can endorse candidates and lobby. We endorsed a winning slate of candidates in the last County elections, also helping to defeat a roads tax with no bike-ped provi-sions. Historically members have helped design and get passed most of our bike infrastruc-ture, such as the extensive bike lane system built in the late 1980s and early 1990s. But they typically did so as individuals, not as -ational club, GCC has an excellent event calendar. It does archive a lot of inside in-formation on bike-ped politics in our com-munity. Almost all of the recreational group rides around town are run by the GCC. The Kickstand is an all-volunteer com-munity bike shop, largely devoted to helpwhat is often their only means of trans-portationa bicycle. With social media and the growing need for non-commercial bike venues, it has evolved into a pretty fun group as well. This is probably the best place to get immediately plugged in to the active branch of our cycling community. well, which should allow them to expand their volunteer opportunities. Plug in at The Kickstand, a Gainesville page, on Facebook. Gainesville Citizens for Active Transit (GCAT) is, to this advocates mind, the most exciting new development. The co-alition roundtable includes outspoken and knowledgeable advocates such as Ron Cunningham (former Gainesville Sun Opinion Editor and current C.E.O. of Bike-Florida) and South West Advocacy Group group is fairly new, but will likely change the face of transit advo-cacy in Gainesville. Talk to g_cat@googlegroups. com for more info. Help shape this group in its in-fancy. County Government is an area where we most need help in bike-ped advo-cacy. Under Florida law, the County Commission controls almost all paved surfaces in and around Gainesville, since they are State Roads. We cur-rently have an uncomfort-able 3-2 bike-ped/transit Lee Pinkoson and Susan Baird typically favoring traditional car-way improvements. Pinkoson makes some good points and can be swayed. Baird has been upfront and unwavering in her op-position to bike-ped. On the other side, Commissioner Byerly leads the bike-ped threesome with Robert Hutch Hutchin-son and Charles Chestnut. You can contact them as a group at bocc@alachuacounty. us. Remember under Florida Sunshine law, all these messages are public. The press reads each one, every day. Be ready to end up quoted in the newspaper. While it is generally pro bike-ped, the Gainesville City Commission controls very few roadways. They are more responsible for things like putting in extra bike park-ing downtown, and for overseeing local law enforcements efforts to improve trafRegional Transit System (RTS), an awardpublic works multi-modalism (MM). MM is simply the interactive planning for all forms of transit, from foot to bus to train to car and more. It takes a holistic ap-proach that neither diminishes nor elevates the reality of the automobile.Gainesville rich in cycling advocacy opportunities Gainesville is seventh nationally for the percentage of bicycle-riding commuters and is the most bicycle-rich community in the Southern United States.

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 5 Mayor Ed Braddy is the ideologue in this case, being strongly sup-portive of an American Dream suburbia and a highly privileged -structure, in part to capture swing votes from working class voters disgruntled with local Democratic Party political decisions. Com-missioner Todd Chase is coming around, but dont expect bike-ped rely on emotional appeals rather than national or global data, so be careful, dont get frustrated, and stick to your message when speaking before them. On the positive side, rookie Commissioner Yvonne Hinson-Rawls express bus park-and-ride and controversial de-laning trends. Hinson-Rawls cast a 4-2 yes vote with Commissioners Susan Bottcher, Thomas Hawkins, and Lauren Poe on moving forward with a multi-modal proposal as part of the proposed County Trans-portation Surtax. Commissioner Randy Wells was unable to attend He was critical in encouraging the start-up of GCAT. The City is important for other reasons. The human-made trails in our city thoroughfares and park systems provide much bikeped connectivity. The City is trying to connect them even more. A less discussed asset are the 70-odd miles of in-town trails in the metro area owned by the people of Gainesville through city ease-ments or through our public utility, Gainesville Regional Utilities. trailkeepers (another opportunity to work!) and offer both connec-tivity and recreation for locals in the know. More and more of them are appearing on Google Maps under the Bicycling tab in green. Other communities have made these trails more open to mitigate The City Commission can be reached at citycomm@cityofgaines-ville.org. Sunshine laws apply. more libertine side of bike activismno leaders, ad-hoc event While critical masses have evolved in other towns to leave from different locations with smaller groups, ours is a more traditional virtual group has no consistent social media and no website (by design). CM was a fun and powerful introduction to bike advocacy for many in my generation (35+), and will likely continue to be. If you do get involved at any level, from County Commission meetings to Critical Mass, try not to get distracted by the safety warriors on one sidecycling advocates who get angry at people without helmets (fewer than 10 percent of us wear them) or who misconstrue Florida Department of Transportation data to make cycling seem unsafe. If you correct for the numbers of cyclists we have, accident incidents are lower in Gainesville than most similar-sized Florida cities. On the other side, dont despair of the anti-bike crowd. The classic version of the American Dreammotorized suburbsis a power-ful part of their, and our, cultural heritage. Car-only advocates prey on this ideal and try to scare people into believing we are trying to take their cars and their lifestyle from them. While younger and family-aged Americans are trending towards less driving and more transit-oriented communities, we will be dealing with the anti-bike crowd for some time. Together we can help them and others understand our communitys needs, one voice, and one pedal stroke at a time. If youre interested in learning more or getting involved, email me D

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PAGE 6, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program The papers and writings of Stetson Kenlorist of the American South, have been donated to the University of Florida by Zora Neale Hurston as part of the liter ary manuscripts of Special Collections, George A. Smathers Libraries. The University of Florida will commemorate the opening of the Stetson Kennedy Papers on Oct. 22 with a celebratory symposium, Stetson Kennedy: Re-Imagining Justice in the 21st Century. Featured speakers include acclaimed author and FIU professor Marvin Dunn, former director of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress Peggy Bulger, and Lucy Anne Hurston, author and niece of literary luminary Zora Neale Hurston. A full day of special events has been planned for October 22. In the morning, beginning at 10a.m., there will be an open house in Room 1A, George A. Smathers Library, with an exhibit of materials from the Stetson Kennedy Papers. This will be followed at noon with a reception and commentary on the writing careers of Stetson Kennedy and Zora Neale Hurston by Sandra Parks and Lucy Anne Hurston. At 2p.m. also in Room 1A Of A PeopleWriting Americas Story The days main event will be the panel presentation Stetson Kennedy: ReImagining Justice in the 21st Century, at 6 p.m. in Pugh Hall with opening comments from UF First Lady Chris Machen. The panel, which will also be live broadcast over the internet, will be moderated by Ben Brotemarkle, executive director of the Florida Historical Society. Stetson Kennedy (19161) epitomized the energy and drive of American social activism. As Dr. Paul Ortz, director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, has noted, Kennedy spent the better part of the 20th century doing battle with racism, class oppression, cor porate domination, and environmental degradation in the American South. He pitted himself against the Ku Klux Klan, going undercover in order to investigate their activities, then broadcasting some the radio series Adventures of Superman (Clan of the Fiery Cross) in which the iconic American superhero battles the to escape retribution, living for a year in Paris. His writings and constant advocacy for with Simone de Beauvoir, Jean-Paul Sartre, Richard Wright, Lillian Smith, Woody and Arlo Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Studs Terkel, Zora Neale Hurston, Myles Horton, Virginia Durr, Alan Lomax, Mar and Harriette V. Moore. Many of his books have become classics, including Palmetto Country (1942), Southern Exposure (1946), The Klan Unmasked (1954), and the Jim Crow Guide to the U.S.A. (1959). The Stetson Kennedy Papers at the University of Florida encompass core areas of his career, spanning his high school writings to his most recent and unpublished work, and include correspondence, a mass of published articles, photographs, him, interviews by him, and recordings of his public talks. Other institutions in the United States with collections of Kennedys work include the Department of Special Collections at the University of South Florida, Georgia State University, the Schomberg UF inherits Stetson Kennedy papers Stetson Kennedy Center for Research in Black Culture, and the University of North Carolina. His personal library was donated to the Civic Media Center in Gainesville, Florida. DTaking a stand: advocating for HIV positive womenby Rural Womens Health Project In 2013, with so much information readily available about HIV, the stigma felt by people living with HIV is still widespread. Further compounding this stigma is the isolation experienced by many, as a result of distance and lack of transportation to support services for those in rural areas. This is the reality faced by many women living with HIV in North Florida a reality that the Peer Advocacy Program, Lets Talk About It (LTAI), is working to overcome by diversifying opportunities for womens involve ment, support and advocacy. Since 2011, the LTAI program has reached out to HIV positive women and female caregivers in North Florida. The LTAI Peer Advocates develop testimonial media to challenge HIV stigma, improve health services for the community and to promote HIV prevention. In 2014, the advocacy program will expand their womens meetings into Marion and Putnam counties and develop the LTAI blog. These new activities are intended to assist in overcoming the challenges positive women face in regards to accessing support and information. Additionally, the activities offer women a platform to voice their concerns and to share what it means to be a woman living with HIV. To learn about LTAI and view our materials, check out: www.rwhp.org/let stalk.html. Opportunities are available for community and individual support of LTAI programs. Call us at 352-3721095. LTAI is a program of the Rural tion with WellFlorida Council, with funding from ViiV Healthcare Positive Action Programme. D

