Title: St. Andrews buoy
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073857/00167
 Material Information
Title: St. Andrews buoy
Uniform Title: St. Andrews buoy
Alternate Title: Saint Andrews buoy
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Emmons & Lynch
Place of Publication: St. Andrews Fla
Publication Date: July 16, 1896
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Saint Andrews (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Washington County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Washington -- Saint Andrews
 Notes
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 3, no. 27 (Sept. 28, 1893).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073857
Volume ID: VID00167
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33065309
lccn - sn 95026996
lccn - sn 95026996

Full Text




sT. ANDREWS BAY

First, Last, and all the

Time!


?f-





~n d


J


VOL. VI. ST. ANDREWS BAY, FLA., JULY 16, 1896. NO.


OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.

UNITED STATES.
S Latoi Hon. Sam'l Pasco, Monticello'
dohb idlkinson Call, Jacksonviile.
presei.talives-lst District, S.M. Spark-
man. Tampa; 2d District, C. M.
Cooper, Jacksonvilie.
Lind Office-Register, J. M. Barco; Re-
Receiver-N 1) Wainwright, Gainesville
STATE.
;rovernor--He ry L. Mitchell; Attorney
(.neral Wm. B. Lamar; Secretary of
ID. Bloxham; Commissioner of Agricul-
ture, L. is. Womhwell; Superintendent
of Public Instruction, W, N. Sheats;
Treasurer, C. B. C Ilins; Justice of Su-
preme Court, R. F. Taylor, Tallahassee.
U S. SENATOR.
First District-Wilkinson Call, Jackson-
ville; Second District, Samuel Pasco,
Mounticullo..
S-rTI; SENATOR.
Twenty-fifth District-Alonzo W. Weeks,
Chlpley.
WASHINGTON COUNTY.
'Ipreseentative, J. R. Wells, Chipley,
County Judge, D. D. Melvin, Vernon;
'!erk of Court, County Clerk, Recorder
i Deeds, W. B. Lassitter, Vernon;
hllerif', C. G. Allen, Clipley; Treasurer,
i. C. Horne, Chipley; Tax Collector, A.
Q. Jones, Vernon; Tax Assessor, A.
I.Gay, Grassy Point; Superintendent
r Public Instruction, W. L. Lockey;
Jhipley; Surveyor, Thos. Collins, Chip-
ST. ANDREWS.
justice of the Peace, C. H. Crippen;
Notary Public, Deputy Circuit Court
Clerk. W. A. Enmmons: School Super-
visor, R. F. Brackin; Post Master,Dr.
W. G Mitchell.
HARRISON.
Postmistress, Mrs. M. B. Jenks.
PARKER.
'ostmistress, Annie R. Parker; Notary
Public, W. H. Parker.
PITsBURC.]
'ostmaster, N. W. Pitts.
ANDE RSON.
Postmaster, S. W. Anderson.
GAY.
Postmaster, Mrs. R. Gay.
BAY HtEAD.
Postmaster, Martin Post.

CAL.nOUN COUNTY--CiOMANTON.
;otaries, E. Mosher, Frank Hoskins,
Postmaster, W. M. Croman; Coun
tv Commissioner, H. M. Spicer
Deputy Clerk of Courts. S. T. Walklev


RELIGION U S.
Methodist-Church cor. Washington ave
and Chestnut st-Rev. J. B. Miller,
pastor. Preaching at 11 a. m. and 1:30
p. m. every alternate Sunday.
Y. P. S.C. E.-Prayer meeting at the
Preslrterian church every Sunday after
.oon at 3:30 o'clock. All are invited.
Balpist-Church, corner of Wyoming
aveii R end Ciucinna i street. Church
conferer :- : turday before first Sunday
at 4 p. in. Sunday school every Sunday at
10 a. m.
Sev enth Day Baptist-Meets every Sat-
irday at 11 o'clock a. m., corner of Wood-
)ine avenue-arild Bay View streets; prayer
nesting same place every Friday evening
It 7:30.
Presbyterian-Church corner Loraine
avenue and Drake street.
3atholic-Church corner Wyoming ave-
iue and Foster street.

THE MAILS.
The northern mail, via Anderson, Gay,
Bayhead and Chipley departs every day
except Sunday at 3:00 o'clock; a. m.;
arrives every day except Sunaay at
7:40 p. m.
East Bay mail for Harrison, Cromanton,
Parker, Farmdale and Wetappo, leaves
St. Andrews going east everymorning
at 7 o'clock and arrives, coming west
every afternoon at F o'clock.

Parker Lodge No. 142,
A.. & F A. :M:
Regular Communications on Satur-
day, on or before each full moon.
Visiting Brothers Fraternally
Invited.
W. H. PARKER W. M.
F. M. BOUTELLE, Secretary.

SUSIN ESS DIRECTORY

W. A. EMMONS,
Deputy Circuit Court Clerk and No-
tary Public for the State at Large; has
jurisdiction to administer oaths, take
afficavits, legalize acknowledgments,
etc., anywhere in Florida. Special at-
tention given to land conveyances and
to marriage services. Office at the
1'UOY Office, St. Andrews Bay.

DR. J. J. KESTER,
Homeopathic Physician and Ac-
coucher. Office Pioneer Drug Store,
corner of Shell avenue and Michi-


gan street,


St. Andrews. -


Florida


DR. W, G. MITCHELL,
Proprietor East End Drug Store, of-
fers his professional services to the
citizens of St. Andrews Bay and
vicinity. Office at Drug Store.
Residence on Bnenna Vista avenue
opposite old Florida Exchange.

W. H. PARKER,
Notary Public and Surveyor. Special at-
tention given to all Notarial business
also to the Drawing of Maps, Charts, etc
Parker. Fla

C. H. CRIPPEN,
Justice of the Peace.
Will attend promptly to all business de-
manding his attention within his juris-
diction. Office on Bavview street, one
block northeast of T C. Danford's
store. Rule days, First Monday in
each month.

Ar VaIRI of onurtreat-
FREE TRIAL."'-''
filL, ,ier.. for weakness.and
F E TRU E decay, nervous debility
and lost vitality oent ree for 12 cants
postaT,. ,I
6 1& WRAID INSTITUTE, 1,9 9th St., MOIUIS, 10.


PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY
One Dollar a Year in Advance.

WILLIAM A. EMMONS
Proprietor.
Display ad rates 50c per inch per month
Position and extraordinary condition
rates subject to sDecial agreement.


DEMOCRATIC NO"IN S.

National.
For Presidential Electors:
R. A. BURFORD, of Marion.
W. S. JENNINGS, of Hernando.
SYD. L. CALTER, of Alachua.
J. F. WILSON, of Orange,
Congressional.
For Congress, First District:
S.M.SPARKMAN,of Hillsborough.
State.
For Governor:
W. D. BLOXHAM, of Leon.
For Supreme Judge:
M. G. MABRY. of Pasco.
For Attorney-General:
W. B. LAMAR, of Jefferson.
For Secretary of State:
JNO. L. CRAWFORD, of Leon.
For Comptroller:
W. H. REYNOLDS, of Polk.
For Treasurer:
C. B. COLLINS, of Marion.
For Supt. Public Instruction:
W. N. SHEATS, of Alachua.
For Commissioner of Agriculture:
L. B. WOMBWELL, of Jackson.
County.
For Representative:
W. T. MAY.
For Clerk of Courts:
W. B. LASSITTER.
For County Treasurer:
R. C. HORNE.
For Tax Collector:
A. Q. JONES.
For Tax Assessor:
W. B. GAINER.
For Sheriff:
C. G. ALLEN.
For Superintendent Public Instruction:
W. C. LOCKEY.
For County Judge:
D. D. MELVIN.
For County Surveyor:
P. L. HORN.
For Members of School Board:
FLETCHER RUSS,
D. G. NIXON,
G. B. BUSH.


The South's Opportunity.
The most important question be-


PENSACOLA TORN UP

By One of the Most Destructive
Winds Ever Witnessed
The Pensacola Morning Star of
July 8, contains a lengthy account
of the storm which visited that city
on the 7th, fro which we take the
following excerpts:


Where Sidney Johnston Died.
Mobile Register.
Senator Harris, of Tennessee, in
locating the place of Albert Sidney
Johnston's death on Shiloh battle-
field, gives very interesting recollec-
tions of Johnston's last movements.
There has long been.a dispute as to
where the confederate general died.


A BUSINESS IN


GREAT WATERS.

By JULIAN OORBETT,
Author of" The FAul of As sard," "Copihet-
ua XIII" and "For God and Gold."

[Convriht. 1fW5. bhv American Press Assooia.


Then mn t etrntive storm ver.. Senator Harris says that General tion.


known in Pensacola, commenced
about 6 o'clock y-sterday morning
without wa:ning, and rapidly gath-
ered strength as me da a a At 8 o'clock it ad assumed the pro-
portions of a destructive cyclone with
a velocity of over 60 miles an hour,
accompanied by ; f e heaviest
down-pours of rain ever experienced
here. Swinging signs were unhinged
and thrown into the streets or against
the show windo.vs, shattering them


Johnston led a charge about 2 o'clock
April 6, 18 just south of the Pur-
dy and Hamburg road, south ot the
peach orchard of the Bell homestead.
Harris, who was on Johnston's staff,
participated, leading the Forty-fifth
Tennessee. When he returned he
met Johnston on the ridge just south-
east of the Bell liouh. He rode up
to him and saw he looked pale. He
said to himi: "General, aren't you
wounded?" He said, "Yes, and I


and scattering fragments over the fear seriously." He saw John ton


sidewalk -.


And everything loose reel in his saddle.


was set to moving.
Next was seen the tearing off of
tin and iron roofs in ail parts of the
city, trees fences a .1 chimneys were
carried down by the irresistible force


When lie rode


up to him he took his bridle reins,
placed o arm around Johnston to
steadv him and rode back with him
to ', ep ra i e, when he helped
him ',ff his horse and laid him d wn


of the wind. and within a few Min- ler a tree.


utes the streets, bordered by beautiful
shade trees, ere so obstructed by
bi ken limbs, fallen trees, and otlier
debris that thev ,ecaine impassable.
Our beautiful park, in the heart of


e called to a passing


confederate sold r to go to the front
along the line where they were fight-
ing and i the officers for a flank of
whiskey and bring it to him at once.
This I h, soldier dil, and lie gave


the city, the pride of Pensacola, :s ~ -, l' """"UIII"" L "'"U UIt, wUi.


almost without shade trees to-day,
all the boasted umbrella chinas, syca-
mores, oaks, etc., having been de-
stroyed.
The trees around the county jail,
which have been the admiration of


swallowed. He gave him a second
drind, but he could not swallow it,
and turned iis head to one side and
let it run out of his mouth. Just
then Col nel William Preston, of
Kentucky, brother-in-law of General


strangers and citizens, are all de- oh'"ston, rode ui. and ju ipI g oil


str.)yed, and that hemutiful row of
umbrellas that have for years made
the great attraction at Sullivan's
wharf are uprooted %nd destroyed.
Throughout the city the same de-
st auction is prominently noticable.
It seems as though the choicest trees
have been taken in nearly every in-
stance. This loss falls heavily upon
our city as the tiees cannot be re-
placed for many years. This damage
cannot be estimated in dollars and
cents.
At an early hour telegraph and


fore the south is, how to secure im- telephone wires went down and all
migration. A large movement of communication with the outer world


population fiom the north and west
and of the better classes of German,
Scandinavian and British farmers to


was cut off, hence we are unable to
give any idea of the damage done in
the country to fruit and forest trees,


the south would be of incalculable but fear that :t is very great, as fruit
value to this section. It would stun- trees are just now in their heaviest


late the whole south, wonderfully
augment the growth of manufactures,


bearing.
No trains departed or arrived yes-


enhance the value of all agricultural terday on the L. & N. or P. & A.
land and of all city property, increase roads, as there is a big washout be-


the money-making opportunities of
every man, woman and child in the
south, bring about better educational
facilities, secure the construction of
better roads, forever settle all pos-
sible race questions, and give to this


his horse ran to him, placing his arm
under his head, implored him to say
so ethin., to him, bnt all he could
dto was to ogen his eyes anid recog-
nize him, He died in a few minutes.
They were alone with the dea l com-
mander, and the battle was going on.
Johnston's horse had died trotu
the wounds he had received at the
time of the charge, and Harris' horse
had run away. It was agreed that
HIarris should go anil notify Beaure-
gard of Johnston's death and Colonel
Preston would remain with the body
and have it taken back to Shiloh
church, which was done, and from
there it was taken to Corinth, Miss.,
and to New Orleans, La., where the
remains are buried in the vault of
tne beautiful monument of the South-
ern Society of the Army of the Ten-
nessee.

Watched a Boy's Heart Beat.
Boston Globe.
The pulsations of a haman heart


tween this city and Escambia on the
I I Iu a h were watched by scores of trained


east, and between here and Olive on
t e north.


eyes recently in Exhibition Hall at
the Mechanics' Building. where were


The. bay front after, the storm hIad gathered physicians fiom all parts of


abated was strewn with wreckage of
all kinds, while about the wharves


section a prosperity as much greater were vessels in all conditions.


than that of the north and west a;
the natural advantages of the former
exceed those of the latter. It is the


the state.


