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The Shpiel ( December 2, 2008 )

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THE S HP i EL VOLUME 6 ISSUE 8 5 Kislev 5769 19 Kislev 5769 December 2, 2008 December 16, 2009 photo illustration by Jackie Jakob This Issue: Christmas vs. Hanukkah Page 3 Interview with Yoni Wolf from band Why? Page 7 Dispatch from youngest Jew in Egypt Page 9 Red string cuisine in unlikely spot Page 10 BY LANA SELIGSOHN SHPiEL staff writer Each winter and summer, thousands of young American Jews, ages 18-26 mostly American college students take part in a free 10-day trip to Israel sponsored by Taglit-Birthright Israel. Funded by the Israeli government, local Jewish federations and private donors, about 190,000 people from 52 countries have been sent to Israel by the program. But the world financial crisis and the recent announcement by a critical donor that he will reduce his funding for the program will leave Birthright with a budget shortfall in 2009. Representatives from the program are saying it will need to decrease the number of students it accepts for trips by more than a third. Birthright to cut budget, trips Rising costs of travel, a decrease in donor funding and the decline in the value of the dollar have hit nonprofits hard, sponsors said. Jay Golan, Birthright president and CEO, told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that Birthright plans to cut its budget to $75 million from $110 million and its participants from 42,000 in 2008 to 25,000 in the coming year. Birthrights largest private donor has already announced plans to cut back. Property developer and casino magnate Sheldon Adelson listed in the September issue of Forbes magazine as the 15th richest American, with a net worth of $15 billion has reduced his financial pledge to Birthright. Adelsons company, Las Vegas Sands Corporation, has spent a year teetering on the edge SEE BIRTHRIGHT, PAGE 2 BY BEN CAVATARO SHPiEL staff writer U.S. Rep. Rahm Emanuel could be the main character in a movie. If that movie involved a relentless former ballet dancer who nearly died from a toe infection, mailed a dead fish to a political adversary, stabbed knives into tables at meetings with other political staffers and brought discipline to a chaotic Democratic congressional campaign operation. Emanuel has been laudedand fearedfor his aggressive political instincts. A former advisor to President Clinton, he was one of the first people tapped by Barack Obama after his election. The president-elect recently chose Emanuel, a fellow Chicagoan, to be his White House chief of staff. Newsweek called Emanuel explosive, Rahmbo takes on the White House profane, wired and ruthless. CNN called him a pitbull politician, killer strategist and nonstop fundraiser. Emanuel, 49, is known even to his own mother as Rahmbo. Sharp upbringing A Chicago native and son of a Jerusalem-born pediatrician and union organizer, Emanuel grew up with his two brothers: Ari Emanuel, who became a Hollywood superagent and the inspiration for the hyperactive Ari Gold on HBOs Entourage, and Dr. Ezekiel Zeke Emanuel, a bioethicist at the National Institute of Health who received his Ph.D. and M.D. from Harvard. The brothers told Charlie Rose earlier this year that dinner at the Emanuel SEE EMANUEL, PAGE 5

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 THE S HPiEL The Only Student-Run Jewish Campus Newspaper in the Country, Right Here at the University of Florida Volume 6, Issue 8 2 | NEWS BY BEN CAVATARO Shorts { } Briefs {Mumbai terrorist attack kills nearly 200, leaves Chabad rabbi and wife dead} A three-day terrorist attack on multiple locations in the Indian city of Mumbai the countrys most populous city and financial capital left nearly 200 dead and hundreds injured. Using AK-47s, explosives and grenades, a team of Islamic militants attacked a busy train station, a famous restaurant, two luxury hotels, the city police headquarters and a movie theatre, as well as a Chabad house. At the five-story Nariman House in south Mumbai, terrorists killed Chabad rabbi Gavriel Noach Holtzberg, 29, a Brooklyn native, and his Israeli-born wife Rivka, 28, and seven others, all Jews. The Holtzbergs 2-year-old son escaped with his nanny, 44-year-old Sandra Samuel, who also worked as a cook for the Jewish outreach center. A young group of 10 to 25 attackers shot randomly into crowds at targeted sites, searching for Westerners especially Americans and Britons to kill. Hostages were held at the historic Taj Mahal Palace & Tower hotel. Only after Indian commandos stormed the building and killed several terrorists did the three-day standoff end. Responsibility for the attacks remains unclear. The group Deccan Mujahideen has claimed responsibility, and the Kashmir-based Lashkare-Toiba is suspected of playing a role. Indian officials also accuse the Pakistani government and particularly its shadowy Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) agency of playing a role in the attack. Investigators are questioning one captured terrorist. {White House sends out Hanukkah cards with Christmas trees} The White House has apologized and cited a mix-up relating to official invitations to a Hanukkah reception that included a picture of a Christmas tree. The invitations mailed to Jewish leaders across the country showed a Clydesdale horse-drawn cart with a Christmas tree in front of a wreathed and snowy White House and stated that President Bush and the First Lady request the pleasure of your company at a Chanukah reception. Press Secretary Sally McDonough apologized for a staff mistake and said that the intended invitations had an image of a menorah given to the White House during the Truman administration. The invitation mix-up was something that fell through the cracks, McDonough told UPI. One recipient of the invitation, Isaac Abraham of Brooklyn, joked to the New York Post: Its obvious whats going on here: The Christmas tree is being taken out of the White House and the menorah is being brought in the back. visit the new theshpiel.org Editor-in-Chief Josh Fleet josh@theshpiel.org Managing Editor Zahara Zahav zahara@theshpiel.org News Editor Ben Cavataro cavataro@ufl.edu Arts & Entertainment Editor Douglas Sharf doug@theshpiel.org Sundry Editor Elaine Wilson elaine@theshpiel.org Executive Advisor/Mentor Giselle Mazur giselle@ufhillel.org Layout Editor Jackie Jakob jackie@theshpiel.org Web Editor Dan Feder dan@theshpiel.org Chief Visionary Faryn Hart faryn@theshpiel.org Photo Editor Emily Hanson emily@theshpiel.org Distribution Danielle Nichols dnichols@ufl.edu Operations Manager Jamie Caceres jnc5122@ufl.edu Answers to Last Issues Crossword Puzzle major Birthright donor large cause for cuts BIRTHRIGHT, FROM PAGE 1 of bankruptcy. The personal fortune of Adelson, the son of Ukrainian and Lithuanian Jewish immigrants, has also declined. In March, he was listed by Forbes as the worlds 12th richest person, with a net worth of $26 billion, and Boston Globe financial columnist Steven Syre named Adelson among the years biggest financial losers. Adelson, a major contributor to Jewish causes as well as Republican candidates and groups, announced that he was reducing his expected donations to Birthright to $20 million dollars in 2009 and then $10 million in 2010, a sharp contrast from the $70 million he has contributed over the past two years. The Jewish Daily Forward reported that trips cost around $3,000 per participant, meaning that unless the organization raises other funds, it will lose the ability to fund more than 3,300 trips in 2009, and nearly 6,700 trips in 2010. The news isnt all bad for Birthright. The Jewish Agency for Israels board of governors recently decided not to adopt a proposal to cut its Birthright allocation by $1 million, and Birthright sponsors plan to aggressively seek other sources of funding. A number of funding sources agree that Taglit-Birthright Israel must become a national priority for Jewish life and are eager to make that happen so that wait-lists for trips do not have to build, said Birthright president and CEO Golan. Founded in 2000, Birthrights eightyear history may help it weather the economic downturn. This financial crisis comes at a time when Taglit-Birthright Israel has established itself as a proven winner in the community that has made a concrete difference in the lifelong Jewish identity of those who go on the trip and those who do not, said the spokesperson for Taglit-Birthright Israel. Property developer and casino magnate, Sheldon Adelson

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 NEWS | 3 visit the new theshpiel.org where healthy never tasted so good! Dlites is the BEST real soft serve ice cream shop in Gainesville. We specialize in delicious low-sugar and low-fat ice allwe also carry a full line of lowsugar and sugar-free products, as well as many low-fat and fat-free goodies. OPEN LATE! Mon-Thurs 11am-9pm fri-Sat 11am-10pm Sun 12-9pm Marketplace Plaza 4216 NW 16th Blvd. (Next to Hollywood Video) 375-4484 www.gatordlites.com NOW OPEN 2nd LOCATION Shoppes of Williston Road 5218 SW 34th St. (Next to Publix) 37 8-2969 Hanukkah vs. Christmas BY JACKIE AZIS SHPiEL staff writer To help spread peace on earth and goodwill toward men, this year The SHPiEL has put together a head-to-head competition between two upcoming winter holidays: the Festival of Lights and the birth of Christ. Lets begin with Christmas. A quick glimpse at the TV Guide channel during the holidays reveals that when it comes to holiday movies, Christmas takes the prize. Theres The Nightmare Before Christmas, the Home Alone and Grinch series, Bad Santa and a mushy-favorite, Love Actually. Even National Lampoons Christmas Vacation is good. Meanwhile, those of us looking for Hanukkah movies get a choice between standard Sandler (Eight Crazy Nights) and Rugrats Chanukah. This one is hardly a competition. But the best thing about Christmas is the decorations: Trees covered with ornaments, cords of lights, stockings, snowglobes, poinsettias and that superior decoration piece that makes Christmas the giving season it is, the mistletoe. I dont know how or why the tradition of kissing under a poisonous plant began, but any holiday that encourages laying a big, wet kiss on the one you love is acceptable in my book. There are a few downsides to the Christmas holiday as well. The cheesy tunes make me dread the radio in December. We are forced to listen to the story of magical Frosty and red-nose bigotry victim Rudolph as we shop and get our hair cutand even at home if carolers make the rounds. Hearing The Twelve Days of Christmas every day from Black Friday to New Years is as painful as eating an entire fruit cake. Heard of Silent Night? Lets try silent Christmas songs. Christmas-lovers, I have one plea for you. For the love of God, get rid of the horrid Christmas sweaters. These knit nightmares are a huge downfall for the holiday. Nobody is impressed that your favorite aunt knitted it for you or that it has real bells hanging from the sleeves. Next time youre roasting chestnuts on an open fire, throw in the stuffy, knitted red sweaters. These wearable monuments to tackiness are immortalized on the Web at uglychristmassweaterparty. com, whereif you mustyou can purchase your own nauseainducing winter wear. The site features advertisements for each piece reading Does it get any uglier? and Wow, you would look awful in this! What about Hanukkah? I find it lacking in both the movie and decoration departments. Once you bring out the menorah your decorating is pretty much complete. Not a lot of room for creativity herebut at least clean-up is almost effortless. As for the gift-giving aspect, Hanukkah is by far the more tortuous and annoying of holidays. With Christmas, gifts come one right after the other all morning long (and you get a whole stocking stuffed with candy). Hanukkah, on the other hand, forces eight nights of patience and slow frustration. As a lover of fried foods, I look forward to Hanukkah for the latkes and sufganiyot Any holiday that promotes cholesterol and sugar intake is good for me. And who doesnt love chocolate gelt? Sure, candy canes are nice and pepperminty, but the existence of fruitcake discredits Christmas from winning on food. Hanukkah wins in the observance department as well. Christmas is sometimes celebrated at a midnight service, so by the time you get home, prepare Santa and his reindeer some cookies and carrots, write him a nice letter and then fall asleep, the next thing you know your little sibling or restless father is waking you up, begging for it to be time to open the presents. Christmas, essentially, equals no sleep. But Hanukkah comes at a much more convenient timeafter sunrise, but before I go to bed. No staying up until midnight and no extra-early wake-up required. The mere fact that there are eight fun nights of celebration for Hanukkah versus only one very early morning for Christmas makes this an easy decision for me. Hey, I like my crazy family. Eight nights of insanity? Sign me up! Points for Christmas Points for Hanukkah The WRAP-UP Greasier Geltier More miraculous More nights of presents More nights of thinking about why you didnt recieve presents and learning from your mistakes No time spent in church No shitty sweaters A wider variety of seasonal movies to watch so you can avoid talking to that creepy uncle you only see once a year and/or when hes out on bail More opportunity to do your part in increasing light pollution More choices for giftwrapping Eggnog The Nutcracker Stockings