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 7 Gainesville Pride Days 2013by Pride Community Center of North Central Florida On Saturday, Oct. 26, Gainesville residents and others will gather for the 2013 Gainesville Pride Parade at noon at 7th Street and West University Ave. The parade will travel to Bo Diddley Plaza downtown, ending at the annual Pride Festival. The festival will feature local music acts, vendors and a kids space. The event is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the Pride Community Center of North Central Florida and the City of Gainesville Department of Cultural Affairs. The origins of todays Pride celebrations are generally credited to the Stonewall Rebellion of June 28, 1969. One year later marches were held in New York, Chicago, L.A., and San Francisco, and within a few years they spread to cities beyond the U.S. In the 1980s, Pride celebrations expanded beyond the march format and became weekend-long festivals in many cities. In the 1990s, Pride celebrations began making transgender inclusion a priority. In 2000 President Bill Clinton made history when he declared June Gay & Lesbian Pride Month. President Barack Obama declared June LGBT Pride Month. The Gainesville Pride Festival was moved to October in 2000 to encourage students at UF to participate and to use the better fall weather. Since moving to October, the festival has increased in size yearly, and in 2012 over 5,000 residents and visitors participated in events. For more information on Gainesville Pride Days, visit gainesvillepride.org/pridedays2013. D THINKINGABOUTTHEMILITARY? MAKEAN INFORMEDCHOICE. ADVICEFROMVETERANSONMILITARYSERVICE ANDRECRUITINGPRACTICESAResourceGuideForYoungPeople ConsideringEnlistment Gainesville Chapter14 http://www.afn.org/~vetpeace/

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PAGE 8, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 See PRONOUN, p. 18 Its FEST time again, and this year its running over 4 days Oct. 31 thru Nov. 3. It is an amazing endeavor with hundreds of bands and performers, and many venues. Besides the wristband for all access, one can choose individual venues for a given day. And acoustic music fans have a venue of their own, the Civic Media hours Friday, Saturday and Sunday. A day pass is $10 at the CMC, and with the format of short sets, you will see a lot of great music each day. Youve got bands and performers from around the country, and great fans from around the world. And youll support the CMC, too. Huge thanks to No Idea Records and all the volunteers for making it happen. D The acoustic side of Fest 12by Joe Courter by Justine Mara Andersen (aka Barefoot Justine) For years Pronoun trouble meant nothing more to me than a good laugh at a classic bit of Vaudeville between Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck. In the classic cartoon Bugs repeatedly convinces Daffy to get him-self shot. In an effort to unwind his undo-ing, Daffy slows down their verbal tennis match, having his ah-ha moment when he catches Bugs switching pronouns. Pro-noun trouble, says Daffy. The sophisti-cated bit always made me laugh... but that laugh is a tad tainted now. Writing this piece for Pride Month hap-pened to coincide with the degrading cov--ning, and that gave me the opportunity to rant about the biggest source of anxiety in my, and many of our lives... pronoun trouble. However obvious it is that I am a woman, some people insist on calling me he or sir, which is ludicrous. I mean, so happened that every comment or bit of coverage on Ms. Manning opened with, and sometimes centered around, pronoun trouble. Witnessing the medias pronoun clustertowards Chelsea got me to thinking about how little people understand transgendered people, and why pronouns are so impor-tant. Though I plan to focus on binary male to binary female (as that is the only experience I can speak to), there are many struggles and issues common to us all, for example the very real fear of verbal, emo-tional, and violent physical attacks. To an ignorant public, transgendered people are seen as creatures worthy of suspicion, the people closest to them may well be con-vinced that their transitions are a phase, or worse, that they have gone off their rockers. Along with our transitions comes a certain amount of alienation. But whats worse, is any transgender person can expect heart-breaking and degrading public disdain de-livered with such subtle slyness that they wont be able to convince people that its happening. People who degrade us like to do it in such a sly way that no one else wit-nesses it, yet their abuse is sniped with such aim that the sniggering and derision will hit its mark every time. Oh, and yes, any of us can expect to be so pained, self-conscious time we wont even trust our ears, doubting whether we even heard what we thought we have frequently asked myself. Any newbie transgender person can expect that their laughter at that classic line from Daffy Duck to change. They can expect that, like many of us, pronouns will become People will stab us with bad pronouns, mostly men in regards to transwomen, as they cant seem to cope with the idea that anyone might want to trade their precious balls in for breasts. To make matters worse, there is no com-munity consensus on pronouns. The most common guidelines on how to be a transally recommend that people never assume and should always ask what our pronoun preference is. No! No, a thousand times no! Asking me is rather like saying, I know youre a man, but do you want me to pretend youre a woman? There is also with pronouns and go neutral as a matter of course. Again, no, and why no? Because many of us do not want asked! No one asks my mom if shes a woman. I dont want anyone neutering me or taking away my -tion. As you can see, the pronoun issue is a muddy one at best, Any transperson can expect to fall on one side or the other of this argument, and very soon they will develop strong feelings about all this, but why are the feelings so strong? For a start pronouns are a sign of respect, and not merely to us personally, not only to our identities, but also to anyone who is trans. Improper use of pronouns is a weap-on people wield to show their contempt and bigotry. On the personal level, for many, the all important issue of passing as a woman (again, to stick with what I know) largely comes down to what pronouns strangers Pronoun trouble