Standing between a


Crookes tube and a large box, in
which the observer shut himself from


The destruction to property is ter- the sunlight, was a boy divested of


riblo and cannot be estimated yet,but
luckily no lives were lost that we


coat ail vest. To the youngster it
was something of a "circus," but to


duty of every man and woman inter- have heard of, and we are thankful the physicians, who, one after an-


tested in the south to bend their best that it was no worse.


energies to this great question. It
demands the untiring work, the most
liberal financial aid aidl the daily
thought of everyone who desires to
see the south enjoy the blessings
that would come from an ever-in-
creasing southward movement of pop-
ulation. The Manufacturer's Record,
devoted to the industrial interests of
this section. and reaching the manu-
facturers of the north and west, and
the Southern States magazine, pub-
lished by it, devoted wholly to its im-


At Mobile.
Register, 8th.
T'Ie first indication of the storm of
yesterday morning made itself felt in
Mobile at about 10:30 o'clock Mon-


Other, took their place in the box, it
was an exemplification of an end-of-
the-century achievement of science.
For the X rays laid open to the hu-
man eye the interior of the boy's
chest, and there, pumping steadily


away, was to be seen his heart, every
day night when the wind rea a


velocity of thirty miles an hour. This
velocity was gradually increased un-
til the maximum, 36 miles an hour,
was reached at 9 o'clock Tuesday


throb of which could be discerned so
clearly that any irregularity mighi
I!asily have been detected. So simple
is the apparatus required, and so


morning. ith ttloe %in-I blovimigr L 'l U I cuLO, s.tII tHt3


northeast. 'At about the same time


migration and agricultural interests, the wind velocity reached a maximum
anil reaching thousands of prospect- of 56 miles at Pensacola, with the


ive settlers, land buyers and immi- wind blowing southeast.


gration agents in the north and weit,
will press industrial and immigra-
tion matters upon the world's atten-
tion more vigorously and upon a


These


wind conditions indicated that the
storm passel out of the gnlf in a
noitlheasterly direction, the centre
being Mobile an I Pensacola, and


1 1 - .1 .I- - - -I. - --. -


cians became enthusiastic over what
they termed the opening of a new
era in medicine and surgery.

Oliver Goldsmith: She who makes
ler husband and children happy, who
reclaims the one from vice and trains
up the other in virtue, is a much
greater character than ladies de-


broaer cal evn tan n te pst.lolewht :arv Pesavla han scibed in romance, whose whole oc-


Will the people of the whole south
Mobile.


the bankers, the merchants, the man-
ufacturers, the land owners, the rail-
road companies and all others realiz-
ing the vital importance of greater
energy in this work and the great-
ness of the reward that is possible.
take up these questions with new
activity and enthusiasm?

Next October a scientific jubilee
will be held in honor vf the fiftieth


Subsequent to thile mnxiinmnm pe-
riod, tile winuc kept up a steady blow,
but gradually decreasing in velocity,
until it :;ad diminished to 12 miles
an hour at 7 o'clock yesterday after-
noon.


The Bay State is to present the
famous battleship Massachusetts
with a bronze statue of Victory. Tne
figure, whi-h will be life-size, will be


cupation is to murder mankind with
shafts from the quiver of their eyes.

Of the saline contents of the sea,
the most abundant principle is com-
mon salt, which constitutes nearly
two-thirds of the whole saline mat-
ter,

Leo Moehc, who has just died in
Milwaukee, at the age of 91 years,
was a native of Alsace, andi was oone


anniversary of the first application of placed upon the forward 13-inch tur- of the most expert swordsmen in' the


ether in surgical operations.


world.


X IJU Ul M L, U b L U L U L I U NLlI Y IVC


when she begins to go about in a fresh
breeze.
Aboard the lugger every eye was in-
tently watching how she would carry it
through; not a soul was there but knew
how much depended on the clumsiness
they hoped to see.
From the first it was evident her
length made her dull in stays. She came
up with painful slowness, shivering as
if in dread of the shock when the wind
should take her aback.
It was not till it came and the after
yards had swung that the rawness of
her crew was fully apparent. She began
falling off as badly as her worst enemy
could have wished, and so desperate a
long time were they in bracing round
the foreyards that she was making
strong stern way before they had done
with it.


[,, J ,


[CONTINUED.]
"Pretty manners" cried Curtis.
"Pretty manners! You never got those
in the king's navy."
He started as the lieutenant clapped
him on the back, and Iooked from one
to the other like a man suddenly awak-
ened, and then slunk away without a
word.
"He is upset today. Ithinkheis ill,"
said Curtis as they took their places
side by side at the lee rail, where thero
was nothing to impede their view of
the frigate.
"Why don't they shoot?" she asked
impatiently.
"They will directly. Wait till we
have crossed their course," he said.
"The gun will hardly bear till then. "
"I wish they would be quick," she
answered.
She had not long to wait. The frigate
was dead stem on as she spoke, and
hardly had they begun to open up her
weather ports when her stem was hid-
den in a puff of smoke. Half way be-
tween the two vessels there was a white
spurt of spray, farther on another, and
then another, as the shot ricocheted on-
ward, but even the last was half a mile
short. Last of all came the dull boom of
the report.
"Oh!" exclaimed Lucile regretfully.
"What is it?" asked the lieutenant.
"Won't it come nearer than that?"
She looked round at him in unaffect-
ed disappointment, like a child, and he
hastened to comfort her.
"Oh, yes," he said, "the gun was
very badly laid. They will do better
than that presently.'"
As they edged more and more to
windward of the frigate the most for-
ward of her broadside guns came to
bear, and as the space between the ships
at the same time sensibly diminished
the range was tried more frequently.
At each shot the spurt of spray was
nearer, but never near enough to please
Lucile.
"It would be nice to be hit once,"
she said, and then, looking at him in a,
kind of shy embarrassment as if she had
said something wrong, she went on:
"I mean just a little bit-to know
what it is like, do you see, and to talk
about it afterward. What is it like?"
"Oh, that depends where you are
struck and what strikes you. "
But that would not content her, and,
much against his will, he must paint
for her the effects of shot and tell of
actions where he had been engaged. She
listened in rapt attention, never looking
from his face except when the frigate
fired, while he told of the jarring thud
when a shot strikes a main timber, of
the scream of splinters from a grazing
ball, and the tearing smash that says a
carronade has fetched home.
They were fast drawing abreast of the
frigate as he talked, and she, with
growing excitement, devoured what his
modesty would let him tell. In him,
too, everything was combining to rouse
that spirit of exaltation that makes war-
fare for such men the most exhilarating
of sports. The breeze had freshened, so
that it was touch and go whether the
lugger could bear her topsails another
ten minutes But nobody dreamed of
taking them in, and the little craft was
springing at the waves like an antelope.
To windward the frigate was heeling
over under the great press of sail she
carried, but there was plainly no inten-
tion of reducing it, and the intense
whiteness of the surge before her stem
told of her increasing speed. Closer and
closer fell the shot as they ranged more
nearly abreast, and at last a ball plunged
into the sea to windward.
Lucile shrank involuntarily as it
whirred past, but recovered at once, and
with a beaming flush on her face point-
ed to the white patch it had made.
"Therel there!" she cried. ,"Oh,
there is nothing like this in the world."
And the lieutenant gave a low, merry
laugh of complete enjoyment.
As the two ships passed abreast of
one another, with the frigate dead to
leeward, the fountains of spray were
spurting all round the lugger, some even
far beyond her, from the increased ele-
vation which the frigate's lie over gave
her guns, and Lucile was panting with
excitement.
"Can you see if they mean to go
about?" cried Dunk, with an anxious
ring in his voice. "This is too livelyto
last i"
"All right!" Curtis sang out in re-
ply, with his glass still in play. "They
are standing by the braces now, I think.
Yes, and there go her bowlines."
"Then we'll do now," said the skip-
per, relieved.
The firing ceased and the leeches of
her sails began to shake as the helm
was put down, giving her that strange-
ly human air of being in a flutter of
nervousness which a ship will have


16.


overboard and were fast losing all they
had gained the last tack.
"Can't any man see him yet?" cried
Dunk impatiently.
"Not yet, sir."
"Yes, there he is!" said Lucile; "we
have passed him."'
In a trice Dunk had brought his obe-
dient craft up to the wind again in or-
der to get back to the drowning man.
But that was not so easy. They had fall-
en so far to 'leeward that, for all the
skipper's fine steering, the most they
could do was to fling a rope.
Ducket caught it, held on a moment
and then let it slip. He uttered another
piercing cry and sank.
As the lugger swept on again Curtis
tossed him an oar.
"Once more, for God's sake," cried
Lucile.
"We'll have time yet," said Curtis,
with a glance at the frigate.
She had tacked again. Looming each
moment larger, she was bearing up up-
on them with her spread of white can-
vas and the boil of foam pushed before
her like an angry swan.
But Dunk did not hesitate. Once
more the lugger turned on her heel and
bore down for where now and again
Ducket could be seen clinging to the
oar.
This time the maneuver was more
successful. Dunk cleverly luffed rirht


Indeed, the whole maneuver was car-
ried out in so unseamanlike a fashion
that Curtis fairly laughed.
"That is lubberly enough for us, my
lads he sang out. "If they can't do
better than that we will have her out of
sight by sundown."'
The two vessels were now upon the
same tack, but the lugger had reached
well ahead, having gained even more
than was to be hoped by the dullness of
the frigate's handling.
Determined to lose none of his advan-
tage, and to compel the Frenchman to
repeat his maneuver so soon as might
be, the skipper sang out:
"We'll go about now, Mr. Curtis I"
"Very well," he answered, "show us
what you can do."
All was bustle again, but prompt and
quiet. In an incredibly short time the
lugsails were lowered, the halyards
hitched on the larboard set and the Con-
tent was reaching away as merrily as
ever ppon the starbol-d tack, clothed in
her spare shift. Had it been a cutter
hardly less time could have been lost,
and it was clear the skipper had not
overestimated what he could gain at
every turn.
Curtis was quite enthusiastic at the
smartness shown and told the hands he
would be proud to command them.
A subdued tension of excitement again
settled down upon the lugger so soon as
the work was over, and they were rac-
ing back to recross the frigate.
As the two ships drew abreast once
more the firing recommended, but now
the shot fell shorter, and no one betrayed
any restlessness except Ducket, who was
plainly growing more and more dis-
turbed.
For a time the frigate reached on as
she was, and while the distance in-
creased he grew quieter, but so soon as
the Frenchman went about again the
strange uneasiness returned, always in-
creasing as the two vessels passed each
other.
For the third time they both went
about, and when again the frigate began
to range abreast and reopen her fire all
the shots dropped well short.
"We have done her now," cried Cur-
tis, "beautifully--beautifully."
"And we have not been hit after all,"
said Lucile. "It seems a pity."
The men standing near laughed.
"I am afraid," said Curtis apologet-
ically, "we are quite out of range now."
"Then let us give her goodby," said
one of the hands.
"Well said, my lad," answered Cur-
'tis, and with a will led them three ring-
ing cheers that set Lucile's blood tin-
gling.
It was a moment of stirring exalta-
tion. No one could fail to feel it.
A speaking silence fell as the sound
of the cheering died off, and then, high
above the whir of the wind amid the
lashing of the waves, rose a piercing
cry, and Ducket was struggling in the
sea..
He had been seen in the excitement
of the cheering to leap upon the bul-
warks and brandish an empty bottle as
if to hurl it at the frigate. Whether he
lost his balance and fell or whether, in
some insane impulse, he leaped over-
board, as some said, was never settled.
It al happened in a flash, and so great
was the lugger's speed that he seemed
swept away aft, as if he had fallen into
a mill race.
Somebody sang out, "Man over-
board!" and Lucile ran to the skipper,
crying:
""Save him, save him 1"
Dunk gave one uneasy glance behind
him and steadied the lugger on her
course without a word.
"Ah I" cried Lucile again. "Isawhim
then. You must save him, you must."
"I can't," growled the skipper, star-
ing straight before him.
"Do, Captain Dunk; for my sake,do,"
she implored.
"Come, Dunk," cried Curtis, sud-
denly taking part, "you can't let the
fellow drown without a try. We have
plenty to spare now. "
The skipper set his lips hard, and
Curtis shouted out:
"What say you, lads? The lady says
save your mate. What say you?"
"Aye, aye, cap'n," said one or two,
"let's have a try if the lady says so,"
and the rest raised a chorus of approval.
The skipper's face lighted up like
dawn.
"Well said, my lads," he cried, "but
it wasn't for me to risk all for one or
her for him. Stand by to wear !"
The Content swung round like a dog,
as if she felt with the rest, and began
running back. The sea was getting up
lumpy with the freshening breeze, so
that to see a man in the water was diffi-
cult. They had run back fully as far as
they had reached since the man went


That was her answer, and so, like her'
mother, she chose the harder way of
life.

