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The Gainesville iguana ( May - June 2013 )

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073860/00050

Material Information

Title: The Gainesville iguana
Alternate Title: Iguana
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28-29 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Creation Date: May - June 2013
Publication Date: 09-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1986.
General Note: Editors: Jenny Brown and Joe Courter, <1991-1996>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 10 (July 1991).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 25027662
lccn - sn 96027403
lccn - sn 96027403
System ID: UF00073860:00057

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073860/00050

Material Information

Title: The Gainesville iguana
Alternate Title: Iguana
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28-29 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Creation Date: May - June 2013
Publication Date: 09-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1986.
General Note: Editors: Jenny Brown and Joe Courter, <1991-1996>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 10 (July 1991).

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 25027662
lccn - sn 96027403
lccn - sn 96027403
System ID: UF00073860:00057


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INSIDE ...From the Publisher . . . . 3 Gainesville 8 . . . . . 6-7 Striking Syria ........... 8 CMC Events . . . . . . 9 Directory . . . . . . 10-11 Event Calendar . . . 12-13 Oral History Program .. 14-15 GROW Radio schedule . . 21 Photo courtesy of Dream Defenders. by Lauren Byers, Dream Defenders This full version of this article was originally published on SocialistWorker.org on Aug. 27. To read the full version, visit http://socialistworker.org/2013/08/27/ourstruggle-has-just-begun. The Dream Defenders ended their monthlong occupation of the Florida state Capitol in Tallahassee on Aug. 15 with a press conference that included civil rights legend and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee founder Julian Bond. Organizers made it clear that this isnt the end but the beginning of a new phase in the As Bond said, Youre ending a protest because youve started a movement. The occupation, which lasted 30 nights and 31 days, was the longest occupation of the Capitol in Floridas history. However, by Joe Courter The Civic Media Center has a special relationship with noted linguist and politi cal dissident Noam Chomsky. The CMC opened its doors on Oct. 18, 1993, coinciding with a speaking engagement by Chomsky, and indeed had him dedicate back-to-back discussions with local independent media publishers and with the UF Linguistics department. Ten years later, in 2003, Chomsky returned to speak in the OConnell Center, where just over 6,000 people turned out for an event cosponsored by ACCENT, the student speakers bureau. So, with the CMC turning 20 this year, Chomsky was approached to return again, and this spring he agreed to come on Wednesday, Oct. 16.Chomsky still comingSee CHOMSKY, p. 2Our struggle has just begunSee DREAM DEFENDERS, p. 16 breaking that record was just the tip of the iceberg. While occupiers were unable to convince Gov. Rick Scott to call a special session to discuss Trayvons Law, they were able to get a legislative poll taken for The protesters convinced some 32 legislators to ask for a special session in writing, poll of the entire 160-member Florida legislature. Unfortunately, the Republicandominated legislature voted against the special session. ... At the press conference, the Dream Defenders also announced their goal of registering 61,550 votersthe voter margin by which Rick Scott was elected. However, Scott isnt the only elected ofers target list for eviction. So, too, will the The GainesvilleIguanaSeptember 2013 Vol. 27, Issue 9

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PAGE 2, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 CHOMSKY, from p. 1 So how to go about this? Well, ACCENT was contacted in June very interested and actually proposed a generous honorarium as well. The main point of contention was whether we could expect the crowd we had in 2003. ACCENT thought not, and expressed wanting to have it at the Performing Arts Center (seating 1,700 people). That was the main point of discussion. At one point in July, ACCENT chair Daniel Landesberg said he was % positive toward the event happening. An ACCENT reservation on the OConnell Center was in place; things seemed But then things seemed to stop, communication became scant, contracts, and that was furnished, but then they did not get in said their research informed them that only a thousand students would be interested in coming to hear Chomsky. This seemed low, and a continued case for the larger venue was made to ACCENT. And as the Performing Arts Center was reserved for Oct. 16. for another event, could Chomsky change his date? As he books way ahead, this was not going to be easy, and seemed needless if we were to just think big and go for the OConnell Center. Then on Aug. 28, in a phone conversation, ACCENT made the request that no advance publicity be made on the event until contracts were signed. Well, the CMC had the arrangement for his coming already set, and the only question was where and if ACCENT would take advantage of this opportunity offered them. That he was coming was not a question. Neither ACCENT we were talking to ACCENT, well, yes, we were. So that day, as had already been planned, a table with a sign saying Chomsky is Coming was on the Plaza of Americas, and notes supporting Chomskys visit collected on a large sheet of paper to show ACCENT there was student support. A picture was emailed to ACCENT with a friendly note of encouragement email, received one week later: Joe, I am very disappointed to see that you ignored my request after our conversation last week when I explicitly requested you not speak publicly on the a number of ACCENT staff members come to me about someone promoting a Noam Chomsky show on campus as well as administrators upset by the violation of university policy. Every attempt at this show has caused problems for ACCENT. It is clear that we do not operate in the same way, so I must insist we part ways on this project. ACCENT will not be bringing Noam Chomsky this year. So there we are. Chomsky is still coming; it is now a question of where. Still, will ACCENT relent if there is an upwelling of supcone of silence request over ... what? What policies, which administrators? Every attempt at this show has caused problems for ACCENT. How? Ya try to do a good thing.... DRemembering the 1973 coup in Chileby Jack Price now 40 years ago, marked a coup in Chile, which overthrew the democratically elected government of Salvador Allende. The coup, a project of Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger, ushered in 17 years of the Pinochet dictatorship. than 3,000 people were killed or disappeared during the Pinochet years. Some 40,000 more were tortured, among them Michelle Bachelet and her mother. Dr. Bachelet became president after the restoration of democracy and is currently a presidential candidate. Thousands more went into exile, several of whom became friends of mine. man rights since 1977. Ten years ago, on the 30th anniversary of the coup, the CivMissing starring Jack Lemmon and Sissy Spacek at the Hippodrome. The movie tells the story of Charles Horman, ment. Horman became missing in the wake of the coup, and so he is today, his body probably having been tossed into the has been pursuing truth and perhaps a measure of justice all these years. She created the Charles Horman Truth Foundation and has organized an ambitious event in New York City Through heroic efforts in Chile and extraordinary interna tional solidarity, democracy has been restored, and Chiles courts have begun meting out jail sentences for human rights abuses. But details of the U.S. involvement in the coup and the deaths of several American citizens remain veiled. To read more about the U.S.-backed coup in Chile, check out Joyce Hormans article, Missing Charlie, 40 Years Lat er, in the September 2013 issue of the Progressive at http:// progressive.org/justice-in-chile. D