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 9 104 SE 1st A ve., Gainesville, FL MTh: 11a.m.8p.m. F: 11a.m.10p.m. 104 SE 1st Avenue Gainesville FLEvery Wed: Zine Workday, noon-2pm Every Thu: Weekly Volunteer Meeting, 5:30pm Every Thu: Poetry Jam, 9pm Wed, Oct 9: The Climb to Katahdin with director Coltin Calloway, documentary about his experience hiking the Appalachian trail with his partner and their dog, 7pm munities in Latin America, 7 to 10pm Mon, Oct 14: Radical Press Coffee Collective presents Zapatista and Resistance in Educaand their autonomous education system, 7pm Tue, Oct 15: Noam Chomsky (Live & in Person), Curtis M. Phillips, M.D. Center for the Performing Arts, UF Campus, 315 Hull Rd, free and open to the public, advance tickets required, (tickets available at CMC on Thu, Oct. 10 Sat, Oct. 12, Noon to 6pm each day, tickets available at Phillips Centers on Mon, Oct 14, Noon to 6pm) Doors at 7:15pm, Talk at 8pm Main Arts Community for a night of music, CMC testimonals, drinks, snacks, cake and fun (CMC anniversary donations encouraged), 6pm to11pm Sat, Oct 19: Days in Solidarity with African People, Chimurenga Waller, National Director of Recruitment & Membership for the African Peoples Socialist Party and Stephanie Midler, National Chair of the Uhuru Solidarity Movement will be speaking and answering questions regarding the Uhuru movement and the or ganizations it supports, 4pm Sat, Oct 19: Voices from the Thursday Night Poetry Jam: A Reading in Honor of the 20th Anniversary of the Civic Media Center, featuring local, regional, & nationally-known poets and spoken word artists including: Johnny Rocket, Wendy Thornton, A. Kyle Strohman, Tom Miller, Paul W. Jacobs, G.M. Palmer, Sheila Bishop & others TBA, 8pm Mon, Oct 21: Stonewall Democrats of Alachua County present The Fall of , a sex scandal leads to a homophobic witch hunt in Boise, Idaho, 7pm Tue, Oct 22: Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHOP) presents Stetson Kennedy: Reimagining Justice in the 21st Century, a multidimensional discussion of the legacy of Stetson Kennedy, renowned author, folklorist, and activist, to mark the donation of his papers to the University of Florida, reception and book sale to follow, Pugh Hall at UF, 6pm Wed, Oct 23: Intervention Skills Workshop/Discussion, 7pm Fri, Oct 25: Art Walk, celebrating that 2013 is the 40th anniversary of Roe vs Wade, art and artists focusing on issues surrounding the case, including the political climate involving womens liberation in the 20 years leading up to the trial, gender representation in American society and peoples rights over their own bodies and decisions, 7 to 10pm Sun, Oct 27: The Growing Threat: Genetically Engineered Trees and the Future of Forests, a and the International Campaign to STOP Genetically Engineered Trees, 7pm Mon, Oct 28: Free Angela Davis and All Political Prisoners, new documentary with per sonal interviews from Angela Davis about her life and actions, 7pm Wed, Oct 30: Gainesville Restaurant Workers Alliance Meeting, 7pm Thu, Oct 31-Sun, Nov 3: Fest 12 at CMC, check website for schedule details island, reveals atrocities committed by U.S. immediately after WWII, 7pm 433 S. Main Street (352) 373-0010 www.civicmediacenter.orgParking just to the south at SE 5th Ave., (see sign) or after 7 p.m. at the courthouse (just north of 4th Ave.) or GRU (2 blocks east of CMC) Check website for details and additional events.Civic Media Center events October 2013

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PAGE 10, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 Notice to readers: If there is inaccurate information in this list, please let us know. If you are connected to an organization listed here, please check and update so others can be accurately informed about your contact information. Thank you. Art Lab is for artists who are continually expanding their skills and knowledge. Comprised of makers from various backgrounds and a range of mediums from forged iron to spun wool to graphic design. We hold technique workshops, artist talks and critiques, professional practices meetings and critical thinking discussions. GainesvilleArtLab@ gmail.com. http://GainesvilleArtLab.org Alachua Conservation Trust, Inc. Protecting North Central Floridas natural, scenic, historic & recreational resources for over 25 years. ACT is honored to be the 2013 national Land Trust Excellence award recipient. (352)3731078. AlachuaConservationTrust.org Alachua County Labor Party meets monthly and organizes to support local labor and advance the national campaign for universal, single-payer health care. Memberships are $20/ year. Contact: FloridaLaborParty.org, ACLP@ FloridaLaborParty.org, 352.375.2832, 14 East University Ave, Suite 204, Gainesville, FL PO Box 12051, Gainesville, FL 32604 American Civil Liberties Union Currently no local chapter. For info on forming a new Amnesty International UF campus chapter of worldwide human rights movement; www. facebook.com/ufamnesty or UFAmnesty@ gmail.com. Citizens Climate Lobby (Gainesville Chapter) provides education and activist opportunities to bring about a stable climate. Meetings are the at the downtown library's Foundation Room. 352-672-4327, www.citizensclimatelobby.org, cclgainesville@gmail.com Civic Media Center Alternative reading room and library of the non-corporate press, and a resource and space for organizing. 352373-0010, www.civicmediacenter.org. The Coalition of Hispanics Integrating Spanish Speakers through Advocacy and Service (CHISPAS) Student-run group at UF. www.chispasuf.org Code Pink: Women for Peace Women-led utilizing creative protest, non-violent direct action and community involvement. Conservation Trust for Florida, Inc. Nonrural landscapes, wildlife corridors and natural Democratic Party of Alachua County Meetings held the second Wednesday each of the County Administration Building is at 901 NW 8th Ave., 352-373-1730, AlachuaCountyDemocraticParty.org Edible Plant Project Local collective to create a revolution through edible and foodproducing plants. 561-236-2262 www. Families Against Mandatory Minimums Work to reform Florida's sentencing laws and system. PO Box 142933, Gainesville, FL 32614, gnewburn@famm.org. 352-682-2542 The Fine Print An independent, critically thinking outlet for political, social and arts coverage through local, in-depth reporting Florida School of Traditional Midwifery A clearinghouse for information, activities and educational programs. 352-338-0766 www. midwiferyschool.org Florida Defenders of the Environment are dedicated to restoring the Ocklawaha and preserving Floridas other natural resources. 352-378-8465 FlaDefenders.org Gainesville Area AIDS Project provides toiletries and household cleaners at no cost to people living with HIV/AIDS. Hot meals and frozen food also available at no cost, www. gaaponline.org, info@gaaponline.org, 352373-4227, Open Tuesdays 10-1 and last Friday of month 5-7. Gainesville Citizens for Alternatives to the Death Penalty concerned people in the Gainesville area who are working to abolish the death penalty in Florida. Participate in vigils when Florida has an execution. Meets Augustine Church and Catholic Student Center (1738 W. University Ave.) 352-284-1749, www.fadp.org. Gainesville Food Not Bombs is the local chapter of a loose-knit group of collectives worldwide who prepare and share free, vegan/vegetarian, healthy, home-cooked meals made from local surplus with all who are hungry. Meals are at 3 p.m. every Sunday at Bo Diddly Community Plaza. Prep starts at 11 am. Get in touch if youd like to help. gainesvillefnb@riseup.net. www.facebook. com/#!/groups/143660782367621/ Gainesville Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice (IAIJ) meets biweekly at the Mennonite Meeting House, 1236 NW 18th Ave. to discuss relevant immigration issues and ways to bring political education to the community through workshops, presentations, Gainesville Loves Mountains works with Appalachian communities to end mountaintop removal coal mining and create a prosperous economy and sustainable future for the region and its people. The single, best path our community can take toward a stronger building a campaign for an ordinance requiring standards. gainesvillelovesmountains@ gmail.com http://www.facebook.com/ GainesvilleLovesMountains 352-505-2928 Gainesville Womens Liberation womens liberation group in the South, formed in 1968, the organization is now part of National Womens Liberation. WomensLiberation.org Graduate Assistants United Union that improved working conditions, community involvement and academic freedom. 352-575Green Party Part of a worldwide movement built out of four interrelated social pillars that support its politics: the peace, civil rights, environmental and labor movements. www. GainesvilleGreens.webs.com Grow Radio provide the opportunity for community members to create and manage unique, engaging, educational, locally-generated visual arts and humanities for the enrichment of, but not limited to, the Gainesville community. www.growradio.org. PO Box 13891, Gainesville, 32604, 352-219-0145 (v), 352-872-5085 (studio hotline) Harvest of Hope Foundation organization that provides emergency Iguana Directory Call 352-378-5655. or email gainesvilleiguana@cox.net with updates and additions