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 4 | NEWS Dr. Jason Rosenberg Specializing in Breast Cancer Reconstruction 4500 Newberry Road Gainesville, FL 32607 phone: 352-336-6037 W.W. Gay Mechanical Contractor, Inc. FLORIDA (904) 388-2696 Jacksonville Gainesville Orlando St. Augustine Little Rock, AR SHPiEL Answers to all your kosher culinary questions Ask Esther : BY ELAINE WILSON visit the new theshpiel.org Hanukkah Dishes Email your kosher cuisine questions to elaine@theshpiel.or g Due to kosher time constraints and my sincere love for unbroken multicourse holiday meals, the Hanukkah lineup in this issue avoids meat and dairy conflicts by using a culinary compromise: vegetarian options. Besides, why make yourself wait at least three hours before satiating your sweet tooth? Begin with a classic recipe that Irish Catholics like me as well as Jews enjoy: the potato pancake. Known as boxty to the Irish and latkes to Jews, these are a wonderfully simple dish that, in many ways, can act as a blank tablet. Take those potato templates and build them up with delicious ingredients. The December issue of Bon Appetit presents three variations on latkes, but its the Rsti-style potato latkes with rosemary and brown butter applesauce that made me salivate (Rsti are a type of large potato pancake that hails from Switzerland). The ingredients are fairly basic, so to make these latkes, you wont need to empty your wallet. Dont let your latkes get lonely. Sephardic spinach patties listed at epicurious.com (bookmark this site!) are not a traditional Hanukkah dish but will please even your carnivorous friends. Hinting at Mediterranean origins, this recipe resembles spanakopita in its content (Greek spinach pie). Like the latkes, these croquettes are versatile and can incorporate cheese, walnuts or even wine-soaked grapes for an Italian edge. As a vegetable dish, youll save more room for what really matters: dessert. Sufganiyot (Israeli jelly doughnuts) are rich and heavy enough to provide the post-holiday meal fullness that begs you to leave the dishes for tomorrow and fall asleep on the couch. If youre like me, jelly goes best alongside peanut butter, so try substituting something else to your liking as a fillingmaybe chocolate. An even simpler option is to forego any fillings and just eat the doughnut rolled in sugar. A recipe) at epicurious.com) reproduced from Joan Nathans Childrens Jewish Holiday Kitchen shows how to create your own dough. While dough made from scratch is often the most delicious avenue, students pressed for time or with limited experience working with yeast may find it daunting. Purchasing plain biscuit dough (the prepackaged kind that comes in refrigerated tubes) may be easier. While less glamorous, biscuit dough fried in oil and rolled in sugar makes a delicious doughnut with significantly less hassle. photo courtesy of foodonthefood.com

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 NEWS | 5 visit the new theshpiel.org EMANUEL, FROM PAGE 1 house was competitive. They called it a brawl, with yelling and screaming, but with love. As a high school student, Emanuel worked at an Arbys fast-food restaurant, slicing his right middle finger in an accident. Avoiding the hospital, Emanuel went to his high school prom and swam in Lake Michigan the following day. As a result, the wound became infected and Emanuel nearly died. His finger was later partially amputated. A talented dancer, Emanuel was offered a scholarship to train with the Joffrey Ballet, but instead enrolled in Sarah Lawrence College, where he graduated in 1981. Rise to fame After college, Emanuel worked for U.S. Sen. Paul Simon, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in 1988 and for Chicago mayor Richard M. Daley. In 1991, Emanuel joined another young Democrat, Bill Clinton, the then governor of Arkansas and a presidential primary candidate. The night after Clintons election, Emanuel stood at a celebratory dinner with other Clinton operatives nearby, seized a steak knife, rattling off a list of betrayers, shouting Dead! Dead! Dead! and plunging the knife into the table after every name. The table looked like a lunar landscape, one witness told Rolling Stones Joshua Green. It was like something out of The Godfather. But thats Rahm for you. The Emanuel stories are legendary. He sends out cheesecakes from Elis Bakery in Chicago to campaign contributors, but he also once sent a dead fish to a pollster who had angered him. As a White House aide, he briefed Tony Blair before he made a joint appearance with Clinton during the 1998 Lewinsky scandal. This is important, Emanuel told the British Prime Minister, Dont fuck it up. On the offense Leaving the White House in 1998, Emanuel headed to Wall Street. Planning on a future run for Congress, he knew he would need money. Working with prominent Democratic financier Bruce Wasserstein, Emanuel emerged with more than $18 millionenough to launch his successful campaign for a Chicago-area House district in 2002. He easily dispatched his Republican opponent. In the House, as he had before, Emanuel relished in the attack something reflected in his language. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is said to have quipped that the economic stimulus plan could be paid for if we put a quarter in a jar every time Rahm uses a swear word. And an unaired Saturday Night Live sketch featuring Andy Samburg depicts Emanuel hurling obscenities at House Republican Leader John Boehner and others. An observant Jew, Emanuel sought and received a special dispensation from his rabbi to continue negotiating the $700 billion bailout plan through Rosh Hashanah. As the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chair, Emanuel terrified Republicans (Obama joked that Jews celebrate Passover recalling the day the Angel of Death passed over their homes in ancient Egypt. Today Republicans celebrate when Rahm passes over their district). Emanuel also ended the practice of doling out money to Democratic candidates freely, instituting a system in which candidates in swing districts would have to sign memos of understanding detailing the number of fundraising calls and appearances made. Emanuels tactics put him in conflict with other Democrats especially Democratic National Committee chair Howard Dean. But Emanuel was largely credited with the Democrats 31-seat pickup in 2006. During the 2008 primaries, Emanuel a longtime Clinton ally, but an Illinoisan like Obama and a personal friend of Obama chief strategist David Axelrod declined to endorse any candidate. Still, less than three days after Obama won the election in November, he was offered and accepted the White House chief-ofstaff position. They are obviously setting up a good cop/bad cop routine in the White House, said David Gergen of CNN. Barack Obama can be the good guy. RAHM FACTS Bradley Whitfords character Josh Lyman on The West Wing is based on Emanuel, and Jeremy Pivens characters brother Ari Gold on Entourage is based on Ari Emanuel, Rahms brother. Emmanuels mother was an X-ray technician, rock club owner and civil rights activist who took her three sons to protests. Today, she is a social worker. He met his wife Amy Rule on a blind date, and she converted to modern Orthodox Judaism before they married. They have three children: Zacharias, Ilana, and Leah. Emmanuel reportedly has referred to Washington as Fucknutsville, and Republican members of Congress as knucklefucks. Admirers have set up RahmFacts. com, billed as awesome as Chuck Norris Facts except 100% true! When Dick Cheney suggested that the vice presidency was not part of the executive branch, Emmanuel suggested cutting off the $4.8 million the Vice Presidents Office receives. RAHM QUOTES You should have messed around with a goyish girl and gotten a Jewish lawyer. (to President Clinton) Theres no safe Republican district. You can run, but you cannot hide. Obama picks political pirate Emanuel to help navigate Arabic dialogue takes on a young Jewish face BY ANKITA RAO SHPiEL staff writer Its the poetic language of Rumi and Hafizthe elegant script that defines the Koran and Islamic tradition. Now, Arabic is soaking through universities across America, making its mark on resumes and notebooks. University of Florida visiting lecturer and adviser for Arabic Esameddin Alhadi cites the 9/11 attacks as a turning point for Arabic studies. The numbers have doubled I think six times since September 11, he said. People became more interested in Arabic culture, trends and society. UF caters to the growing demand with classes in beginning, intermediate and advanced Arabic. Students can also study Arabic culture, focusing on business communication, politics and religion. For Jewish students, the language creates an intercultural dialogue that could be a vital asset in different industries. These two cultures live together, Alhadi said of Jewish and Muslim populations. There are two languages, and people need to learn both of them. He wasnt sure about the number of Jewish students enrolled in the course, but he said the number correlated to the overall rise in students choosing to learn Arabic. Journalism major and Arabic studies minor Dayna Malek,19, was surprised to find how similar the language was to Hebrew, which she learned while growing up in Israel. I always like the reaction I get when I tell people Im learning Arabic, Malek said. Her family was hesitant when she first told them, but she said she thinks it is a valuable skill. She hopes Arabic will help support her career plans with the United States Foreign Service, a branch of the Department of State that sendsdiplomats abroad. Alhadi said knowing Arabic makes students marketable because they can work in intelligence and business fields and also better understand the Middle Eastern culture. Arabic culture and Arabic history have been stereotyped for so long. We spend the first week [in class] finding out what students think about it, he said. Because the language differs in each country, UF teaches a standard type of formal Arabic like the one spoken in Egypt. Because Alhadi is from Sudan, he said the standard Arabic helps him to communicate with people no matter where he goes. Even if people dont understand the colloquial Arabic, everyone can speak the Egyptian dialect. Students learning Arabic often study abroad in Morocco or Egypt, Alhadi said. They see that the language is spoken in the streets and applies to both culture and religion. Malek practices by listening to BBC broadcasts in Arabic, but she would also like to go to Morocco to immerse herself in the culture. The minute I start speaking Arabic I go to a different place in my mind, she

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www.theshpiel.org AND YOU SHALL KNOW US BY THE TRAIL OF OUR VINYL The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 6 | ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT visit the new theshpiel.org You probably will not understand AND YOU SHALL KNOW US BY THE TRAIL OF OUR VINYL BY ELAINE WILSON SHPiEL staff writer Jewish culture has a rich history that now comes with an accompanying soundtrack. Jewish-American musicians have made a large impact on the music industry throughout the years, and authors Roger Bennett and Josh Kun have been unearthing as many tattered, longforgotten LPs as they can find to tell the story of Jewish musical greats who played between 1940 and the 1980s. The project began eight years ago, and now Bennett and Kun are releasing the fruit of their labors, And You Shall Know Us by the Trail of Our Vinyl, a book chronicling The Jewish Past as Told by the Records We Have Loved and Lost. The writers accompanying blog with the same name functions as a continuation of the historic musical search through garage sales and attics, branching off to include links to specific songs and YouTube videos and more interactive media to unearth not only the titles, but the sound. Cultural intersection comes with the territory of Jewish-American musical history. Bennett and Kun posted pictures and stories from a meeting with Israeli song bird Hannah Ahroni, but also a video file that was a strange sight to behold, the Israeli woman singing a song about Spain in the German language for a German television show. Another post examines the influence of Jewish music within the black community and vice versa. Bennett and Kun not only allude to Billie Holidays cover of My Yiddishe Momme but also include video of Hava Nagilah as the melody behind a song condemning civil rights abuses. One mysterious LP began a search that spread beyond music and into the psyche. A vinyl album featuring an unheard-of artist by the name of Lou Mason caused Trail of Our Vinyl authors to feverishly search the Internet for more information, but to no avail. They have learned since that Lou Mason was a comedian and musician from New York, but the discoveries made while in pursuit of Masons identity make compelling food for thought. Scouring the Internet for traces of Mason, Bennett and Kun stumbled across an issue of Time magazine from 1978 featuring an article about the large number of Jewish comedians. Psychiatrist Samuel Janus links their Jewish identity to their successes with stand-up routines, arguing, Jewish humor is born of depression and alienation from the general culture. The blog also introduces a group known as the Israeli Simon and Garfunkel, The Paravim, which means the suburbs. The Middle Eastern musicians not only resemble their American folk musician counterparts by simply being a duo playing folk tunes, but they have even created Hebrew covers of Simon and Garfunkel hits. According to Bennett and Kun, folk music was a logical choice for 1970s Israeli musicians, partially because the genres love of flowery lyrics gave Israeli poets permission to let themselves loose ideologically, and also to some degree because electric guitars were a rarity in the young nation. Listen to Hebrew covers of Simon and Garfunkels America or El Condor Pasa on the blog Web site: http://trailofourvinylbook. blogspot.com/ BY DOUGLAS SHARF SHPiEL staff writer Disclaimer: This writer happens to like klezmer way more than the average college student. That being said, this isnt your Bubbe Pearls klezmer album. Though, it might actually be, given the amount of Yiddish lyrics pervading this klezmerjazz fusion odyssey. A New Jersey-based band, The Klez Dispensers recently released their third studio effort, Say Youll Understand, which boasts 13 tracks that all range in Yiddish to English ratios and klezmer to jazz ratios. The diversity of the bands eight members brings these varying cultural points together smoothly and skillfully. Alex Kontorovich is a Russian-born saxophonist-slash-clarinetist. Susan Watts Hoffman is a Ukrainian trumpet legacy. Heather Chriscaden-Versace received her Bachelor of Music degree in double bass performance from Washington State. Well, you get the idea. The real beauty behind Say Youll Understand is it is not solely klezmer A review of The Klez Dispensers new album Say Youll Understand and not solely some form of jazz, but at any point in the album, one of those genres is detectable. It stays true to itself without straying too far from its roots, and it keeps from straying too far while still taking risks. Pushing play on track one, Papirosn, results in a crash of Latin jazz. For 10 seconds, you hear the voice of Mr. Mariachi, but hes soon replaced by the smooth, folky pipes of Susan Watts, who has a perfect grasp on the stylized manner in which trope-y Yiddish music is sung. The harmonious marriages of different types of music like this one are found in most of the tracks, which only keeps your ears attention throughout the entire album. The final song, Bay Mir Bitsu Sheyn, has a sound that pays homage to the heart wrenchingly beautiful cries of Ella Fitzgerald but with the riffing of a cantor (dare I say Ellen Gerald-Fitz?). One problem that an album of this ilk runs into is an automatically narrow target audience. Its impossible to write a record consisting of mostly Yiddish and not have it sound Jewy. The Klez Dispensers surely understand that, however, and are satisfied to know that the record still appeals to aficionados of folk, klezmer and all jazz stylings. But be forewarned: despite fusing the klezmer segments with other genres, this album still sounds Jewy. Recording almost entirely in a dying language that only a minute fraction of listeners will understand implies the lyrics are probably not the bands focus. The message is in the notes and the klezmer tradition of lesser-used scales like the Ukrainian Dorian and the Harmonic Minor. Layering these rare scales with other music makes the band special. Were trying to get musical beauty expressed in a variety of different musical languages, explained the bands pianist, Australian Adrian Banner, in an interview with NJ.com. If that is their mission statement, they are accomplished. Say Youll Understand is available now at www.klezdispensers.com and at the iTunes music store.