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 3 From the publisher ...Think globally, act locallyby Joe Courter riding question has been What are we gonna do about Syr Syria exhibits all the problems so many others in the area have: decades of authoritarian rule, a legacy of international power games, stockpiles of ever more potent weaponry, a rise in social media and technology both within the counreligious rivalries and now, with all the death, injuries and refugees, enough bad blood and bitterness that peaceful resolution seems impossible. So tragic. NPRs series Back Story on Aug. 31 had a show devoted to the impact of ethics humans are doing in our time on the planet. Ever more powerful weapons affect not tance also allows for a dehumanization of the enemy, with distance not only meaning proximity but cultural, too; a particular characteristic of white Europeans fueled between two Native American tribes in the New England area, and how one of the emy wounded and dying slowly in trenches. theoretically, the people, is a good thing. That public opinion is running so strong against the Syrian attack is encouraging. Country after country has had to endure U.S. military solutions in their lands and in most cases come out worse for the experience. As Michael Franti sings: You can bomb the world to pieces, but you cant bomb the world to peace. We citizens have had enough of the destruction and cor ruption of the military industrial complex and the policies that enrich them. They are the ones who win at war, they win at our expense, stealing our tax money that should be going to education, healthcare and infrastructure. No to war, yes to diplomacy. Andrew Bacevich nailed it on the head on the Sept. where we are now. This must change. Closer to home, there is a rise in labor organizing among lower income workers. From Walmart workers to the fast food industry, people are starting to stand up to exploitative labor practices and low pay. Here locally workers at the northwest Tasty Buddha location went on strike July 20 and were able to successfully negotiate their grievances and return to work. Key to their success was knowing their rights and acting within the laws that protect the right to strike. Their article can be found on raise in six years who seemed thrilled to see such support coming to their table. And thats what its about, and why we do this paper: while we may focus and worry about bigger and distant issues like war and climate change, we roll up our sleeves (okay, poor metaphor for this hot summer), organize with others and work locally to have positive impact in our community. D Joe Courter Subscribe! The Gainesville Iguana is Gainesville's progressive events calendar & newsletter.Individuals: $15 (or more if you can) Low/No income: What you can Groups: $20 Iguana, c/o CISPLA P.O. Box 14712 Gainesville, FL 32604Comments, suggestions, contributions list your event or group, contact us at: (352) 378-5655GainesvilleIguana@cox.net www.gainesvilleiguana.org facebook.com/gainesvilleiguana The Iguana has been published monthly or bimonthly by volunteers for 25 years. Circulation for this issue is 5,000. Publisher: Joe Courter Editors Emeritus: Jenny Brown Mark Piotrowski Editorial Board: Pierce Butler Joe Courter Beth Grobman Jessica Newman Production work & assistance: Justine Mara Andersen Joye Barnes Scott Camil Rick Piper Emily Sparr Target Copy Donna Tucky Otto Olsen Distribution: Joe Courter Marcus Dodd Bill Gilbert Jack PriceAuthors & photographers have sole credit, responsibility for, and rights to their work. Cover drawing of iguana by Daryl Harrison. Printed on recycled paper.

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PAGE 4, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 by Joe Courter Every year about this time there is an infusion of new people to Gainesville, and to them we say WELCOME. This goes out to them especially, but is also for everyone: You have landed in an amazing little city, with many hidden treasures. Do get out and explore, be it nature-related, food-related, music-related, or the malls and the familiar corporate logo-ed businesses. Hey, Supporting local businesses is important to the vitality of this town. Money spent in a local business stays in town and circulates around. Lots of small shops, be it clothes, bikes, restaurants, groceries, books, music; can provide you with what you need. Talk to natives. Get out and explore yard sales on weekends for economical goods, from kitchen to recreational; i.e., cheap bikes, etc. There has been a great expansion of bike lanes, get a decent bike, a good lock and youve got a way to get around. Here is an important nugget to plant in your brain about getting around Gainesville: CLAP and STDs. No this isnt a safe sex message (though by all means be sensible in that regard). This involves navigation, and here it is: Courts, Lanes, Avenues and Places are East-West in orientation. Streets, Terraces and Drives are North-South. Roads have a sort of diagonal component. That concept, coupled with the fact that University Avenue and Main St. are your zero numbered axes that divide East from West, Support local Credit Unions and not the big banks cause its the right thing to do. Period. Plug in to ways to make the town better. Advisory boards from details. Register to vote here, and represent the future genera tions of folks coming here. Or maybe your future self, because DSupport local business, explore local cultureConversations about mental healthMind Freedom Florida, The Center for Clarity and the Mental Health Coalition of North Central Florida are inviting the community to participate in conversations on the topic of Mental Health Recovery. Daniel Mackler will be in Gainesville from Sept. 13-16. Mackler graduated from Swarthmore College and worked as a psychotherapist in New York for 10 years. He now dehas travelled extensively, and studied treatment of mental severe Mental Health Diagnosis and his presence will invite the Gainesville Community to talk and learn about this important and controversial issue. Friday, Sept. 13, United Church Of Gainesville (1624 NW 5th Ave.) in Fellowship Hall 7 pm Meet and Greet 7:30 pm Movie Take These Broken Wings followed by Saturday, Sept. 14, Civic Media Center (433 S. Main St.) 8 pm Movie Coming Off Psych Drugs 10 pm Music with Daniel Mackler & Friends Sunday, Sept. 15, United Church of Gainesville, Fellowship Hall 11 am noon Seminar with Daniel Mackler Sunday, Sept. 15, Trinity United Methodist Church (4000 NW 53rd Ave.) 6:30 pm 8:30 pm Movie Healing Homes followed by Monday, Sept. 16, United Church of Gainesville, Fellowship Hall tive, Finnish Approach To Healing Psychosis, Q&A with director Mackler, and panel discussion with Daniel Mackatrist), Neil Chonin (civil rights attorney), Frank Blanken ship (survivor and human rights activist) and Dave Byrd (consumer and peer counselor)) For information, visit facebook.com/DanielMacklerGaines ville. D Check us out online!The Gainesville Iguanawww.gainesvilleiguana.org

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 5 From Occupy Posters owsposters.tumblr.com

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PAGE 6, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 The Gainesville Eight, 40 Years Laterby Jessica Newman On Aug. 31, 1973, the Gainesville Eight were acquitted of charges of conspiracy to violently disrupt the 1972 Republican National Convention in Miami Beach. Their acquittal came at the end of a 14-month long, highly publicized legal battle, and many of the truths it exposed still ring true today. Thats why, 40 years later, three of the original defendants (Scott Camil, Pe-ter Mahoney and Don Perdue) and 12 others involved with the trial reunited in Gainesvillepreserving his-tory to prevent it from repeating itself. The Gainesville Eight were made up of eight anti-war activists, seven of whom were members of Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW). Their plans for a peaceful, anti-war demonstration at the 1972 RNC were disrupted by law enforcement agentsfrom the group and attempted to sway VVAW toward a more violent approach. Eventually, the Gainesville Eight were indicted by grand jury investigation with conspiracy to organize cars and stores in Miami Beach using lead weights, fried marbles, ball bearings, cherry bombs, and smoke bombs by means of wrist rocket slingshots and cross bows. The Gainesville Eight posed only a political threat to the U.S. government, if they posed any threat at all. They came back from people listened to them. We have been to Vietnam, so the government could not say that we werent willing to serve our country, said defendant Scott what was really being done in Vietnam, in the name of the Ameri-can people, and the government cant claim that we dont know what we are talking about because we did it. -ufactured evidence by using agent provocateurs and informants, deliberations. Federal Judge Winston Arnow placed unreasonable limitations on the evidence that could be brought by the defense, The judge did everything he could to rule against the defense, said Brady Coleman, a Texas National Lawyers Guild attorney at the time from the Gainesville Eights trial team. One of Colemans most memorable moments from the case was when the defense team, after a long day at trial, went to confer in their supposedly private room of the courthouse. But on the way, defendant Peter Mahoney saw the shadow of two men hiding be-hind a behind a door in the corridor. The defense team summonsed the judge, who sent U.S. Marshals to investigate. When the door -tions. Another noteworthy moment from the trial was when the prosecu-tion called Emerson Poe to the stand. Poe was one of the 23 VVAW members subpoenaed to testify before a grand jury just prior to under oath, that none of those 23 people were government infor-mants. But Poe, who was thought to be a very close friend and concamp, had been represented for a time by defense attorneys, had eavesdropped on defense strategy, according to an article from the Nation from October 1973. The jury deliberated only 4 hours before reaching a verdict of not guilty. Now, 40 years later, those who attended the Gainesville Eight rejurors during the trial. Lois Hensel, the jury foreperson, is now de-ceased, but her husband Jim who still lives in Gainesville came to the reunion. With him he brought a box of artifacts from the trial, or a treasure trove, as Camil called it. Contained in Hensels box was everything the jury had received from the trialincluding the newspapers with all political cover-age snipped out, Lois Hensels notes about each of the personalities from the case, and even the guilty packet from the court that she From left to right: Nancy Stearns (Gainesville Eight defense lawyer), Scott Camil (defendant) and Brady Coleman (defense lawyer) peruse the treasure trove of items collected by jury foreperson Lois Hensel during the trial. Photo by Joe Courter.