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 11 farm workers around the country. www. harvestofhope.net, email: kellerhope@cox.net. Home Van A mobile soup kitchen goes out to homeless areas twice a week with food and other necessities of life, delivering about 400 meals per week; operated by Citizens for Social Justice. barupa@atlantic. net or 352-372-4825. Humanist Society of Gainesville Meets 7:30 pm on the 3rd Wednesday of most months at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 4225 NW 34th St to discuss and promote secular, humanist, atheist & agnostic social facebook.com/humanistsocietyofgainesville; gainesvillehumanists@gmail.com. Humanists on Campus: We are a new organization at UF trying to provide a community for freethinking, secular humanists at the University of Florida. Our goals include promoting the values of humanism and discussing the current issues humanists face internationally. We also strive to participate in community service and bring an overall fun, dynamic group to the university!Preferred Contact info: emailufhumanistsoncampus@ phone561-374-3537 Industrial Workers of the World Local union organizing all workers. Meetings are at month at 6 p.m.. Gainesvilleiww@gmail.net. www. gainesvilleiww.org Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice organizes faith communities to work together at 6 p.m. at La Casita, 1504 W. University Ave. (across from Library) GainesvilleIAIJ@ gmail.com; 352-377-6577 International Socialist Organization Organization committed to building a left alternative to a world of war, racism and poverty. Meetings are every Thurs. at the UF classroom building at 105 NW 16th St. at 7 p.m. gainesvilleiso@gmail.com. Kindred Sisters Lesbian/feminist magazine. PO Box 141674, Gainesville, FL 32614. KindredSisters@gmail.com, www. kindredsisters.org. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program who protect the rights of elders in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. Special training and should call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs Web site at http://ombudsman. MindFreedom North Florida Human rights group for psychiatric survivors and mental health consumers. 352-328-2511. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Support, education and advocacy for families and loved ones of persons with mental illness/ brain disorders. 374-5600. ext. 8322; www. namigainesville.org. National Lawyers Guild Lawyers, law support progressive social movements. nlggainesville@gmail.com or www.nlg.org National Organization for Women Gainesville Area www.gainesvillenow.org. info@gainesvilleNOW.org NOW meeting info contact Lisa at 352-450-1912. Occupy Gainesville is about engaging the people of our community in grassroots, participatory democracy. We are about diversity and dialogue; we stand in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street Movement and the rest of the people peacefully occupying public space across this county and the rest of the world. www.occupygainesville.org and https://www.facebook.com/occupygainesville PFLAG (Parents and Families of Lesbians and Gays) meets the 3rd Tuesday of each month at the Fellowship Hall of the United Church of Gainesville (1624 NW 5th Ave.) at 7 p.m. with a programmed portion and informal meeting with an opportunity to talk and peruse Planned Parenthood Clinic Full-service health center for reproductive and sexual health care needs. Offering pregnancy testing and options counseling for $10 from 10amnoon and 2-5pm. Located at 914 NW 13th St. 352-377-0881. Pride Community Center of North Central Florida Resources for the gay/lesbian community, open M-F, 3-7, Sat. noon-4. Located at 3131 NW 13th St., Suite 62. 352377-8915, www.GainesvillePride.org. Protect Gainesville Citizens Group whose mission is to provide Gainesville residents with accurate and comprehensible information about the Cabot/Koppers Superfund site. 352354-2432, www.protectgainesville.org. River Phoenix Center for Peacebuilding provides innovative ways to resolve services like mediation, communication cemterforpeacebuilding.org. 2603 NW 13th St. #333, 352-234-6595 Sierra Club every month at 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Gainesville 4225 NW 34th St. 352-528-3751, www. Sister City Program of Gainesville links Gainesville with sister cities in Russia, Israel Tuesday of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the Mennonite Meeting House, 1236 NW 18th Avenue (across from Gainesville HS). http:// www.gnvsistercities.org. Student/Farmworker Alliance A network of youth organizing with farmworkers to eliminate sweatshop conditions and modern-day slavery Student/Farmworker Alliance. Students for a Democratic Society Multiissue student and youth organization working to build power in schools and communities. Meetings held every Monday at 6:30 p.m. in Anderson Hall 32 on the UF campus. UF Pride Student Union Group of gay, lesbian, bi and straight students & nonedu/~pride. United Faculty of Florida Union represents faculty at Univeristy of Florida. 392-0274, president@uff-uf.org, www.UFF-UF.org. United Nations Association, Gainesville Florida Chapter. Purpose is to heighten citizen awareness and knowledge of global problems and the UN efforts to deal with those issues. www.afn.org/~una-usa/. United Way Information and Referral. Human-staffed computer database for resources and organizations in Alachua County. 352-332-4636 or simply 211. Veterans for Peace Anti-war organization that raises awareness of the detriments of militarism and war as well as seeking peaceful and effective month at 7 p.m.. 352-375-2563, www.afn. org/~vetpeace/. WGOT 94.7 LP-FM Community lowpower station operating as part of the Civic Media Center. wgot947@gmail.com, www.wgot.org.D

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PAGE 14, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 Transcript edited by Pierce Butler This is the seventeenth in a continuing series of transcript excerpts from the collection of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. Liz Fusco Aaronsohn was interviewed by Paul Ortiz [O] in 2012. A : Im Liz Aaronsohn. I was Liz Fusco in 1964 and thats how people down here know me. O: Liz, I wonder if you could talk about what led you into the Movement. A : Ive written about that, theres a book called Owning and Disowning White, edited by Jim ODonnell at the University of Arizona. The whole idea of whiteness and how white people came about, their commitment and all that stuff is really a topic of conversation. Weve talked about it at National Association of Multicultural Educators for the past several years, and several books are out like ours. Basically, I will say this: my father was a thou do, and I took him seriously. Period. Thats it. When I was in Seattle, Washington, I had planned to go to the Peace Corps, but I was selected out because I was asking too many questions about Vietnam and about class structure in the United States. They said youll have servants in Ethiopia as teachers, teachers have servants. I said huhuh, Im not going to have any servants. My mother grew up in an orphanage and she was a servant and I wont have servants. So I started to question America at that time. for the same reasons, so I was active in Seattle. Then I read in a paper called the National Guardian no longer exists about a call for white volunteers, Northern volunteers to come down. I was wanting to leave a bad marriage and so I said, okay, and I got so hooked in Oxford, Ohio, and being here in Ruleville, and I stayed for two years. And I left at the end of two years because I really wanted to be teaching and mostly by the end I was going out canvassing, encouraging people to register to vote one-on-one. I missed the classroom because I had been a teacher before. I was older than most of the young people who came down, I was twenty-eight when I came down. I was already teaching three or four years. So the white power structure would not let me teach there werent any integrated schools, and they wouldnt let me teach in either of the black or the white schools, so I left. Thats when I went up to New York City and got involved with Teachers Against Racism. O: Today, you were talking about the importance of the Freedom Schools. This is something that historians and the Movement, because for many years when you hear about the Movement, the Freedom Schools are always the last thing brought in. A: As Hollis [Watkins] was saying today, its the liberation of peoples minds from a slave mentality and a mentality of inferiority. Who was he quoting where he said, if you convince people theyre inferior, you dont have to do any more work; theyve already enslaved themselves. So, bringing black history to people, bringing their voices back to them, we had a newspaper called The Student Voice, and the whole idea of voice was really important. Even though there were separate centers, and freedom school we realized before the end of the summer that it was voter-registration without Freedom School and you couldnt have a place for all of this without a community center and who you were teaching. If were going to put that in quotations, teenagers that you thought you were going to be teaching lessons to, its everybody, its elderly people who want to learn. Its Paulo Freires idea, but we didnt know about Paulo Freire at that time although he was operating in Brazil at the same time as we were operating in Mississippi. O: Can you talk about the interactions between the teachers and the students inside the Freedom School? What made it different than a conventional education? A : As Freire talks about, it was a dialogue. It was us learning from the students, students learning from teacher, and teacher learning from students. and about history and about claiming Michelle Cliff calls it claiming an identity they taught me to despise. Its claiming your own identity in very powerful ways, and thats freedom. Its the liberation of the mind. Sometimes it was one-on-one and sometimes it was having kids talk to each other and sometimes it was whatever came up. The structure was not what most teachers who came down from the North expected. There was a special uncertainty here, because we thought we knew what school was and what teaching was and we thought we knew what learning was. I had a Masters degree, high-powered education, Smith and Yale. No wonder I was so arrogant. Came down and I started listening to local people and it took me two years to learn what I needed to learn. The Freedom Schools, as we conducted them, were different depending on the constituency, depending on who showed up, depending on who was there, in every place across the whole state. I do know that when I became coordinator of the Freedom Schools, when Staughton Lynd went back to Yale, he asked Ralph Featherstone and History and the people who make it: Liz Fusco Aaronsohn