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT | 7 visit the new theshpiel.org Youll never see your friends again, youll never see your friends again BY DAN FEDER AND ZAHARA ZAHAV SHPiEL staff writers Every spring, the aspiring and motivated among us look to resumepadding internships, jobs and study abroad programs that send them away from the confines of Gainesville. For those of us who cant plan ahead to the next week and will cry ourselves to sleep from boredom through the coming semester, here is The SHPiELs guide to surviving for five months without our nearest and dearest. Losing a boyfriend or girlfriend or both: Get a webcam so that you can set up video-chat dates with your significant other, even though they dont show up at the designated time because they are doing things much more interesting than talking to you because they are so important and cant make time for uncultured, backwater philistines like you. Make sure to get numerous photos of yourself up-close-and-personally displayed on Facebook with any random attractive guy or girl you can convince to be in on your jealousy-inducing plan. Fill any empty hours (like the ones most people sleep during) with keeping up on every photo, note or comment on the wall of that dolt with whom youre In a Relationship. Give homosexuality a try. Or heterosexuality. Losing a roommate: Make the place your own. If youre gonna mope, do it naked. Definitely rub as many body parts as possible on everything your overly motivated roommate couldnt fit in his or her suitcase. Throw a dinner for all your new, better friends using every scrap of food your treacherous roommate left behind. While that backstabbing co-leaser is strutting the streets of Seville, convert their abandoned abode into a room that better suits your present needs. -Ball pit (snakes optional) -walk-in freezer -planetarium Losing your best friend: Start convincing yourself that the random acquaintance who you always see at parties is your real best friend and youre only now noticing. Put a post on Craigslist. Play Tetris with the furniture in your room. Buy piles of understanding, sympathetic stuffed animals who will never tire of hearing about how your day went. Cryogenically freeze yourself for five months. If all else fails, you could volunteer for your local Jewish college paper. Seriously, all our friends are leaving and we need some company. BY ANDREW FORD SHPiEL staff writer Yoni Wolf taught himself to play music. In 1997, he and several friends formed the independent record label anticon. The label largely produces artsy hip-hop. The influence of rhythm-driven lyrics is clearly apparent in the work of his latest musical project Why?. The scansion of the bands lyrics is mirrored in the accompanying instrumentals. The leading melody is written in a repeating, rhythmic fashion (U2 uses this style greatly). Background instruments make use of arpeggiated chords for a similar effect. There is a slight New Wave flavor in their sound that comes mostly from their use of synth instruments and vocal distortions. This layer of sound adds the psychedelic touch that sets Why? apart from other bands while easing the smash of their two primary influences. Rhyming-rapping-indie-hip-hop-psychedelia. Why? It sounds good. Hip-hop, indie fusion is an original move. Why? does an excellent job of falling squarely between the two genres, likely to please fans of either. They meet the production values of hot hip-hoppers like Danger Mouse while remaining true to the indie values forged with anticon. The real beauty of the band Why? is the way they carefully occupy a space between indie and mainstream. They are musically talented and original enough to please indie purists while not being too weird for the above-average pop fan. When asked about the meaning of the name of the band Yoni Wolf replies, When I was younger, I did graffiti and why was a favorite word of mine. The interview continued. The SHPiEL: Your latest album is titled Alopecia. What is the significance of that? Wolf: Thats the term for when hair follicles stop producing hair. TS: Right. Baldness. Why did you choose that for the title of the album? W: Its really a personal metaphor TS: What would you say is the message of your work? W: Were trying to be honest, to make something true. Were trying to communicate with the audience. TS: What role does religion play in your lives and music? W: Im not religious. I grew up religious, and it has affected my writing. My vernacular can be biblical. TS: What is your preferred method of creating music? W: Were planners, not jammersI dont write sheet music, but we do plan things and record demos of arrangements before recording the real ones. While Why? produces solid music, there is much to be desired. Their lyrics are largely abstract, absurd and disconnected. The band seems to desire some form of offbeat, philosophical significance, but they come up short. At least for now. There is potential for the band to grow; they have some great material. To sum it up, Why? is worth paying to see. Watching to see where they go in the future is even more valuable.

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 8 | KVETCH KHADER A BU E L H AIJA sta writer THE S HP i EL Opinions expressed in this section do not necessarily reflect those of The SHPiEL. We encourage comments from readers who possess all points of view. No, really, were interested in what you have to say. Feel free to write a letter to the editor or you can contact us with a column idea. Please send comments to theshpiel@gmail.com. Terroristology Questions? Comments? Contact Khader at khader.abuelhaija@gmail.com Number of sealed jars of kosher olive oil available for rededication of the Temple: Current price of a barrel of oil in US dollars: Square miles of ocean covered by the Exxon Valdez oil spill: virgin and extra virgin olive oil: US dollars: double cheeseburger: Percent increase in heart-related deaths Tablespoons of oil used to make latkes: 1 54 11,000 1.2 30 150 5 73 100 inestimable Harpergoldsteinblatts | Index visit the new theshpiel.org Visit us at our new online home for more music, pictures and blogging The terrorist bombings in Mumbai this week have shifted the news headlines to India, leaving the global financial crisis, along with the Middle East and other hot spots, as seconds and thirds in media helpings. These bombings sum up many parts of the problem going on in this complicated world. No one knows for certain who is responsible yet, but most do not condone this brutal attack on innocent people. The results of these atrocities in Mumbai, a financial center in India, are still unknown, but they will surely be negative since economic success demands security first. Why did this happen? I have no tolerance for any terrorist act: killing innocents is wrong. Period. But, I am trying to see why this craziness emerged. Sometimes it is very difficult to try to reach a mature plan to counter terrorism, since any attempt to understand the lunatic process can be easily labeled as being sympathetic to criminals. Right-wing extremists especially believe this. If we really want to counter terrorism, we should know with whom we are dealing. Terrorists terrorize for different reasons just as criminals commit crimes for different reasons. An oversimplification of the causes will only lead to more ignorance and a prolonged suffering of innocent victims in every coming attack. For example, poverty can be a reason for crime to emerge. It is not the reason for all crime, but it does boost crime rates. Fighting poverty is not about listening to the demands of criminals. It is an act against the disasters of poverty. Also, it will prevent potential criminals from entering a vicious cycle of both crime and poverty. The poverty-driven criminals will end up again needing external assistance to help them, but this time it will be much more complicated. The strongest option against terrorism is simple: spread the justice around. It is so simple to say, but in our current world, it is very challenging to do. This is the most logical option against the illogical terrorist mentality. There is no complete solution, as there is none against crime. But some solutions are more effective than others. The gun should be a tool on the table, but not the only one. Social justice and economic development must be at the core of the operations against terror. The Middle East can learn from the recent events in Mumbai. The tensions in the Gaza strip due to the Israeli siege are unbearable for the little kids and the old men and women, especially among the ill. More than a million people there are suffering from the effects of a horrible economy. I am wondering if this siege will actually counter the killing of innocent civilians in Israel, or if it will construct terrorist-plantation-camps by increasing the misery and fear of people living under such conditions. Terrorism is a crime and should be countered in the same way as other major crimes. Criminology helps society to counter crime by understanding it and fighting it through laws and orders. We should work to eliminate the causes of terrorism before we are forced to deal with consequences. It is never, ever, a justified crime. In the same sense, I would love to see politicians conducting the fight against terrorism in a mature and academic way. Criminology helps against crime. Terroristology will help against terrorism. Some politicians think it is so cool if they wait for criminals to do the crime, then they bust them afterwards, so they can look as heroes of victory. I think its better if you help potential criminals before it is too late. If it is not so cool for political gain, then at least its cool enough when you have to answer to your own conscience.

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www.theshpiel.org Dont forget to try our newly opened full coffee bar, Community Java Connection! Enjoy our new mixed nut, candy, and dried fruit bar. Over 60 varieties! No trans-fat! The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 KVETCH | 9 visit the new theshpiel.org UF Hillel Rabbi There is a wonderful Midrash a teaching from our oral tradition, which the rabbis share about a father who had three sons. This father wanted to challenge them, and so one day, he brought them to a cave and asked them to fill up the entire cave. The first son brought as many rocks as he could, and although you could no longer maneuver around the cave, the father explained that there were still gaps within the cave. The second son filled up the cave with straw, and yet again, there were parts of the cave that remained empty. Finally, it was the third sons turn, and he took one candle and placed it in the middle of the cave. The father was amazed and congratulated his son for filling the cave with the light of the candle. This month, we celebrate the Festival of Lights, Hanukkah, which classically is the holiday that commemorates the fight against assimilation. Its the story of how a band of Jews, the Maccabees, stood up against the mighty Greek society in order to preserve their own distinct way of life. As a Hillel rabbi working with college students, one of the best aspects of my job is the opportunity I have to speak with students about their spiritual journey. For most college students, and even for many of us, we live two distinct and separate lives our religious/ spiritual lives and our secular lives. It isnt often that these two worlds collide. Rather, we keep them hidden from each other. The metaphor I often use is that of a light switch. In the realm of our secular world, the default position for the light switch is on rooting for the Gators, going out to see a movie, socializing with our friends. We instinctively engage in these daily activities. When it comes to our religious identity, we have to actively turn the light switch on when we light the Friday night candles, when we celebrate a simcha or even when we eat gefilte fish. The question I pose is whether there is a way for these two worlds to learn from each other or to impact each other. In other words, can the light switch be on and off at the same time? The mere mention of the word assimilation has for decades, and even centuries, made Jewish communities shudder in fear. The loss of ones identity while adopting someone elses culture is something that we Jews have actively distanced ourselves from. But is assimilation really that bad? Is there perhaps a middle ground where we can feel comfortable placing ourselves? The reality is that most of us already live in two co-existing worlds. We are Jews living side by side with our neighbors. We should celebrate the richness of both worlds, understanding that in more ways than we can enumerate, people influence and depend on each other. In this Hanukkah season, may the light of the candles, the light that fills our caves, inspire us to draw those two worlds nearer to each other without sacrificing the integrity of either. Thinking Outside the Lox: Gators and Gelt BY CORY SHERMAN SHPiEL contributing writer I went to a synagogue in Alexandria, Egypt, on Yom Kippur (I am here teaching English to 20and 30-yearold Egyptians). When I walked up to the giant gates guarding the entrance, there was a bomb squad patrol out front and about eight Egyptian soldiers on the sidewalk. A man in a suit came up to me and asked: Jew or Christian? I answered truthfully. He proceeded to take my passport (which he held onto the entire time I was at the synagogue) and searched my bag. All neccessary precautions. They walked me around to a side entrance where my bags were searched again. Upon entry to a giant, well-kept courtyard in front of the gorgeous Eliyahu Hanevi synagogue, the Jewish leader in Alexandria approached me. His first question was, Will you be coming tomorrow? By the end of the conversation, he was practically begging me. The synagogue does not have enough men left to hold a minyan. I walked into this beautiful old congregation hall with Greco-Roman columns running down the sides. The place was ornate with gold and silver everywhere. It had a balcony running around the whole room. This room could easily hold 200-300 people. When my eyes stopped wandering around the room, I focused on the congregation. It consisted of three elderly women, one kid my age (20), one elderly man (the rabbi I think) and one even older rabbi leading services (he was shipped in from Israel). There are less than 100 Egyptian Jews, a large percentage of whom are elderly widowed women whose children have moved away. They were so happy to see me. It was a brilliantly sad contrast. A room that not too long ago held an active congregation was now down to three old ladies. What will happen to this place when these people die? There is no young generation to take over. After services, all the people in the room wanted to know was if I was coming the next day. Please come tomorrow. Bring your friends. Make this feel like a community again. One woman told me stories of being a little girl sitting way up in the balcony (women were not allowed to sit in the lower section) with her mother, sniffing lemons to curb her appetite on Yom Kippur. Another woman told me she used to sing in the choir. They were remembering a time that is long gone. I fear this remarkable place will never have a congregation again. They can not even muster 10 Jewish men to make the service complete. My final thought is this: I am in Egypt a Muslim country thousands of miles from home. Its possible that I am the youngest Jew in Egypt (the youngest Egyptian Jew is a 52-year-old woman) and I go to a synagogue. Even though their numbers are few, and there are qualms about how the service goes (the Rabbi leading is Sephardic), I am in a room of Jews. They are speaking Hebrew, Arabic, French and English, but we are here. Minyan or no, they come every year and they will continue to come no matter the circumstances. I went back the next day. A slightly dated dispatch from a Jewish American in Heeb-less Egypt