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 7 would have signed had the jury ruled differently. but their sequestration really impacted their lives and their families lives, Camil said. The most important thing you can do in this country, the most powerful action you can take is to sit on a jury. Camil, Don Perdue and Peter Mahoney from the Gainesville Eight were present in Gainesville for the reunion. Also present were three other VVAW members who were subpoenaed to the grand jury, Richard Hudgens, John Chambers, Jack Jennings. John and Jack spent 40 days in jail for refusing to testify to that grand jury. Three of the trial lawyers, members of the defense committee, one juror, and two husbands of jurors attended as well. The reunion was orga-nized by Camil with the main goal of recording their historythe peoples historybefore it disappeared. Because the Gainesville Eights story is not the kind of story thats written down in his-tory books; its not the kind of history that those in power want to remind people of. Students and staff from the University of Florida Samuel Proc-tor Oral History Program (SPOHP) also attended the weekends festivities and interviewed all but two of the reunion attendees involved in the trial. The transcripts of those interviews will be combined with the cases primary source documents from different people involved in the case (like Jim Hensels treasure trove) to form the Gainesville Eight Collection, maintained by SPOHP. This generation needs to know [the Gainesville Eight] history so they dont repeat it, said Nancy Miller Saunders, another attendee of the reunion and member of the defense committee. Saunders eventually went on to write Combat by Trial about her experience working with anti-war veterans and the trial itself. Nancy Stearns, defense attorney for the Gainesville Eight from the Center for Constitutional Rights. But whistleblowers and those who work for transparency today Julian Assange, Chelsea Manning, Edward Snowdenare being persecuted in exactly the same way, if not more ruthlessly. Like the Gainesville Eight, the whistleblowers of today are lay-ing bare the dirty laundry of the U.S. government. And just like the government tried to silence the VVAW and other anti-war ac-tivists in the 1970sthrough lies, through intimidation, through surveillance and secrecythose in power are trying to silence, to criminalize and demonize, to discredit the modern-day heroes of transparency. But while there are a lot of parallels to draw between the Gaines-ville Eight case (and similar cases from that era) and today, things are undeniably worse now. Nixon was hobbled by laws that Bush started removing after 9/11, Saunders said. Nixon tried to justify Watergate and his crackdown on radicals like VVAW as actions in the nations best interest. He painted the VVAW as a grave threat to national security, according to an Au-gust 1973 article in Ramparts. Sound familiar? -tleblowers under the Espionage Act; before him, there were three presidents who each brought one. The people are supposed to have the privacy, and the govern-ment is supposed to be transparent, Camil said. But now its all backwards. The people have no privacy and the government has no transparency. Amy Goodman summarized the current state of whistleblowing best on Aug. 22 in an editorial for TruthDig: Miranda is rattled, but free. Manning will soon head, shackled, to begin serving his sentence. NSA whistle-blower Edward Snowden remains in tem-porary political asylum somewhere in Russia, and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange continues his residence in exile, not far from Heathrow, in the cramped Ecuadorean Embassy in London. This is why the peoples history is important, like that of the Gainesville Eights. And its why the whistleblowers of today need our support. Because the people cant perform their job in a democ-racy without being informed. A common theme throughout the Gainesville Eight trial, repeatedly iterated by the pro-prosecution judge, was, The government is not on trial here. But it was, and it still is today. Whistleblowers and truth-seekers may be our best chance at putting the government back on trial. the employer, Camil said. We have to hold them accountable, and we cant do that without access to information. D

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PAGE 8, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 by Phyllis Bennis As of press time, the U.S.s actions in Syria were still being determined, but this potential new war is too important for us to ignore. The article below provides a great analysis of why war isnt the answer, and weve also thrown in some links at the bottom of the article for you to keep up with the coverage and avoid the propoganda. The excerpt below came from a longer on Sept. 2. To read the full article, visit ion/2013/09/201391142319670421.html. ILLEGAL ... The United Nations Charter, the fundamental core of international law, may be vague about a lot of things. But it is unequivocal about when military force is legal, and when it isnt. Only two things make an act of war legal: immediate selfdefense, which clearly is not the case for the US. ... The other is if the Security UN Charter, authorises the use of force in response to a threat to international peace and security. Thats the authorisation President Obama knows he cannot getcer tainly Russia and China would veto, but right now a British veto would certainly be a possibility if Cameron wanted to respond to his public. ... The US is thoroughly isolated internationally. The problem for President Obama is he still is determined to use military force, despite the requirements of international law. He says he doesnt need that authoritythat maybe hell use the 1999 Kosovo precedent to go around the Security Council. The problem, of course, is that the 1999 US-NATO assault on Serbia and Kosovo was illegalfaced with a sure Russian veto, Bill Clinton simply announced he stead, he would get permission from the NATO high command. ... [N]othing in international law allows NATO to substitute for the Security Council. ... So any new decision to go to use military force without Council authority means that use of force is illegal. ... IMMORAL logic tells us all: every use of military force threatens civilian lives. More than 100,000 Syrians have been killed in this civil war so far, and hundreds more were killed in what appears to be (remember, we still dont know for sure) a chemical strike last week US cruise missile strikes wont bring any of them back, and more impor tant, wont protect any Syrian civilians from further threat. To the contrary, lowranking conscript troops and civilians are almost certain to be injured DANGEROUS A US military strike on Syria will increase levels of violence and instability inside the country, in the region, and around the world. ... A US strike will do nothing to strengthen the secular armed opposition, still largely based in Turkey and Jordan, let alone the heroic but weakened original non-violent democratic opposition forces who have consistently opposed militarization of their struggle and outside military intervention. ... Dangerous There is also the danger of escalation between the US and Russia, already at odds in Syria. ... Crucially, a military strike without United Nations authorisation undermines the ur gent need for serious, tough diplomacy to end the Syrian war. ... strikewith an attack on a US warship, or a US base in a neighbouring country, or on do we really think the US will simply stand back and say no, this was just a one-time surgical strike, we wont respond? ... What should the US do? First thing, stop this false dichotomy of its either military force or nothing. ... First, do no harm. Dont kill more people in the name of enforcing an international norm. Recognise that international law requires international enforcement; no one country, not even the most powerful, has the right to act as unilateral cop. ... Recommend that whoever is found responsible be brought to justice in The Hague at President Obama can distinguish himself powerfully from his unilateralist predecessor by announcing an immediate campaign not only to get the Senate to ratify strengthen the Court and provide it with serious global enforcement capacity. arms embargo in Syria. Russia must stop, funding the Syrian regime. ... LINKS On the fence about Syria? Why this potential war is not the answer and why people are having a hard time accepting that. http://fpif.org/fence-syria-read/ Nobody Wants This Except the Milican people are against this war; the international community is against this war; Syrians are against this war. So why is it still on the table? http://www. thenation.com/blog/176017/nobodywants-except-military-industrialcomplex#axzz2e8JZomVQ Civil War in Syria: Some Valuable Resources A list of articles, interviews, and essays to help folks understand the crisis. http://www.war-times.org/civil-warsyria-some-valuable-resources Obama and Putin: Time for Diplomacy on Syria Amy Goodman of Democracy killing innocent Syrian civilians to punish the Syrian regime for killing Syrian civilians? http://www.nationofchange.org/ obama-and-putin-time-diplomacy-syr ia-1378478000 GENERAL, ONGOING COVERAGE Glenn Greenwald of the Guardian (www.theguardian.com/profile/glenngreenwald) cole.com) Common Dreams (commondreams.org) AntiWar.com (antiwar.com) Veterans for Peace (veteransforpeace. org) The Peace Alliance (thepeacealliance. org) DStriking Syria: illegal, immoral, dangerous