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 15 go around the state and provide materials for people. O: What allowed you to begin to learn from them, and then what did you learn from them? A: It took me the whole two years and I know I stepped on a lot of toes in that time, though I know I did that, too but it was probably local people and I probably caused some pain. I cant pinpoint what allowed me to do that. I guess, as teachers I work so hard on having them Dewey says that education comes from have to be in charge. That was the whole idea, it was Charlie Cobbs idea from the beginning with the Freedom Schools, but all of us white teachers and maybe some of the black teachers from the North too, we had one model in our minds of what teaching is. I think we had to, those of us who stayed long enough because we began to respect the people we were working with so deeply. We were so dependent on them for our safety, for our lives, for our food, for the reason for our existence. I think there was also a spiritual content to that, the mass meetings and the church services, all of us who were white and had not been raised in the black Baptist church. Also, we begin to learn along with our students. I remember, even in Ruleville and certainly in Indianola and Sidon the book that I was using mostly was Pictorial History of the Negro in America, Milton Meltzer and I think Langston Hughes was a part of that before he died. We started to learn a content that had never been part of our schooling, and so we began to question our own schooling about content, as well as about process, as well as about purpose. All of that stuff, and I think, once I questioned my upper-class education I was not upper-class myself, I was a quota student, being a Jew at Smith. There was a ceiling, and my father, having been blinded in World War I, we lived on a government pension, so we didnt have money, but I got in on scholarship there. So I always knew I was marginalized for that reason, I think thats what helped me, too, to side with those who are on the margins, rather than to see from the center. I think that helped me be pre-disposed to standing at the margins of society. It started in January when Stacy called me. I got a call at school and she said, Liz Aaronsohn, were you Liz Fusco in Indianola? My heart stopped, because no one knew me in my new life in that way, but it was such a pivotal experience for me. I was very excited to come back. Then, I started thinking about all the toes that I had stepped on, and I called Stacy and I said, Im reluctant to come, because if a couple of people are coming whom I really know I gave pain to, I dont want them to have to suffer my presence. She said to me something that I knew in my head from Nelson Mandela but I hadnt put together in terms of me, she said, youve been carrying that burden for forty years, were a forgiving people. If those people are here, they will forgive so welcomed, but its been a pilgrimage. I felt I had to take a side-pilgrimage to the town of Sidon, which is ten miles south of Greenwood where I stayed from [19]65 to [19]66. I was the only outside agitator there and I felt like I had to make that be there and see whoever. And to see the place unchanged since I left it took me of ways, which is why I mentioned it. To know that Nole is dead now because of went to Vietnam and he came back, but he was not a whole person. I saw his mama, I went and visited her in Rising Sun. I called her and asked could I visit. She looked the years. She told me when he came back from Vietnam he was never right, and he lasted twenty years. He was a beautiful, strapping young man; eighteen years old, one do? Which is the same reason people deal drugs. What are you going to do? You got to live. There arent any options, and I think the system sets it up that way. This has reenergized me to talk to my students more, help them understand how the system works to keep black people down, keep structures the way they are, the systems of advantage for certain people. A full transcript of this interview AA00017847/00001. The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program believes that listening carefully to way we understand history, from scholarly questions to public policy. SPOHP needs the publics help to sustain and build upon its research, teaching, and service missions: even small donations can make a big difference in SPOHPs ability to gather, preserve, and promote history for future generations. oral/support.html or make checks to SPOHP, and mail to PO Box 115215, Gainesville, FL 32611. D The growing threat: Genetically engineered trees and the futureby Brandon Jones Members of Everglades Earth First! show to the Southeast: The Growing Threat: Genetically Engineered Trees and the Future. The presentation features members the leading organization in the International Campaign to STOP GE tech and spread the word about the Earth First! Winter Organizers Conference and Rendevous coming to Florida this February 19-24. Universities and companies throughout the U.S. are working to develop genetically engineered trees for use in timber and pulp plantations, as well as for woody biomass and liquid biofuels. rently focusing its efforts on preventing the legalization of GE eucalyptus in seven states in the southeastern U.S. including Florida. There are already active test plots in Florida, and we need your help to stop GE trees before their commercialization starts. D

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PAGE 16, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 The story of Hyde and Zeke Recordsby Bob McPeek The sudden and tragic passing of owner Charlie Scales in turn has led to the closing of Hyde and Zeke Records, after over 36 years as an integral part of the Gainesville music scene. The thousands of friends who shopped at Zekes made the store a gathering place for music lovers of two generations. The loss of Charlie Scales and the shuttering of Hyde and Zeke Records are a huge double blow to many. As a cofounder of Hyde and Zekes, Im still reeling. Two memorials for Chas have helped me recognize and appreciate his gifts to the com-munity. But there has been no such ceremony for the store, so I hope you will allow me a few words of remembrance and gratitude. Hyde and Zekes was the creation of my friend Ric Kaestner and me, way back in the late hippie era of 1977. Ric and I met in Columbus, Ohio, where we both performed one night at a songwriters showcase in a bar near the Ohio State University campus. Despite quite different musical styles, we started perunder a variety of goofy band names, till one of them stuck: Hyde and Zeke. Love of music infused our lives. Ric was a gifted singer and picked up some extra cash operating lights at the Agora for the likes of REO Speedwagon. I was the kind of guy who dreamed about records plastic tickets to another place. Aided by the fact that we were chums with a Columbus used record store entrepreneur (The Mole), another place meant somewhere we could move and launch a used record store (with The Moles psychology professor. -ding in the sleepy summer of Hogtown 1976, his enthusiasm for the place won me over sight unseen. We packed our bags and the week before Thanksgiving, 1976. We immediately set about looking for a location for a used record store. Hyde and Zekes almost didnt happen. Landlords took one look at us and generated excuses why they couldnt rent us space. Somehow Ric, the diplomat of the team, convinced an import store named Macondo Kalimba to consolidate their sparse shelves and rent us the back half of the storefront at 919 W. University Ave. With perfect timing, The Mole then announced that he was withdrawing his backing. We didnt have a Plan B, having moved a thousand miles and chucked away promising careers with one goal in mind. So, after much handwringing, we pooled our meager resources, scoured garage sales for used records, and opened Hyde and Zekes in early 1977. We didnt dream making $100 a week. It was, as I said, about music. -cords. Despite our navet, we grew quickly and steadily. We made back our initial investment within three months, largely because the start up amount was so pathetically small. did with a better location and much better inventory. I like to think people felt they got a fair deal at Hyde and Zekes check, a fact that other student-oriented business owners had trouble believing. In 1979 we moved across from campus, to 1620 W. University. Business boomed. We added employees: Gary Gordon, who was elected mayor while he worked for us as manager; J. D. Foster, a great bass player who later played with Dwight Yo-akam and made a career as a record producer after moving to California; Bill Perry, a never-ending font of music knowledge and a natural at customer service; and Charlie Scales, a great guitar player with an encyclopedic command of every known musical genre (and a few as yet undiscovered). Those were the golden years, from my perspective. We had a thriving business and a close staff that shared or surpassed our love of music. I especially remember Fridays fondly, when we the word hello, from the immortal vinyl classic, Teach Your Parrot to Talk. For me, the golden era reached its zenith in 1981, when we reStranger in the Same Land. Full disclosure: the band, Tranceform, included Ric and me, as well as George Tortorelli, David Smadbeck, and Ralph Gray. This was the culmination of all the threads of my life: making music and putting it on vinyl. That peak, of course, couldnt and didnt last. Over the next few years, our focus on the store began to drift. I was operating a second business, Mirror Image Recording Studio. Ric, restless, moved to Tennessee. We tried opening a second store, in Ocala, which didnt work. Gary left the store, and we had differences of opinion about management with his replacement. Records were on their way out; the digital age was well underway. The Ric Kaestner and Bob McPeek stand outside Hyde & Zeke record shop in Gainesville. Photo courtesy of Bob McPeek.