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www.theshpiel.org 4 3 The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 10 | SUNDRY visit the new theshpiel.org Red string cuisine BY FARYN HART SHPiEL staff writer A psychologist, rabbi and a Camellia sinensis bush have joined forces for the first time. Caf Emunah, a kosher Kabbalistic restaurant and tea bar in Fort Lauderdale, is the result of the inspiration of Dr. Marla Reis. Reis was looking for a place to have group sessions discussing Kabbalah, the mystical branch of Judaism, in an inviting environment. What better way to attract people than with food? Not only does this funky, contemporary, Asian Caribbeaninspired joint serve award-winning sushi, but it serves organic, local food with the intention to inspire peace through awareness. Biodegradable take-out containers and silverware are made with corn, and the dcor is made from recycled and natural materials such as the non-PVC-emitting plastic and ergonomic chairs. Because the restaurant uses dairy products, it serves only vegan and vegetarian options. The teas, or Soul Stirrings, are all garden-direct and organic whole-leaf and are served with individual digital hourglass steeping-timers. Foresight appetizers include The Zen Salad and Mind-Body-Soul Soup Trio. Revelation entres offer a Peace Earth Burger which is basically fancy, super-sized falafel. And After the Flood sushi includes rolls such as the Day 5 Roll and the Rabbi Roll, made with salmon and cream cheese. Heaven is a listing under Garden of Eden desserts. Though it doesnt have a liquor license, the restaurant does offer complimentary wine and is more than glad if customers BYOB. Their keep it kosher, in-house rabbi, Rabbi Moishe Meir Lipszyc, visits once or twice a day and will answer all life-pondering, mystical questions. And there are always the shelves of books on Judaism and Kabbalah to tend to the curious mind. Annie Fore, the restaurants manager, says that the philosophy of Caf Emunah is to offer an experience for the senses, and an oasis for the mind, body and soul a physical journey into your spiritual self. Caf Emunah wishes to provide a transformative experience with food. Since their doors opened in February 2007, the restaurant has received a mixed genre of satisfied patrons. Most are Jewish and experience kosher food like they have never experienced it before. But many diners dont even know what kosher is, let alone the ancient esoteric philosophy of Kabbalah. Many come for the larder, but they stay for lore. The BCS standings of Jewish communities BY JEREMY ATTERMANN SHPiEL staff writer Lets face it; there are Jews everywhere in the U.S. From the ranches of the Texas plains to the cold, barren regions of Alaska to the retirement homes of South Florida, you can always find a Jew wherever you go. I have traveled to a great deal of Jewish communities in my short life. For your pleasure, I have ranked my top five greatestand perhaps most Esameddin Alhadi ostentatiousJewish community centers in the U.S. At No. 4 is the Hillel at George Washington University. With more than 4,000 undergrad and graduate Jewish students, this place is always busy. Dont believe me? Just take a look at their schedule. With events occurring almost every day, and not to mention the numerous free food programs they have, the Jewish community at GW is always satiatedand with more than just food. And as for other important aspects to Jewish culture such as community service, the Jews at GW pride themselves on having a Tzedek Hillel, which means they focus and spend a great deal of time tackling important social issues such as poverty and homelessness in D.C. and the surrounding area. With amazing programs and delicious food, its no wonder why so many students sport the George Washington University Hebrew t-shirts. Hillel at George Washington University: http://www. gwhillel.org / The Hillel at the University of Pennsylvania comes in at No. 3, where Jews make up a whopping 25 percent of the student population. Its clear the Jewish community is involved. The luxurious, threestory building draws around 500 people to services every Shabbat. This Hillel sends out weekly e-mails filled with countless upcoming activities and events of all sorts, such as the Jewish Renaissance Project. This project is an innovative and alternative choice for Jewish students on Penns campus to explore their Judaism in an edgy and meaningful way. And the food? How does daily delicious kosher food all around campus sound? At UPenn, whether youre Reform, Conservative, Orthodox or even Sephardic, you can find your niche at this jaw-dropping Hillel. Hillel at the University of Pennsylvania: http:// pennhillel.org/pen n Coming in at No. 5 is the JCC (thats Jewish Community Center) of Pittsburgh, Pa. Ill be blunt. This place is huge. Its so big that they had to divide it into three different community centers. The JCC at Pittsburgh has a long history, beginning when many of its Jewish inhabitants emigrated from Eastern Europe at the end of the 19 th century. But the history of this Jewish community seems small in comparison to how much there is to do at these JCCs. With four pools, two gyms, a variety of classes, youth programs and more, this place is always busy. The question is: how do parents decide which JCC summer camp is right for their kids? JCC at Pittsburgh: http://www.jccpgh.org/ default.as p Our runner-up goes to the JCA (Jewish Community Alliance) in Jacksonville, Fla. It wouldnt surprise me to learn that many readers have been to this enormous, castle-like structure. The 95,000-square-foot facility comes complete with pools (thats right, indoor and outdoor), indoor basketball courts, gyms, tennis courts and more. If sports arent for you, then take a look at the dozens of cultural activities offered. From films and music to arts and crafts and dancing, there is always something to do. Jewish Community at Jacksonville: http://www.jcajax.org / You may not agree with my top five choices, and thats OK, because the beauty of us Jews is that no matter where we are, be it a gorgeous new Hillel or a two-room house, we possess the ties that bind. The heavyweight champ and the No. 1 Jewish community goes to the University of Florida. Ive never been to the barren regions of Alaska, nor the great plains of Texas, but the comforting, intimate feel of the UF Jewish community is refreshing for homesick college students. It may seem trite, but its true. Whether you are a devout Jew looking for a place to pray, or a Jew who doesnt know much about religion but is eager to learn, the UF community is a perfect place to feel right at home with your fellow Jewish Gators.

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 SUNDRY | 11 Crossword #16 Across 1. Joseph or Adam 5. Village of Simeon 9. Tuches (Eng) 13. Nurse 14. Part for Peerce 15. Packing Uzis 17. Rothschilds often 19. Need for Manischewitz 20. Macys event 21. Tu BShevat plantings? 23. Reason for shiva? 24. Dilemma 26. Break a commandment 27. Emcee Parks 28. Israeli city 29. Historian 31. Purim drink? 32. Diplomat 34. __Maris, Jerusalem 35. That woman 36. Rim 37. Prophesies 38. Josephs entrapment 41. El Al milieu 42. Eden sound 43. Tel-Aviv to Bet Shean (dir) 44. Acted as Abbie Hoffman 48. The Godfather, star 49. Agadah 50. Barney Miller, __ Linden 51. Bird groups 53. Jonas Salks Org.? 54. Comic Mort 55. __ Story, Seigel 56. Hasidic text of Kabbalah 58. Full of Chutzpah 62. Hungarian sculptor 63. Sandal maker 64. Megillat Esther 65. Knesset position 66. Starter bet for Greenstein 67. Emulate Spitz Down 1. 700 2. Ribicoff, initially 3. The Nanny star 4. Singer songwriter Neil 5. Lauder 6. Also 7. Cleveland Indians MVP 8. Like the laws of Moses 9. Shamatahs (Eng) 10. Gabbai catch 11. Modigliani 12. Koppells job 16. Remembered by Yahrzeit See next issue for solutions to this puzzle visit the new theshpiel.org 18. Needs a Meeshebairach 22. Tools for the Mohel 24. Exodus midwife 25. Immigrants Ellis 27. Top for Gottex 29. Streimel 30. Breaks the ninth 32. Wiesel 33. King of Gomorrah 37. Footballs Luckman 38. Political party 39. First Swedish Jew 40. Plagues 41. Enjoyed the Seder 42. Author Lillian 44. Center of the Seder 45. Vishniac and Polanski 46. Etrogs cousin? 47. Hummus sauce 48. Lids 51. Herbie Manns instrument 52. Airport locale 54. Lots wife 57. Affirmative 59. Cholent holder 60. 151 61. Tu BShevat need? BY STEPHANIE SHACTER SHPiEL staff writer Though many Jews worry about todays Jewish youth straying far from its roots, there is hope in the growing formation of new-age minyanim or prayer groups, attracting young Jews in masses. Tikkun Leil Shabbat is one such prayer group growing in Washington, D.C. The service is unique in its ability to attract an incredibly diverse group of young Jews. The service rotates between traditional a capella-sung prayers facing east and another service which removes the congregation from the structure of Hebrew school days into a new zone of spirituality. This nontraditional service includes instruments and circular seating. The sermons speak of social justice issues within the community in addition to the conventional biblical portion. Following the service is a potluck during which the essence of Shabbat dinner comes to life with togetherness and giving. Each member contributes a kosher or vegetarian dish with the intent of bringing warmth to the end of everyones week. The location of the service is always to-be-announced, and the service takes place only once every three Fridays. There are no titles or positions of authority reigning over this Innovative spiritual growth offered at kosher potluck every third Friday congregation. There is no dress code. No one is paid to help set up or clean. But despite the unconventional structure, a crowd of twentysomethings always gathers to revamp their spirituality and educate themselves about the needs of their community. Tikkun Leil Shabbats Facebook group currently has more than 300 members. Zach Teutsch has been very involved with TLS since its beginnings in 2006. He said that most people who are currently a part of TLS were looking for a more meaningful Jewish life and wanted to build more Jewish connections. He also explained that the uniqueness of TLS lies in its ability to attract and work for such a diverse group of people. Whats most exciting are the various innovations its made for a variety of people, Teutsch said. The Facebook group says its congregation includes Jews of all sects, educational backgrounds, sexual preferences, hometowns, colors and labels. What also attracts the young Jewish crowd, besides a new lift of spirit, are the social justice issues brought up in sermons. People of the community come to talk about their organizations improving life for all in the D.C. area. I feel lucky to be a part of a community that has values I care about that enrich my life, socially and spiritually, said Teutsch.