CHAPTER XXIL
LA CHUTE DES ROIS.
The frigate had hove to about a da-
blo's length from them. A boat was'
shoving off from her, and on board the
lugger all was prepared for its recep-
tion. The passengers were removed from-
sight, brother and sister in the cuddy,
Curtis in the forecastle. This had been'
Dunk's suggestion, for he was not too
much hurt to have his wits about him,
being only knocked silly a moment by'
the jump of the tiller. At the sound of'
Lucile's voice he had opened his eyes at
once.
"Hurt, miss f" he had said, speaking'
with difficulty. "Lord love your heart,
no Loastways, not more than a rib.
Brandy? Yes; I dessy that would do'
good."
With Curtis' help he gotf up, after'
draining the pannikin: Lucile brought,.
and saw the frigate's boat being low-
ered.
"You must hide, all of you, "'he said.
"But why, captain?" asked Lncile.
"If they (,,'I:'t sri any of you, maybo
we might f,.'o! th!-:n ve't.
[TO BE CONITlNUED.1


up into the wind, so close to the wretch-
ed fellow as almost to ruin him down.
In a moment a couple of hands seized'
hold of him, and as the lugger filled'
smartly away again he was dragged'
fainting on deck.
By this time, however, the Content
had lost all she had gained. The frigate
had been put about at a moment which
betrayed the most exact judgment, and
so magnificently was she sailing that
she was now little more than half a-
mile away. A silent strain of excite-
ment settled down upon the lugger am
the chase recommended. At the helnf
the skipper was surpassing himself. Lu-
cile was forward with the mate, leaning
over Ducket's lifeless form and trying
to restore some animation. Curtis was
keeping his eye on the frigate in evident
anxiety.
"Gad! Dunk," ho cried suddenly.
"She is wearing. Look but nowl"
The words were not more than wel-
ont of I aijrith before the whol'.
broadside of the frigate was displayed
and then in a moment hidden in a cloud-
of smoke, To windward of the lugged
the sea was churned with shot; on el-
ther side spray spurted up as balls wen4
ricocheting by, and suddenly the tiller
gave a kick and dropped forward on the
deck. A shower of splinters flung from
the counter, and the lugger staggered
up into the wind shivering.
Dunk was on one knee, with his hand
pressed to his side. Curtis was hanging
over the taffrail Aymon broke out from-
the cuddy with a cry of alarm, but no'
one heeded him.
"Ease the aftersheets there," gasped
the skipper. "Foresheet aweathert
Stamp me What ails ye all? Fill he#
away, fill her away !"
In a confused hurry they ran hither
and thither to do as they were bid, tili
Curtis rose leisurely from where he had
been examining the damage.
"'Tis no good, Dunk," he cried.
"They have done us. The rudderhead'd'
gone! '
"And all through that madman,"
groaned the skipper.
"Are we taken then?" cried Aymod'
in a voice that was near to a scream.
"We have lost," said Curtis, looking:
at him very stern, "but we must lose-
like gentlemen."
Ducket opened his eyes at the shock
of the shot, and Lucile had left him
when her brother called out. She was
looking at the lieutenant, and he could
read gratitude in her face. For at his
speech Aymon had walked back to the'
cuddy, without further display of his"
weakness.
"Lay her ahullI" Curtis sang out,
"They will keep on firing till you do."
"What cried Lucile. "Are you go-
ing to surrender? Is that what yod
meant?"
"There's no way out of it," head,
"No wayyI" she returned, flaming up,
"Not if we are afraid to die. But wr
can fight it out. We can sink."
"Oh, that won't do," he said.
"Though, to be sure, 'tis what I would
choose myself. But with the others 'tis
different. This is no question of death
for them. But indeed I think they
would fight for it if you asked them."
"Do you?" she cried, in sudden exi
altation.
"I am sure of it," he answered,
"Now, at this moment, while their
blood is up, there's not a man of them.
but what's ready to die for you. Will
you ask them?" he went on, for she
stood silent, and there was a kind of
sadness in his voice as he spoke. "Oi'
shall we face the harder way-to-
gether?"
She was still silent, and no wonder.
It was then that she first knew she had'
encountered a courage of a finer temper
than her own, and she was abashed be-
fore it. The thought of making the men
fight for her like a distressed princess'
had lifted her up, and it was a terrible
fall to the choice hle l.id before her. It
was a choice for which she was quite'
unprepared. Nothing in her romances'
had told her of a fortitude beyond the
fortitude to die. At the worst, her he-
roes and heroines could find glory in a-
defiance and a picturesque end. Of her
a harder thing was required, and her
fine speech came back to her as very
sorry gasconade and made her ashamed.
The very boldness of his heroism shocked
her, and yet she was humbled by it,
and distracted, and not far from casting,
herself for support upon his strength.
But still she strove against the self sur-
render, and that last unhappy word of
his came to her relief. That "together"'
was an intrusion, an unfair one, too, at:
such a time, and thus persuading her-
self she was able to call up her resent--
ment and still hold out.
"Captain Dunk is wounded, I fear,"
she said at last. "I had best see to his;
hurt."


J'Jingtrkil q whil-11 11"


T I _


__ __ __


-- I-


UI"y is I F, 11 V, 11 11t I %II I


rtlin(r t lip. rpqziltQ th.-if t1in nbv&:;-


_ _


Washiington Countfy


West Florida
Against the World.





- -~ -- ,III-I I- '-I -'' --~*~_ YL-.------.I.. -L Y.- ~ ~,- ... ,- ~--,- i- -


M ARITIM E.


NOTE.-It must be remembered that the
wind is not a wholly reliable motive pow-
er and if the sailors sometimes find it im-
Dossible to make schedule time it must he
cl arged to the elements; they do the best
they can.

The Cleopatra arrived Tuesday
afternoon with a good freight and
two passengers.
The Jessie P. sustained serious
injuries during the storm at Pensa-
cola last week, and it is not known
when she v ill be able to return to St.
Andrews.
Pensacola Times: The Wauka-
tomica will make regular trips- to
Warrington and Fort Barrancas for
the Pensacola Terminal company
u until the dummy line can be re-
paired.
The steamer AlpTha stopped at St.
Andrews last Saturday on her wiy
to Mobile and took on a large quan-
tity of wool that had been brought
to St. Andrews from the Econfina
settlement for shipment. She pro-
ceedaed on her way to Mobile same
d a y.


PACKET SCHOONER

CLEOPATRA.
L. MAES, MASTER.
Leaves St. Andrews Bay every Tuesday,
leaves Pensacola every Friday,
(weather permitting). Special atten-
tion will be given to receiving and
forwarding freight for parties living on
East and North Bay, passengers for
points on either arm of the Bay can
depend upon securing prompt trans-
portation at reasonable rates. For
further information apply to
L. M. WARE & Co., Agts
SCHOONER
JESSIE P.
C(AI'T. WM~. HOLMES.
lMakes regular trips between Pittshurg on
East Bay and Pensacola; will make reg-
*ilar landings at Cromanton and Har-
rison, Parker and at any other point
when requested beforehand to doso.
Passengers and freight transported at
reasonable rates and satisfaction guar-
anteed. The Peonle's Store at Pitts-
burg is headquarters and orders left
there will receive prompt and careful
attention N. W, PITTS, Pro.,rietor.

EAST BAY MAIL BOATS
BUCKEYE and HAZEL.
IBuckeye, Capt. Edwd. Hand mas-
Ster, leaves St. Andrews Monday,
Wednesday and Friday mornings; ar-
rives at Wetappo same evening. Leave
Wetappo alternate mornings, arriving
at St. Andrews in the evening.
Hazel, Capt. Fred Guderian, master,
leaves St. Andrews Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday mornings: arrives at
Wetappo same evening. Leave Wetap-
po alternate mornings, arriving at St.
Andrews in the evening.
Careful attention given to the comfort
of passengers, and freight transported
at reasonable rates.
EDWD. HAND, Contractor.


PECULIAR in combination, pro-
portion and preparation ofingredi.
ents,Hood's Sarsaparilla possesses great
curative value. You should TRY IT.


A Week's Weather.
The following table shows what tlhe
temperature at St. Andrews has been
during the past week, from observations
taken at the Buoy office each morning
and noon:
Morn. Noon.
Thursday........ July 9 77 88
Friday .......... 10 7) 87
Saturday. ....... 11 76 80
Sunday.......... 12 78 85
Monday ......... 13 76 87
Tuesday......... 14 77 90
Wednesday...... 15 78 86


WEAK MEi MADE VIGOROUS.




iiDv' Y NDA. ITSDA. O7AL
What PEFFE '$ INIERlIOR ODd!
It cets powerfully rnd quickly. Cures when all
others fall. Young men regain losI manhood: old
man rovn r youth lul viaor. Absolutely Ouar


Lnteed to Cure Nervonensa, Lost Vitality,
mpoteney, Nightly Fmilaslon. Lost Power,
either sex, F&'!lna' Lemory, Oasting MI&
eacs, and all eects o! self abue or excesses and
ndftscretion. Warda off insanity and consumption.
Don't let druggist Impose a worthlessubstitute on
You because it elds a & reader profit. 'Insiston hayv
ng PEEFIg' A lAea VIGO c, or send for it.
Can be carried in vest I)ootet. Prepaid plain wrap.
per. Sa per box, or a for 'i, with A. PoIoltlva
Written Guartntee to Cure or efuud the
wonev. Pamphlet free. Sold bj druglaste. Address
It DAFADICA-16 A IND thlcaLes MI
For sale by Dr. J. J. Kcster, at the
Pioneer Drug Store,


Spoons Free to All.
I read in the Christ'an Standard that
Miss A. M. Fritz, Station A, St. Lou!s,
Mo., would give an elegant plated hook
sncon to any one sending her ten 2-cent
slamls. I sent for one and found it so
useful that I showed it to my friends, and
made $13 in two liours, taking orders for
the spoon. The hook spoon is a house-
hold necessity. It cannot slip into the
dish or cooking vessel, being held in its
place by a hook on the hack. The spoon
is something housekeepers have needed
ever since spoons were firs invented. Any
one can get a sample soon by sending
ten 2-cent stamps to Miss Fritz. Fliis is a
splendid opportunity to make inon%"
around home. Verytruly, Ja:;XETT S.





Is prepared to cut
WOOD AN) FENCE POSTS
and. deliver them at reasonable rates.
If you ncec.l labor with team call upon
Gi. W. SURBER.


LOCAL DRIFT,

-Fresh stock of groceries just re-
ceived at T. C, Danford's.
-Watermelons, grapes and pears are
becoming plentiful in this market.
-Heavy rains have fallen in all parts
of the country during the past week.
-Stoves and tinware, groceries and
notions cheap at E. P. Maxon's cash
store.
-Always in season, Hopkins' Steam-
ed Hominy(Hulled Corn.) Elegant lunch
in milk.
-It is estimated that Pensacola was
damaged about $200,000 by the storm of
last week.
-Smoked sturgeon, home product,
constantly on hand at T. C. Danford's.
Price 8c. a pound.
-About 4000 pounds of wool was ship-
ped from St. Andrews last Saturday on
the steamer Alpha.
-A large number of Jackson county
people are in St. Andrews this week,
having a good time.
-The democratic convention for the
25th senatorial district will meet in St.
Andrews next Thursday, July 24.
-Legal cap, comm~,ccial note
letter-head papers and envelopes, either
printed or plain at the Buor office.
-Tobacco users will find, in another
column, an item of decided interest to
them, headed "'Don't Stop Tobacco."
-Any person having green salted
aligator hides can find a market for all
they have and get a good price for them
at T. C. Danford'sstore.
-Owing to the storm of last week
causing considerable damage to the
railroads, no through mail was received
in St. Andrews for three days.
-Cocoa shells, a delicious and whole-
some beverage, far superior when prop-
erly prepared to either tea or coffee-
three pounds for 25c. at Pioneer Drug
Store. Try it.
-Our correspondents will please bear
in mind that their favors must be mailed
early enough to reach us not later than
Monday evening; otherwise they cannot
appear in the current issue.
-The mails are running on time on
the new schedule, and is received in St.
Andrews eighteen hours earlier than
by the old schedule, which convenience
is appreciated by our citizens.
-By reference to the proceedings of
the school meeting held last Saturday,
it will be seen that Miss Lydia Day was
chosen teacher for the ensuing term of
school here, and that the term is to
commence in November.
-The BUOY is commissioned to ne-
gotiate for options on large bodies of
land in Washington county-the larger
the better. No improvements or de-
tached parcels wanted. Lands must be
cheap. Correspondence solicited.
-Wagoners and fish haulers can find
plenty of fish all the time and fish roe
and oysters in their season at W. H.
Shand's store, Parker, Fla.; also pleas-
ure boats for those wishing to make ex-
cursions to the Gulf or elsewhere.
-The St. Andrews Bay Horticultural
and Improvement Associatfn is prepar-
ed to clear, improve and plant into fruit
any tract of land which may be given
them. It will pay all persons to buy a
tract from them and have it improved.
-If you are thinking of buying prop-
erty in St. Andrews or immediate vi-
cinity, you cannot afford to purchase
until you have conferred with the pro-
prietor of the BUoY. If you are short of
money and want to buy on your own
time for actual settlement you can be
accommodated
--Rev. J. B. Miller was confined to
his room with fever several days 'ast
week, but was so far recovered as to be
able to start for his home in Alaba.ma
Tuesday, accompanied by his son and
daughter, who have been spending a
month in St. Andrews. Mr. Miller will
be absent about two weeks.
-The lecture delivered by Prof. Lipes
at the Methodist church last Saturday
night was well attended, and all pres-
ent felt they had spent a very profitable
evening. By request Prof. Lipes will
deliver a temperance lecture at the
same place next Saturday evening, to
which every one is invited. Admission
free.


-No place in Florida or elsewhere
presents more or greater attractions to
the homeseeker than does the pictur-
esque village of Parker, on East Bay.
Every dollar invested there is sure to
multiply many fold, and the investment
can hardly be otherwise than a good
one. W. H. Parker will take pleasure
in showing anyone around, no matter
whether you buy or not.
-The BUOY is informed by Prof.
Lipes that the Washington County
Teachers Association is expected to
meet in the Presbyterian church in
St. Andrews next Thursday, the 24th
inst., and continue through Friday
Quite a number of teachers are expect-
ed to attend, and they should have a
pleasant and profitable time while here.
Two sessio';s will be held each day,
morning and afternoon.
-Notice for bids to carry a tri-weekly
mail direct from Vernon via Noles' to
Anderson, on North Bay-service to
commence September 1, next-are
posted in the postoftice at Vernon and
Anderson. This will be an improve-
ment in the mail service that will be
appreciated by citizens at the Bay, who
have heretofore had to wait ten or
twelve days to get a reply to mail mat-
ter sent to Vernon.
-J. R. Bicknell (Episcopal) of Mari-
onna, Arch Deacon of West Florid ,
preached an interesting sermon to a
large audience i,: the Presbyterian
church in St. Andrews'last Sunday at
11 o'clock. He also delivered another
discourse in the afternoon at 5 o'clock.
Mr. Bicknell has made arrangements
to visit St. Andrews once a month, and
will preach here on Tuesday evening
after the first Sunday in each month
until further notice.


cottage.
Dr. Stilley and Wm. Pittman, of
Marianna, are among the visitors to the
Bay.
J. W. Braxton, of Bridgecreek, is in
town visiting his family for a few days.
Ocala News: Capt. L M. Ware, a
prominent merchant of St. Andrews
Bay, is in attendance at the republican
convention * R. L. Scarlett,
the leading republican politician of
Orange Hill, is a guest at the Ocala
House as a delegate to the republican
convention.