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 17 business continued to grow, but the shine had faded for the founders. We sold the store in 1986. Sadly, the new owner made a series of record and video store, and eventually took all the stock home and changed the locks on an empty storefront, without any advance notice to customers or even employees. The store sat empty for a few months, until my hero Charlie Scales stepped in and rescued it from a premature demise in 1990. There were still good years left, but the inexorable rise of digione blow after another. The staff shrunk and locations moved further and further from campus. Chas kept it alive with some great help from Bill Perry. I dont know details, but Im pretty sure that over the last few years Chas was barely eking out a living, driven primarily by his love of music and given hope by a mild recovery of inter-est in vinyl. I can only hope he still found satisfaction going to work each day. I do know he was proud of having a good run, a comment he shared with Bill not long before his untimely passing. from rows of stacked orange crates covering a wall to a device diminished to a fraction of its former glory. For every one of through the day in a magical song, there are dozens for whom music is simply another indistinguishable element in the media soup that washes over their numb brains. good old days. What I know for sure is that there is a Hyde and by a sense of gratitude to my partners, collaborators, friends, mentors, patrons, and occasional nut cases who intersected with Hyde and Zekes over the last 36 and a half years. Yes, Chas, it was a good run. A damn good run! Dby Elena Stein, Coalition of Immokalee Workers The Publix Truth Tour launched on Sunday, Sept. 22, with a dramatic send-off from some of the CIWs most stalwart allies in Gainesville. The partnership between Immokalee and Gainesville is so strong, in fact, that the days activities marked not only the beginning of the Truth Tour, but also the culmination of the citys annual CIW week, a full seven days of local education, activi After spending the morning with the adult Sunday School class of Trinity United Methodist Church and the combined youth groups of United Church of Gainesville followed by an ofdefatigable Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice and the Emmanuel Mennonite Church the Fair Food community of Gainesville gathered for a press conference and march to a nearby Publix. byterian Church as the CIWs Lupe Gonzalo and Oscar Otzoy began by explaining what propelled them to undertake this twoweek tour. They explained how real improvements in working conditions, wages, and zero tolerance for sexual harassment were negoti ated with more than 90 percent of Florida growers and eleven like Publix, whose tomatoes are supplied by the holdouts who continue to exploit workers. In a tone steadfast and resolute, Lupe underscored the power of the Fair Food Program in addressing the sexual harassment that and a downpour commenced. But the now 100 people gathered didnt skip a beat, setting out toward Publix almost as though they hadnt noticed the heavy rain. With a sizable contingent from UFs CHISPAS leading chants, the intrepid marchers kept on for over a mile before arriving at Though colors of newly hand-painted signs bled together and t-shirts soaked through, not even the relentless showers could dampen the crews animo. CIWs Modern Day Slavery Museum came to Gainesville earli ing and slavery that persists in Florida to the present. The Museum was on the UF campus Wednesday and at Trinity United Methodist Church Thursday. Wednesday night CHISPAS sponsored a showing of Rape in the Fields, a new documentary about what female farm workers must endure. Gainesvilles Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice and CHISPAS co-sponsor the annual CIW Week of Action. DThe Public Truth Tour with Coalition of Immokalee Workers Members of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice, and supporters march through the pouring rain to the Westgate Publix in Gainesville at the launch of the CIWs Publix Truth Tour. Photo by Elena Stein.

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PAGE 18, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 PRONOUN, from p. 8use when they address us. A bad pronoun is in essence a failing grade, and it can leave us reeling, doubting our sense of self, ul-timately leading to self-loathing, and for many, agoraphobia and isolation. Some simply choose to avoid dealing with bad pronouns and being misgendered, so we hide. Pronoun trouble! We do not see things as they are, we see them as we are. Anais Nin When a person looks at me and still says he rather than she they are not seeing me. The problem is that I am her now, and I was never truly him. Then I was a nonperson. I was a drunken bitter crust built around denial of the truth. When I transitioned it was not a creation of a new me, the transition was a release of the true me from the prison of self, a shedding of a disguise, and being called he demonstrates that the person misgendering me does not see me for who I am, they see only the past that they are more com-fortable with... they reveal their own limitations, bigotry and lack of imagination. When a person calls me he I realize that they are only seeing their own limitations. I am She. This is why I moved away from Ohio, to be among people who do not remember him. There are a number of other things that people should understand. Once it comes to hormone replacement therapy, all transgender people have to make what is the single most important decision of their lives. We have to decide if the transition is literally worth our lives. At my age the choice to start hormone replacement therapy put me at a 24% chance risk of bloodclot, stroke and cancer though hopefully not all at once! Yeah, think about that. We are literally willing to die for that change of pronoun. When a person makes the choice to put their lives on the line, there is nothing fun-ny or cute to them about another persons cruel or simply thought-less misuse of pronouns. Keep in mind also that a public misgen-dering or bad pronoun draws attention to us, and in this transphobic society, being pointed out is extremely dangerous. It is better for us to pass under the radar. -male started I lost body hair, gained hair on my head, My body fat moved around, softening me head to toe, I grew real breasts, hips, and a little bit of ass (though not enough to satisfy meoh yeah, now I have body issues, too). Replacing testosterone with estrogen completely changed the way I felt and thought. I learned to trust my emotions, until they got too hot, and I learned to cry and feel more completely. The toxin testosterone blocks emotional clarity by convincing men that the brain and intellect provide the only reliable answers to lifes problems, and transwomen, thanks understand and regret things they could never understand before, like why the things men say and do hurt so much. As I progressed through my second puberty I would look in the mirror with pride to see how much Ive feminized thanks to the hormones. Just as I began to think that the risks of hormone replacement therapy were all worth it some schmuck would come along, mistakenly see me over again. And it damn well hurts... every time. This is why it was so contemptuous for anyone or any entity to in-sist on misgendering Chelsea, me, or any of us. When the press did that to Ms. Manning they were not merely scoring political points for the right against her, they were pissing on all of my trans brothManning, they were dismissing and disrespecting all of us, and that is unacceptable. In the eyes of many on the right, Chelsea will be one more case in point proving to them that transgendered people are ungodly and unpatriotic low-life freaks, and Im not sure we need that now. Still, I wish her well, and feel so sorry that she will soon not only be in prison, but isolated, abused, confused, terriindeed. DRead more by Barefoot Justine at her website, barefootjustine.com. Letters of support to Chelsea Manning can be sent to the following address. As per rules, the outside envelope needs to say Bradley PVT Bradley E Manning 89289 1300 N Warehouse Rd Ft Leavenworth KS 66027-2304 USA Second store at 5011 NW 34th St.