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 9 Every Tue Morning Yoga, 9am Every Wed Zine Workday, noon-2pm Every Thu Weekly Volunteer Meeting, 5:30pm Poetry Jam, 9pm Wed, Sep 11 Citizens Co-op Quarterly Member Meeting and Nominee Panel, 6-7:30pm Thu, Sep 12 Kickstand Bicycle Collective Volunteer Meeting, in Courtyard, 6pm Sat, Sep 14 MindFreedom Florida presents: Coming off Psych Drugs and Music with director Daniel Mackler, 8-11pm Sun, Sep 15 CMC Volunteer Training, come out and get involved, 5pm Mon, Sep 16 Radical Rush at Santa Fes Oak Grove, 11am-2pm Stonewall Democrats of Alachua County present: Screaming Queens: The resistance to the social oppression of queer people in the United States, 7pm Tue, Sep 17 Radical Rush at Santa Fes Oak Grove, 11am-2pm Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) Meeting, 5pm Wed, Sep 18 Radical Rush at UFs Plaza of the Americas, 11am-2pm Thu, Sep 19 Radical Rush at UFs Plaza of the Americas, 11am-2pm Fri, Sep 20 Radical Rush Social, local politically conscious musicians, pizza, and the opportunity to get involved and make a difference in our community, 7pm Sat, Sep 21 Other Voices Fall Equinox Party and Music Show, 8pm Sun, Sep 22 WGOT Fall Organizational Meeting, 6pm Mon, Sep 23 The Century of Self Parts 1 and 2, Adam Curtis documentary about the use of psychology by governments and corporations to analyze, deal with, and/or control people, 7pm Wed, Sep 25 Gainesville Restaurant Workers Alliance Meeting, 7pm Fri, Sep 27 ArtWalk, 7pm-10pm, Music with Sinners and Saints (Greenville, NC), Julie Karr, Wax Wings, and Dust Congress, 10pm Bearings, Frog, James Wesson, more TBA?, 9pm Sun, Sep 29 cultmoviemania.com presents: Adjust Your Tracking, (documentary on VHS collecting/collectors) VHS Swap Meet, and Music with the Post Teens, 6pm Mon, Sep 30 Uhuru Solidarity Movement presents: Rosewood, based on the true events of the 1923 Rosewood massacre in Florida ,7pm Wed, Oct 2 Music with Ricky Kendall and others, 8pm Fri, Oct 4 CerridwenWorks presents Tiger Monkey Extravaganza 2.0, interactive art show and open mic, 6pm-10pm Mon, Oct 7 River Phoenix Center for Peacebuilding presents: Being with the Energy of Love and Forgiveness, with director Mark Umbrecht, 7pm Fri, Oct 11 Hispanic Heritage Art Show, 6pm-10pm Mon, Oct 14 Radical Press Coffee Collective presents: Zapatista and Resistance in Education: Autonomous Education in Las Chiapas, 7pm 104 SE 1st A ve., Gainesville, FL MTh: 11a.m.8p.m. F: 11a.m.10p.m. 104 SE 1st Avenue Gainesville FL 433 S. Main Street (352) 373-0010 www.civicmediacenter.orgParking just to the south at SE 5th Ave., (see sign) or after 7 p.m. at the courthouse (just north of 4th Ave.) or GRU (2 blocks east of CMC) Check website for details and additional events.Civic Media Center events September 2013

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PAGE 10, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 Notice to readers: If there is inaccurate information in this list, please let us know. If you are connected to an organization listed here, please check and update so others can be accurately informed about your contact information. Thank you. Art Lab is for artists who are continually expanding their skills and knowledge. Comprised of makers from various backgrounds and a range of mediums from forged iron to spun wool to graphic design. We hold technique workshops, artist talks and critiques, professional practices meetings and critical thinking discussions. GainesvilleArtLab@gmail.com. http:// GainesvilleArtLab.org Alachua County Labor Party meets monthly and organizes to support local labor and advance the national campaign for universal, single-payer health care. Memberships are $20/year. Contact: FloridaLaborParty.org, ACLP@ FloridaLaborParty.org, 352.375.2832, 14 East University Ave, Suite 204, Gainesville, FL PO Box 12051, Gainesville, FL 32604 American Civil Liberties Union Currently no local chapter. For info on forming a new chapter, or ACLU info, Amnesty International UF campus chapter of worldwide human rights movement; www.facebook.com/ ufamnesty or UFAmnesty@gmail.com. Citizens Climate Lobby (Gainesville Chapter) provides education and activist opportunities to bring about a stable climate. Meetings are the usually at the downtown library's Foundation Room. 352-672-4327, www.citizensclimatelobby.org, cclgainesville@gmail.com Civic Media Center Alternative reading room and library of the non-corporate press, and a resource and space for organizing. 352-373-0010, www. civicmediacenter.org. The Coalition of Hispanics Integrating Spanish Speakers through Advocacy and Service (CHISPAS) Student-run group at UF. www.chispasuf.org Code Pink: Women for Peace Womenled grassroots peace and social justice movement utilizing creative protest, non-violent direct action and community involvement. CodePink4Peace.org, jacquebetz@gmail.com. Conservation Trust for Florida, Inc. Floridas rural landscapes, wildlife corridors and natural areas. 352-466Democratic Party of Alachua County Meetings held the second Wednesday each of the County Administration Building is at 901 NW 8th Ave., 352-373-1730, AlachuaCountyDemocraticParty.org Edible Plant Project Local collective to create a revolution through edible and food-producing plants. 561-236-2262 www.EdiblePlantProject.org. Families Against Mandatory Minimums Work to reform Florida's sentencing laws and restore fairness to Florida's criminal justice system. PO Box 142933, Gainesville, FL 32614, gnewburn@famm.org. 352-682-2542 The Fine Print An independent, critically thinking outlet for political, social and arts coverage through local, in-depth Florida School of Traditional Midwifery A clearinghouse for information, activities and educational programs. 352-338-0766 www.midwiferyschool.org Florida Defenders of the Environment are dedicated to restoring the Ocklawaha and preserving Floridas other natural resources. 352-378-8465 FlaDefenders.org Gainesville Area AIDS Project provides toiletries and household cleaners at no cost and frozen food also available at no cost, www.gaaponline.org, info@gaaponline. org, 352-373-4227, Open Tuesdays 10-1 and last Friday of month 5-7. Gainesville Citizens for Alternatives to the Death Penalty concerned people in the Gainesville area who are working to abolish the death penalty in Florida. Participate in vigils when Florida has an execution. Meets the Church and Catholic Student Center (1738 W. University Ave.) 352-332-1350, www.fadp.org. Gainesville Food Not Bombs is the local chapter of a loose-knit group of collectives worldwide who prepare and share free, vegan/vegetarian, healthy, home-cooked meals made from local surplus with all who are hungry. Meals are at 3 p.m. every Sunday at Bo Diddly Community Plaza. Prep starts at 11 am. Get in touch if youd like to help. gainesvillefnb@ groups/143660782367621/ Gainesville Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice (IAIJ) meets biweekly to discuss relevant immigration issues and ways to bring political education to the community through workshops, presentations, advocacy and action. gainesvilleiaij@gmail.com or www.gainesvilleiaij.blogspot.com Gainesville Loves Mountains works with Appalachian communities to end mountaintop removal coal mining and create a prosperous economy and sustainable future for the region and its people. The single, best path our community can take toward a stronger economy, better jobs, and a healthier environment campaign for an ordinance requiring standards. gainesvillelovesmountains@ gmail.com http://www.facebook.com/ GainesvilleLovesMountains 352-505-2928 Gainesville Womens Liberation The South, formed in 1968, the organization is now part of National Womens Liberation. WomensLiberation.org Graduate Assistants United Union that for improved working conditions, community involvement and academic org, www.ufgau.org Green Party Part of a worldwide movement built out of four interrelated social pillars that support its politics: the peace, civil rights, environmental and labor movements. www. GainesvilleGreens.webs.com Iguana Directory Call 352-378-5655. or email gainesvilleiguana@cox.net with updates and additions