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www.theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8 12 | PARTY! visit the new theshpiel.org


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MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Shpiel
Alternate spelling:
Spiel
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 35 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Shpiel,
The Shpiel
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
biweekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish college students -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Jewish students -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Students -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Judaism -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Jewish way of life -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, issue 1 (Feb. 13/26, 2006)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues also have Jewish calendar dates.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"The Jewish newspaper at the University of Florida"--Masthead.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 1, issue 3 (Mar. 21/Apr. 3, 2006).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 65370113
lccn - 2006229065
lccn - 2006229065
System ID:
UF00073858:00044

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Shpiel
Alternate spelling:
Spiel
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 35 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Shpiel,
The Shpiel
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
biweekly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish college students -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Jewish students -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Students -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Judaism -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Jewish way of life -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre:
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, issue 1 (Feb. 13/26, 2006)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues also have Jewish calendar dates.
General Note:
Title from caption.
General Note:
"The Jewish newspaper at the University of Florida"--Masthead.
General Note:
Latest issue consulted: Vol. 1, issue 3 (Mar. 21/Apr. 3, 2006).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 65370113
lccn - 2006229065
lccn - 2006229065
System ID:
UF00073858:00044


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THE SHPiEL
VOLUME 6 ISSUE 8


5 Kislev 5769


19 Kislev 5769


December 2, 2008
the only student-run jewish newspaper in the country


December 16, 2009


Rahmbo takes on the White House Birthright to cut budget, trips


BY BEN CAVATARO
SHPiEL staff writer

U.S. Rep. Rahm Emanuel could be
the main character in a movie. If that
movie involved a relentless former
ballet dancer who nearly died from a
toe infection, mailed a dead fish to a
political adversary, stabbed knives into
tables at meetings with other political
staffers and brought discipline to a
chaotic Democratic congressional
campaign operation.
Emanuel has been lauded-and
feared-for his aggressive political
instincts. A former advisor to President
Clinton, he was one of the first people
tapped by Barack Obama after his
election. The president-elect recently
chose Emanuel, a fellow Chicagoan, to
be his White House chief of staff.
Newsweek called Emanuel"explosive,


profane, wired and ruthless." CNN
called him "a pitbull politician, killer
strategist and nonstop fundraiser."
Emanuel, 49, is known even to his own
mother as "Rahmbo."
Sharp upbringing
A Chicago native and son of a
Jerusalem-born pediatrician and union
organizer, Emanuel grew up with
his two brothers: Ari Emanuel, who
became a Hollywood superagent and
the inspiration for the hyperactive
Ari Gold on HBO's Entourage, and Dr.
Ezekiel "Zeke" Emanuel, a bioethicist
at the National Institute of Health
who received his Ph.D. and M.D. from
Harvard.
The brothers told Charlie Rose earlier
this year that dinner at the Emanuel

SEE EMANUEL, PAGE 5


BY LANA SELIGSOHN
SHPiEL staff writer

Each winter and summer, thousands
of young American Jews, ages 18-26
- mostly American college students
- take part in a free 10-day trip to Israel
sponsored by Taglit-Birthright Israel.
Funded by the Israeli government,
local Jewish federations and private
donors, about 190,000 people from 52
countries have been sent to Israel by
the program.
But the world financial crisis and
the recent announcement by a critical
donor that he will reduce his funding
for the program will leave Birthright
with a budget shortfall in 2009.
Representatives from the program
are saying it will need to decrease the
number of students it accepts for trips
by more than a third.


Rising costs of travel, a decrease
in donor funding and the decline in
the value of the dollar have hit non-
profits hard, sponsors said. Jay Golan,
Birthright president and CEO, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
Birthright plans to cut its budget to
$75 million from $110 million and its
participants from 42,000 in 2008 to
25,000 in the coming year.
Birthright's largest private donor has
already announced plans to cut back.
Property developer and casino
magnate Sheldon Adelson listed in the
September issue of Forbes magazine as
the 15th richest American, with a net
worth of $15 billion has reduced his
financial pledge to Birthright. Adelson's
company, Las Vegas Sands Corporation,
has spent a year teetering on the edge

SEE BIRTHRIGHT, PAGE 2








2 NEWS


visit the new theshpiel.org


The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8


major Birthright donor large cause for cuts


Shorts Briefs

BY BEN CAVATARO


{Mumbai terrorist attack kills nearly 200, leaves Chabad rabbi
and wife dead}
A three-day terrorist attack on multiple locations in the Indian city
of Mumbai the country's most populous city and financial capital -
left nearly 200 dead and hundreds injured. Using AK-47s, explosives
and grenades, a team of Islamic militants attacked a busy train station,
a famous restaurant, two luxury hotels, the city police headquarters
and a movie theatre, as well as a Chabad house.
At the five-story Nariman House in south Mumbai, terrorists killed
Chabad rabbi Gavriel Noach Holtzberg, 29, a Brooklyn native, and his
Israeli-born wife Rivka, 28, and seven others, all Jews. The Holtzbergs'
2-year-old son escaped with his nanny, 44-year-old Sandra Samuel, who
also worked as a cook for the Jewish outreach center.
A young group of 10 to 25 attackers shot randomly into crowds
at targeted sites, searching for Westerners especially Americans and
Britons to kill. Hostages were held at the historic Taj Mahal Palace &
Tower hotel. Only after Indian commandos stormed the building and
killed several terrorists did the three-day standoff end.
Responsibility for the attacks remains unclear. The group Deccan
Mujahideen has claimed responsibility, and the Kashmir-based Lashkar-
e-Toiba is suspected of playing a role. Indian officials also accuse the
Pakistani government and particularly its shadowy Inter-Services
Intelligence (ISI) agency of playing a role in the attack. Investigators
are questioning one captured terrorist.

{White House sends out Hanukkah cards with Christmas trees}
The White House has apologized and cited a mix-up relating to
official invitations to a Hanukkah reception that included a picture of
a Christmas tree. The invitations mailed to Jewish leaders across the
country showed a Clydesdale horse-drawn cart with a Christmas tree
in front of a wreathed and snowy White House and stated that President
Bush and the First Lady "request the pleasure of your company at a
Chanukah reception."
Press Secretary Sally McDonough apologized for a "staff mistake"
and said that the intended invitations had an image of a menorah given
to the White House during the Truman administration. The invitation
mix-up was something that "fell through the cracks," McDonough told
UPI.
One recipient of the invitation, Isaac Abraham of Brooklyn, joked to
the New York Post: "It's obvious what's going on here: The Christmas
tree is being taken out of the White House and the menorah is being
brought in the back."


BIRTHRIGHT, FROM PAGE 1

of bankruptcy. The personal fortune
of Adelson, the son of Ukrainian and
Lithuanian Jewish immigrants, has
also declined. In March, he was listed
by Forbes as the world's 12th richest
person, with a net worth of $26 billion,
and Boston Globe financial columnist
Steven Syre named Adelson among
the year's biggest financial losers.
Adelson, a major contributor to
Jewish causes as well as Republican
candidates and groups, announced that
he was reducing his expected donations
to Birthright to $20 million dollars in
2009 and then $10 million in 2010, a
sharp contrast from the $70 million
he has contributed over the past two
years.
The Jewish Daily Forward reported
that trips cost around $3,000 per
participant, "meaning that unless the
organization raises other funds, it will
lose the ability to fund more than 3,300
trips in 2009, and nearly 6,700 trips in
2010."
The news isn't all bad for Birthright.
The Jewish Agency for Israel's board of
governors recently decided not to adopt
a proposal to cut its Birthright allocation
by $1 million, and Birthright sponsors
plan to aggressively seek other sources
of funding.
"A number of funding sources
agree that Taglit-Birthright Israel must
become a national priority for Jewish
life and are eager to make that happen


Property developer and casino magnate,
Sheldon Adelson
so that wait-lists for trips do not have
to build," said Birthright president and
CEO Golan.
Founded in 2000, Birthright's eight-
year history may help it weather the
economic downturn.
"This financial crisis comes at a
time when Taglit-Birthright Israel has
established itself as a proven winner in
the community that has made a concrete
difference in the lifelong Jewish identity
of those who go on the trip and those
who do not," said the spokesperson for
Taglit-Birthright Israel.


HEAT SPENT STA
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S I TS R A B RE R
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ASHKELON IRK
AN N DE SIM L E T
ALMOND RNA VI LE
R OE S TK AP I T A L
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DRY MEIDAN EAR
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N E IR P L MR WMJUIT
MAS AR E NE S LS


The Only Student-Run Jewish Campus Newspaper in the Country, Right Here at the University of Florida


Editor-in-Chief
Josh Fleet
josh@theshpiel.org

Managing Editor
Zahara Zahav
zahara@theshpiel.org

News Editor
Ben Cavataro
cavataro@ufl.edu


Arts & Entertainment Editor
Douglas Sharf
doug@theshpiel.org

Sundry Editor
Elaine Wilson
elaine@theshpiel.org

Executive Advisor/Mentor
Giselle Mazur
giselle@ufhillel.org


Layout Editor
Jackie Jakob
jackie@theshpiel.org

Web Editor
Dan Feder
dan@theshpiel.org

Chief Visionary
Faryn Hart
faryn@theshpiel.org


Photo Editor
Emily Hanson
emily@theshpiel.org

Distribution
Danielle Nichols
dnichols@ufl.edu

Operations Manager
Jamie Caceres
jnc5122@ufl.edu


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The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8


visit the new theshpiel.org


NEWS 3


vs. Christmas


BY JACKIE AZIS
SHPiEL staff writer

To help spread peace on earth and
goodwill toward men, this year The
SHPiEL has put together a head-to-head
competition between two upcoming
winter holidays: the Festival of Lights
and the birth of Christ.
Let's begin with Christmas. A quick
glimpse at the TV Guide channel during
the holidays reveals that when it comes
to holiday movies, Christmas takes
the prize. There's "The Nightmare
Before Christmas," the "Home Alone"
and "Grinch" series, "Bad Santa" and
a mushy-favorite, "Love Actually."
Even "National Lampoon's Christmas
Vacation" is good. Meanwhile, those of
us looking for Hanukkah movies get a
choice between standard Sandler ("Eight
Crazy Nights") and "Rugrats Chanukah."
This one is hardly a competition.
But the best thing about Christmas
is the decorations: Trees covered with
ornaments, cords of lights, stockings,
snowglobes, poinsettias and that
superior decoration piece that makes
Christmas the giving season it is, the


mistletoe.
I don't know how or why the tradition
of kissing under a poisonous plant
began, but any holiday that encourages
laying a big, wet kiss on the one you
love is acceptable in my book.
There are a few downsides to the
Christmas holiday as well. The cheesy
tunes make me dread the radio in
December.
We are forced to listen to the story
of magical Frosty and red-nose bigotry
victim Rudolph as we shop and get our
hair cut-and even at home if carolers
make the rounds. Hearing "The Twelve
Days of Christmas" every day from
Black Friday to New Year's is as painful
as eating an entire fruit cake. Heard of
"Silent Night?" Let's try silent Christmas
songs.
Christmas-lovers, I have one plea for
you. For the love of God, get rid of the
horrid Christmas sweaters. These knit
nightmares are a huge downfall for the
holiday.
Nobody is impressed that your
favorite aunt knitted it for you or that it
has real bells hanging from the sleeves.
Next time you're roasting chestnuts on


e
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"" ...... serve ice cream shop in Gainesville.
..-- .. IB

We specialize in delicious low-sugar and low-fat ice

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as many low-fat and fat-free goodies.