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 19 Jean ChalmersCRS, GRI, REALTORBROKER-ASSOCIATE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTMobile: (352) 538-4256 www.ElwoodRealtyServices.com FLORIDA ORGANIC, from p. 1Civil Society? On the Future Prospects of Meaningful DialogueCenter for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, UFOCT 15: Stephen Steinberg (Prof. of Urban Studies, Queens College, CUNY) The Perennial Racial Divide: Two Steps NOV 12: tory, Tufts University) The Fractured Teapot: Debating the Legacy of the Boston Tea Party Both events at 5:30 p.m., Smathers Library (East), 1A to accept certain facts alleged by the plaintiffs that were undisputed by Monsanto, application of too harsh a legal standard on the plaintiffs to show the existence of a controversy, and neglect those challenging bogus patents like Monsantos. In January 2013, dozens of family farmers, seed businesses, and agricultural organizations traveled to Washington, D.C. to represent over 300,000 individuals and 4,500 farms in the January 10 Oral Argument to be aired in front of the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. Their mission was still the sameto reverse a lower courts decision to dismiss their protective legal action against agricultural giant Monsantos patents on genetically engineered seed. for the Federal Circuit ruled that the group of organic and otherwise non-GMO farmer and seed company plaintiffs were not entitled to bring a lawsuit to protect themselves from Monsantos transgenic seed patents because Monsanto has made binding assurances that it will not take legal action against growers whose crops might inadvertently contain traces of Monsanto biotech genes (because, for example, some transgenic seed or pollen blew onto the growers land). In September 2013, the group petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to hear their case against Monsanto. We are hopeful that the Supreme Court will agree to hear this important case, one where organic and conventional growers and farm ville and one of the organizations involved in the case. That opportunity in court to talk about the important points that are raised in the case has been denied. We have spent years arguing whether the case should be heard, not about the merits of the suit. We became a co-plaintiff at the request of organic farmers after Monsanto simply refused to agree not to sue organic farmers sense would say Monsanto should be responsible and not have the ability to sue victims of genetic trespass. It is comparable to a chemical company, whose product drifted on an organic farmers is clear regulatory process has failed, the legislative process has failed, and now we are hopeful the courts will at least give the case a listen. D

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PAGE 20, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 rates and levels are said to be 30 percent fact that nitrogen and phosphate levels have increased by nearly the same acceleration rate, and one can easily see the critical state of our precious remaining water. Yet the government agencies that were put in place to protect our natural resources continue to issue permits as if there were no crisis at hand. The Consumptive Use Permit request by the Adena Springs Ranch in Ft. McCoy -lons/day will likely be approved soon. This will mean less ground water and more nutri-ent pollution. Hopefully anticipated litiga-tion by us environmentalists will close the -ent pollution. We here in Alachua County and the sur-rounding region are fortunate to have the nat-ural resources still available to us, unlike our over-populated South Florida and east coast counterparts who have already overdrawn their share of the water. We should be able to say, no to more population. In addition to the water crisis, there is the urban sprawl issue regarding the Plum all counties and cities in Florida worked for years developing the Comprehensive Plan. Since the early 1990s, all Florida Comprehensive plans have been approved and in place. These Comp plans include every aspect of each local governments map for growth management. In the pro-cess, ALL entities were included by law. The stakeholders were not hand-picked as were those in the Plum Creek Envision Alachua process, and the elected governthe developers employees. In the Plum Creek envision process, the Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club was not invited to be at the table. Obviously, Plum massive and ecologically illogical plan, thus, no invitation to the table. Business Magazine of North Central Florida stated in their June 2013 editorial that organiza-tions as diverse as the Chamber of Com-merce and the Sierra Club are on board with the Envision plan. When I questioned Scott Schroeder, Bizmags editor, he said that he could not explain how he reached that conclusion. by Whitey Markle Conservation Chair of the Suwannee-St. Johns Sierra Club Plum Creek Land Development Corpora-tion has been in the process of testing the feasibility of developing a massive portion of Eastern Alachua County. By inviting key persons into this process, they have begun to develop a master plan, similar to the already-existing Alachua County Comprehensive Plan. Politicians, Plum Creek administrators and personnel, busi-nesspeople, investors, educators, state and local government agency representatives, plus a plethora of interested organizations have been gathered over the last couple of years into what the corporations public re-lations specialists are calling the Envision Alachua process. From the publicity that has come out of -tails have surfaced. An uninformed reader -tives of Plum Creek Corporation and the rosy plans they are espousing are harmless and probably healthy for the future of the county. From the limited information the Suwan-nee/St. Johns Sierra Club has received on the issue, we have concluded several key facts. Plum Creek now owns practically all of the land between the eastern shore of Newnans Lake and U.S. highway 301 and from State Road 26 on the north to S.R. 20 on the south (some 60,000 acres). Plum Creek plans to convert most of the land from agriculture (timber)/recreation (hunting) to an indus-trial/commercial complex along S.R. 20 and U.S. 301, and conservation land and eventually homes throughout the rest of the land area. In Plum Creeks 20-year vision, they have need for the 10,000 new homes they plan to Plum Creek has also said that their plan is to develop economic growth in East Gaines-ville. This is simply not logical in view of the fact that the new development and new East Gainesville. What should happen (and could happen if the political will was there) would be to redevelop East Gainesville. If the Plum Creek plan evolves as they propose, the vast woodlands and wetlands in eastern Alachua County will become sprawling clusters of housing, commerce, and strip malls as we see in many Florida counties. Good planning implementation would be to encourage the existing cit-ies and towns to grow from within. Haw-thorne should be encouraged to build the housing within its town limits to accomwork for the commercial/industrial cluster at U.S. 301 and S.R. 20 rather than devel-oping a new massive town like Nacotee and The Villages in the midst of our most valuable resources. Public leaders, in this time of economic downturn, tend to espouse optimistic pic-tures of their constituents economic future, whereas we environmentalists tend to be a bit more cynical when contemplating the days ahead. In fact, even Governor Scott has set out a plan to grow more business (and people) in Florida by proposing more tax incentives for new businesses coming into Florida. This philosophy echoes down to the smallest local governments. More woes. Most of us in the environmental community perceive increased population and business, along with the industry, commerce, and ag-riculture that come with that growth, as a se-vere problem for our natural environment. We also believe that increased population, etc. costs more, not less economically. More people and businesses require more services and infrastructure, not less. Historically, growth costs us all economically and eco-logically. The Florida Department of Environmental Florida is within a 6 percent margin of be-ing in a critical and chronic ground water situation. In other words: our state govern-ment has actually declared a critical con-dition for our ground water. Plum Creek obviously will lead to more surface water transfer to accommodate growth (more wa-ter for drinking, power generation, etc.). We feel that eventually (not far in the fu-ture) we have to face the water crisis and that moment will likely be too late. Just a look at the springs and creeks is quite con-vincing: Algae and vegetation have already Plum Creeks Envision Alachua out of focus

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 21 The Alachua County Comprehensive Plan has set aside much of the very area that Plum Creek has decided to develop into massive housing for conservation. This area is the watershed for Lochloosa -ida Waterway and must, by law, be afforded special environmental protection. Apparently the Plum Creek Envisioners have missed this key fact. Additionally, the underground water system that will be so all of the toxic waste, household chemical, petroleum, and ferprovides Gainesvilles drinking water. The area is part of the Ocala-Osceola wildlife corridor. If this plan goes forward, much less wildlife will be able to migrate naturally. -ing, one-level growth will occur between East Gainesville and Hawthorne and in between. A drive down to southwest Marion County will demonstrate what out of control development will bring to Alachua County. What was once -less housing, commercial strips, and their accompanying impervious pavement. If we expect to keep what natural resources are left, we must push hard for our government leadership to stop giving away those resources. We must reverse the present policies that take growth management and resource management away from the public. These policies can be corrected, but we, the public must re-establish our place in the policy-making arena. D