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 11 Grow Radio that will provide the opportunity for community members to create and manage unique, engaging, educational, locally-generated programming to humanities for the enrichment of, but not limited to, the Gainesville community. www.growradio.org. PO Box 13891, Gainesville, 32604, 352-219-0145 (v), 352-872-5085 (studio hotline) Harvest of Hope Foundation organization that provides emergency farm workers around the country. www. harvestofhope.net, email: kellerhope@ cox.net. Home Van A mobile soup kitchen goes out to homeless areas twice a week with food and other necessities of life, delivering about 400 meals per week; operated by Citizens for Social Justice. barupa@atlantic.net or 352-372-4825. Industrial Workers of the World Local union organizing all workers. Meetings are of the month at 6 p.m.. Gainesvilleiww@ gmail.net. www. gainesvilleiww.org Interfaith Alliance for Immigrant Justice organizes faith communities to work together for immigrant justice. Meets 2nd Mondays at 6 p.m. at La Casita, 1504 W. University Ave. (across com; 352-377-6577 International Socialist Organization Organization committed to building a left alternative to a world of war, racism and poverty. Meetings are every Thurs. at the UF classroom building at 105 NW 16th St. at 7 p.m. gainesvilleiso@gmail.com. Kindred Sisters Lesbian/feminist magazine. PO Box 141674, Gainesville, FL 32614. KindredSisters@gmail.com, www.kindredsisters.org. Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of advocates who protect the rights of elders in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs Web site at http://ombudsman. MindFreedom North Florida Human rights group for psychiatric survivors and mental health consumers. 352-328-2511. National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Support, education and advocacy for families and loved ones of persons with mental illness/brain disorders. 374-5600. ext. 8322; www.namigainesville.org. National Lawyers Guild Lawyers, law students, legal workers and jailhouse lawyers using the law to advance social justice and support progressive social movements. nlggainesville@gmail.com or www.nlg.org National Organization for Women Gainesville Area www.gainesvillenow. org. info@gainesvilleNOW.org NOW meeting info contact Lisa at 352-450-1912. Occupy Gainesville is about engaging the people of our community in grassroots, participatory democracy. We are about diversity and dialogue; we stand in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street Movement and the rest of the people peacefully occupying public space across this county and the rest of the world. www.occupygainesville.org and https:// www.facebook.com/occupygainesville PFLAG (Parents and Families of Lesbians and Gays) meets the 3rd Tuesday of each month at the Fellowship Hall of the United Church of Gainesville (1624 NW 5th Ave.) at 7 p.m. with a programmed portion and informal meeting with an opportunity to talk and peruse Planned Parenthood Clinic Full-service health center for reproductive and sexual health care needs. Offering pregnancy testing and options counseling for $10 from 10am-noon and 2-5pm. Located at 914 NW 13th St. 352-377-0881. Pride Community Center of North Central Florida Resources for the gay/ lesbian community, open M-F, 3-7, Sat. noon-4. Located at 3131 NW 13th St., Suite 62. 352-377-8915, www. GainesvillePride.org. Protect Gainesville Citizens Group whose mission is to provide Gainesville residents with accurate and comprehen sible information about the Cabot/Koppers Superfund site. 352-354-2432, www. protectgainesville.org. River Phoenix Center for Peacebuilding provides innovative ways to resolve services like mediation, communication skill building and restorative justice. www. cemterforpeacebuilding.org. 2603 Sierra Club of every month at 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Gainesville 4225 NW 34th St. 352528-3751, www.ssjsierra.org Sister City Program of Gainesville links Gainesville with sister cities in Russia, at 7:30 p.m. at the Mennonite Meeting House, 1236 NW 18th Avenue (across from Gainesville HS). http://www. gnvsistercities.org. Student/Farmworker Alliance A network of youth organizing with farmworkers to eliminate sweatshop conditions and Facebook, search Gainesville Student/ Farmworker Alliance. Students for a Democratic Society Multi-issue student and youth organization working to build power in schools and communities. Meetings held every Monday at 6:30 p.m. in Anderson Hall 32 on the UF campus. UF Pride Student Union Group of gay, lesbian, bi and straight students & nonstudents, faculty and staff. www.grove. United Faculty of Florida Union represents faculty at Univeristy of Florida. 392-0274, president@uff-uf.org, www.UFF-UF.org. United Nations Association, Gainesville Florida Chapter. Purpose is to heighten citizen awareness and knowledge of global problems and the UN efforts to deal with those issues. www.afn. United Way Information and Referral. Human-staffed computer database for resources and organizations in Alachua County. 352-332-4636 or simply 211. Veterans for Peace Anti-war organization that raises awareness of the detriments of militarism and war as well as seeking peaceful and effective alternatives. Meets WGOT 94.7 LP-FM Community lowpower station operating as part of the Civic Media Center. wgot947@gmail.com, www.wgot.org.

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PAGE 14, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 Transcript edited by Pierce Butler This is the sixteenth in a continuing series of transcript excerpts from the collection of the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program at the University of Florida. Dr. Alan Bean [AB] & Mrs. Nancy Bean [NB] were interviewed by Jessica Taylor [T] in 2012. NB: We were run off from this church in Derby, Kansas. The kids were in good schools, but there was no community. We decided to move back to my hometown. We quit our jobs and moved to Tulia [Texas]. What was a Ph.D. in church history going to do in this little bitty town? He said, teaching. Lydia headed off to college and the boys came with us. We had in mind this family reunion: quilting bees, re-introducing the kids to living in community vited to the quilting bees which my family still does and family dinners. Then we read about this kid named Jamie Moore who received a 75-year sentence kinfolks? My mothers mother, one of her familys names is Moore. We were attending the Baptist church at the time. So, was 17, 18, given a 75-year sentence. The pastor says, the victim of the rape is our pianists daughter, and he might be could feel all the curtains closing. Thats when the drug bust hit. We started looking at the names in the paper to see names, but my dad started reading the addresses, and he said, oh, these people are all on the black part of town. My mother says, how can this town have 46 kingpin drug dealers? This cant be right. Thats when we started doing this investigation. We didnt realize what we were getting into. We kind of assumed that the Civil Rights Movement had made justice, right? were our neighbors. We started putting out calls: the Justice Department, NAACP, ACLU, nobody cared. Finally, a local chapter of LULAC [League of United Latin American Citizens] set us up with one of the lawyers working for the defendants. The lawyer told Alan and my father that they didnt want to get involved. That, the DA would not be above putting a hit out on our family, and certainly not above planting drugs in our vehicles. That night, we took it home to our boys. They said, somebodys got to do it and because we were ousted from the family not my parents, but the extended family. When we go to basketball and football games where our kids are playing, no one knows us any longer. AB: Were excommunicated. NB: theres no place for me to sit at a faculty meeting. No one speaks to me anymore in the school except the Mexicans. [Laughter] The custodians, the TAs, the cafete ria workers, they became my spies. They were invisible. They could be in a room and people would just keep talking as if they werent hearing, and then they would tell me what was going on. Our phones were tapped. My brakes were cut one morning. We didnt ever call the police because it was the police that we were afraid of. Our boys didnt tell us at the time, they told us years later they were being pulled over regularly. AB: We wanted our kids to have a faith that worked for them. Because our involvement brought out the absolute worst in the local religious community the white religious community they got a very jaundiced view of religion. NB invitation to the matriarch and patriarch of our family, Aunt Lucy and Uncle John. They sent it back with additional pages scrawled, disinviting us from the family, telling us that they had torn up all of our childrens pictures. Empowering the least of these is our ministry, its what kept us together. The boys were hurt not just by what happened in Tulia, but by our experiences in churches all around. Amos, our youngest, says he gets nauseated when he walks into a church yet, hes teaching Special Ed. So, he is empowering the least of these. Adams starting to have a perspective thats not quite so negative. T: How did you pick this path? AB: The whole Civil Rights thing was thing like that. NB: We joined Mobilization for Survival in Louisville, an anti-nuclear organiza tion, and we worked with Fellowship of was very unwelcome there. We went as co-pastors to the Baptist Union of Western Canada. When we got there, they made it very clear they were kidding; they just said yes to our co-pastor thing so they could get Alan. AB: They werent ready, they said, to or in for ordination. NB: No one ever said to me, were not was not empowered enough to take it on. We were so isolated, in these rural Alberta, British Columbia, churches. So, The big action that said, we are going History and the people who make it: Alan & Nancy Bean