$100 Reward $100.
The readers of this paper will be
pleased to lear o that there is at least
one dreaded disease that science has
been able to cure in all its stages, and
that is Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh Cure
is the only positive cure known to the
medical fraternity. Catarrh being a
constitutional disease, requires a con-
stitutional treatment. Hall's Catarrh
Cure is taken internally, acting direct-
ly upon the blood and mucous surfaces
of the system, thereby destroying the
foundation of the disease, and giving
the patient strength by building up the
constitution and assisting nature in do-
ing its work. The proprietors have so
much faith in its curative powers that
they offer One Hundred Dollars for any
case it fails to cure. Send for list of
testimonials. Address,
F. J. CtIENEY & CO., Toledo, 0.
Sold by Druggists. 75c.
Hall's Family Pills are the best.

CREAT BATTLES are contin-
ually going on in the human sys-
tem. Hood's Sarsaparilla drives out
disease and Restores Health.

Notice.
The Democratic Executive Commit-
tee of Washington county is requested
to meet in St. Andrews on July 24,1896,
fo-. organization aid transaction of
business. WM. MILLER,
Chairman.


Cripple

The iron grasp of scrofula has no
mercy upon its victims. This demon
of the blood is often not satisfied with
causing dreadful sores, but racks the
body with the pains of rheumatism
until Hood's Sarsaparilla cures.
"Nearly four years ago I became af-
flicted with scrofula and rheumatism.



Made
Running sores broke out on my thighs.
Pieces of bone came out and an operation
was contemplated. I had rheumatism in
my legs, drawn up out of shape. I lost ap-
petite, could not sleep. I was a perfect
wreck. I continued to grow worse and
finally gave up the doctor's treatment to





take Hood's Sarsaparilla. Soon appetite
came back; the sores commenced to heal.
My limbs straightened out and I threw
away my crutches. I am now stout and
hearty and am farming, whereas four
years ago I was a cripple. I gladly rec-
ommend Hood's Sarsaparilla." URBAN
HAMMOND, Table Grove, Illinois.



Hood '

Sarsaparilla
Is the One True Blood Purifier. All druggists. $1.
' Prepared only by C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass.
cure liver ills, easy to
Hood's Pills take, easy cooperate. 2

--An interesting account of the 4th
of July celebration at Indian Bluff was
received too late for this issue.
-The preliminary work toward the
building of the new court house at Ver-
non is progressing; the lumber required
is mostly on the ground and the bricks
are being manufactured about a mile
south of the site, a machine having
baen located there to mix and mould
the clay.
-As soon as the tax collector can get
certificates made out they will be
forwarded to those who purchased lands
at the delinquent tax sale. A few who
authorized the BuoY to buy for them
will be disappointed, for the reason
that the tax had been paid upon the
property selected, or else it was run
down to a point beyond what would
have been considered a fair investment;
but the greater part of the property
selected was secured and the certificates
will be forthcoming in two or three
weeks.

Regular weekly prayer meeting at
he Methodist church every Wednes-
day night, to which all are invited.
The Y. P. S. C. E. meets every Sat-
bath afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the
Presbyterian church. All interested
in Christian Endeavor work are
earnestly invited to attend.

Personal
Capt. L. M. Ware returned Saturday
night from the republican convention
at Ocala.
W. A. Maxwell, of Chipley, was in
town Saturday and Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Clark, of New York,
who spent six weeks in St. Andrews,
left last week for Cincinnati, where Mr.
C. will engage in photography.
Mrs. Robt. Brown and daughter, of
Parker, were in town Friday.
W. T. Ponder and family, Nick Pen-
der and family, Frank Bryan and Eug.
Blow, of Greenwo 'd, Fla., are at Old
Town.
T. R. Holliday and family, of Cotton-
dale, are visiting at Old Town.
Heon. W. H. Milton and Judge V. D.
Barnes, of Marianna, are enjoying the
balmy breezes of St. Andrews.
C. L. Wilson, mayor of Marianna, is
in St. Andrews on a short vacation.
W. A. Lee and family and J. R. Fox-
worth, of Marianna, are guests at the
Swan Cre t.
J. C. Folsom and family and J. Y.
Folsom and family, of Marianna, are
stopping for a few days in the Preston


specialty.
All these inmprovement- have been made
without ani increase in the cost, which
'remains at one dollar per year.
Wce offer this unequaled newspaper anid
The Bror together oine year for $1.75.
the regular subscription price of the two
papers is $2.00.






get them, plant
them. They are te
i standard seeds every-
s where; sown by the
largest planters in the world.
VWhether you plant 50 square feet
of ground or 60 acres, you should
Shave Ferry's Seed Annual for'6.
The most valuable book for far-
mers and gardener ever given
S away. Mailed free.
D. X. FERRY & CO.,
Detroit, sich.





Greeoe's Laandry.

Shirts Made to Order.
Violins, Etc., Repaired.
BY
V. D. GREENE,

St. A are ws Bay, Fla
CHARGES REASONABLE,

Not one part but every
part of HIRES Rootbeer
tends toward making it
the perfect temperance
and healthgiving drink.
Made only by The Charles E. Hires Co., Philadelpb 4
A 25. package Mikes 5 4allo2,. 1 ol4 TeIrleie.


The Chicago Convention.
The democratic national conven-
tion at Chicago adopted a free silver
platform, and placed Win. J. Bryan,
of Nebraska, at the head of th5
ticket. There isgreat dissatisfaction
among the gold standard democrats,
and it cannot cc told at present what
the outcome will be.
It is generally conceded that Mr.
Iryvan is the strongest nmani that
couli have been placed on a free
silver ticket.
Arthur Sewall, of Maine, received
the nomination for vice-president.

School Meeting.
Pursuant to a call made by J. R.
Thompson, school supervisor district
No. 2, a meeting was held in the
school house in St. Andrews, July
11, 1896, for the purpose of selecting
a teacher for the ensuing term, and
also to decide upon the proper time
for the term of school to commence.
C. H. Crippen was chosen chair-
man, and D. C. Williams secretary .
The object of the meeting was
stated by the chairman, after which
Miss LydidDay and Mr. L. L. Pratt
were placed in nomination and a
vote taken. It was found that Miss
Day had received nine votos and Mr.
Pratt had received six votes. Miss
Day was declared the choice of the
meeting.
Moved and carried that the school'
commence sometime during the
month of November, 1896.
There being no farther business
the meeting adjourned sine die.
C. H. CRIPPEN, Ch'11i.
D. C. WILLIAMS, Sec'y.

John Barr Glenn for the Legis-
lature.
POINT WASHINGTON, July 8.
En. BuoY:-Thle undersigned dem-
ocrats of this place, recognizing the
abilities of Tr. John Barr Glenn, ask
that he be our candidate for member
of the legislature, and pledge him
our hearty support.
H. T. WISE,
B. F. COLLOM,
WM. MILLER,
JOHN WESLEY, SR.,
S. STRICKLAND,
War. M. WILSON,
R. IT. .IoNsoN,
R. N.. FORANCE.

A Chance to Makel Money.
I have berries, grapes nnd defches, a
year old, fresh a? when picked. I use the
California Colh process, do not heat or
seal the fr:;it, just put it up cold, keeps
perfectly fresh and costs almost nothing;
can put up a bulshdl in ten minutes. Last
week I sold directions to over a 120 fam-
ilies; anyone will pay a dollar for direc-
tions, when they see tie beautiful samples
of fruit As there are many people poor
like myself, I consider it my duty to give
my experience to such, and feel confident
anyone can make one or two hundred dol-
lars round home in a few days I will
mail sample of fruit and complete direc-
tions, to any of your readers, for eighteen
two. cent stamps, which is only the actual
cost of the samples, postage, etc., to me.
FRANCIS CASEY, St. Louis, Mo.

THE

NEW YORK WORLD,

THRICE-A-WEEK EDITION.

18 Pages a Week.
156 Papers a Year.
Is larger than any weekly or semi-week-
ly paner published anmd is th!eonlv import-
antt Democratic "weekly" published in
New York City. Three times as large as
tlihe leading Iecplulicanm weck!v of New
York City. It will be of espeial ad\vanl-
age to you during time PRESIDnSN'AL CAM-
PAIGN, as it is pulishlired every other day
except Suday, and has all the freshness
and timeliness of a da:l. Il combines all
news with a long list of interesting de-
partments, unique features, cartoons and
graphic illustrations, tie latter being a


Our Clubbing List.
The BUCO has made very liberal club-
bing arrangements with a few of the very
best publications in the country and for
the present can send for a whole year
Tlie BUOY and
I he Florida Ci.tizen,weekly,for...$1 65
Farmer and Fruit Grower ... 2 55
Floiida Agriculturist ... 2 55
do clubs of 5, each ... 2 25
Farm Journal, Philad'a, monthly 1 10
CincinnatU Enquirer twice a week
8 large pages each issue ..... 1 65
Atlanta Constitution ... 1 5
N. Y. World (thrice a wpek)....... I 15
For any or citel of the above public
tions in connection with tihe BUOY, ad-
iress all orders to THE BUOY.
St. Andrews, F!a.

ARE YOU FOND OF tREADING?
If you are, you have only to take advant-
age of the following splendid oier: iyv
anl arralngenient the Buoy hiis i;ide with
thle grea, ptmlishhinmg ho,,ue of (;eo:ge
Munro's Sons, Ne w York, we are ablic to
g.ve as a preminin m o every sulbscri er who
sends iin advance one dollar for a vear's
subscription to the B ov any book named
in their Seaside Library, Munro's Library
of i'opimlar Novel or the Charlotte M,
Braeime's Works catalogues, which sells
for 25 cents or less. This .,i er f holds
'ood until further notice. If yoi wish to
take advantage of this olt':r, write to
Muiinro's Publishing House, 17 to 27 Vanm-
dewater street, New York, and request
them to send you tihe three catalogues
ni;med; when you receive them select tihe
,booik vou want and send the numnler
selected to tihe Buoy witn $1 for a year's
subscription, and the book will be sent
you postage paid. Thlii is one of lie most
liberal offers ever made Iv a publisher,
andl should not be miissed by a anyone wlio
likes first-clas.s literature and a pa )ei
published in tha garden spot of Florida.
Be suio and first get the cat:ilogues from
George Mmmunro's oiis. and then order
from it by nuimhers through the Broy.
Oriers in anyi other manner will receive
no attention. Don't forget that these
lists contain the very best as well as tlhe
most popular novels in the English lan-
guage, an you can only get them free by
following directions as above, carefully.

W ANTED:- -everal trustworthy gen-
tlemen or ladies to travel in Flor-
ida for established, reliable house, Sal-
ary $780 and expenses. Steady position.
Enclose reference and self-addressed
stamped envelope. The Dominion Conm-
pany, Third Floor, Omaha Building,
Chicago, Ill


2 CANCER K AGNA
Diseases CURED without the use of
knife. Question Blank and Book tree. Call
or write DI,. H. B. BUTTS,
s822inSE t tu LOOiS* i, .

VIRGINIA COLLEGE
FOR YOUNG LADIES, ROANOKE, VA.
Opens Sept. 10, 1896. One of the lead-
ing Schools for Young Ladies in the
South. Magnificent buildings, all mod-
ern improvements. Campus ten acres.
Grand mountain scenery in Valley of
Va., famed for health. European and
American teachers. Full course. Su-
perior advantages in Art and Music.
Students from twenty States. For cat'-
alogues address the President.
MA.TTI'- P'. H- \ l4iS, i]oaiKke. Va.


,uJ


Weak, Irritable,Tired

I" Was No Good on Earth."'

Dr. Miles' Nervine strengthens
the weak, builds up- the broken
down constitution, and permanently
cures every kind of nervous disease.
"About one year ago Iwas afflicted
with nervousness, sleeplessness,
Creeping sensation in my legs,
Slight palpitation of my heart,
Distracting confusion of themind,
Serious loss or lapse of memory.
Weighted down with care and
worry. I completely lost appetite
And felt my vitality wearing out,
I was weak, irritable and tired,
My weight was reduced to 160 lbs.,
In fact I was no good, on earth.
A friend brought
me Dr. Miles' book,
"New and Start-
ling Facts," and
I finally decide
to try a bottle of
DR. MILES' Re-
orative Nervine,
Before I had taken
one bottle I could
sleep as well as a
l0-yr.-old boy. My
appetite returned
greatly increased.
When I had taken the sixth bottle
My weight increased to 170 bs.,
Tle sensation inmy legs was gone;
My nerves steadied completely;
My memory was fully restored.
My brain seemed clearer than ever.
I felt as good as any man on earth.
Dr. Miles' Restorative Nervine is
A great medicine, I assure you."
Augusta, Me. WALTER R. BURBANK.
Dr. Miles' Nervine is sold on a positive
guarantee that the first bottle will benefit.
All druggists sell it at 81,6 bottles for $5, or
it will be sent, prepaid, on receipt of prioe
by the Dr. Miles Medical Co., Elkhart, Ind.

Dr. Miles' Nervine
Restores Health


How A Woman Paid Her Debts.
A lady in Lexington says: I am out
of debt, and thanks to the Dishwasher
business. Iu the past six weeks I have
made $530. Every housekeeper wants
a Dishwasher, and any intelligent per-
son can sell them with big profit to him-
self. The Dishwasher is lovely, you
can wash and dry the family dishes in
two minutes, ank without wetting your
hands. You can get particulars by ad-
dressing The Mound City Dishwasher
Co., St. Louis, Mo. There is big money
in the business for an agent. I expect
to cleir $4,000 the coming year I need
the money,why not make it. MISSC. E.

NOTICE FOR PUBLIC ION.
LAND OFFICE AT GAINESVILI.E. FLA.,4
June 15, 1S96. .
Notice is hereby given that the follow-
ing-named settler has filed notice of his
intention to make final proof in support
ofh Is claim, and that said proof will he
made before clerk of the circuit court at
Vernmon, Fla., on August i, 1896, viz:
FRANCIS M. McKINNEY, of Pt. Wash-
ington. Fla.
Homestead No. 18795, for the wk( of se1
and so14 of sel4 section 35, township 2
south, lange 19 west.
IHe names the following witnesses to
prove Iis continuous residence upon and
cultivatioui of, said land, vIz:.
Stephen Wesley, Ileniy Wise, John
Wesley, D. F. Gunn, all of Pt. Washing-
ton, Fla. J. M. 1BAco, Register.