Marketplace Plaza
4216 NW 16th Blvd.
(Next to Hollywood Video) Check our daily flavors at
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. NOW OPEN
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k Shoppes of
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(Next to Publix)
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an open fire, throw in the stuffy, knitted
red sweaters.
These wearable monuments to
tackiness are immortalized on the
Web at uglychristmassweaterparty.
com, where-if you must-you
can purchase your own nausea-
inducing winter wear. The site
features advertisements for
each piece reading "Does it
get any uglier?" and "Wow,
you would look awful in
this!"
What about
Hanukkah? I find it
lacking in both the
movie and decoration
departments. Once you
bring out the menorah,
your decorating is
pretty much complete.
Not a lot of room for
creativity here-but
at least clean-up is
almost effortless.
As for the gift-giving
aspect, Hanukkah is by
far the more tortuous and
annoying of holidays.
With Christmas, gifts come
one right after the other all
morning long (and you get a whole
stocking stuffed with candy).
Hanukkah, on the other hand,
forces eight nights of patience and
slow frustration.
As a lover of fried foods, I look
forward to Hanukkah for the latkes and
sufganiyot. Any holiday that promotes
cholesterol and sugar intake is good
for me. And who doesn't love chocolate
gelt?
Sure, candy canes are nice and
pepperminty, but the existence of
fruitcake discredits Christmas from
winning on food.
Hanukkah wins in the observance
department as well. Christmas is
sometimes celebrated at a midnight
service, so by the time you get home,
prepare Santa and his reindeer some
cookies and carrots, write him a nice
letter and then fall asleep, the next thing
you know your little sibling or restless
father is waking you up, begging for it
to be time to open the presents.
Christmas, essentially, equals no
sleep.
But Hanukkah comes at a much more
convenient time-after sunrise, but
before I go to bed. No staying up until
midnight and no extra-early wake-up
required.
The mere fact that there are eight
fun nights of celebration for Hanukkah
versus only one very early morning for
Christmas makes this an easy decision
for me.
Hey, I like my crazy family. Eight
nights of insanity? Sign me up!


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4 NEWS


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The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8


Ask Esther Answers to all your kosher
SBY ELAINE WIN culinary questions
BY ELAINE WILSON


Hanukkah Dishes


Due to kosher time constraints and
my sincere love for unbroken multi-
course holiday meals, the Hanukkah
lineup in this issue avoids meat and
dairy conflicts by using a culinary
compromise: vegetarian options.
Besides, why make yourself wait at least
three hours before satiating your sweet
tooth?
Begin with a classic recipe that Irish
Catholics like me as well as Jews enjoy:
the potato pancake. Known as boxty to
the Irish and latkes to Jews, these are a
wonderfully simple dish that, in many
ways, can act as a blank tablet.
Take those potato templates andbuild
them up with delicious ingredients.
The December issue of Bon Appetit
presents three variations on latkes, but
it's the R6sti-style potato latkes with
rosemary and brown butter applesauce


that made me salivate (R6sti are a type
of large potato pancake that hails from
Switzerland).
The ingredients are fairly basic, so
to make these latkes, you won't need to
empty your wallet.
Don't let your latkes get lonely.
Sephardic spinach patties listed at
epicurious.com (bookmark this site!) are
not a traditional Hanukkah dish but will
please even your carnivorous friends.
Hinting at Mediterranean origins,
this recipe resembles spanakopita in its
content (Greek spinach pie). Like the
latkes, these croquettes are versatile
and can incorporate cheese, walnuts or
even wine-soaked grapes for an Italian
edge. As a vegetable dish, you'll save
more room for what really matters:
dessert.
Sufganiyot (Israeli jelly doughnuts)


are rich and heavy enough
to provide the post-holiday
meal fullness that begs
you to leave the dishes for
tomorrow and fall asleep
on the couch.
If you're like me, jelly
goes best alongside peanut
butter, so try substituting
something else to your
liking as a filling-maybe
chocolate.
An even simpler option
is to forego any fillings
and just eat the doughnut
rolled in sugar. A recipe) at
epicurious.com)reproduced
from Joan Nathan's Children's Jewish
Holiday Kitchen shows how to create
your own dough.
While dough made from scratch
is often the most delicious avenue,
students pressed for time or with
limited experience working with yeast
may find it daunting. Purchasing


photo courtesy of foodonthefood.com

plain biscuit dough (the prepackaged
kind that comes in refrigerated tubes)
may be easier. While less glamorous,
biscuit dough fried in oil and rolled in
sugar makes a delicious doughnut with
significantly less hassle.
Email your kosher cuisine questions to
elaine@theshpiel.org.


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The SHPiEL:Volume 6, Issue 8


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NEWS 5


Obama picks political pirate Emanuel to help navigate


EMANUEL, FROM PAGE 1

house was "competitive." They called
it a "brawl, with yelling and screaming,
but with love."
As a high school student, Emanuel
worked at anArby's fast-food restaurant,
slicing his right middle finger in an
accident. Avoiding the hospital, Emanuel
went to his high school prom and swam
in Lake Michigan the following day. As
a result, the wound became infected
and Emanuel nearly died. His finger was
later partially amputated.
A talented dancer, Emanuel was
offered a scholarship to train with the
Joffrey Ballet, but instead enrolled
in Sarah Lawrence College, where he
graduated in 1981.

Rise to fame
After college, Emanuel worked for
U.S. Sen. Paul Simon, the Democratic
Congressional Campaign Committee in
1988 and for Chicago mayor Richard M.
Daley. In 1991, Emanuel joined another
young Democrat, Bill Clinton, the then
governor of Arkansas and a presidential
primary candidate.
The night after Clinton's election,
Emanuel stood at a celebratory dinner
with other Clinton operatives nearby,
seized a steak knife, "rattling off a list
of betrayers, shouting "Dead! Dead!
Dead!" and plunging the knife into the
table after every name."
The table "looked like a lunar
landscape," one witness told Rolling
Stone's Joshua Green. "It was like
something out of 'The Godfather.' But
that's Rahm for you."
The Emanuel stories are legendary. He
sends out cheesecakes from Eli's Bakery


in Chicago to campaign contributors,
but he also once sent a dead fish to
a pollster who had angered him. As a
White House aide, he briefed Tony Blair
before he made a joint appearance
with Clinton during the 1998 Lewinsky
scandal. "This is important," Emanuel
told the British Prime Minister, "Don't
fuck it up."

On the offense
Leaving the White House in 1998,
Emanuel headed to Wall Street. Planning
on a future run for Congress, he knew
he would need money. Working with
prominent Democratic financier Bruce
Wasserstein, Emanuel emerged with
more than $18 million-enough to
launch his successful campaign for a
Chicago-area House district in 2002.
He easily dispatched his Republican
opponent.
In the House, as he had before,
Emanuel relished in the attack-
something reflected in his language.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is said
to have quipped that the economic
stimulus plan could be paid for if "we
put a quarter in a jar every time Rahm
uses a swear word." And an unaired
Saturday Night Live sketch featuring
Andy Samburg depicts Emanuel hurling
obscenities at House Republican Leader
John Boehner and others.
An observant Jew, Emanuel sought
and received a special dispensation
from his rabbi to continue negotiating
the $700 billion bailout plan through
Rosh Hashanah.
As the Democratic Congressional
Campaign Committee chair, Emanuel
terrified Republicans (Obama joked
that "Jews celebrate Passover recalling
the day the Angel of Death passed over
their homes in ancient Egypt. Today
Republicans celebrate when Rahm


passes over their district").
Emanuel also ended the practice
of doling out money to Democratic
candidates freely, instituting a
system in which candidates in
swing districts would have to
sign "memos of understanding"
detailing the number of fundraising
calls and appearances made.
Emanuel's tactics put him in
conflict with other Democrats-
especially Democratic National
Committee chair Howard Dean. But
Emanuel was largely credited with
the Democrats' 31-seat pickup in
2006.
During the 2008 primaries,
Emanuel a longtime Clinton ally,
but an Illinoisan like Obama and
a personal friend of Obama chief
strategist David Axelrod declined
to endorse any candidate.
Still, less than three days
after Obama won the election in
November, he was offered and
accepted the White House chief-of-
staff position.
"They are obviously setting up
a good cop/bad cop routine in the
White House," said David Gergen
of CNN. "Barack Obama can be the
good guy."


RAHM FACTS

* Bradley Whitford's character Josh
Lyman on "The West Wing" is
based on Emanuel, and Jeremy
Piven's character's brother Ari
Gold on Entourage is based on Ari
Emanuel, Rahm's brother.
Emmanuel's mother was an X-ray
technician, rock club owner and
civil rights activist who took her
three sons to protests. Today, she
is a social worker.
He met his wife Amy Rule on a
blind date, and she converted to
modern Orthodox Judaism before
they married. They have three
children: Zacharias, Ilana, and
Leah.
Emmanuel reportedly has referred
to Washington as "Fucknutsville,"
and Republican members of
Congress as "knucklefucks."
Admirers have set up RahmFacts.
com, billed as "awesome as Chuck
Norris Facts except 100% true!"
When Dick Cheney suggested that
the vice presidency was not part of
the executive branch, Emmanuel
suggested cutting off the $4.8
million the Vice President's Office
receives.

RAHM QUOTES

* "You should have messed around
with a goyish girl and gotten
a Jewish lawyer." (to President
Clinton)


* "There's no
district. You
cannot hide."


safe Republican
can run, but you


Arabic dialogue takes on a young Jewish face


BY ANKITA RAO
SHPiEL staff writer

It's the poetic language of Rumi and
Hafiz-the elegant script that defines
the Koran and Islamic tradition. Now,
Arabic is soaking through universities
across America, making its mark on
resumes and notebooks.
University of Florida visiting lecturer
and adviser for Arabic Esameddin Alhadi
cites the 9/11 attacks as a turning point
for Arabic studies.
"The numbers have doubled I think
six times since September 11," he said.
"People became more interested in
Arabic culture, trends and society."
UF caters to the growing demand
with classes in beginning, intermediate
and advanced Arabic. Students can
also study Arabic culture, focusing on
business communication, politics and
religion.
For Jewish students, the language
creates an intercultural dialogue that


could be a vital asset in different
industries.
"These two cultures live together,"
Alhadi said of Jewish and Muslim
populations. "There are two languages,
and people need to learn both of
them."
He wasn't sure about the number of
Jewish students enrolled in the course,
but he said the number correlated to
the overall rise in students choosing to
learn Arabic.
Journalism major and Arabic studies
minor Dayna Malek,19, was surprised
to find how similar the language was
to Hebrew, which she learned while
growing up in Israel.
"I always like the reaction I get when
I tell people I'm learning Arabic," Malek
said. Her family was hesitant when she
first told them, but she said she thinks
it is a valuable skill.
She hopes Arabic will help support
her career plans with the United
States Foreign Service, a branch of the


Department of State that sendsdiplomats
abroad.
Alhadi said knowing Arabic makes
students marketable because they can
work in intelligence and business fields
and also better understand the Middle
Eastern culture.
"Arabic culture and Arabic history
have been stereotyped for so long. We
spend the first week [in class] finding
out what students think about it," he
said.
Because the language differs in each
country, UF teaches a
standard type of formal
Arabic like the one
spoken in Egypt.
Because Alhadi is
from Sudan, he said the
standard Arabic helps
him to communicate
with people no matter
where he goes. Even if
people don'tunderstand
the colloquial Arabic,


everyone can speak the Egyptian
dialect.
Students learning Arabic often study
abroad in Morocco or Egypt, Alhadi said.
They see that the language is spoken in
the streets and applies to both culture
and religion.
Malek practices by listening to BBC
broadcasts in Arabic, but she would
also like to go to Morocco to immerse
herself in the culture.
"The minute I start speaking Arabic I
go to a different place in my mind," she


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6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT


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The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8


You probably will not understand


A review of The Klez Dispensers' new album Say You'll Understand


BY DOUGLAS SHARF
SHPiEL staff writer

Disclaimer: This writer happens to
like klezmer way more than the average
college student.
That being said, this isn't your
Bubbe Pearl's klezmer album. Though, it
might actually be, given the amount of
Yiddish lyrics pervading this klezmer-
jazz fusion odyssey.
A New Jersey-based band, The Klez
Dispensers recently released their third
studio effort, "Say You'll Understand,"
which boasts 13 tracks that all range in
Yiddish to English ratios and klezmer to
jazz ratios. The diversity of the band's
eight members brings these varying
cultural points together smoothly and
skillfully.
Alex Kontorovich is a Russian-born
saxophonist-slash-clarinetist. Susan
Watts Hoffman is a Ukrainian trumpet
legacy. Heather Chriscaden-Versace
received her Bachelor of Music degree
in double bass performance from
Washington State. Well, you get the
idea.
The real beauty behind "Say You'll
Understand" is it is not solely klezmer



6 55T?(DD


and not solely some form of jazz, but
at any point in the album, one of those
genres is detectable. It stays true to
itself without straying too far from its
roots, and it keeps from straying too far
while still taking risks.
Pushing play on track one, "Papirosn,"
results in a crash of Latin jazz. For
10 seconds, you hear the voice of Mr.
Mariachi, but he's soon replaced by the
smooth, folky pipes of Susan Watts,
who has a perfect grasp on the stylized
manner in which trope-y Yiddish music
is sung. The harmonious marriages of
different types of music like this one are
found in most of the tracks, which only
keeps your ears' attention throughout
the entire album. The final song, "Bay
Mir Bitsu Sheyn," has a sound that
pays homage to the heart wrenchingly
beautiful cries of Ella Fitzgerald but
with the riffing of a cantor (dare I say
Ellen Gerald-Fitz?).
One problem that an album of this
ilk runs into is an automatically narrow
target audience. It's impossible to write
a record consisting of mostly Yiddish
and not have it sound "Jewy." The Klez
Dispensers surely understand that,
however, and are satisfied to know that


the record still appeals to aficionados
of folk, klezmer and all jazz stylings.
But be forewarned: despite fusing the
klezmer segments with other genres,
this album still sounds Jewy.
Recording almost entirely in a dying
language that only a minute fraction
of listeners will understand implies
the lyrics are probably not the band's
focus. The message is in the notes and
the klezmer tradition of lesser-used
scales like the Ukrainian Dorian and the
Harmonic Minor. Layering these rare


scales with other music makes the band
special.
"We're trying to get musical beauty
expressed in a variety of different
musical languages," explained the
band's pianist, Australian Adrian
Banner, in an interview with NJ.com.
If that is their mission statement,
they are accomplished.