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 15 See ORAL HISTORY, p. 17 to build our own life, was when we moved to Tulia. Small towns are totally integrated. Theres just one school. We were moving our kids from a very segregated to a very integrated community, from a white community to a majority Hispanic community. Mr. Freddy Brookins, one of the activists traded in your white card, but we never got a black card. The black community in Tulia was so fragmented that there really wasnt a community to be invited into. AB: We did a lot of activism in the Hispanic community. We got two young boys out of prison who had been charged in bogus circumstances. Then, the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission did a Graduation Night raid on a Hispanic family. NB: They were having a multi-genera tional party, barbeque in the backyard. They busted into the party and had everybody on their knees with their guns, because they were serving alcohol to minors. They had no search warrant. Also, in Texas, youre allowed to serve your children alcohol if you are the parent. We were able to overturn that. AB: We interviewed about 25 people, put their stories into a timeline, and then told the story through their eyes in a very graphic kind of way. Then published this in independent newspapers, in Spanish and English versions. Eventually, they sent six bureaucrats from Austin. NB: They came to tell us the way the cow eats the cabbage. They were going to tell us why they could do whatever they want. walking out. They stopped their lectures and we started talking. AB: Spanish between the mother and this administrator. She said, how dare you send these big men into my backyard? Break into somebodys house to interrupt our gathering and to spoil the graduation of high school. How dare you do this? As a result of that meeting, they ended up pletely rewrote their search and seizure policy statewide. That really gave us ... NB: Sense of empowerment. Now, we can make a difference. AB: We understood the power of story, getting the story together and giving people a voice. We didnt do the talking for them, they did their own talking. They taught us the story, and we put it all together and taught it back to them. NB: Disempowered people often dont know how to tell a story. They have no sense of chronology. The people in Tulia wouldnt tell you a story. They would tell you incidents from all over their life. The role that Alan had, was in listening and writing down every incident so he could get it into a chronology. By the time we had the Rosales raid, he had learned this years, and that was very, very painful. T: Youve mentioned a lot about the Civil Rights Movement. Clergypeople were very important in shaping that. How did that shape your own philosophy? NB: The Civil Rights Movement totally informs our faith. The new Civil Rights Movement is about immigration and incarceration and defunding of education coming even clearer with the disenfranchising movement. We founded Friends of Justice and we tossed around names with Thelma Johnson, she was kind of the auntie of the think Thelma said, its Friends of Justice. made our t-shirts, Friends of Justice, and our logo was, do justice, love mercy, walk humbly, because the other scripture which propels us is Micah 6:8. He has shown the yeoman what is good and what the Lord requires of you. Theres nothing else. AB: One of the things thats so impressive about the Civil Rights Movement is how many young people, black and white, came streaming into this movement during the Freedom Ride. Nobody had a good word to say about them, yet, there was this thirst for experience and justice, and being part of something bigger than themselves. Theres nothing like that now. Community is so essential to the Civil Rights Movement, music and community. Because we have to sleep in each others homes and cook each others food, and the person who has a job has to cook for the person who doesnt. NB: raise your children with empathy and compassion and not with privilege. Value formation and expectation. Exchanger. We always used faith language for that. AB: High expectations, complete accep tance. Halberstams book, The Children, brings this homethat almost every one SPOHP wins Stetson Kennedy Vox Populi AwardThe Oral History Association has named the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program (SPOHP) a recipient of the 2013 Stetson Kennedy Vox Populi Award. The award honors individuals or organizations who have accomplished outstanding achievement in using oral history to create a more humane and just world. Nominees may include those who use oral history as a means of furthering social justice as well as those collecting oral histories of social justice advocates. This is a signal honor for our program, a testament to the dedication of our students, staff, and volunteers, said Paul Ortiz, director of SPOHP. The Kennedy award is support we enjoy at the University of Florida and in the broader community. This award is particularly meaningful to us given the decadeslong friendship between Sam Proctor and Stetson Kennedy. The Vox Populi Award was created to recognize work that has made this kind of difference in the world, while advancing our sense of the power of oral history in the process. The award is co-sponsored by The Stetson Kennedy Foundation (http://www.stetdation dedicated to human rights, racial and social justice, environmental stewardship, and the preservation and growth of folk culture. The Stetson Kennedy Vox Populi (Voice of the People) annual award will be presented at the OHA 2013 Annual Meeting in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.D

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PAGE 16, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 of those kids involved in the Civil Rights Movement had a parent, usually a mother. That drove them and had great dreams for dren, we wont raise exceptional children. Were going to raise technology-addicted, purposeless pleasure machines, who exist for entertainment. AB: Their conversation consists of swapping popular culture references. Theres no visionary thinking. AB: Theres got to be something beyond religious vision. There are claims placed upon us, moral claims. And what Martin Luther King called a beloved community. Weve lost that vision. ORAL HISTORY, from p. 16 DREAM DEFENDERS, from p. 1 from both major parties who voted against the call for a special session in the legislative poll. And in case words werent enough to strike press conference, activists marched from the Capitol building onto Gov. Scotts mansion down the street to deliver an eviction notice in person. For the next phase in their movement, the Dream Defenders are planning a multifaceted approach in order to build a united organized resistance to racism in Florida. This fall, youth organizers across the state will return to their communities and continue to build locally, bringing with them their experience and knowledge gained during the occupation. LaQuinta Alexander, a student organizer in Tallahassee, said during the press conference: The support we have garnered has propelled us to the gains we are celebrating today, but we cannot rest until we have changed the reality for young people in Florida. As we leave the Capitol, we are ward to returning to my campus and the Tallahassee community to continue to build momentum for Trayvons Law and the movement to end the criminalization of young people of color in Florida and across the nation. As we return to our campuses and communities, we will be organizing to bring awareness to our criminal injustice system and encourage people to take action. The eight established Dream Defender chapters across the state will hit the ground running this fall. On a local level, chapters will engage in various struggles against the criminalization of people of color and the working poor, whether around the three components of Trayvons Law, prison divestment or student-worker alliances. sion in March 2012, activists are planning to continue to organize efforts to pressure cials like him. The next major statewide mobilization to Tallahassee is set for September 23, the opening of committee week, which is when the House subcommittee is scheduled to hold hearings on Floridas Stand Your Ground law. DA full transcript of this interview AA00016739/00001. The Samuel Proctor Oral History Program believes that listening carefully to first-person narratives can change the way we understand history, from scholarly questions to public policy. SPOHP needs the publics help to sustain and build upon its research, teaching, and service missions: even small donations can make a big difference in SPOHPs ability to gather, preserve, and promote history for future generations. oral/support.html or make checks to SPOHP, and mail to PO Box 115215, Gainesville, FL 32611. D

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 17 by Lisa Renner The Gainesville Chapter of the United Nations Association invites you to join us for our annual UN Day Meeting on Thursday, Oct. 10, from 9a.m.p.m. at the Gainesville Womans Club. Our theme this year is Why the World Still Needs the UN and Why the UN Needs the World. Our UN Day Chair is Dr. Patricia Hilliard-Nunn, Adjunct Associate Professor of African-American Studies at the University of Florida. The program will open with a panel discussion by Dr. Linda Cottler, Professor and Chair or the Department of Epidemiology, College of Medicine and College of Public Health and Health Professions, and Brian Mitchell, who worked with the nonThe Keynote Speaker is Stephen Karnik, United Nations and the European Union. There will be a luncheon at the event as well, and co-sponsors and community organizations will have information tables set up. tion that would like to be a co-sponsor of the program, please send a suggested $25 donation to Lisa Renner at P.O. Box 358361, Gainesville, FL 358361, along with your completed Luncheon Reser vation Form, no later than October 5. As a Co-sponsor, your name will be listed in the program. Tables will be available if you wish to set up a display to inform the community of your activities. For access to a copy of the co-sponsor form and luncheon reservation form, email Lisa Renner at ejrenner@hotmail. com. Dby Gainesville Loves Mountain Mountaintop removal (MTR) is arguably the most devastating form of energy extraction our nation has yet encounteredand Gainesville, FL can To-date, MTR has permanently erased more than 500 peaks from the Appalachian mountains, buried or polluted more than 2,000 miles of pristine headwaters streams, and swept away more then 800 square miles of one of Americas most diverse and valuable ecosystems. The social, health, and economic toll on the region has been equally dire. Our City Commission can end Gainesvilles connection to MTR by asking GRU to avoid any future purchases of coal mined using this method. Lets help make Gainesville an example of how communities can embrace a clean Gainesville Loves Mountains has proposed an ordinance to the Gainesville City Commission that would prevent Gainesville Regional Utilities (GRU) from buying coal extracted by mountaintop removal mining. The Gainesville City Commission will give the proposed ordinance a hearing on Sept. 12 at 5p.m. at City Hall. Supporters are needed at the meeting to show the Citys commitment to end MTR. City Commissioners directly and tell them that you want to end Gainesticular, Commissioners Lauren Poe & Todd Chase, as well as Mayor Braddy, need to hear from you. Contact inis available here: http://www.cityofgainesville.org/GOVERNMENT/ MayorCityCommission/tabid/362/ Default.aspx You can also help by signing the petition supporting the ordinance at http:// www.change.org/petitions/gainesville-regional-utility-s-purchases-ofmountaintop-removal-coal. DLoblolly Woods saved ... for nowby Melissa Elliott, Save Loblolly Woods On Aug. 27, Nathan Collier withdrew the bid he presented to the Gainesville City Commission in May to purchase 5.17 acres of Loblolly Park. Collier led the idea of the purchase of city park land with privacy concerns, as the proposed parcel runs the length of his homes eight-foot fence. The city commission agreed to move ahead with the sale, and declared the land as surplus, but limitwould not be developed. At the time, there wasnt a lot of public information being released, apart from Collier and his representatives. For one local resident, it became crucial to increase community awareness. The Save Loblolly Woods group began in early June with one Facebook page. Within the space of a month, that page garnered over 500 fans and became a hotbed for local activists who wanted to help. The original aim of the page was to provide a forum in which concerned locals could learn about more about the proposed sale. Not surprisingly, a small working group began to form. The online group soon connected with homeowners in the neighborhood who would be directly affected by the sale. Meetings took place, the town. Members of the group met with city commissioners numerous times, and had multi ple editorials published in The Gainesville Sun, and The Alligator. The group also started a website, placed Save Loblolly Woods signs in affected neighborhoods, and began making in-depth public records requests. By the end of August, the Facebook Page had over 780 fans, including two city commissioners and many other prominent community members. On Aug. 25, Save Loblolly Woods held a hike-in on the Loblolly parcel. Over 70 residents and environmentalists came out to hear Dr. Michael Andreu speak of the natural history of the parcel and why that part of Loblolly is so biologically unique. Though Collier did withdraw his latest bid, its on city record that hes been attempting the pur chase since 2008. Members of the group will be making a presentation to the city commission on Sept. 5 to place all 160 acres of Loblolly Woods Nature Park on Gainesvilles Registry of Protected Public Places. D United Nations Day: Oct. 10 Gainesville Loves MountainsSept. 12 ordinance hearing

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 19 Introducing Daily GreenGainesvilles latest restaurant additionby Adam Reinhard Overall our goal is to create a restaurant that we would like to patronize. We have nitely love Gainesville, its community vibe, its nature. Plans have been in the making for several years, and when Louis Lunch became available, it all came together. The three owners have been working for over two years to create our vision of Daily Green. John Arana and Adam Reinhard, general manager/owner and business manager/owner, respectively, are transplants from south Florida for over 20 years. Eddie Cromer, owner/executive chef is all local. Eddie has developed the entire menu and food creations. need due to our schedules, was a healthy quick place to eat lunch. Daily Green is a counter service establishment. The kitchen is open to customers so they can see and smell the goodness of what we do. Daily Green offers a unique experience where everyone can cones and on various local breads), homemade soups, salads, and also have fresh vegetable juices and smoothies. Our menu has been developed to offer something for everyone. Regardless of what one's eating regime is, they should Although, it is more labor intensive, all of our food is hand-cut and prepared eating food that is prepared fresh from healthy ingredients. Most of our items are made with organic ingredients. When cost or availability are prohibitive, we choose natural ingredients before anything else. We also use as many local individuals and businesses to help us achieve our goals as possible. From the development of our logo, website, and menu, to choosing our suppliers and selecting our building materials, we strive to be as local, regional, and natural as we possibly can. Daily Green is a space that will further enrich Gainesville's unique food scene and culture. Patrons will see local art work in the building and will eventually enjoy outside seating and local music. We love the idea of developing something for Gainesville as well as ourselves. We are so happy to be able to use this unique and historic building that previously held Gainesville's oldest restaurant. Please come by and visit. Take a seat in a rocking chair and enjoy some fresh food and pleasant atmosphere. Daily Green is located at 436 SE 2nd Street in downtown Gainesville. Were open from 10a.m.p.m., MondaySaturday. For more information, visit www.dailygreendowntown.org. D THINKINGABOUTTHEMILITARY? MAKEAN INFORMEDCHOICE. ADVICEFROMVETERANSONMILITARYSERVICE ANDRECRUITINGPRACTICESAResourceGuideForYoungPeople ConsideringEnlistment Gainesville Chapter14 http://www.afn.org/~vetpeace/ Jean ChalmersCRS, GRI, REALTORBROKER-ASSOCIATE SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTMobile: (352) 538-4256 www.ElwoodRealtyServices.com Second store at 5011 NW 34th St.

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PAGE 20, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 Pfc. Chelsea Manning post-sentencing statementSometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society The following is a rush transcript by Common Dreams of the statement made by Pfc. Chelsea Manning* as read by David Coombs at a press conference on Wednesday following the announcement of a 35-year prison sentence by a military court. my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. Weve been at war with an and due to this fact weve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life. to meet this risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our and Afghanistan. When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and execuacts in the name of our war on terror. Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown our any logically based intentions [unclear], it is usually an American soldier that is ordered to carry out some ill-conceived mission. Our nation has had similar dark moments for the virtues of democracythe Trail of Tears, the Dred Scott decision, McCarthyviewed in a similar light. to cover the shame of killing innocent people. my country and a sense of duty to others. that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free socithat is truly conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all women and men are created equal. Subsequent to this statement on the following day, Manning announced, via legal counsel, the desire to be regarded as a woman and to be called Chelsea, rather than Bradley, a request the Gainesville Iguana intends to honor moving forward. D