Date.
May 2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
June 9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9

May 5
28
June 1
10
30


War'n
No.
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
29-4
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318


t
To Whom Paid. For What Issued.
F ': Hawk .............. teacher at Bethel ................
S D Bostick.......... .. Cow Ford............
L L Charles............. Grassy Point.........
N J Hasselborg........ Watson Bayou.........
Clara Holley......... Inlet ..................
F R Payne............ Laird Bayou... ......
W A Emmons ..........printing report ..............
James L. Miller........member this board (ch'm).......
D G Nixon............. "
L M Ware.............for purchasing lot at St Andrews..
W C Lockey..........sa ary for May....................
Geo Everett............ bill of lumber for Brock..........
P J Godwin ..........teacher at St Luke.............
......... ....... ..... ..
.................. ..,....o
R C Horme........... commission as treasurer..........
L L Pratt.............services on grading committee....
N C Hasselborg....... "
John W Bowen....... ....
Louie Tiller..........teacher at Ebenezer ............
J H White........5 house sills for Bouen...........
J H Armstrong......amt on So Side and New Hope......
M Glenn............. .nails for order this hoard.........
E N Dekle...........bill for stationary.................
L L Charles..........teacher at Grassy Point...........
.......... ...........
(1 (I mm iX (1
...... ... .. .......
W C Lockey........stamps and stationary..............
Clara Holley........ teacher at Inlet (dis) ................
G B Bush............ h'm this board one day ............
Jas L Miller .........member this board oneday.......
DG Nixon.......... .........
W C Lockey. ......salary for June ..................
F R Payne..........teacher at Laird Bayou.............
D G Nixo ..........conducting examination.............
Jas L Miller......... asst supt conducting examination....
RECEIPTS.


To amt A J Waldredge .................. ..........$ 60 00
To amt State W U Teleg Co ........................ 4 76
To amt State 1 mill tax ........................... 1055 20
To amt W C Lockey.............................. 43 00
To amt A Q Jones ................. ................. 409 00
To amount to balance............................... 1017 43
$1571 96 $1571 96


The foregoing is a true and correct report from this office for the months of
May and June, to best of our ability.
Attest: G. B. BUSH, Ch'n.
W. C. LOCKEY, Sec'y and Co. Supt.


T. G AN FO D
DE ALER I N




r d0 ase'

QUEENSWARE, GLASSWARE,


STOVES 'nN TINWARE,


A Full Line of Canned Go:ds


"1

AND A COMPLETE STOCK OF


UNDERTAKER'S SUPPLIES.

Sast, Foos & Comn any's

A m P uMP


IS YOUR NERVE GOIE?
The Kola nut has been used for cnitur-
ics by Africans as a renewer of the tissues
and a preventer of fatigue.
Dr. Charcot, the eminent authority on
nervous diseases, prepared a presetiption
from Kola which he vouched tor as a true
specific in all nervous diseases and a sure
invigorator for the blood.
Dr. Charcot's Kola Nervine Tablets are
prepared upon the above mentioned pre-
scription from the fresh nuts especially
imported from Western Africa.
Kola is not a cure-al!. It is a food for
nerves, brain and muscles and a tonic for
the blood.
Kola Nervine Tablets are absolutely cer-
tain and speedy in their effects. They
cure alt nervous diseases, nrevent fatigue,
renew failing vigor, give tone to the whole
system.
Kola Nervine Tablets cure sleepless-
ness and the nervous troubles from which
sleeplesntss comes. They are specific in
cases of nervous dyspepsia.
The druggists say the demand for the
Tablet is astonishing. Kola is what the
debilitated want.
Thousands of packages have been sold.
Good effects were felt at once.
Hundreds of letters say: 'One package
of the Tablets, costing $1.00, has done
for me what physicians, who cost me $100
failed to do."
We absolutely guarantee that no harm-
ful or secondary effects are felt from the
use of theTablets.
Can you, injustice to yourself, refuse to
pay cents a day for sure relief from neu-
ralhgia, bloodlessness, brain fatigue, sleep-
lessness, nervous dyspepsia. loss of vigor,
melancholia and all the evils resulting
from a nervouscondition? Ask yourself
the question with all seriousness.
Dr. A. C. Snrewiii is one of the best
physicians in New England. Hie writes:
"Hotel Pelham, Boston, Dec. 6th, 1895.
-Gentlemen; I am! prescribing Dr. Char-
cot's Kola Nervine Tablets for N ervo:s-
ness, Insomnia, Dyspepsia and Neuralgia,
with excellent results. I have noo hesita-
tion in stating that they are infallible in
all forms of Inervous diseases. Th ir in-
vigoratirng properties are -wondeiful.
Yours truly, A. C. Shrewin, M. I."
Edward Everett Hale, 1). D., the famous
author of "The Man Without a Country ",
in an editorial in thie Boston Commnon-
wealth, and later in a personal letter,
wrote thus:
"I am assured by a careful inquiry
among leading physicians and personal
friends who have used them and in whom
I have the utmost confidence-that Dr-
Chiarcot's Kola Nervine Tablets are in-
valuable in insomnia and all nervous dis-
eases. EDw. E. HALE.
Fifty Coens and $1 00 per box (one
month's treatment). See Dr. Charcot's
name on box. Kola booklet free. All
druggists or sent, direct. Eureka Chemical
& Ifg. Co., LaCrosse, Wis. and Boston.
Mass.


Whry inot R O


Pay but one profit between maker and
User and that a small just one.
Our Big 700 Page Catalogue and Buyers
Oulde proves that it's possible. Weighs
2Y2 pounds, 12,000illustrations, describes
and tellsthe one-profit price of over 40,000
articles, everything you use. We sendit
for 15 cents; that's not for the book, but
to pay part of the postage or expressage,
and keep off idlers. You can t get it too
quick.
MONTOOMERY WARD & CO.,
The Store of All the people
IilOll6 Michigan Ave., Chicago.


__ ^___ ,

Geo. S. Hacker & Son,


CHARLESTON, S C.

MANUFACTURERS

Sash, Doors, Blinrls,


'I
" .'_ i








AND

Building Material.
Window and Fancy Glass a
Specialty.
ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY
GIVE N



PATENTS $5.00.

If you have an invention on which
you wish to obtain a patent, and can-
not afford to expend from $60 to $70
for that purpose, cut out this coupon
and send to the publisher of this pa-
per with five two-cent stamps, and
you will receive full information as
to how you may obtain a patent in
the United States at an expense to
you.of Five Dollars.
N AME ......................
A DDRESS ......................


MRS, SCHELENGER'S

Boarding House.

No 214 East Zarragossa Street,


Ponsacolb -


- Fla,


First Class Accommodations and

Reasonable Rates.
N NOTICE.
All persons holding claims against, the
estate of Geo. Russell, late of Washing-
ton county, deceased, are required to pre-
sent their claims to the undersigned ad-
ministratrix, within twelve months from
the date hereof or they will be barred by
the statute of limitations. And all per-
sons who ;ire indeed to th said estate
in aniv manner are hereby requested to
cone forward and settle without delay,
.)ated Oct. 1-29t, A. n.1895.
tSIBAH R1. RUSSELL, Admx..

TVANTED:- -'everal trustworthy gen-
V~t !V e men or ladies to travel inl Flor-
ida for 1st nlished, reliable house. Sal-
nrv vjTO and exp.nmses. Steady position.
Enclose reference and self-addressed.
stamped envelope. ThIe Dominion Com-
pany, Third Floor, Omaha Buildin,.
Chicago, Ill1.


- - I -I- --I- -


REPORT
Of the Board of Public Instuction for the Months Endin4
May and June, 1896.
DISBURSEMENTS,


Am';
S20 00
20 00
25 00
20 00
20 00
20 00
200
2 95
5 30
50 00
40 00
12 00
10 95
12 88
16 32
36 72
13 30
13 30
9 90
25 00
400
22 50
100
525
800
200
6 85
8 15
11 15
20 00
3 40
2 75
5 30
40 00
20 00
8 00
8 75 ..







PARKER.
Correspondence of the 3r:ov.
Mr. and Mrs. Martin Darvi. ,'e the


The Republican State Conven-
tion.
rThe stale convei.tion of the Flor-


parents of another fine son--bolirn ida republicans met in Ocala oni the


Thursday, July 16, 1896.

ST. ANDREWS
PRICES CURRENT.
GROCERIES.
iugar, I lb Tea, B lt
Granulated.... 6% He No....... 75
Cofee,A ..... 6 Gunpowder.. 80
Lt brown..... 5 Uncol'd Jap.. 50
coffee, Cond milk, can
Green.. 2223@25 Unswcetn'a.10@15
Browned .25@30 Sweetened .10@15
linger snaps... 10 Baking powder
Jrackers,soda 81/ Royal........ 50
Tobacco, plug 30a60 Campbell. ... 15a25
-laisins Canned fruit
London layers..15 Peaches ... 20a20
Valencia..... 1234 Tomatoes... .10al5
lice. ...... .. .. 7 Apples........ 10
Apples Pears ......... 15
Evaporated.. 12 Plums......... 25
Dried Peaches 8 Apricot........ 25
Joal Oil prgal... .2 Strawberries... 20
gasolinee "......20 Pineapple..... 20
Slorida Syrup... 50 Canned Meats
Ioney........1.00 Roast Beef.. 15a25
,inegar........ 30 Corned Beef 15a25
Cheese pr lbt.... 16 Chipped Beef.. 25
Butter......... 30 Lobster ....... 20
Lard-.,........ 8 Salmon....... 15
Beans.......... 6 Canned Vegetables
Cocoanut pkg... 10 Baked Beans... 15
FiuitPnddine. .w 10 Corn.......... 15
Jelly, glass. 15a25 Peas .......... 15
Lime Juice ...... 50 Pumpkin...... 15
Eggs per doz... 15
PROVISIONS.
Flour Pork
S 0 N 2.... 2,00 Mess pr lb..... 8
Favorite.... 4.50 Bacon Sides..... 9
JornMealprbu 85 Fresh....... 8al0
)at Meal pr lb... 5, Br'kf'st Bacon.. 12
.,ornper bu........75 Ham canvassed 14
Potatoes Shoulders..... 10
Irish ........ 1.20 Beef
Early R'se seed 1.60 Corned......... 8
Sweet........ 50 Fresh...... ..8al0
3alt, pr sack... 1.00 Dried......... 25
Table ........ 5 Milk pr qt...... 10
HARDWARE.
tails, per lb...4a4 Ax,with handle. 1.00
Manilla ropel2y,1al5 Hoes, each. .. 35a50
dtoves cook,. .$8a5 Copper paint, can 50
Pipe, joint.18a20 Linseed oil, gal.. 80
DRY GOODS,
Prints, per yd.. 5a8 Ginghams ..... 8al0
Sheetings .... 5a9 Flannel. ..... 25a50
luslin....... 9all Thread per spool. 5
means ......25a200 Shoes, ladies.gia2 75
Extra pants pat 225 Men's... $140a300
MISCELLANEOUS.
Hay pr cwt.... 1.3u Outs pr bu....... 60
Bran ....... .1.25 Brick pr M......8.00
Rope Sisal ...10@12 Lime pr il...... 75
FRUIT and NUTS.
Oranges pr do&.. Pecans pr 11l..... 15
Apples ........ W walnuts. ....... 20
Lemons........ 30 Almonds........ 20
OYSTERS
Inshell prl,000 1.50 Opened pr qt .. 15c
LIVE STOCK.
Horses... $80al00 Cows....... $15a$25
Mules... $100a$.155 Hogs... ... $3 to $4
qxen., pr yoke $40 Sheep.... ...... $2
POULTRYY
COickenseach 15a25 Geese each. 45a50
l'arkeys.....75al.00 Ducks....... 15a20
GAME.
Venison pr 11b 7l0 Turkeys...... 75al.00
FISH.
Fresh Salt
Mullet prloz 25c Mullet pr 1)1b 5.00
Trout .......... 25 Trout. ....... 4.50
Pompano pr lb. 6 Pompano .... 10.00
Sturgeon...... 10 Mackeral .... 8.00
LUMBER.
Flooring, Ceiling.
reart, 4 m. ..$16.00 Heart, -. m...1 6.00
Face ... 14.00 Face ... 14.00
Sap ... 12,00 Sap .. 12.00
Drop siding, Clapboards,
Heart face p~I 15.00 1/2x6i in. nm...$12.00
Sap 12.00 Finishing lum-
Buff lumber.. 8@12 ber, d.. $12@15.00
Heartshingles, 2.50 Lath, ) m.... 2.00
Sap 1.50 Boat lumber,
dressed....20a30


A IAP

Of the Citv of St. Andrews.
Gotten up with great care by the
publisher, who has spared no pains
to prepare for the public a map of
St. Andrews as it really is. It shows
about
FOUR MILES OF COAST LNIE,
Extending eastward from Dyer's
Point, taking in the Old Town site of
St. Andrews, and gives location of
public business places, private resi-
dences, docks, etc., also every lot in
each block and the adjoining addi-
tion to the Cincinnati Company's
land, with a full description of the
same.
The Map will show owners of lots
in the city just where they are lo-
cated, and is of value to those think-
ing of buying property.
Size of Map 30x50 Inches.
The BUOY will send this map to any
address on the receipt of
ONE DOLLAR,
Or given as a premium for 5 yearly
cash sulsecritions.


BOARDING.


Irs. I. J. Corby.

EBema Vista Avo an Drake 8 t
St. Andrews, Fla.,


fiouse and Accommodation
Class in Every Respect.


First


Copyright 1896, by Dr. H. Sanche. All
rights reserved.

SILVER or GOLD.