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PAGE 22, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 Green Drinks is a networking opportunity for anyone interested in learning about environmental issues and shar ing news about sustainable businesses and initiatives. Cinema Verde is an annual environmen13, 2014). Now the two have come together to provide the monthly networking followed by an environmental tors 4 Cinema in the Oaks Mall Plaza (6741 West Newberry Road). Film tickets are $10 and $12. Green Drinks networking begins at 6 afterward well discuss the issues raised come and bring friends! of photographer James Balog and his Extreme Ice Survey to publicize the effects of climate change. For more info: https://www.facebook. com/events/162304880602718/. DCinema Verde and Green Drinks uniteVoices from Poetry Jam: Oct. 19 by the Civic Media Center The Civic Media Center will host a night of local and regional artists reading and performing original works of poetry, spoken word, and short prose on Saturday, Oct. 19, beginning at 8 p.m. The event is organized in honor of the 20th anniversary of the founding of the Center and its long-running weekly open reading, The Thursday Night Poetry Jam. The Poetry Jam is the longest-running open poetry reading in Gainesville, and one of the longestlived independent, grassroots poetryoriented event series in the U.S. The featured artists include current or former participants in, and some for mer hosts of, the Poetry Jam. Reader/performers will include well-known Gainesville poet Johnny Rocket, who is the current Poetry Jam host and also co-hosts the Feminist Open Mic at Wild Iris Books; local author and widely published poet Wendy Thornton; internationally-acclaimed poet and author A. Kyle Strohman; poet, performance artist, musician, and host of the Tabernacle of Hedonism Tom Miller; playwright, actor and performance artist Sheila Bishop; Jacksonville poet, author, editor and teacher G.M. Palmer; and Rollins College writing teacher, poet, essayist and longtime small-press publisher Paul W. Jake Jacobs. Other local and regional artists who are current and past regulars at the CMC Poetry Jam will share original works as well. A full roster of reader/ performers will be announced. For more information on this event, please contact event organizer James Schmidt (352-872-6352, punkickr@ yahoo.com). For more information on the Civic Media Centers full list of 20th anniversary events, please contact CMC coordinator Robbie Czopek (352-373-0010, coordinators@ civicmediacenter.org. D

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IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013, PAGE 23 What you can do: For information: Radical Press Coffee Shop in the CMC: 433 S. Main St., Gainesville 32601 Grassroots Support Keeps it Going What the Civic Media Center does: GROW.org programming scheduleGrow Radio is a listener-supported, Gainesville-based Internet radio station that provides community members an opportunity to create and manage engaging, educational, informative, locally-generated programming to and humanities for the enrichment of the Gainesville community. Sunday 3 p.m. Paper Beats Rock 5 p.m. Joe and Craig Show 9 p.m. The Sum of Your Life Monday 11 a.m. Dr. Bills Super Awe ... 1 p.m. Get on the Right Thing 3 p.m. Seoulmates-Kpop Radio 5 p.m. The Barefoot Sessions 7 p.m. Maium 8 p.m. New Day Rising 10 p.m. Female Trouble 11 p.m. Eagle Death Tuesday Midnight Eagle Death 10 a.m. Funhouse 12 p.m. Whats the Story? 2 p.m. Street Nuts 4 p.m. Patina and Gold 6 p.m. America in the Evening 8 p.m. river rail rhythm 10 p.m. The Experiment Wednesday 9 a.m. Sax and Violins 1 3 p.m. The Quiet City 5 p.m. A Brazilian Commando 9 p.m. The Otherness 11 p.m. Radiodeo Thursday midnight Radiodeo noon Things Be Blowin ... 4 p.m. Hope & Anchor 6 p.m. Erosion 10 p.m. Lost Sharks Friday 11 a.m. The Breakup Song 1 p.m. 4D Meltdown 5 p.m. Acme Radio 7 p.m. The Narain Train 9 p.m. A Train Full of Tricks Saturday 11 a.m. Jazzville 5 p.m. Alewife Outbound 7 p.m. Planet of Sound 9 p.m. Reality Bites WGOT 94.7 LP FM Gainesville's Progressive Community Radio Station WGOT is on the airSunday: 1-4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 1 4 p.m.. 8 p.m.-midnight Tuesday, Thursday: midnight-5 a.m.,14 p.m., 8-9 p.m. Saturday: 19 p.m.Check out wgot.org for upcoming events and a detailed schedule. WGOT stream under the Shoutcast directory. To listen from your iOS, Android, or Blackberry mobile device, you can use any radio streaming apps such as Tune In. We are listed in iTunes Radio under the Eclectic category. Direct feed at www.wgot.org/listen/. 94.7 is a Low Power FM station with a transmitter at NW 39th Ave and I-75, so best reception is within 5 miles, but many people are able to pick up the station in their car. Questions? Comments? E-mail us at info@wgot.org. Democracy NOW! airs Mon.-Fri. 1 p.m. & Mon.-Thur. 8 p.m.

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PAGE 24, IGUANA, OCT OBER 2013 by Joe Courter What started as an audacious idea, to open a storefront to promote non-corporate media, is about to pass a 20-year mark as an ever-growing counter-culture oasis in downtown Gainesville. If you are reading this, you might be one of its supporters, perhaps aware of the CMC for the whole run, or perhaps you werent born yet when the run started. Its been that long. The CMC has touched countless lives attendees at events the CMC created, volunteers who gained experience, musicians who were provided a place to play when starting out, people who checked out a book or DVD they might not have run into otherwise, even people who through the CMC met another person who changed their life, or even became a life partner. created, and advances in peoples knowledge and understanding of the world we live in as well. Theres been the big events like Chomsky, Zinn and Parenti. They have also hosted Glenn Greenwald, Norman Soloman, Col. Ann Wright, Stetson Kennedy, and the Cointelpro Speaking Tour, among many others. Theres annual events like Radical of local progressive organizations. Theres the meeting space the CMC provides for word. And now, with the move to S. Main Street a few years ago, the CMC set off a momentum which brought the Citizens Co-op, Sequential Artists Workshop and the new home for Wild Iris Books to the little counter-cultural oasis sometimes referred to as SMACCSouth Main Arts and Cultural Center. With our 20-year anniversary, a call has gone out to as many old volunteers for them to check in with the CMC and report on how the CMC impacted their lives. Friday, Oct. 18, the CMC will share these messages as part of the block the visit from Noam Chomsky on Oct. 15. The CMC is also asking for donations to mark the day, either by annual donation or a monthly or quarterly direct deposit. The CMC takes about $5,000 a month to run, with that breaking down to one full time staff, rent, utilities, publicSince Radical Press Coffee Collective opened up inside the CMC, there is an increased vibrancy to the space, and a way for people who attend to get drinks and snacks. Twenty years is a long time, and it is worth celebrating. It has mat tered to countless people and in constant ways. And it doesnt plan on stopping. But it moves forward only with community support. Elsewhere in the Iguana youll see ways to be involved in keeping it going down the road. A shorter version of this article ran in the CMC quarterly newsletter Media Notes, which is mailed to its member ship list. Anyone who donates becomes a member and gets the right to check out books, DVDs and CDs. DThe Civic Media Center at 20, why it mattersThe Lubee Bat Conservancy will host its 9th Annual Florida Bat Festival on Oct. 26 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Guests can visit a working research and conservation center to see some of the largest bats in the world. The festival will be held at 1309 N.W. 192nd Ave. in Gainesville. This is the only day of the year that the center is open to the public. The free event features family activities in cluding bat-themed crafts, presentations by bat experts, and the opportunity to see live fruit bats with 5-foot wingspans. Vendors will provide information as well as sell food and batty merchandise. Donations are accepted at the festival and will be used to fund education programs. For more information, please visit our Web site at http://www.lubee.org.9th annual Florida Bat Festival The Gainesville Iguana is Gainesville's progressive events calendar and newsletterSubscribe!Individuals: $15 (or more if you can) Low/No income: What you can Groups: $20 Iguana, c/o CISPLA P.O. Box 14712 Gainesville, FL 32604 Comments, suggestions, are welcome. To list your event or group, contact us at: (352) 378-5655 GainesvilleIguana@cox.net www.gainesvilleiguana.org facebook.com/gainesvilleiguana issues of the Gainesville Iguana online (complete issues are available as PDFs) at www.gainesvilleiguana.orgThe Gainesville Iguana (established 1986)