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 21 World Peace Day: Sept. 21On Sept. 21, Gainesville will celebrate World Peace Day. Starting in the early 1980s, honoring peace on a special day has grown to take many forms around the world from ringing Peace Bells to bly, by unanimous vote, adopted Resolution 36/67 establishing centrate the efforts of the United Nations and its Member States, as well as the whole of mankind, to promoting the ideals of peace and to giving positive evidence of their commitment to peace in for honoring world peace in ceremonies and good works. the Plaza. This simple ceremony, done around the world on this date, honors peacemaking. Thousands of Peace Poles have been dedicated around the world including one in Gainesvilles Veterans Park. Our portable Peace Pole will be erected until 2 p.m. The pole has inscribed in eight different languages on its sides May peace prevail on earth. There will also be a childrens art activity connected with the Peace Pinwheel Project associated with World Peace Day, and tabling by sponsoring organizations United Nations Association of Gainesville, Gainesville Veterans for Peace Chapter 14, Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Gainesville and the River Phoenix Center for Peacebuilding. D

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PAGE 22, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 by Juan Cole This article was originally published on Aug. 19 on Juan Coles blog, Informed Comment. Read more at www.juancole. com. The original includes a lot of infor mative links. You can read more at http:// www.juancole.com/2013/08/greenwaldterrorist-dictatorship.html.\ authoritarian state in 10 easy steps: 1. Misuse the concept of a Top Secret government document (say, the date of lions of mundane documents a year. 2. Classify all government crimes and violations of the Constitution as secret. 3. Create a class of 4.5 million privileged individuals, many of them corporate emments but allege it is illegal for public to 4. Spy on the public in violation of the Constitution. 5. Classify environmental activists as ter rorists while allowing Big Coal and Big Oil to pollute and destroy the planet. 6. Share info gained from NSA spying on ment to protect pharmaceuticals & liquor industry from competition from pot, or to protect polluters from activists. 7. Falsify to judges and defense attorneys how allegedly incriminating info was discovered. 8. Lie and deny to Congress you are spying on the public. 9. Criminalize the revelation of government crimes and spying as Espionage. 10. Further criminalize whistleblowing as Terrorism, have compradors arrest innocent people, detain them, and conwarrant (i.e. David Miranda, partner of Glenn Greenwald). Presto, what looks like a democracy is really an authoritarian state ruling on its own behalf and that of 2000 corporations, databasing the activities of 312 million innocent citizens and actively helping destroy the planet while forestalling climate activism. DHow to create a dictatorshipby Joe Courter First off, again, the cluster of activities we call the South Main Arts and Culture Center (which includes Citizens Co-op, the Civic Media Center, Display Gallery, What has taken place is the City of Gainesville has signed the purchase agreement contracts on the land south of SE 5th Avenue, pending an environmental survey of the soil. The test samples have yet to be analyzed completely, but if all goes well, and the purchase goes through, construction on the new Fire Station will commence beginning January 2015. That means that for ALL of 2014, things will be as normal, except the Repurpose Project will need to fore the end of 2014. But meanwhile, tables and umbrellas have the Radical Press Coffee Collective inside the CMC has seen improvements with new counter-space and volunteers, and things are very much alive. Come visit for Artwalk on Sept. 27, or whenever you can. DSouth Main update What you can do: For information: Radical Press Coffee Shop in the CMC: 433 S. Main St., Gainesville 32601 Open 9a.m. 9p.m. Weekdays / 10a.m. 9p.m. Weekends Late Night (1a.m.), Tuesday and Thursday Grassroots Support Keeps it Going What the Civic Media Center does:

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IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013, PAGE 23 hoopers, jugglers, puppeteers, dancers, a guy on stilts, a unicyclist, and thousands of Fest was a FREE event by locals, for locals, about locals. Photo by Diana Moreno.Labor Daze Fest builds communityGROWRADIO.org programming scheduleGrow Radio is a listener-supported, that provides community members an opportunity to create and manage engaging, educational, informative, locally-generated programming to and humanities for the enrichment of the Gainesville community. Sunday 3 p.m. Paper Beats Rock 5 p.m. Joe and Craig Show 9 p.m. The Sum of Your Life Monday 11 a.m. Dr. Bills Super Awe ... 3 p.m. Seoulmates-Kpop Radio 7 p.m. Maium 8 p.m. New Day Rising 10 p.m. Female Trouble Tuesday 8 a.m. Narcolexi 10 a.m. Funhouse 12 p.m. Whats the Story? 2 p.m. Street Nuts 4 p.m. Patina and Gold 6 p.m. America in the Evening 8 p.m. river rail rhythm 10 p.m. The Experiment Wednesday 9 a.m. Sax and Violins 1 3 p.m. The Quiet City 5 p.m. A Brazilian Commando 7 p.m. Homebrew Talk 8 p.m. Downtown Sound 9 p.m. The Otherness 11 p.m. Radiodeo Thursday 12 a.m. Radiodeo 11 a.m. Get on the Right Thing ... 12 p.m. Things Be Blowin ... 4 p.m. Hope & Anchor 6 p.m. No Filler 10 p.m. Lost Sharks Friday 11 a.m. The Breakup Song 1 p.m. 4D Meltdown 5 p.m. Acme Radio 7 p.m. A Train Full of Tricks Saturday 11 a.m. Jazzville 5 p.m. Alewife Outbound 7 p.m. Planet of Sound 9 p.m. Reality Bites WGOT 94.7 LP FM Gainesville's Progressive Community Radio Station WGOT is on the airSunday: 1-4 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 1 4 p.m.. 8 p.m.-midnight Tuesday, Thursday: midnight-5 a.m.,14 p.m., 8-9 p.m. Saturday: 19 p.m.Check out wgot.org for upcoming events and a detailed schedule. WGOT stream under the Shoutcast directory. To listen from your iOS, Android, or Blackberry mobile device, you can use any radio streaming apps such as Tune In. We are listed in iTunes Radio under the Eclectic category. Direct feed at www.wgot.org/listen/. 94.7 is a Low Power FM station with a transmitter at NW 39th Ave and I-75, so best reception is within 5 miles, but many people are able to pick up the station in their car. Questions? Comments? E-mail us at info@wgot.org. Democracy NOW! airs Mon.-Fri. 1 p.m. & Mon.-Thur. 8 p.m.

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PAGE 24, IGUANA, SEPTEMBER 2013 The Civic Media Center will once again sponsor Radical Rush at Santa Fes Oak Grove, Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 16-17 and at the University of Floridas Plaza of the Americas, Wednesday and Thursday, Sept. 18-19, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day. This week-long event culminates in the Radical Rush Social on Friday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at the CMC. Radical Rush (RR) is an organizational fair for progressive, alternative and radical activist groups of Gainesville to recruit new members and publicize their work to students at UF and Santa Fe. The Rush is presented in the form of a collaborative tabling effort on the Oak Grove and on the Plaza of the Americas, and the Social on Friday night. Anyone interested in learning about progressive social change and/or becoming more active in the community has the opportunity to talk with group members about their organization. Campus and community-based groups participate, with the bonus of helping bridge the town/gown divide and allowing activists working on a variety of issues to meet one another, network, and learn about other organizations. RR also helps break through the generation gap, fostering inter-generational collaboration as students and younger activists are introduced to older, seasoned organizers Radical Rush will culminate in a social on Friday, September 20 at the Civic Media Center. The social is in the form of a pizza party (with vegan friendly options as well) that will begin at 7 p.m. Speakers from the various organizations will give 2-3 minute speeches about their groups, followed by an evening of music from local politically conscious musicians starting at 9 p.m. D The Gainesville Iguana is Gainesville's progressive events calendar and newsletterSubscribe!Individuals: $15 (or more if you can) Low/No income: What you can Groups: $20 Iguana, c/o CISPLA P.O. Box 14712 Gainesville, FL 32604 Comments, suggestions, are welcome. To list your event or group, contact us at: (352) 378-5655 GainesvilleIguana@cox.net www.gainesvilleiguana.org facebook.com/gainesvilleiguana issues of the Gainesville Iguana online (complete issues are available as PDFs) at www.gainesvilleiguana.orgThe Gainesville Iguana (established 1986)