Half a million intelligent families have
Vanished disease. pai: distress, doctors
and drugs from their homes witl the
"OXYDONOR," or the "'ANIMATOR," or
the "FEVER ARRESTER," none of whom
would dispense with them for a moun-
tain of silver or gold. All can do the
same. Why do you not?
Book of particulars free Address,
DR. H. SANCHE,
161 Fifth Ave., New York, and ;1 Fifth
St., Detroit, Mich.
Who can think
-- of some simple
Wanted- Idathing to patent?
Protect your ideas; they may bring you wealth.
Write JOHN WEDDERBURN & CO., Patent Attor-
ey, Washtington, D. C., for their $1,800 prize offer
EYAB i lat f t njl ad 4 irntielln utPns f"ru.


last Sunday morning.
Messrs Chas. and Peter Parker andrl
Willard Pratt went to Apalachicola
recently in the Beckie Lee, returning
last Saturday night.
J. A. Donalson was fortunate
enough to raise a good crop of watei-
melons this year, and keeps the Par-
kei store supplied regularly.
Capt. John Parker treated a party
of the young people to an excursion
to the Gulf on the sloop Anna. They
left on Saturday morning and re-
turned home the next night.
Like everywhere else on the bay,
the fruit trees in this locality show
the effects of the recent storm. There
weie many bushels of both pears and
plums blown off. but fortunately they
can be used without waste.
The many friends of Mrs. Julia A.
Parker, beloved mother of W. IH.


8th inst., an i placed a full state
ticket in the field, as follows:
Governor-George W. Allen, Mon-
roe.
JuIgo supreme court-Thos. 1E.
Wilson, Orange.
Secretary of state-T. F. Mc-
Goorin, Walton.
Attorney-general-W. B. Shep-
pard, Franklin.
Comptroller-Jno. McDougall, Le-
on.
Treasurer-W- A. Allen, Volusia.
Superintendent of schools-Bryan
F. Marsh, Lake.
Commissioner of agriculture-Jas.
Harden, Polk.
Presidential electors-M. B. Mc-
Farlane, Hillsboro; J. T. Walls, Al-
achua; E. C. Weeks, Leon; Samuel
Potty, Nassau.
Alternates-R. B. Brooks, Marion;


Parker, will regret to hear of her H. H. Attaway, Escambia; J. L.
death, which occurred at Cleveland, Pherig, Leon; N. C. Wamboldt, Du
Tenn., on the 3d of July, after a five val.


weeks' sickness.


She was well


known here, and beloved ana respect-
ed by every one. 0. B. SERVER.


Falling Water.
The name Falling Water comes
far from describing this one of the
natural wonders of Florida to which
it is applied. True, the water falls,


Congress-J. N, Stripling, Duval.
The convention is reported to have
been very harmonious. About 250
delegates were in attendance.

Citizen: The Illinois Central rail-
road company some time ago in-
ornied its employees that it would
assist them to become stockholders,
-._ - .- '-. L ., .,


unt. thi'; isa finll itin iiite--ll randby perinttinIiig thin to invest tneir


view the place presents.
In a hilly country a few miles dis-
tant from Cliipl.y, Fla., covered with
pine and small oak, the road winds
around a large hill. On one side the
scraggy knoll is to be seen, on the
other, descending with quite a slope
of the sandy land is a spot noticeable
from the surrounding country only
from the fact that the trees are much
closer and of a different foliage from
the evergreen pines surrounding.
Once inside the encircling foliage,
however, a great change is to be
seen. Great outcroppings of rock.
in appearance, at least, of volcanic


savings on the installment plan in
shares of stock. Interest at the rate
of 4 per cent would be allowed on all
deposits intended for the purchase of
stock until enough should be accu-
mulated to complete the purchase.
It is a fact that Hood's barsaoarilla,
the One True Blood Purifier, has proved,
over and over again, that it has power to
cure, even when other medicines fail to
do any good.
Hood's Pills a.e purely vegetable and
do not purge pain or gripe. All drug-
gists. 25c.


democraticc Senatorial
venltion.


Con-


Phr ON EAST ST ANDREWS BAY a
PittsburP, ON EAST ST ANDREWS BAY ; ia,


N. W PITTS,


Knowing the wants of the community, buys itelligently and



NOTE THE FOLLOWING PRICES:


Wheat bran $1.15 per 100 pounds.
Corn 60c. a bushel.
Corn meal 55c. a bushel.
Corn chops 55c. a bushel.
Oats 40c. a bushel.
Irish potatoes 80c. a bushel.
Lard 7c. a pound.
Best green coffee 5 pounds to the dol-
lar. Arbuckle's coffee 24c. a pound.
Matches Sc. a dozen boxes.
Potted and Deviled ham, each 5c
per can.
Butter 25c. a pound.
Tobacco 20c. to 40c. a pound.


Fertilizer $20 to $25 a ton.
Try me on canned goods; it will pay
you.
Snowflake sugar corn $1.50 a dozen.
Stanley Bros. sugar corn $1.20 a doz.
3-Pound tomatoes $1 a dozen.
2-Pound tomatoes 75c. a dozen.
1-Pound beef $1.30 a.dozen.
2-Pound beef $2.40 a dozen.
Baking powder 10c. to 20c. a pound
Good sardines 5c. a can.
Pie peaches, large cans, 12.c. a can.
Candy 10c. a pound.
Kerosene oil 121c a gallon.
Linseed oil 65c. a gallon.


If you live near the Bay Cjme in a Boat; if back in the Counry, Come on
Horseback; if you have no Horse, borrow your Neighbor's Ox and Cart.
COME ANY WAY and load in your COUNTRY PRODUCE
And let me prove to you that ,
YOCT C.A. SAVTBE VOJlTy II:EER E-.E
Fine Water-Front and Other Lands for Sale!


Florida Central and Pe insu l r
IR A. TI TI IE O -A ID-

New Florida and Northern Air Line and Florida
TRUNK LINE.
Time Table in Effect, June 14, 1896.


S= am '


2 OOp
2 45p
3 12p


a


!>^
oe
m *a
Q


! 182
12 26p
2 071
' 27p
4 13p

8 20p
9 38p
10 48p
12 OOp
6 00a
1 58a
3 35a
6 42a
8 05a
10 25a
12 53p
9 00p


Tle democratic convention for the


origin, obstruct tile way. The path Twenty-fifth senatorial district conm-


descends rapidly to a deep cut, ob-
structed by stone overgrown with


uprising the counties of Calhoun and
Washington will be held at St. An-


moss. From here looking up about drews on Friday, July 24, at 12
twenty feet aboye we see a small noon, for te p ose of nomination
noon, for the purpose of nominating


stream of water ] during over the
edge of a broad wall (f rock, and
going down farther we can see where


it goes. At our feet ya.wns a hole,
thirty feet in diameter and about
seventy feet deep, with nearly the
roundness and regularity and all of
the shelerness of a well. At its bot-
tom the water falls in spray and is
continually flowing away through an
unseen aperture in the rock wall. Its
bottom is lined with white sand and
gravel, and the trunks of mighty
trees have fallen into it, some on end
and some crossed in the chasm.
Whether they are the debris of some
mighty ftld or not cannot be told.
The rock wall has crevice, in it large
enough to admit tle passage of a
horse.


Around the falls are several caves
of curious formation, opening into
the ground like a well for thirty or
thirty-five feet and then leading off
in passages. Some of their have
been partially explored, but none
th,,roughly. This region affords a
fine field for geological inspection.


Why Jumbo Was Attached.
It was eight or nine years ago, and
the cars containing the animals were
unloaded near the Canal street freight
house. The animals were guided across
Exchange place by attendants, and the
elephants went along very peaceably.
They hadn't gone a great distance,
however, when Jumbo's back began to
itch. The big elephant tried to reach
the place with his trunk, but didn't
manage to. So he stepped from the line
and looked for a suitable place against
which to rub his back. There were two
objects in sight-a big flagstaff and
Paddy Burns' shanty, which stood in
the rear of the Three Ones' fire station.
Jumbo picked out the shanty, and by
the time he had relieved his feelings
things inside were upside down, and the
building had nearly been removed from
its foundations and shoved into the wa-
ter.
Paddy Burns looked for a lawyer, and
found the late Ambrose E. West. The
attorney issued a writ and gave it to a
deputy sheriff, with instructions to at-
tach Jumbo. The officer presented the
paper to the treasurer of the circus and
then took up a position near the ole.
phant, but out of the reach of the swing
of his trunk.
The bill for damages was promptly
settled, but the officer said afterward
that if the animal had decided to walk
away he hadn't any idea how he could
have proceeded to enforce the law by
compelling him to remain.--Providence
Journal.
Wesley's Mother.
The mother of John and Charles Wes-
ley, the founders of Methodism, was one
of the most remarkable characters of her
own or any other age. From tender years
the principles of religion and practical
piety were instilled by her in the minds
of her. children. She daily took them
into a private room and prayed with
each, and so imbued their minds with
the spirit of religion that the Methodist
movement was really born in hlr home.


a candidate for state senator to be
supported at the nextgeneral election.
The basis of representation will be
one olteleg for evory, twenty-five
vctes in each precinct.
W.m. MILLER, C:'ll
Washington County,

Ice Cream Made by a New Pro-
cess.
I have an ice cream freezer that will
freeze cream instant. The cream is
put into the freezer and comes out in-
stantly, smooth and perfectly frozen.
This assonishes people and a crowd will
gather to see the freezer in operation
and they will want to try the cream.
You can sell cream as fast as it can be
made and sell freezers to many of them
who would not buy an old style freezer.
It is really a curiosity and you can sell
from $5 to $8 worth of cream and six to
twelve freezers every day. This makes
a good profit these hard times and is a
pleasant employment. J. F. Casey &
Co., 1143 St Charles St., St. Louis Mo.,
will send full particulars and informa-'
tion in regard to this new invention on
application and will employ good sales-
men on salary. ROBT C.


NORTHERN POINTS.


50p Lv.... .Jacksonville.... Ar
30p Lv. ....... Yulec ........ Ar
50o Ar......Fernandina.......Lv
15p Ar....... Everett....... Ar
.... Ar. ..... Brunswick ...... Lv
15p Ar.......Savannah ......Lv
25p L-v...... Savannah ......Ar
20a Ar... .Fairfax S C.....Lv
00a ....Augusta Ga..... "ugsta G.....
15a .... Denmark S C..... "
00a ....Columbia SC.... "
45a ..,Spartanburg S C... "
40p ....Asheville NC.... '
5 ....Charlotte NC ...
20a .... Salisbury N C ... "
05a ...Greensboro N C...
30p .....Danville Va..... "
40p ....Richmond Va..... "
35p ....Lvynclhurg Va.... "
50p ....Charlot tcsvill. .... "
40p .....Washington ..... "
35p ...... Baltimore ...... .
.6a ...Pi iladelphita..... "
53a ......New York...... "
OOp ....... .Boston ....... "


C ,
a


9 00a
8 19a
7 30a
6 42a
6 00a
5 02a
4 30;1
3 10a
2 31a
12 57a
5 30p
2 15p
11 OOp
9 12p
7 40p
6 (5p
12 55p
4 00p
2 27p
11 15a
9 4-2a
7 20a
12 15p
5 OOp


m '?

9 00p
8 15p
( 30p
6 27p
4 33p
4 25p
2 20p
1 32p
11 55a

8 Va
7 04a
5 50a
2 00a
3 40a
1 55a
10 43a
9 20p
6 515p
4 30p
9 00a


7 40o
6 52p


'-Q


1 35p
12 20p
11 OUa
8 24a








,.,. .


Trains 35 and 36 solid Between Jacksonville and Charlotte. Thlrough Ileepers
Jacksonville and New York. Also through sleepers Tampa, and New York; Nos.
37 and 38 carry through sle. pers between Jacksonville, T'ampa and New York.
Elegant Through DI)y Coacnes Jacksonville to Charlotte, on
No. 35 and 36.
CINCINNATI-JACKSONVILLE. Chicago, Toledo, Detroit, Cleveland, Louis-
ville, Nashville, Indianapolis.
Leave Jacksonville 8 20 a.m., ( 50 p.m. Arrive 9 00 a.m.


Arrive Everett
Macon
Atlanta
Leave Atlanta
Arrive Ch'tanoga
Leave Atlanta
Arrive Ch'tanoga
Cincinnati


10 57 a m.
445 "
7 50 p.m
10OO00 "
4 10 a.m
1:50 p m
7 05 p.m
7:15 a.m


9 15 "
2:50 a.m.
550
7:30 "
12:55 p.m


Leave 6:35 "
11:30 p.m.
835pm
1:30 '
8:05
Arrive 1:30
7:45
800 p. m.


9:00 p m.
(6:27 "
10:55 a.m
7:00 "
12:10 "
7:00 "
8:10 p.m
8 30


Nos. 36 and 35 carry through Pullman sleepers between Jacksonville and Ciucin-
nati. No. 38's connection carries sleeper Atlanta to Chattanooga. Passengers can
remain at Chattanooga in sleeper until 7 a. in. Close connections for Chicago and
all Western points.


HOLLY SPRINGS ROUTE.
To St. Louis, Chicago, Sioux City.
6 50 p.m Lv Jacksonville, Ar. 9 00 a. m.
600a.m Atlanta Lv 1050p.m.
1220p.m Birmingham 255p.m.
815 p.m Holly Springs 7 20 a. m.
7 16 a.m St. Louis 7 30 p. m.
2 50 p.m Chicago 135p.m.
7 40 p.m Dubuque 7 30 a. m.
7 00a.m Sioux City 800p.m.
1240p.m Birmingham Ar 315 p.m.
10 20 pm Ar Memphis Lv 5 30 a.m.
5 0 p.m Kansas City 10 50 am.


ASHEVILLE ROUTE.
Between Jacksonville and Cincinnati.


6 50pm
11 15pm
400am
10 45am
12 45am
1 40pm
I 13pm
7 25pin
4 2 5am
7 15am


SOUTH AND WEST FLORIDA AND NEW ORLEANS.