Say You'll Understand is available now
at www.klezdispensers.com and at the
iTunes music store.


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S S









The SHPiEL:Volume 6, Issue 8


visit the new theshpiel.org


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 7


You'll never see your friends again, you'll never see your friends again


BY DAN FEDER
AND ZAHARA ZAHAV
SHPiEL staff writers

Every spring, the
aspiring and motivated
among us look to resume-
padding internships,
jobs and study abroad
programs that send them
away from the confines of
Gainesville.
For those of us who
can't plan ahead to the
next week and will cry
ourselves to sleep from
boredom through the
coming semester, here
is The SHPiEL's guide to
surviving for five months
without our nearest and
dearest.


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displayed on Facebook with any room mate leftfriends are leaving and we need
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hetrosxuaity som company.


Rhyming-rapping-indie-hip-hop-psychedelia. "Why?" It sounds good.


BY ANDREW FORD
SHPiEL staff writer

Yoni Wolf taught himself to play music.
In 1997, he and several friends formed the
independent record label "anticon." The
label largely produces artsy hip-hop. The
influence of rhythm-driven lyrics is clearly
apparent in the work of his latest musical
project "Why?".
The scansion of the band's lyrics is
mirroredinthe accompanyinginstrumentals.
The leading melody is written in a repeating,
rhythmic fashion (U2 uses this style
greatly). Background instruments make use
of arpeggiated chords for a similar effect.
There is a slight New Wave flavor in their
sound that comes mostly from their use of
synth instruments and vocal distortions.
This layer of sound adds the psychedelic
touch that sets Why? apart from other bands
while easing the smash of their two primary
influences.


Hip-hop, indie fusion is an original
move. Why? does an excellent job of falling
squarely between the two genres, likely
to please fans of either. They meet the
production values of hot hip-hoppers like
Danger Mouse while remaining true to the
indie values forged with anticon.
The real beauty of the band Why? is the
way they carefully occupy a space between
indie and mainstream. They are musically
talented and original enough to please indie
purists while not being too weird for the
above-average pop fan.
When asked about the meaning of the
name of the band Yoni Wolf replies, "When
I was younger, I did graffiti and 'why' was a
favorite word of mine."
The interview continued.

The SHPiEL: Your latest album is titled
"Alopecia". What is the significance
of that?
Wolf: That's the term for when hair
follicles stop producing hair.
TS: Right. Baldness. Why did you choose
that for the title of the album?
W: It's really a personal metaphor
TS: What would you say is the message of
your work?
W: We're trying to be honest, to make
something true. We're trying to
communicate with the audience.
TS: What role does religion play in your
lives and music?
W: I'm not religious. I grew up religious,
and it has affected my writing. My
vernacular can be biblical.


TS: "What is your preferred
method of creating music?"
W: "We're planners, not
jammers...I don't write
sheet music, but we do plan
things and record demos
of arrangements before
recording the real ones."

While Why? produces solid
music, there is much to be desired.


Their lyrics are largely abstract,
absurd and disconnected. The
band seems to desire some form of
offbeat, philosophical significance,
but they come up short. At least for
now.
There is potential for the band
to grow; they have some great
material. To sum it up, Why? is
worth paying to see. Watching to
see where they go in the future is
even more valuable.


S S







8 | KVETCH visit the new theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8





-|o nED @as}Khad Terroristology

SKHADER ABU EL-HAIJA T h e very difficult to try to reach a mature The strongest option against Terrorism is a crime and should -
t e r r o r ist plan to counter terrorism, since any terrorism is simple: spread the be countered in the same way as -
Sbombings attempt to "understand" the lunatic justice around. It is so simple to say, other major crimes. Criminology -
1 in Mumbai process can be easily labeled as being but in our current world, it is very helps society to counter crime by -
this week sympathetic to criminals. Right-wing challenging to do. This is the most understanding it and fighting it -
i have shifted extremists especially believe this. If logical option against the illogical through laws and orders. We should -
SL the news we really want to counter terrorism, terrorist mentality. There is no work to eliminate the causes of -
1 headlines we should know with whom we are complete solution, as there is none terrorism before we are forced to -
to India, dealing. Terrorists terrorize for against crime. But some solutions deal with consequences. It is never,
leaving the different reasons just as criminals are more effective than others. The ever, a justified crime. In the same
Global financial crisis, along with the commit crimes for different reasons. gun should be a tool on the table, sense, I would love to see politicians 1
i Middle East and other hot spots, as An oversimplification of the causes but not the only one. Social justice conducting the fight against terrorism 1
- seconds and thirds in media helpings. will only lead to more ignorance and and economic development must be in a mature and academic way.
- These bombings sum up many parts a prolonged suffering of innocent at the core of the operations against Criminology helps against crime.
- of the problem going on in this victims in every coming attack. terror. "Terroristology" will help against i
- complicated world. For example, poverty can be a The Middle East can learn from terrorism.
- No one knows for certain who is reason for crime to emerge. It is not the recent events in Mumbai. The Some politicians think it is so
responsible yet, but most do not the reason for all crime, but it does tensions in the Gaza strip due to cool if they wait for criminals to -
1 condone this brutal attack on innocent boost crime rates. Fighting poverty the Israeli siege are unbearable for do the crime, then they bust them -
1 people. The results of these atrocities is not about listening to the demands the little kids and the old men and afterwards, so they can look as -
1 in Mumbai, a financial center in India, of criminals. It is an act against the women, especially among the ill. heroes of "victory." I think it's better -
1 are still unknown, but they will surely disasters of poverty. Also, it will More than a million people there are if you help potential criminals before -
= be negative since economic success prevent potential criminals from suffering from the effects of a horrible it is too late. If it is not so cool for -
= demands security first. entering a vicious cycle of both crime economy. I am wondering if this siege political gain, then at least it's cool 1
S Why did this happen? I have no and poverty. The poverty-driven will actually counter the killing of enough when you have to answer to 1
tolerance for any terrorist act: killing criminals will end up again needing innocent civilians in Israel, or if it will your own conscience.
innocents is wrong. Period. external assistance to help them, construct terrorist-plantation-camps 1
But, I am trying to see why this but this time it will be much more by increasing the misery and fear of Questions? Comments? Contact Khader
craziness emerged. Sometimes it is complicated, people living under such conditions. at khader.abuelhaija@gmail.com








Number of sealed jars of kosher olive oil 1
available for rededication of the Temple:
Current price of a barrel of oil in US 54
dollars: a
Square miles of ocean covered by the 11,000i
Exxon Valdez oil spill:
Difference in acidity percentage between 1.2
virgin and extra virgin olive oil:
30mu
Average price of oil change at Jiffy Lube in 3
US dollars:
Calories from just the oil in a McDonald's 150
double cheeseburger:
Percent increase in heart-related deaths 5 9 a 9 9 9
during winter holiday season (Web MD):
73
Percent of black hat Orthodox who are
overweight: HPiE L
Percent chance that I want McDonald's 100T H E

right now: inestimable
inestimable
Tablespoons of oil used to make latkes: Opinions expressed in this section do not necessarily reflect those of The
Disclaimer: Most of the above information has been well researched. Some SHPiEL. We encourage comments from readers who possess all points of view.
was conceived while inebriated. We leave it up to you, oh dear, omniscient, No, really, we're interested in what you have to say. Feel free to write a letter
silly reader, to figure out what's what. to the editor or you can contact us with a column idea. Please send comments
to theshpiel@gmail.com.

W W W









The SHPiEL:Volume 6, Issue 8


A slightly dated

dispatch from a

Jewish American

in Heeb-less Egypt

BY CORY SHERMAN
SHPiEL contributing writer

I went to a synagogue in Alexandria,
Egypt, on Yom Kippur (I am here
teaching English to 20- and 30-year-
old Egyptians). When I walked up to
the giant gates guarding the entrance,
there was a bomb squad patrol out front
and about eight Egyptian soldiers on
the sidewalk. A man in a suit came up
to me and asked: "Jew or Christian?" I
answered truthfully.
He proceeded to take my passport
(which he held onto the entire time I
was at the synagogue) and searched my
bag. All necessary precautions.
They walked me around to a side
entrance where my bags were searched
again.
Upon entry to a giant, well-kept
courtyard in front of the gorgeous
Eliyahu Hanevi synagogue, the Jewish
leader in Alexandria approached me.
His first question was, "Will you be
coming tomorrow?" By the end of the
conversation, he was practically begging
me. The synagogue does not have
enough men left to hold a minyan.
I walked into this beautiful old
congregation hall with Greco-Roman
columns running down the sides. The
place was ornate with gold and silver
everywhere. It had a balcony running
around the whole room. This room
could easily hold 200-300 people.
When my eyes stopped wandering
around the room, I focused on the
congregation. It consisted of three
elderly women, one kid my age (20),
one elderly man (the rabbi I think) and
one even older rabbi leading services
(he was shipped in from Israel).
There are less than 100 Egyptian
Jews, a large percentage of whom are
elderly widowed women whose children
have moved away. They were so happy
to see me.
It was a brilliantly sad contrast. A
room that not too long ago held an
active congregation was now down to
three old ladies.
What will happen to this place when


visit the new theshpiel.org


KVETCH 19


Thinking Outside the Lox: and
i-and----


. M


these people die? There is no young
generation to take over.
After services, all the people in
the room wanted to know was if I was
coming the next day.
"Please come tomorrow. Bring your
friends. Make this feel like a community
again."
One woman told me stories of being
a little girl sitting way up in the balcony
(women were not allowed to sit in the
lower section) with her mother, sniffing
lemons to curb her appetite on Yom
Kippur. Another woman told me she
used to sing in the choir.
They were remembering a time that
is long gone.
I fear this remarkable place will
never have a congregation again. They
can not even muster 10 Jewish men to
make the service complete.
My final thought is this: I am in Egypt
- a Muslim country thousands of miles
from home. It's possible that I am the
youngest Jew in Egypt (the youngest
Egyptian Jew is a 52-year-old woman)
and I go to a synagogue.
Even though their numbers are
few, and there are qualms about how
the service goes (the Rabbi leading is
Sephardic), I am in a room of Jews. They
are speaking Hebrew, Arabic, French
and English, but we are here. Minyan
or no, they come every year and they
will continue to come no matter the
circumstances.
I went back the next day.


L There is
a wonderful
Midrash,
a teaching
from our oral
tradition,
which the
rabbis share
about a
Hillel Rabbi father who
had three sons.
This father wanted to challenge them,
and so one day, he brought them to
a cave and asked them to fill up the
entire cave.
The first son brought as many
rocks as he could, and although you
could no longer maneuver around the
cave, the father explained that there
were still gaps within the cave. The
second son filled up the cave with
straw, and yet again, there were parts
of the cave that remained empty.
Finally, it was the third son's turn,
and he took one candle and placed it
in the middle of the cave. The father
was amazed and congratulated his
son for filling the cave with the light
of the candle.
This month, we celebrate the
Festival of Lights, Hanukkah, which


74e


classically is the holiday that
commemorates the fight against
assimilation. It's the story of how a
band of Jews, the Maccabees, stood
up against the mighty Greek society
in order to preserve their own distinct
way of life.
As a Hillel rabbi working with
college students, one of the best
aspects of my job is the opportunity
I have to speak with students about
their spiritual journey. For most
college students, and even for
many of us, we live two distinct
and separate lives our religious/
spiritual lives and our secular lives.
It isn't often that these two worlds
collide. Rather, we keep them hidden
from each other.
The metaphor I often use is that
of a light switch. In the realm of our
secular world, the default position
for the light switch is on rooting
for the Gators, going out to see a
movie, socializing with our friends.
We instinctively engage in these
daily activities. When it comes to our
religious identity, we have to actively
turn the light switch on when we
light the Friday night candles, when
we celebrate a simcha, or even when


WC1m


tastes from around the world


At The Ot~M1 Cc4-, we offer a variety of diverse cuisines at an
affordable price. We have everyday specials ranging from the
all-you-can-eat Mediterranean extravaganza to a Pizza & Pasta
smorgaslx)rd!


Offering:
American BBQ
Pizza & Pasta Bar
Mediterlanean
Pan- iain/SiLhi
Mexican Fiesta


Mea Is starting t $ i $10


The/Ol /l hours:
Lunch: 11:30 am 2:30 pmi
I)innet 5:30 8:30 pin
(Community Java Connection:
M-Th: 7:30 am 8:00 pm
Friday. 7:30 am 3:00 pin


Don't forget to try our newly opened
full coffee bar,
Community Java Connection!

Enjoy our new mixed nut, candy, and
dried fruit bar.
Over 60 varieties! No trans-fat!


UF Hillel
2020 W University Ave
(across from O'Dome)
(352) 372-2900
IUnder Orthodox Kosher sulwrvision


W W Wt h e s h p


F


we eat gefilte fish.
The question I pose is whether
there is a way for these two worlds
to learn from each other or to impact
each other. In other words, can the
light switch be on and off at the same
time?
The mere mention of the word
assimilation has for decades,
and even centuries, made Jewish
communities shudder in fear. The
loss of one's identity while adopting
someone else's culture is something
that we Jews have actively distanced
ourselves from. But is assimilation
really that bad? Is there perhaps a
middle ground where we can feel
comfortable placing ourselves?
The reality is that most of us
already live in two co-existing
worlds. We are Jews living side by
side with our neighbors. We should
celebrate the richness of both worlds,
understanding that in more ways than
we can enumerate, people influence
and depend on each other. In this
Hanukkah season, may the light of
the candles, the light that fills our
caves, inspire us to draw those two
worlds nearer to each other without
sacrificing the integrity of either.


UF









10 SUNDRY


visit the new theshpiel.org


The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8


The BCS standings of Jewish communities


BY JEREMY ATTERMANN
SHPiEL staff writer

Let's face it; there are Jews
everywhere in the U.S.
From the ranches of the Texas
plains to the cold, barren regions
of Alaska to the retirement homes
of South Florida, you can always
find a Jew wherever you go.
I have traveled to a great deal
of Jewish communities in my short
life. For your pleasure, I have
ranked my top five greatest-and
perhaps most Esameddin Alhadi
ostentatious-Jewish community
centers in the U.S.


Coming in at No. 5 is the JCC (that's Jewish
Community Center) of Pittsburgh, Pa. I'll be
". This place is huge. It's so big that they
divide it into three different community
rs. The JCC at Pittsburgh has a long history,
ginning when many of its Jewish inhabitants
emigrated from Eastern Europe at the end of
the 19th century. But the history of this Jewish
community seems small in comparison to how
much there is to do at these JCCs. With four
pools, two gyms, a variety of classes, youth
programs and more, this place is always busy.
The question is: how do parents decide which
JCC summer camp is right for their kids?


JCC at Pittsburgh:
default.asp


http://www.jccpgh.org/


t. No I s th e'' Illel servicel, t Jlewl- at

11 1 I [?ll~lll ;~1 ,'1'm Ii1'1I itlP-1 'I'I



Univesity. Wit S ore a -Tzedek Sille which




this place- I 'alwy buy mpotn soc i s sl'
Don't be'gliremj l take a as povert nhess
lookat tIheirI' sc"e le..With'in D.C. an th suroudin
evnsocrigams vr ra ihaaigporm
da, ndno t mntonth nddeicou fod i'sn


(Jewish Community Alliance) in
Jacksonville, Fla. It wouldn't surprise
me to learn that many readers have
been to this enormous, castle-like
structure. The 95,000-square-foot
facility comes complete with pools
(that's right, indoor and outdoor),
indoor basketball courts, gyms, tennis
courts and more. If sports aren't for
you, then take a look at the dozens
of cultural activities offered. From
films and music to arts and crafts and
dancing, there is always something to
do.

Jewish Community at Jacksonville:
http://www.jcajax.org/


You may not agree with my top five choices, and
that's OK, because the beauty of us Jews is that no
matter where we are, be it a gorgeous new Hillel or a
two-room house, we possess the ties that bind.


The- Hilrll at the IP Univri' tyI 4I of53 PennsyI'lvan ia
comes, in+ at o, where Jews mkupawoing'







25 rIcent of['I' the student popuio It clear1 the












Red string cuisine


BY FARYN HART
SHPiEL staff writer

A psychologist, rabbi and a Camellia
sinensis bush have joined forces for the
first time.
Cafe Emunah, a kosher Kabbalistic
restaurant and teabar in Fort Lauderdale,
is the result of the inspiration of Dr.
Marla Reis. Reis was looking for a place
to have group sessions discussing
Kabbalah, the mystical branch of
Judaism, in an inviting environment.
What better way to attract people than
with food?
Not only does this funky,
contemporary, Asian Caribbean-
inspired joint serve award-winning
sushi, but it serves organic, local food
with the intention to inspire peace
through awareness. Biodegradable
take-out containers and silverware are
made with corn, and the decor is made
from recycled and natural materials
such as the non-PVC-emitting plastic
and ergonomic chairs. Because the
restaurant uses dairy products, it serves


only vegan and vegetarian options.
The teas, or "Soul Stirrings," are all
garden-direct and organic whole-leaf
and are served with individual digital
hourglass steeping-timers. "Foresight"
appetizers include The Zen Salad and
Mind-Body-Soul Soup Trio. "Revelation"
entrees offer a "Peace Earth Burger"
which is basically fancy, super-sized
falafel. And "After the Flood" sushi
includes rolls such as the "Day 5 Roll"
and the "Rabbi Roll," made with salmon
and cream cheese. Heaven is a listing
under "Garden of Eden" desserts.
Though it doesn't have a liquor
license, the restaurant does offer
complimentary wine and is more than
glad if customers BYOB.
Their "keep it kosher," in-house
rabbi, Rabbi Moishe Meir Lipszyc, visits
once or twice a day and will answer all
life-pondering, mystical questions. And
there are always the shelves of books
on Judaism and Kabbalah to tend to the
curious mind.
Annie Fore, the restaurant's manager,
says that the philosophy of Cafe Emunah


is to "offer an
experience for
the senses, and
an oasis for the
mind, body and
soul... a physical
journey into
your spiritual
self."
Cafe Emunah
wishestoprovide
a transformative
experience with
food. Since their
doors opened in February
2007, the restaurant has
received a mixed genre of
satisfied patrons. Most are
Jewish and experience kosher
food like they have never
experienced it before. But
many diners don't even know
what kosher is, let alone the
ancient esoteric philosophy
of Kabbalah.
Many come for the larder,
but they stay for lore.


S S W









The SHPiEL:Volume 6, Issue 8


visit the new theshpiel.org


SUNDRY 11


Crossword #16


See next issue for solutions to this puzzle


Across
1. Joseph or Adam
5. Village of Simeon
9. Tuches (Eng)
13. Nurse
14. Part for Peerce
15. Packing Uzis
17. Rothschilds often
19. Need for Manischewitz
20. Macy's event
21. Tu B'Shevat plantings?
23. Reason for shiva?
24. Dilemma
26. Break a commandment
27. Emcee Parks
28. Israeli city
29. Historian
31. Purim drink?
32. Diplomat
34. __Maris, Jerusalem
35. That woman
36. Rim
37. Prophesies
38. Joseph's entrapment
41. El Al milieu
42. Eden sound
43. Tel-Aviv to Bet She'an (dir)
44. Acted as Abbie Hoffman
48. "The Godfather", star


49. Agadah
50. "Barney Miller", __ Linden
51. Bird groups
53. Jonas Salk's Org.?
54. Comic Mort
55. "_ Story", Seigel
56. Hasidic text of Kabbalah
58. Full of Chutzpah
62. Hungarian sculptor
63. Sandal maker
64. Megillat Esther
65. Knesset position
66. Starter bet for Greenstein
67. Emulate Spitz
Down
1. 700
2. Ribicoff, initially
3. "The Nanny" star
4. Singer songwriter Neil
5. Lauder
6. Also
7. Cleveland Indians' MVP
8. Like the laws of Moses
9. Shamatahs (Eng)
10. Gabbai catch
11. Modigliani
12. Koppell's job
16. Remembered by Yahrzeit


18. Needs a
Meeshebairach
22. Tools for the Mohel
24. Exodus midwife
25. Immigrant's Ellis
27. Top for Gottex
29. Streimel
30. Breaks the ninth
32. Wiesel
33. King of Gomorrah
37. Football's Luckman
38. Political party
39. First Swedish Jew
40. Plagues
41. Enjoyed the Seder
42. Author Lillian
44. Center of the Seder
45. Vishniac and Polanski
46. Etrog's cousin?
47. Hummus sauce
48. Lids
51. Herbie Mann's
instrument
52. Airport locale
54. Lot's wife
57. Affirmative
59. Cholent holder
60. 151
61. Tu B'Shevat need?


Innovative spiritual growth offered at WH.U N F

kosher potluck every third Friday L ai


BY STEPHANIE SHACTER
SHPiEL staff writer


Though many Jews worry about
today's Jewish youth straying far from
its roots, there is hope in the growing
formation of new-age minyanim, or
prayer groups, attracting young Jews in
masses.
Tikkun Leil Shabbat is one such
prayer group growing in Washington,
D.C. The service is unique in its ability
to attract an incredibly diverse group of
young Jews.
The service rotates between
traditional a capella-sung prayers facing
east and another service which removes
the congregation from the structure of
Hebrew school days into a new zone of
spirituality. This nontraditional service
includes instruments and circular
seating.
The sermons speak of social justice
issues within the community in addition
to the conventional biblical portion.
Following the service is a potluck
during which the essence of Shabbat
dinner comes to life with togetherness
and giving. Each member contributes
a kosher or vegetarian dish with the
intent of bringing warmth to the end
of everyone's week. The location of the
service is always to-be-announced, and
the service takes place only once every
three Fridays. There are no titles or
positions of authority reigning over this


congregation. There is no dress code.
No one is paid to help set up or clean.
But despite the unconventional
structure, a crowd of twentysomethings
always gathers to revamp their
spirituality and educate themselves
about the needs of their community.
Tikkun Leil Shabbat's Facebook group
currently has more than 300 members.
Zach Teutsch has been very involved
with TLS since its beginnings in 2006. He
said that most people who are currently
a part of TLS were looking for a more
meaningful Jewish life and wanted to
build more Jewish connections. He also
explained that the uniqueness of TLS
lies in its ability to attract and work for
such a diverse group of people.
"What's most exciting are the various
innovations it's made for a variety of
people," Teutsch said.
The Facebook group says its
congregation includes Jews of all
sects, educational backgrounds, sexual
preferences, hometowns, colors and
labels.
What also attracts the young Jewish
crowd, besides a new lift of spirit, are
the social justice issues brought up
in sermons. People of the community
come to talk about their organizations
improving life for all in the D.C. area.
"I feel lucky to be a part of a
community that has values I care
about that enrich my life, socially and
spiritually," said Teutsch.


S S W





121 PARTY! visit the new theshpiel.org The SHPiEL: Volume 6, Issue 8







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