Our line of School Furniture and
Supplies is tl'e n;ost nearly coIn-
S plete ever offered by' a single firm.
W e can furnish and equip a school
Throughout better and more cheap-
ly than anyone else.
W ritefor particulars.
We want an experienced ageas in eve-y y
county. Good opening for a good ma i
Wr;ts for terms and mention this medium.
.*, ANDREWS'
+ .." ", SCHOOL
FURNISHING
Q"- .,- COMPANY
.- 65 Fifth Avenue
TROAE MARK NEW YORK


WANTED.
Old Conft. dcrtte Post.age Stamps annd
Money. A:so old T. S. Stnamps, Look up
yur! Letters; it will aiy yon. yend
s:n,;,les "tf cntiice lot io is I iind we will
guar:n' l e thie hihii"st casll prices. C. S.
E-:OK & CO., Equitahlle Buildling, Mewlm-
ptis. 'Tonn.

THE POPULAR



L nwisHouse,

PENSACOLA
IS
the Place for Passengers
(Gring to and from St. Andrews Bay

Rooms Gp Tfrtahble!

Terms Reaslna le!


910 pm
10 15 pm
1137 pm
1211 am

12 55 am
1 30 am
2 27 am
3 53 am
5 40 am
6 26 am
9 10 am
4 51 am
5 18 am
5 37 am
6 47 am
7 55 am
5 50 p m
10 45 pmi
12 15 am
2 00 am
4 20 am
5 30 am


7 45 am
9 07 am
915 am
9 55 am
11 16 am
11 50 iam
1 25 ;)m
5303 im
.256 cir
1 24 'rl
2 08 pm
2 23 pm
3 23 pm
? 58 pm)
4 24 pmu
5 45 pm
6 20pm
4 09 pm-
4 30 pm
4 46 pm
5 41 pm
6 35 pm


9 15 am
S1 25 am
12 13 pm
1 13 pm
2 35 pm
3 30 pm
4 30 pm
5 15 pm
11 00 pm
3 05 am
7 35 am


Through Pullman


Fernandina
Callahan
Jacksonville
Baldwin
Starko
Waldo
Gainesvillo
Cedar Key
Hawthorne
Citra
Silver Springs
Ocala
Homosassa
Wihlwood
Leesburg
Tavares
Orlando
Winter Park
St. Catherine
Lacoochee
Dade City
Plant City
fTampa


Lv Jacksonville Lv 7
Ar Lake City Lv 5
" Live Oak 4
" Madison 3
" Monticello 2
" Tallahassee 1
Quincy 12
River Junction 12
Pensacola 6
" Mobile 2
" New Orleans 9
sleepers Jacksonville to New Orleans.


Jacksonville I
Savannah
Columbia
Spartanburg
Hendersonville
Ashevill ,
Iot Springs
Knoxville
Lexington
Cincinnati


9 00am
4 53am
12 57am
5 20pmo
3 57pm
2 15pm
12 40pm
8 00am
10 45am
8 00pm '


Daily, except as noted.
Ar 5 90 pm
6" 333 pm
" 7 50 am 345pm
Lv 645 am 245 pm
" 517 am 131 pm
" 440 am 1 06ipm
1130 am
715 am
3 50 am 12 15 pm
3 08 am 11 45 pm
1 45 am 11 05 pm
'" 12 01 pm 10 0(; am
10 3:, pm 9 32 am
940pm 902(am
7 00 pm 7 45 am
7 20am
10 44r)m 922am
1016 pm 900am
956 pm 844 am
842pm 749am
7 30 pm- 7 00 am


50 am
36 n,m
48 am
46 am
20 am
45 am
45 am
01 am
50 pm
15 pm
45 am


tiP'lu LpizWzro oy 0 Pl f+inn Itnpp I


in the Robb Building, Isabella St., West End.

CHAS. G. ARMSTRONG
Has Opened out a CHOICE STOCKIt
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,


To be sold C~-E :- A- IT OIE -OOA-S,-I-E, OIiL -Y.
And lie invites the patronage REASONABLE PI:IES.
FRESH BREAD, PIES AND CAKE, BAKED EVERY DAY.


SaU1 E R


D"AlR


STORES


CORNER OF HiiLL AVENUE A ED iN ICHIGAN i TREE,.

8T. AFDE5H S BAY, FLA.


Carries a FuR Li;i- of Dlrus, Wleicinos,

Diamond Dyes, Trussss, Syringes;

PAINT BRUSHES, FANCY AND TOILET
PE " JT LES .
DR, J, J, KESTER, Drugr.ist.


a i '' E



SC ASHl 8 OrE- 1pr ESTN


g CASH STO1RE-$WEST END.


am=














*c-"a

tica~c


Dry


DEAIEIZ IN


Goods,
G rccenocs,


! $ I *

Ship ChJndlery

BiderKs' Supplies.
I o


I

I'


0))
I
U


CA


N TL IONI S.



Twgne, wnc


F U Ri P, 18 E 0 H 0 Ul S E S


TOL- t Ti. IT T


L


a.


tr1


HAVING LEASED TIHE


Salisbury


Lulm or


m
CMO
ma


i:l-~b.


[>r aiyi~i'S


Mili,


Two Miles East of St. Andrews, I am now prepared to furnish first-clastr


s~ mW~


Either Rough or Dressed,
IN ANY QUANTITY AT REASONABLE PRICES.


Also


Rouoldhi.D.
D. D.


ani Tur"nePur'd Work
I)A Vhs, Pro:' tluroit,


St. I'lI I d irw F I o oj II C


to Order.


9 15 am


9 15 am
3 40 pm
1 54 am
1 55 pm
9 40 am
8 20 pm


Cincinnati Sleeper via Aslhevillo goes through to the Carolina moun-
tain resorts. Summer Excursion Rates Seashore and Mountains.
tDaily except Sunday. lConnections at Tampa for St. Petersburg, Manatee
River and Key West and Havana steamers. Steamer Manatee for all .points
on Manatee river. At Starke for Lacrosse. At Waldo. steamer for Molrose.
Connects at Tallahassee for St. Marks, Carrabeile and Apalachicola. Connects
at River Junction for Chattahooche River steamers. Connects at Ocala for Ho-
mosassa. All baggage will be checked from Union Depot. Tickets
\,ill still be sold at the city ticket office, 202 Hogan st., as well as at the Union
Depot ticket office. J. E. MARSHALL,
Ticket Agent 202 West Bay street, corner Hogan, Jacksonville Fla.
R. W. CAMPBELL, Passenger Agent
WALTER G. COLEMAN, General Tr; veling Agent, Jacksonville.
N. S. PENNINGTON, Traffic Mgr. A.. O. MAC DONETLL, Gen. Pass. AgI

Chlcheater'E Entgll n Diamond Brnnal PARKER'S
ULM ianfva m m HAIR BALSAM
'ENNYROYAL PILLS "*A
iN fv iitl4 P L 1Cleanses and beautifies the hair.
SROnPlyIL B Promotes a luxuriant growth.
Original and Only Genuine. Never Fails to Eeetore Gray
SAFE, always reliable. LADIES ask \ SHair to its Youthful Color.
m en drBra nde s i" ,dra ,d. aiol
Druggist for Chichester's English Dia \ se a & hair ling.
emond Brandu in Red and GoW metallic 1 l.fO at Druggi-ts
boxes, sealed with blue ribbon. Take -- -
no other. Refusedangero sis stitu.- .,
Soin stamps for particulars, testimonials and -
S elief for Ladlea," in letter, by return -, ... t i
Sll. 10,000 T timouia Na,,l m -r. io, keint e. ts.
o a hl- t Lhel o1l ty a.l Loual 1,1 ite. hllUal. n Sta. e t:l .llt, 6it. ai .U i 't r 1 Uiis

WILL HEZ PUT HIS FOOT INJ Ti







~5.' .5-,

is * '3

xI'-
L~~Ie- 0 e' che1t''htbi s olt I'nsacigjoi1
.,aun.1..~ I iy i eir 'w rli


_ __


~~aZ~UI~LLII;~B~mX~Ba'LL~,~P-YII~MI~


PROPRIETOR


'T, 7 /--% rl T


e'ts a-- ""l ei ties,


I


%N ;


ji~A


"ZY




r'asn aL -~y .I -I.w- `` '"rYss


THlI OLD DOC'TO*

LADIES' FAVORITE.
ALWAYS RELIABLr and perfectly SAFE. The same
s used by thousandsoftw men allover the United State;,
In the OLD DOCTOR'S private mail practice, for 38 years
an I not a single bad result.
Monby re urnd it not as represented. Bend 4 cent!
(tamps) for sealed particulars.
C& WARD INSITUlTE, 120 N.9th St.. St. LouIs, Mo


The old original French Fruit Cure.
O B. Sanatorium,
X 0 0 1 822 Pine St.,
.\z 8, St Lonis, No.
%ro 0Call or Write.
Ab9e littler st*nd no Inlury to health.



WANTED.
several trustworthy gentlemen or ladies
to It.cvcl in Florida for established, re-
liable house. Salary $780 and expenses.
Steady position. Enclose references and
self-addressed stamped envelope. The
Dominion Company, Third Floo', Omaha
Building, Chicago, Ill.


A SECTIONAL MAP


Of St. Andrews
and the

Bay Country.

WVe have made arrangements by
which we can furnish this fine MAP
covering about eighteen miles square
of territory, including the Cincinnati
Company's Tract, also Harrison,
Parker, Cromanton, and adjacent
country, for
ONE DOLLAR.
Or g iven for 5 cash yearly subscriptions.
By the aid of this map the location of
lands purchased of the Cincinnati
Company can be easily ascertained,
or, parties may send us $1 and their
description and we will locate their
lots and return the Map by mail.
Address THE BUOY,
St. Andrews, Fla.
For 5 cash subscribers,we will give as
a premium, 1 Sectional Map of the Bay
country, or 1 Map of the City of St. An-
drews. Either map sold singly-$1


TRADE MARKS,
I DESIGN PATENTS,
COPYRICHT8, etc.
For Information and free Handbook write to
MUNN & CO., 361 BROADWAY, New YORK.
Oldest bureau for securing patents in America.
Every patent taken out by us is brought before
the public by a notice given free of charge in the

Largest circulation of any scientific paper In the
world. Splendidly Illustrated. No Intelligent
man should be without it. Weekly. 3,00 a
year; $1.50 six months. Address, MUNN & CO.
PFB"LsLH8R, 301 Broadway. New York City.

It rixiiit tst ist t 03^4
S. p
$100.00 0

? Given Away
,so

: Every Month
I to the person submitting the e0
o most meritorious invettiotsa
during thepreceding month. g
S WE SECURE PATENTS "o
e FOR INVENTORS, and the *
O object of this offer is to en- $
courage persons of an invent- s
6l Ive turn of mind. At the
Same time we wish to impress '
the fact that :: : : o
It's the Simple,
STrivial Inventions 0
2 That Yield Fortunes "
-such as Do Long's Hook
and Eye "See that Hump,"
"Safety Pin," "Pigs in Clo-
Sver" 'Air Brake," etc.
SAlmost eyery one conceives
0 Q a bright idea at some time or
t other. Why not put it in prae- c
m, tical use? YOUR talents may M
# lie in this direction. May
m make your fortune. Why not v
04 try? :: ::
se "Write for further information and
Mention this paper.
THE PRESS GLAfIMS GO. .
1 Philip W. Avirett, Gen. Mgr.,
618 F Street, Northwest,
t WASHINGTON, D. C.
as 'The responsibility of this company W
a may be judged by the fact that its -
s stock is held by over one thousand 69
e of the leading newspapers in the 0
W United States.



The Old Reliable

Established 38 years. Treats-maloorfemale,
married or single, In cases of exposure
abuses, oexesses or Improprietles. SKILL
GUARANT ED. Board and apartment
furnished whean desired. Question Blanjg
aud onsk froe. Call or write.


The ST AND REWS BAY



Horticultural a n d Improvaem t






ORGANT7ETf JANUARY. 9, 1892.

Te purpose of this Association is to Improve the Country adjacent to St
Andrews !Bay and to
Develop its Resources as a Fruit-Growing Country.
To accomplish this the Association proposes to Sell Lands in tractsof T\wo-
and-a-half and FiveAcres to such parties only as will improve them by the
Erection of Houses. Fences and such Permanent Imorovements as will enhance the
value of each tract so disposed of, and particularly to
Plant them out in Trees, Plants and Vines,
To the end that in the shortest practicable time every such tract shall be a
Source of Revenue to its Owner.
AS TO RELIABILITY OF THE ASSOCIATION
The first question wh;ch will naturally be asked will be: "Is this Asso-
ciation reliable"? And the answer to it is: Any person employing the Association
to make improvements may deposit an approximate payment of the estimated cost of
the same with any responsible business man or firm doing business on the Bay or in
Bank at their own home to be paid over only when the Association shall satisfacto-
rily show that the improvements have been made according to agreement.
The Association will not only improve and plant, but watch and care for
all property entrusted to its keeping, guarding against forest fires, dishonest pilferers
for damages from any cause possible to be prevented.
From a careful estimate of the probable expense and income of a fruit
plantation in the St. Andrews Bay country a few figures are given:
Price of ;ana per acre, say $25 to $50; cost of clearing, say $20; 'ost of planting 1st
year, say $30; cost of cultivation each year thereafter, $20,
It is not extravagan: to estimate that a 1-acre vineyard will on the third
year, if properly cultivated, yield $200 worth of fruit, and of peaches nearly or quite
the same, while figs should do even better than that. Then, though perhaps a little
longer, some of them, in coming into profitable bearing may be named pears, apricots,
nectarines, lplums, prunes, mulberries, olives, Japan persimmons almonds English
walnuts, Japai. chestnuts, pecans, and j.any other varieties of fruits and nuts. which
are almost. certain to flourish here; while oranges and citrus fruits, though not con-
sidered certain yield large returns oftener than they miss.
The Secretary of the Assodiation will give particular attention to an-
swering letters of inquiry, and the Buoy will in its answers to correspondents an-
swer all questions asked it.
R EM E M B E R, the Association Lands will be sold on Easy
Terms of Payvnent; but improvements must be paid for as satisfactory proof in given
that the work has been performed. CO RRESP O NDENCE SOLICITE'D.
Address R. E. lHOWARD, Sec.
HIarrison, Fla.


LO O


HE


Yo Can't Afford to Miss This Chance!

Having Purchased the Stock of Goods in the Store at


I am Making Constant Addintions Thereto and Propose to


SELL FOR CASH, AT O E CE



At thel Lowest Living Margin of Profit.

And Treat Every Cutom r Alike and GCorteously.
Call and Se My Coo s and Cet My Prices.

W. He SHA NH O,
PA R R FT, A.


WHO WOULD GET THE BENEFIT?
The Real Gainers by Frea Silver Would
EPD the Mine Owners.
If a 16 to 1 free coinage measure were
to become law next year, who would it
benefit the most? Certainly not the
farmers and workingmen, who w 3uld
find that, though it might increase the
number of dollars they received in re-
turn for their labor or their products,
these dollars would be worth but half as
much as those now in use. Neither
would the manufacturers and business
men be benefited by a law which would
make goods of all kinds far dearer, and
therefore lessen the demand for them
and check productive industry and
trade.
The real beneficiaries of free silver
would be the owners of silver mines,
who would get a higher price for their
products, and the debtors, who would
be enabled to pay off their obligations
in 50 cent dollars. Among those debtors
would be some farmers, but by far the
greater part of the debts of the country
is owed by large firms, corporations,
banks, insurance companies, and sim-
Silar organizations.
IThus the farmer, who has many years
been paying premiums on $1,000 fire
insurance on his house and barns, would
under free coinage receive, in case of
loss by fire, only the equivalent of $500
in our present currency. The working-
man, who has been paying for $1,000
life insurance, would find that the adop-
tion of the silver standard had cut in
two the provision he had been making
for his vife and family.
The millions of farmers and workers
who have a little money in the bank
would be compelled, if the banks
wished, to take dollars worth half
of those the-y had deposited. The
great corporations which have borrowed
large amounts from thousands of small
investors, or from banks representing
thousands of depositors, would have
half of their debts wiped out.
These results would doubtless be a
good thing for the big insurance com-
panies, railway corporations, banks,
Wall street speculators, etc. But is that
any reason why the masses should favor
the 50 cent dollar policy?
First Book Lessons In Finance.
See the Wheat. There is a big Heap.
The Farmer has finished Thrashing and
wants to know How Much Grain he has.
If he has Many Bushels, he will be
Glad, for then he can buy a Lot of
Goods.
He is using a Measure. It is called a
"Bushel," and if it is an Honest meas-
ure it will Always hold 2150.4 Cubic
Inches of Wheat. It is the Standard by
which Quantities of Grain are meas-
Adt


ured, and it is Important that its Size
should never be Changed. If it should
be made Bigger or Smaller at any time,
People who buy Grain would not Know
How Much they were getting.
See the Smart Man coming. If you
Listen, you can hear the Wheels Buzz.
He is a Small Bushel man and objects
to the Great Holding Power of the 2150
inch measure. He has a 1075 inch
Bushel which he is Tryirg to get the
Farmer to use by telling him that if his
Wheat is Measured in it he will have
Twice as Many Bushels.
Will the Farmer be so Simple as to
Think that the Quantity of Wheat in
his Heap will be Doubled by measuring
it in the Small Bushel, which is Really
only a Half Bushel? Maybe so, for a
good many People believe that their
Property can be made Worth Twice as
much as it is now by Measuring it in a
Cheap Dollar, worth half as much as
the Gold Dollar.
It is certain that a Change in the
Size of the "Bushel" would not make
more Wheat. Neither would a Change
in the value of the "Dollar" make the
people Richer. The Smart Man is a B-'g
Humbug, just like the Sixteen-To-One
Shouters, who say that Everybody would
be Rich if a Dollar worth Fifty Cents
was used instead of one worth One Hun-
dred Cents.
Poor, Stricken Silver.
Every good silverite knows that "the
crime of 1873 struck down the white
metal and made gold the only money of
the country. At least that is what tlhe
free coinage agitators say, and they may
be supposed to have some regard for the
truth.
In view of the alleged demonetization
of silver it is important to note that
during the month of May of this year
the coinage of silver at the United
States mints amounted to $1,826,490,
of which $1,500,000 was in standard
silver dollars of full legal tender. This
is a very curious kind of "demonetiza-
tion. "
Not More but Better Measures Needed.
There can be no rule for fixing the
number of dollars for use in any coun-
try, any more than any other standard
measure. It would be as reasonable to
fix the number of yardsticks or gallon
measures. The only duty properly de-
volving upon government is to fix the
unit and maintain it against all comers.
For no other reason is the power given
to governments, as stated in our consti-
tution, to "coin money and fix the stand-
ard of weights and measures. "-D. W.
McOlung in "Money Talks. "
Germans Much In Earnest.
The Indianapolis News says that the
Indiana Germnans may redeem that stat.:
to sound money. "Even admitting that
Indiana is for free silver now," says
The News, "it does not at all follow
that it will be for free silver when elec-
tion day rolls around. In that educa-
tional work the Germans will bear a
large part. They are very much in ear-
nest in their opposition to free silver,
and they are mostly men of intelligence
and influence. "


THE FOOL WHO ROCKS THE BOAT.


Who is to blame it business is upset?


HOUSE-CLEANING TIME.


Being a PRACTICAL L

SURVEY S, MA
On the Siori'te


CALL ON
we


RUSSIA MOVES FORWARD.
Abandons the Depreciated Silver Money
Standard and Adopts Gold.
After more than half a century's ex-
perience with silver monometallism and
fiat money Russia has adopted the gold
standard.
This has been done in pursuance of
Russia's determination to press forward
in the march of the nations.
In 1839 the silver ruble was estab-
lished by imperial decree as "the legal
and unalterable metallic unit of the
money current in the Russian empire."
Russia has found that she cannot keep
the pace of other great nations with a
silver standard and has therefore
changed to the gold standard.
Silver will still be freely used in the
Russian currency as it is in the cur-
rency of all nations which have the gold
standard, and 14-0,000, 0C ounces of
silver are to be purchased to take the
place of about one-fourth of the Russian
paper currency.
The adoption of the gold standard
will therefore result in a great im-
provement of the monetary system of
that country. Twenty-five years ago the
Russian ruble had a purchasing power
of 74 cents in gold. It has fallen to
about 40 cents, owing to the immense
increase in the production of silver and
the general adoption of the gold stand-
ard by the civilized world.
Russia has acted wisely in abandon-
ing a depreciated money standard, and
the adoption of the gold standard will
make the empire a still more powerful
factor in the affairs of Europe and the
world.--Atlanta Journal.
What Do They Care For Experience.
To open the floodgates and permit the
world's volume of silver to flow to our
mints to be coined at 16 to 1 in the hopo
and belief that the market value of sil-
ver would be thereby advanced to $1.29
an ounce seems to me to be a dream so
extravagant as to be beyond the possi-
bility of realization. If free coinage by
this country alone ';uld not only ar-
rest the decline of s Av(r, but restore its
market value, why is it that such a re-
sult has not been attained in the coun-
tries where free coinage is permitted?
The mints of Japan, Mexico and several
of the countries of South America-Pe-
ru, Bclivia and Equador-are today open
to the free and unlimited coinage of
both gold and silver, yet in no single
instance can it be shown that the bul-
lion value of silver has been kept at a
parity with its coinage value. More
than this, no nation on the globe today
has its mints open to the free and un-
limited coinage of both gold and silver
that is not confessedly on a silver basis
with gold at a premium. What reason
have we, therefore, as a nation to ex-
pect any different results if we should
venture on such an experiment? From
reason and experience I am forced to
the conclusion that to open cur mints to
the free and unlimited coinage of silver
at the ratio of 16 to 1 without the co-
operation of the leading commercial na-
tions of Europe would quickly plunge
the nation to a silver basis and create
such a disturbance in our monetary sys-
tem as to involve its total destruction.
-Hon. J. C. Burrows.
Simple Question For Silver Leaders.
Who would be benefited by adultera-
tion of the currency? Not the farmers.
They could not be better off if they got
two 50 cent dollars where they get now
one 100 cent dollar, and that is the ut-
most Tillman would be able to give
them. But the fearful contraction of
the currency caused by a collapse of
standard money to the 50 cent cheap sil-
ver standard would create such hard
times tait for years workingmen would
get hardly more 50-cent dollars than
they get now 100-cent dollars. How
would that benefit them? Neither Alt-
geld nor Tillman has ever explained
this simple question. -Clicago Tribune.
A Nebraska woman, advertising
for a husband, says she owns a job
office and can set tvre.


Odd Fellows and Free Silver.
The Souvenir, a paper claiming to be
the official organ of the great fraternal
order of Odd Fellows, published in a re-
cent issue a plea for the free coinage of
silver at 16 to 1. The principal reason
given for attempting to commit a non-
partisan organization to the 50 cent dol-
lar swindle was that a large number of
members of the order had been sus-
pended by reason of their inability to
pay their dues, and that it was there-
fore impossible to continue the payment
of relief funds on the present scale of
$3,500,000 per year. This would mean
that aged and infirm Odd Fellows, or
the widows and orphans of deceased
members, would receive smaller bene-
fits, and to prevent this condition of af-
fairs The Souvenir claims that it is nec-
essary to coin more silver dollars so that
members in arrears can get cheap money
with which to pay up their dues.
If the editor of The Souvenir had stop-
Sped to think before rushing into print,
heo would have seen that his own statc-
ment of the poverty and suffering which
would follow a reduction in the benefits
paid by the order was the very best of
reasons why this country should not
adopt free coinage. For nothing is mere
certain than that free silver would cut
the purchasing power of the dollar in
two, so that the sick Odd F7ll:.w, cr the
widow or orphan who now pets benefits
of, say, 0 4 per week would, under the
silver standard, got only Ihe equiva lnt
cf $3 per wcek. The amounts to be paid
in benefits in each particular case are
fixed by the rules of the order. Duos it
require any argument to Fhn,W that if
those benefits are paid in clheap dollars
the people who get them will lose one-
half of their income?
The crder of Odd Fellows has a de-
servedly high reputation as a great or-
ganization working in the interests of
benevolence and fraternity. It can hard-
ly be possible that it is ready to indorse
a scheme vhich means the repudiation
of fraternal obligations and the robbery
of the widows and orphans intrusted to
its care.
The Colcr&ao Senators Disagree.
Senator Teller of Colorado has de-
clared his intention of leaving the Re-
publican party if the St. Louis conven-
tion adopts a platform favorable to the
maintenance of the gold standard. In
his opinion it will be better for all who
believe in the sacred 16 to 1 to join the
Populists or form a silverite party than
to try to secure free coinage as Repub-
licans or Democrats.
Senator Wclcott of the same state
does not agree with his colleague. He
has announced that while he desires the
free coinage of silver he will abide by
the decision of the national convention,
and warns the people of Colorado
against an alliance with the Populists.
"The Populist party," he says, "favors
free coinage, but only as a stepping
stone to unlimited paper money, and it
unites with its free coinage advocacy
socialistic and paternalistic doctrines
which are dangerous in their tendency,
and which would be, if adopted, de-
structive of free institutions."'
While the course of Senator Wolcott
in pointing out the dangers of Popu-
lism is to be praised, it must be ad-
mitted that Senator Teller's attitude is
more consistent with the silver theories
which both senators hold. If the Repub-
lican party declares against free coin-
age, the Republicans in the senate
should be believers in an honest dollar.
Advocates of free coinage should unite
with the free silver party, so that there
would be no question as to where they
stand. Senator Teller is very much mis-
taken in supposing that if the silverites
of both parties join the Populists they
can get a majority of the people to vote
for their candidates. But he will do
less harm as an announced opponent of
Republicanism than if he remained in
his party while fighting against its
principles.

Subscribe for the BUOY: $1 a year


n m prepared to furnish

N1) CHARTS
17. N I C e.


40, 42, & 44 S. Palafox st, Pensacola, Fla.


LtBWGEST STOCK,


LOWEST PRICES.



Dr. MillthEls Dr g Store,

POST OFFICE BLOCK, BAY VIEW AVENUE.



Fresh and of guaranteed Purity.
DR. W. G. MITCHELL, PROPRIETOR,
Ofers His Professional Services to the Citizens of St, Andrews and
Surrounding Country.
May be c,,und at his residence on Buenna Vista avenue at night.
--ui- --- --u- g


L. M. WARE JNO. THOMPSON



Pion1eei' Store.




L. M.. TH 0 M PS' O
SL.

DEAL S IN

DRY GOODS,
GROCERTER
HARDWARE,
BUILDERS' SUPPLIES

Ship Chandlery, Salt Fish, Etc. Etc., Etc
6-0-0-0-0-
AGENT FOR


Baltimore Twie and Net Company.
ALSO FOR

E 3 W% 4e t -ht tie





NORHI BAY LUIMBEB COMPANY

BAM IEAD, FLA.



0. TOMPKINS & CO
AR PR PARED TO FURNISH
RUugh and Dressed Lumbar of All Grades.
***
THE PATRONAGE OF THE PUBLIC SOLICITED
ris Terms cash or endorsed notes,




Piner W ds rdMill



ON EAST ST. ANDREWS BAY;

Postofice, Farmdale, Fla.
Can FRurnish Rough Lumber
FOR BUILDING PURPOSES, FENCING, ETC., ON SHORT NOTICE.
should you not find what you want on the yard, leave your
order, which shall have
PROMPT ATTENTION.
R V .DEADIERTCK_ MAnT r_


Do You Want


OR A


Location.?


Assessment and Fayment of Taxes,
Will be Given Promipt, Personal Attention.


.* Prker,


Real Estate Dealer.
Parker, Fla




If you need F 'RN IT 1 of ;no;\ kin,, i.,ll ,, o n


IP~L~-~B~YIDi~UIr*IUYUT T~P1 (~


IF SO

Secure one or More Good Residence or Busines




Or a Five-Acre Frit Tract



-o


r
"r --T--, _
5L~b E~ ~


IN& I


Husiness


M T
ARS I ON


NUH


~111


o.


3Elt~b ML IOU ~k




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs