• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Preface
 Acknowledgement
 Recommendation
 Introduction
 Methods
 Results
 Discussion
 Literature cited
 Appendix A: Power plants surveyed...
 Appendix B: Brevard county
 Appendix C: Riviera Beach/Hobe...
 Appendix D: Tampa Bay Big Bend...
 Appendix E: Northwest coast
 Appendix F: Everglades National...
 Appendix G: Summary statistics...
 Appendix H: Plots of residuals...






Group Title: Manatee population report no. 2
Title: Analysis of manatee aerial surveys
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073816/00001
 Material Information
Title: Analysis of manatee aerial surveys a compilation and preliminary analysis of winter aerial surveys conducted in Florida between 1977 and 1982
Series Title: Manatee population research report
Physical Description: iii, 119 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Packard, Jane M
Mulholland, Rosemarie
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: [1983]
 Subjects
Subject: Manatees -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Manatees -- Research -- Florida   ( lcsh )
West Indian manatee -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 24-25.
Statement of Responsibility: authors, Jane M. Packard, Rosemarie Mulholland.
General Note: "Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service"--Cover.
General Note: "Cooperative agreement no. 14-16-0009-1544."
General Note: "Research work order no. 2."
General Note: "Final report 1983."
Funding: This collection includes items related to Florida’s environments, ecosystems, and species. It includes the subcollections of Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit project documents, the Sea Grant technical series, the Florida Geological Survey series, the Coastal Engineering Department series, the Howard T. Odum Center for Wetland technical reports, and other entities devoted to the study and preservation of Florida's natural resources.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073816
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001893029
oclc - 19478929
notis - AJW8284

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Title page
    Table of Contents
        Table of contents
    Preface
        i
    Acknowledgement
        ii
    Recommendation
        iii
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Methods
        Page 1
        Data compilation
            Page 1
            Page 2
        Analyses
            Page 3
    Results
        Page 4
        Data sets
            Page 4
            Page 5
        Identification of important variables
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
        Site-specific models
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
        Comparison of adjusted means and maximum counts
            Page 18
    Discussion
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Literature cited
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Appendix A: Power plants surveyed by Florida Audubon Society for Florida Power and Light Company
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Appendix B: Brevard county
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Appendix C: Riviera Beach/Hobe Sound
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Appendix D: Tampa Bay Big Bend Power Plant
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Appendix E: Northwest coast
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 86
    Appendix F: Everglades National Park
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Appendix G: Summary statistics for FAS winter survey
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    Appendix H: Plots of residuals vs. date for regression of TOTMAN against MINTEMP1
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
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Full Text





ANALYSIS OF MANATEE AERIAL SURVEYS


A Compilation and Preliminary Analysis of Winter

Aerial Surveys Conducted in Florida Between 1977 and 1982


FINAL REPORT

1983


Authors:

Jane M. Packard

Rosemarie Mulholland


Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
117 Newins-Ziegler Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611




Prepared for:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
75 Spring Street, S.W.
Atlanta, GA 30303


Cooperative Agreement No. 14-16-0009-1544

Research Work Order No. 2

Citation should read: Packard, J. M., and R. Mulholland. 1983. Analysis of
manatee aerial surveys: A compilation and preliminary analysis of winter
aerial surveys conducted in Florida between 1977 and 1982. Manatee
Population Research Report No. 2. Technical Report No. 8-2. Florida
Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida. 119pp.









CONTENTS


PREFACE

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

RECOMMENDATIONS

INTRODUCTION

METHODS

Data Compilation
Analyses

RESULTS

Data Sets
Identification of Important Variables
Site-Specific Models
Comparison of Adjusted Means and Maximum Counts

DISCUSSION

LITERATURE CITED

APPENDICES

A. Power Plants surveyed by Florida Audubon Society
for Florida Power and Light Company

B. Brevard County

C. Riviera Beach/Hobe Sound

D. Tampa Bay Big Bend Power Plant

E. Northwest Coast

F. Everglades National Park

G. Summary Statistics for FAS Winter Surveys

H. Plots of Residuals vs. Date for the Regression of
TOTMAN against MINTEMP1


PAGE

i

ii

iii

1

1

1
3

4

4
6
9
18

18

24









PREFACE


The amount of information from aerial surveys of manatees has increased
substantially in the last decade because of studies conducted at discrete
sites by several organizations. The aerial survey information has previously
been distributed through a number of unpublished reports that differ in the
amount and format of data presented. It became apparent that in order to
synthesize this information, it needed to be compiled such that future
research could build from the past work.

The researchers involved have been most cooperative in providing their
information to contribute to this effort. We ask that readers recognize the
sources of information included in this report and refer to the original
reports in any further citations. There are risks involved in analyzing and
interpreting data collected by other researchers. We requested validation of
our statements from those that know their data better and expect that any
readers who choose to take a different look at the data will extend the same
courtesy to the original authors.

For permission to cite or use unpublished data included in this report,
please contact the following cooperators.


Patrick M. Rose
1901 Lake Margaret Dr.
Orlando, FL 32806


Galen P. Rathbun
U.S.F.W.S. Sirenia Project
412 NE 16th Ave. Rm. 250
Gainesville, FL 32601

Jeffrey Patton
Mote Marine Laboratory
1600 City Island Park
Sarasota, FL 33577


Daniel K. Odell
University of Miami BLR-RSMAS
46 Rickenbacker Causeway
Miami, FL 33149


Ross Wilcox
Florida Power
P.O. Box 1400
Juno Beach, FL


and Light Co.

33408


Oron Bass
Everglades National Park
P.O. Box 279
Homestead, FL 33030









ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


We express our sincere appreciation to all who helped with this study.
P. M. Rose and M. A. McGehee helped compile the data from surveys conducted
by the Florida Audubon Society. The foresight of J. R. Wilcox has been
invaluable in providing support from the Florida Power and Light Company for
the long-term monitoring of power plants. G. B. Rathbun kindly provided us
with the data from surveys of the northwest coast, and H. I. Kochman helped
in accessing computer files. The data from the surveys of Everglades
National Park were provided by 0. L. Bass and 0. K. Odell. We appreciate the
statistical advice given by K. M. Portier and the assistance of D. A. Stinson
in preparation of the manuscript. We thank H. I. Kochman for his thorough
review of an earlier draft of this manuscript and D. K. Odell, T. J. O'Shea,
G. B. Rathbun, D. B Siniff, and J. R. Wilcox for their comments on the same
draft. This study was funded by a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service to the School of Forest Resources and Conservation in the University
of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. It was conducted
under Cooperative Agreement No. 14-16-0009-1544, Research Work Order No. 2 of
the Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit.









RECOMMENDATIONS


1. Power plant sites are sufficiently different that survey data need
to be analyzed separately for each site. The value of combining sites
that are close together should be further explored.

2. Since the importance of various measures of temperature varies from site
to site, it is premature to reduce the number of temperature variables
being monitored. Additional measures (such as water temperature in the
waterways that become too cold for manatees) should be monitored during
surveys. Survey conditions must be considered as well as temperature.

3. Analysis of covariance, which can control variation in temperature and
other environmental parameters, is a promising technique for statistical
comparison of manatee counts between years. Aerial surveys should be
designed to collect data appropriate for such analysis. The number of
surveys at each site during each winter should be based on the level of
confidence desired to detect changes between years. Temperature
information must be available for all surveys, and survey conditions
should be measured, not estimated.

3. Criteria need to be developed that will indicate when a survey should be
aborted due to poor visibility. Visibility appears to be a better
criterion than temperature for deciding when to schedule surveys
because the effects of temperature can be accounted for statistically.
In contrast, the parameters currently used to estimate survey conditions
are too subjective to be included in statistical analyses as control
variables.

4. Because the relationship between manatee counts and temperature may vary
between winters (making the use of analysis of covariance inappro-
priate), it is very important that survey methods are consistent. It
may be better for surveys to be conducted separately at each site rather
than trying to include all sites in statewide surveys.

5. No method for detecting statistically significant changes in maximum
counts currently exists. Therefore, an index based on mean adjusted
counts is useful as a method for detecting statistically significant
changes in manatee abundance at power plants. However, use of an index
based on mean adjusted counts should complement rather than replace the
index based on maximum counts since these two indices measure different
aspects of manatee use of warm-water refuges.









INTRODUCTION


Existing aerial survey data need to be analyzed to develop an index that
will accurately reflect trends in abundance of manatees (Trichechus manatus)
in Florida (Eberhardt 1982). Counts have been made at warm water refuges
since the late 1960's (Irvine and Campbell 1978, Hartman 1979, Patton 1980,
Packard 1981, Shane 1981, Powell and Rathbun 1983). The most consistent
series of aerial surveys have been conducted since 1977 by Florida Audubon
Society (FAS) under contract to Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) (Rose
and McCutcheon 1980, Raymond 1981, McGehee 1982).

Typically, the maximum total count at each site has been used as a
simple index to evaluate trends in abundance (Eberhardt 1982). This approach
has limitations because it does not allow statistical comparison between
years to determine if changes in counts are significant. It is well
documented that manatee abundance at warm water refuges is related to
temperature (Hartman 1979, Rose and McCutcheon 1980). The effects of weather
variations between years must somehow be accounted for in assessing changes
in manatee counts.

Eberhardt (1982) suggested that temperature could be used as an
auxiliary variable to correct for bias in counts. He proposed examining the
relationship between lagged temperature variables and manatee counts and
plotting the residuals from the regression of temperature against time. The
plots would indicate whether season and location influenced the relationship
between temperature and manatee counts. The goal of such an analysis would
be to develop a model that corrects for bias in aerial counts. Estimates
obtained from such a model could be validated by comparison with unbiased
population estimates.

In this report, we have taken the initial steps in developing an index
to monitor manatee population trends. It may take several years to meet the
ultimate objective of evaluating statistical significance of population
trends. Initially, existing data were compiled and evaluated. Evaluation
was based on the consistency with which environmental variables were
monitored in the different studies. Secondly, the most appropriate data set
was analyzed to determine the effect of environmental variables on manatee
counts. Finally, to make comparisons between counts, several statistical
models using temperature variables to adjust counts were explored.
Recommendations regarding the future design of aerial survey studies are the
short-term result of these analyses.

METHODS

Data Compilation

Winter aerial survey data for 19 sites were provided by cooperators
(Figure 1). Of sites surveyed regularly since 1977 by Rose and McCutcheon
(1980), Raymond (1981) and McGehee (1982), eight sites are power plants
(Indian River, Cape Canaveral, Vero Beach, Fort Pierce, Riviera Beach, Fort
Lauderdale, Port Everglades, Fort Myers) and one site (Hobe Sound) is a
manatee feeding area associated with a power plant. Additional studies have
been conducted in feeding areas of Brevard County (Shane 1981) and in the









INTRODUCTION


Existing aerial survey data need to be analyzed to develop an index that
will accurately reflect trends in abundance of manatees (Trichechus manatus)
in Florida (Eberhardt 1982). Counts have been made at warm water refuges
since the late 1960's (Irvine and Campbell 1978, Hartman 1979, Patton 1980,
Packard 1981, Shane 1981, Powell and Rathbun 1983). The most consistent
series of aerial surveys have been conducted since 1977 by Florida Audubon
Society (FAS) under contract to Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) (Rose
and McCutcheon 1980, Raymond 1981, McGehee 1982).

Typically, the maximum total count at each site has been used as a
simple index to evaluate trends in abundance (Eberhardt 1982). This approach
has limitations because it does not allow statistical comparison between
years to determine if changes in counts are significant. It is well
documented that manatee abundance at warm water refuges is related to
temperature (Hartman 1979, Rose and McCutcheon 1980). The effects of weather
variations between years must somehow be accounted for in assessing changes
in manatee counts.

Eberhardt (1982) suggested that temperature could be used as an
auxiliary variable to correct for bias in counts. He proposed examining the
relationship between lagged temperature variables and manatee counts and
plotting the residuals from the regression of temperature against time. The
plots would indicate whether season and location influenced the relationship
between temperature and manatee counts. The goal of such an analysis would
be to develop a model that corrects for bias in aerial counts. Estimates
obtained from such a model could be validated by comparison with unbiased
population estimates.

In this report, we have taken the initial steps in developing an index
to monitor manatee population trends. It may take several years to meet the
ultimate objective of evaluating statistical significance of population
trends. Initially, existing data were compiled and evaluated. Evaluation
was based on the consistency with which environmental variables were
monitored in the different studies. Secondly, the most appropriate data set
was analyzed to determine the effect of environmental variables on manatee
counts. Finally, to make comparisons between counts, several statistical
models using temperature variables to adjust counts were explored.
Recommendations regarding the future design of aerial survey studies are the
short-term result of these analyses.

METHODS

Data Compilation

Winter aerial survey data for 19 sites were provided by cooperators
(Figure 1). Of sites surveyed regularly since 1977 by Rose and McCutcheon
(1980), Raymond (1981) and McGehee (1982), eight sites are power plants
(Indian River, Cape Canaveral, Vero Beach, Fort Pierce, Riviera Beach, Fort
Lauderdale, Port Everglades, Fort Myers) and one site (Hobe Sound) is a
manatee feeding area associated with a power plant. Additional studies have
been conducted in feeding areas of Brevard County (Shane 1981) and in the









INTRODUCTION


Existing aerial survey data need to be analyzed to develop an index that
will accurately reflect trends in abundance of manatees (Trichechus manatus)
in Florida (Eberhardt 1982). Counts have been made at warm water refuges
since the late 1960's (Irvine and Campbell 1978, Hartman 1979, Patton 1980,
Packard 1981, Shane 1981, Powell and Rathbun 1983). The most consistent
series of aerial surveys have been conducted since 1977 by Florida Audubon
Society (FAS) under contract to Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) (Rose
and McCutcheon 1980, Raymond 1981, McGehee 1982).

Typically, the maximum total count at each site has been used as a
simple index to evaluate trends in abundance (Eberhardt 1982). This approach
has limitations because it does not allow statistical comparison between
years to determine if changes in counts are significant. It is well
documented that manatee abundance at warm water refuges is related to
temperature (Hartman 1979, Rose and McCutcheon 1980). The effects of weather
variations between years must somehow be accounted for in assessing changes
in manatee counts.

Eberhardt (1982) suggested that temperature could be used as an
auxiliary variable to correct for bias in counts. He proposed examining the
relationship between lagged temperature variables and manatee counts and
plotting the residuals from the regression of temperature against time. The
plots would indicate whether season and location influenced the relationship
between temperature and manatee counts. The goal of such an analysis would
be to develop a model that corrects for bias in aerial counts. Estimates
obtained from such a model could be validated by comparison with unbiased
population estimates.

In this report, we have taken the initial steps in developing an index
to monitor manatee population trends. It may take several years to meet the
ultimate objective of evaluating statistical significance of population
trends. Initially, existing data were compiled and evaluated. Evaluation
was based on the consistency with which environmental variables were
monitored in the different studies. Secondly, the most appropriate data set
was analyzed to determine the effect of environmental variables on manatee
counts. Finally, to make comparisons between counts, several statistical
models using temperature variables to adjust counts were explored.
Recommendations regarding the future design of aerial survey studies are the
short-term result of these analyses.

METHODS

Data Compilation

Winter aerial survey data for 19 sites were provided by cooperators
(Figure 1). Of sites surveyed regularly since 1977 by Rose and McCutcheon
(1980), Raymond (1981) and McGehee (1982), eight sites are power plants
(Indian River, Cape Canaveral, Vero Beach, Fort Pierce, Riviera Beach, Fort
Lauderdale, Port Everglades, Fort Myers) and one site (Hobe Sound) is a
manatee feeding area associated with a power plant. Additional studies have
been conducted in feeding areas of Brevard County (Shane 1981) and in the

























Suwannee River -
Withlacoochee River
Barge Canal
Crystal River Power Plant-
Crystal River/Kings Bay
Homosassa River /
Chassahowitzka River -


Big


I I
0 100 KM


Fort Myers (FM)-



Everglades
National Park


Indian River (IR)
Cape Canaveral (CC)

Brevard County

Vero Beach (VB)
-Fort Pierce(FP)
Hobe Sound (HS)

Riviera Beach (RV)

Fort Lauderdale (FL)
Port Everglades (PE)


Locations of survey sites. Solid dots indicate power plant sites.
Letters in parentheses are abbreviations for sites surveyed by
Rose and McCutcheon (1980). Power plants operated by Florida
Power and Light Company are: CC, VB, FP, RV, FL, PE and FM.


Figure 1.









Hobe Sound/Riviera Beach area (Packard 1981). Surveys conducted in the
Everglades National Park covered broad areas since there is no known
localized refuge in that region (Odell 1977, Bass, in prep.). The Big Bend
site in Tampa Bay is a power plant with warm-water discharge (Patton 1980),
as is the Crystal River power plant (Hartman 1979, Powell and Rathbun 1983).
On the northwestern coast of Florida, warm springs in Crystal and Homosassa
Rivers provide winter refuges, and the other river systems surveyed
(Suwannee, Withlacoochee/Barge Canal, Chassahowitzka) are primarily
non-winter habitat (Hartman 1979, Powell and Rathbun 1983). The data
compiled for this study were stored on disk at the Northeast Regional Data
Center at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida and are available
upon request.

Data sets were evaluated by considering the duration, methodological
consistency, and number of monitored environmental variables. Only a portion
of the data was suitable for the analyses designed to meet the objectives of
this report.

Analyses

Calculated summary statistics included means, standard deviations,
ranges, and Pearson product-moment correlations. Several temperature
measures were examined (Appendix A): maximum, minimum, mean, and range of air
temperature, the intake and effluent water temperatures at power plants, and
the difference between intake and effluent temperatures. Air temperatures on
the day of survey and one and two days prior to survey were examined. Water
temperatures were from the day of survey. The number of days following the
last cold front (see Appendix A for definition) was determined for each'
survey. The temperature variables measured for the Riviera Beach power plant
also were applied to Hobe Sound. Variables indicating survey conditions were
included: water clarity, water surface conditions, overall survey conditions,
and date.

Stepwise linear regression (MAXR: SAS Institute 1982) was used to
identify variables that best accounted for the variation in manatee counts at
each site. The procedure identifies the variables which produce the highest
R2 for each variable model (one-variable model, two-variable model, etc.)
(SAS Institute 1982). The "best" model was identified by a combination of
the following criteria: a low value for Mallows' C(P) statistic, little
change in the mean square error value, high value of R2, and inclusion of
variables with significant probability levels. Linear regressions were
calculated on two sets of variables: temperature variables alone and
temperature and survey condition variables combined.

Analysis of variance (GLM: SAS Institute 1982) was used to determine
whether site and survey conditions affected the number of observed manatees.
The effects of temperature were not controlled for. The total number of
observed manatees was the dependent variable in the analysis of variance
model.

The consistency of the relationship between temperature and manatee
counts at each site was examined by plotting residuals against the survey
date. The residuals from the regression of manatee counts against the survey









date. The residuals from the regression of manatee counts against minimum
air temperature one day prior to survey were plotted. The residuals from
analysis of covariance models also were plotted. The minimum temperature one
day prior to survey was used in the regression because it tended to have
highest correlations with total manatee counts.

Analysis of covariance (Snedecor and Cochran 1980) was used to test for
the difference in manatee counts among winters while controlling for the
variance associated with temperature variables. The covariates were chosen
by examining the results of the linear regression for each site. The
temperature variable with the highest F value was used as the first
covariate. For any additional variables with high F values, the correlation
between the variable and the initial covariate was examined; the variable was
not used if it was highly correlated with the initial covariate since it
would have accounted for little additional variation.

Covariance analysis tests for the differences among the intercepts of
the regression line for each group (winter) assuming a constant regression
relationship for all groups. To test this assumption, the heterogeneity of
slopes was examined to determined if the regression coefficients were
constant over all groups. A general linear model (GLM: SAS Institute 1982)
was used to test for heterogeneity of slopes. The covariates and interaction
terms (describing the interaction between the covariates and winter) were
included in the GLM procedure. A significant interaction between a variable
and winter (P < 0.05) indicated that the regression coefficients were not
constant over winters. Analysis of covariance was not used to compare
adjusted means when the regression relationship was not constant.

Several analysis of covariance models were examined for. each site.
Where appropriate, non-linear relationships were examined by including the
squared value of variables. When the heterogeneity of slope hypothesis could
not be rejected, analysis of variance with Duncan's multiple range test
(Snedecor and Cochran 1980) was used to determine the significance of
differences in counts among winters.

To describe the yearly trends in manatee counts while adjusting for the
effects of temperature, adjusted means from the covariance models were
plotted for each site. The slope of the trend was determined by linear
regression.

RESULTS

A brief description of the compiled data sets and an explanation of
which data were chosen for statistical analyses follows. Variables to be
included in the analyses are then identified. Finally, statistical models
testing for changes in total counts of manatees among years are examined.

Data Sets

Data from six studies were compiled (Table 1). Aerial surveys of FPL
and associated power plants (Appendix A) were conducted from December 1977 to
March 1982 and included sufficient information to determine 15 temperature









date. The residuals from the regression of manatee counts against minimum
air temperature one day prior to survey were plotted. The residuals from
analysis of covariance models also were plotted. The minimum temperature one
day prior to survey was used in the regression because it tended to have
highest correlations with total manatee counts.

Analysis of covariance (Snedecor and Cochran 1980) was used to test for
the difference in manatee counts among winters while controlling for the
variance associated with temperature variables. The covariates were chosen
by examining the results of the linear regression for each site. The
temperature variable with the highest F value was used as the first
covariate. For any additional variables with high F values, the correlation
between the variable and the initial covariate was examined; the variable was
not used if it was highly correlated with the initial covariate since it
would have accounted for little additional variation.

Covariance analysis tests for the differences among the intercepts of
the regression line for each group (winter) assuming a constant regression
relationship for all groups. To test this assumption, the heterogeneity of
slopes was examined to determined if the regression coefficients were
constant over all groups. A general linear model (GLM: SAS Institute 1982)
was used to test for heterogeneity of slopes. The covariates and interaction
terms (describing the interaction between the covariates and winter) were
included in the GLM procedure. A significant interaction between a variable
and winter (P < 0.05) indicated that the regression coefficients were not
constant over winters. Analysis of covariance was not used to compare
adjusted means when the regression relationship was not constant.

Several analysis of covariance models were examined for. each site.
Where appropriate, non-linear relationships were examined by including the
squared value of variables. When the heterogeneity of slope hypothesis could
not be rejected, analysis of variance with Duncan's multiple range test
(Snedecor and Cochran 1980) was used to determine the significance of
differences in counts among winters.

To describe the yearly trends in manatee counts while adjusting for the
effects of temperature, adjusted means from the covariance models were
plotted for each site. The slope of the trend was determined by linear
regression.

RESULTS

A brief description of the compiled data sets and an explanation of
which data were chosen for statistical analyses follows. Variables to be
included in the analyses are then identified. Finally, statistical models
testing for changes in total counts of manatees among years are examined.

Data Sets

Data from six studies were compiled (Table 1). Aerial surveys of FPL
and associated power plants (Appendix A) were conducted from December 1977 to
March 1982 and included sufficient information to determine 15 temperature









Table 1. Description of data
Florida.


compiled from aerial surveys of manatees in


Location Dates Sources Data Type


Eastern and
Southwestern
Power Plants



Brevard County



Riviera Beach/
Hobe Sound


Tampa Bay Power
Plant

Northwest
Coast



Everglades
National Park


1977-82





1978-80



1980-81



1979-80


1977-83




1973-81


Rose and McCutcheon
1980, Raymond 1981,
McGehee 1982



Shane 1981



Packard 1981



Patton 1981


Powell and-
Rathbun 1983,
Kochman et al.
1983

Odell 1977
Bass, in prep.


Manatee counts,
water clarity,
surface conditions,
survey conditions,
water and lagged air
temperatures

Manatee counts, air
temperature on
survey date, survey
conditions

Manatee counts,
water and lagged air
temperature tide,
water clarity

Manatee counts


Manatee counts,
incomplete water
temperature


Manatee counts









variables and three categorical variables describing survey conditions. The
Brevard County surveys (Appendix B) cover two of the power plants included in
the FPL data set from 1978 to 1980, as well as adjacent summer habitat. Only
temperature on the day of survey and a subjective assessment of survey
conditions were included as environmental variables. Riviera Beach and Hobe
Sound (Appendix C) were surveyed independently from the FPL surveys in winter
1980-81. These data included four temperature variables and a continuous
variable describing survey conditions. The Tampa Bay Big Bend power plant
(Appendix D) was surveyed during 1979 and 1980. Specific information on
temperature and survey conditions were not reported for each flight. Data
from aerial surveys of the rivers along the northwest coast of Florida
(Appendix E) were available for 1977 to 1983. Water temperatures from the
intake of the Crystal River power plant were available for a limited number
of surveys. The Everglades National Park (Appendix F) was surveyed from 1973
to 1981; however, no information on associated environmental variables was
available.

The FPL data set covered nine sites and was the only set with sufficient
variables and numbers of surveys for use in the planned analyses of this
study. Of the nine sites surveyed (Table 2), two sites, which were not
included in the last three years, were dropped from further analysis (Vero
Beach and Fort Pierce). The number of surveys per year ranged from 9 to 23.

Identification of Important Variables

Variables that may have contributed to variation in manatee counts were
examined: winter; site; survey conditions; water clarity; water surface
conditions; air temperature (maximum, minimum, mean, range) on the day of
survey and one and two days prior; effluent and intake water temperatures on
the day of the survey; the difference between intake and effluent
temperatures; date of survey; time of survey; and type of survey.
Definitions and ranges of these variables are listed in Appendix A. To
determine how to partition the data set, we examined the effects of single
variables upon the variance of manatee counts and interactions among
variables.

Based on analysis of variance over all years and temperatures, total
manatee counts differed significantly by site (P = 0.04). Survey conditions
did not account for the variation in counts of manatees over all sites and
all years (P = 0.42). However, examination of the partitioned data set
indicates that survey conditions varied among sites and years (Table 2). For
the entire data set, 60% of the surveys were made under fair or better
conditions. Three sites (Riviera Beach, Fort Myers, Port Everglades) had a
higher proportion of surveys conducted under good conditions. Survey
conditions were worse in 1978-79 and 1979-80 than in other winters.
Therefore, we concluded that sites should be examined independently and that
the effect of survey conditions could not be discounted in further analyses.

The relationship of relative manatee counts to water clarity was complex
(Table 3). Water clarity was seldom high (11% of the surveys) and high
counts (within 67% of the maximum) were relatively rare (5% of the surveys).
High counts were obtained more frequently (15 surveys) under poor water
clarity than under good water clarity (8 surveys). However, under good water
clarity, high counts were more probable (8 out of 77 surveys) than under low
water clarity (15 out of 381 surveys).









Table 2. Number of surveys per winter at each site and
survey conditions .


percentage of good


WINTER (November to March) TOTAL

SITE 77-78 78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82
No. (%) No. ( No.T -T N~o. (% No. (%) No. (%)

Indian River 15 (40) 23 (50) 20 (37) 16 (44) 20 (75) 94 (50)
Cape Canaveral 15 (40) 23 (44) 20 (35) 16 (38) 20 (70) 94 (46)
Vero Beach 16 19 0 0 0 35
Fort Pierce 11 0 0 0 0 11
Hobe Sound 11 (73) 23 (50) 20 (42) 16 (81) 18 (58) 88 (59)
Riviera Beach 15 (93) 23 (64) 20 (84) 15(100) 18(100) 91 (87)
Fort Myers 15 (87) 22 (52) 17 (75) 15 (80) 17 (76) 86 (73)
Fort Lauderdale 9 (44) 22 (33) 20 (42) 14 (38) 17 (53) 82 (41)
Port Everglades 14 (71) 23 (64) 19 (56) 14 (64) 17.(82) 87 (67)

Total (%) 121 (65) 178(51) 136(52) 106(63) 127(75) 668(60)


alncludes surveys evaluated as "very good" to "fair" conditions. Excludes
missing data from the total in calculation of percentage of good surveys.














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High manatee counts were not a simple function of survey conditions
(Table 4). Calm survey conditions were relatively rare (3% of the surveys).
More high counts were obtained under rippled or choppy conditions than under
calm or very choppy conditions.

Sites in northern Florida (Indian River, Cape Canaveral, Hobe Sound) had
fewer significant correlations between temperature variables and manatee
counts than southern sites (Table 5). In general, the minimum and mean
temperatures had higher correlations than maximum temperature and temperature
range. Intake temperature was correlated with manatee counts at more sites
than either the effluent temperature or the range between intake and effluent
temperature. The most predictive temperature measures were the minimum and
mean on the day prior to the survey. Riviera Beach and Fort Myers had higher
temperature correlations than other sites.

Results of stepwise linear regression were different for each site
(Table 6). Regression models were more predictive for southern sites (Fort
Lauderdale, Port Everglades) than for northern sites as indicated by R2
values. Maximum air temperature and intake water temperature on the day of
the survey entered into most of the regression equations. In contrast to the
patterns indicated by correlation coefficients, temperatures on the day prior
to the survey did not enter into many of the regression equations. Fort
Myers and Cape Canaveral differed from the other sites because no temperature
variable explained a high degree of variation in manatee counts, as indicated
by F values above 20.0. Seasonal trends at Hobe Sound and Port Everglades
were indicated by inclusion of the date in the regression equation. At least
one parameter accounting for survey conditions entered into regression
equations for each site.

A separate set of regression analyses were run excluding survey
condition variables as these variables represent ordinal type data. The R2
values of these regressions were lower than the regressions described in
Table 6, and covariance models based on variables chosen from this set of
regression analyses did not pass the test for heterogeneity of slopes.
Therefore, the regression analyses which'included survey condition variables
were used to identify variables to be used in development of covariance
models.

Site-Specific Models

Characteristics of the data and the covariance models examined for each
site are described below. Results of the analysis of variance and covariance
are summarized in Table 7.

Indian River

Ninety-four surveys were analyzed from the Indian River site (Appendix
G). The average number of manatees observed was 14 with a range of 0 to 42.
Fair to poor overall survey conditions were the average at Indian River.
Water clarity averaged fair to poor, and the surface conditions averaged
choppy. On survey days, maximum air temperatures ranged from 00C to 30C
while minimum air temperatures ranged from -4C to 210C. The mean intake
water temperature was 190C and mean effluent water temperature was 260C. The
mean difference between intake and effluent water temperature was 70C.
















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Table 5. Significant correlations of manatee counts with temperature
variables.

SITEc

VARIABLEb IR CC HS RV FM FL PE


Day of survey

MAXTEMPO -0.49 -0.63 -0.42 -0.49
MINTEMPO -0.63 -0.66 -0.43 -0.55
TEMPO (mean) -0.62 -0.68 -0.44 -0.55
TRANGO +0.40 +0.26 +0.39
EFFTEMP -0.50 -0.46 *
INTKTEMP -0.51 -0.66 -0.54 -0.55
WTRANGE +0.26

One day prior

MAXTEMP1 -0.63 -0.69 -0.47 -0.59
MINTEMP1 -0.63 -0.64 -0.53 -0.64
TEMP1 (mean) -0.67 -0.70 -0.54 -0.65
TRANG1 +0.21 +0.29 +0.34

Two days prior

MAXTEMP2 -0.47 -0.59 -0.45 -0.61
MINTEMP2 -0.27 -0.52 -0.49 -0.42 -0.73
TEMP2 (mean) -0.24 -0.54 -0.58 -0.50 -0.73
TRANG2 +0.27 +0.44


aAsterisk indicates Pearson's product-moment correlation is
at P = 0.05. All other correlations are significant.


bFor description of variable, see Appendix A.

CSites are arranged along a north to south latitudinal gradient.
explanation of abbreviations see Figure 1.


not significant


For









Table 6. Variables chosen in stepwise
manatee counts (F values)


linear regression predicting


SITE

VARIABLE IRb CC HSc RVb FM FL PE

MAXTEMPO 10.5 23.7 7.8 6.4
MINTEMPO 5.7 *
INTKTEMP 4.7 0.8 12.0 1.8 *
FRONT 9.1 *
MAXTEMP1 7.3 12.5 *
MINTEMP1 56.8 *
TEMP1 4.2 *

MAXTEMP2 0.8 *
MINTEMP2 9.2 *
TRANG2 4.6 8.3 *
TEMP2 23.2 37.2

DATE 20.7 4.2
DATE2 21.0 6.0

SURFCOND 4.1 3.4 *
SURVCOND 2.6 5.0 6.4 *
WATCLAR 1.4 8.5

TYPSURV 2.8 7.2 *

WINTER 26.8 1.0 14.7 *


R2 of regression 0.47 0.33 0.48 0.64 0.62 0.84 0.73

aVariables included in the linear regression are listed in Appendix A.
An asterisk indicates that the variable did not explain sufficient
variance to enter into the model. A minus indicated variable was not
included in the regression due to missing values. For explanation of
abbreviations of site names, see Figure 1.
bariables not included due to missing values: INTKTEMP, EFFTEMP, WTRANG
Variables not included due to missing values: EFFTEMP, WTRANG
cVariables not included due to missing values: EFFTEMP, WTRANG










Table 7. Results of analysis of variance and covariance.a


SITEb COVARIATES R2 SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WINTERSc
77-78 78-79 79-80 80-81 81-82


MINTEMP2
MINTEMPO
MINTEMPO2
MINTEMP22




MAXTEMP1
MAXTEMP12
INTKTEMP
INTKTEMP2


MAXTEMPO
MAXTEMPO2
DATE
DATE2


MAXTEMPO



None



MINTEMP1


TEMP2
DATE
DATE2


0.54







0.31





0.28





0.32



0.11



0.36


0.60


+-----------+
+------------------+
+---------------------------+
+--------------------------+
+-------------------+
+-----------+


No differences





No differences





+------------------------+
+---------------------------+


+-----------------------+
+-------------------------------------+


+-----------------------+
+---------------+
+----------+
.. .. .. .. + -


No differences


aAnalysis of variance rather than covariance was used for the Fort Myers (FM)
data because the relation between the covariates and the dependent variable
(manatee counts) did not pass the test for heterogenity of slopes over all
years.

bThe meanings of abbreviations are listed in Figure 1.

CWinters marked by "+" and connected by a dashed line were significantly
different at the level of P = 0.05.









No consistent pattern was apparent in the plots of residuals
(deviations) of the regression between temperature (MINTEMP1) and manatee
counts (Appendix H). High deviations occurred at different times of the
season when winters were compared and were distributed throughout the season
when all winters were combined.

As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variance in manatee
counts was influenced by winter, minimum temperature two days prior to
survey, minimum temperature on the day of survey, maximum temperature one day
prior to survey, and survey conditions (Table 6). In the analysis for
heterogeneity of slope, the following variables were included: winter
(WINTER), minimum air temperature two days prior to survey (MINTEMP2) and its
squared value (MINTEMP22), minimum air temperature on the day of survey
(MINTEMPO) and its squared value (MINTEMP02), and terms for the interaction
between WINTER and MINTEMP2 and WINTER and MINTEMPO. This analysis indicated
that the slopes of the regressions for each winter were not significantly
different, thus the assumptions for analysis of covariance were met.

The analysis of covariance model included the variables WINTER,
MINTEMP2, MINTEMP22, MINTEMPO, and MINTEMPO2 (Table 7). The R2 value for the
overall regression was 0.54. Winters were significantly different
(F statistic, P = 0.0001). In comparing winters, winters 78-79, 79-80, and
80-81 had a significantly higher mean adjusted number of manatees than
winters 77-78 and 81-82 (P <0.05).

Cape Canaveral

Ninety-four surveys were analyzed from the Cape Canaveral site (Appendix
G): The average number of manatees observed was 19 with a range of 0 to 120.
The maximum count (120) was considerably higher than the maximum count at
Indian River (42). Fair to poor overall survey conditions were the average
at Cape Canaveral, as they were for Indian River. Water clarity and surface
conditions were similar to those at Indian River. Maximum and minimum air
temperatures and mean intake temperatures were similar to those of Indian
River. The mean effluent temperature (220C) was slightly lower than Indian
River as was the mean difference between intake and effluent water
temperature (40C).

When plotting the residuals of counts regressed on the minimum air
temperature one day prior to survey against time (Appendix H), a pattern was
apparent. In all winters except 79-80, larger deviations occurred late in
the winter. When all winters were combined, the pattern still emerged.

As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variation in manatee
counts was influenced by the maximum air temperature one day prior to
survey, the number of days since the last front, the intake water
temperature, the air temperature range two days prior to survey, and surface
conditions (Table 6). The following variables were included in the test for
heterogeneity of slope: winter (WINTER), maximum air temperature one day
prior to survey (MAXTEMP1) and its squared value (MAXTEMP12), the intake
water temperature (INTKTEMP) and its squared value (INTKTEMP2), and terms for
the interactions between WINTER and MAXTEMP1 and WINTER and INTKTEMP. This
analysis indicated that the slopes of the regressions for each winter were
not significantly different, thus analysis of covariance was appropriate.









The analysis of covariance included the variables WINTER, MAXTEMP1,
MAXTEMP12, INTKTEMP, and INTKTEMP2 (Table 7). The R2 value for the overall
regression was 0.31. In comparing winters, there was no significant
difference (P > 0.05) in the adjusted mean number of manatees sighted each
winter.

Hobe Sound

Eighty-seven surveys were analyzed from the Hobe Sound site (Appendix
G). The average number of manatees observed was 16 with a range of 0 to 97.
Fair overall survey conditions were the average at Hobe Sound. Surface
conditions averaged rippled, and water clarity averaged fair to poor. No air
and water temperatures were measured at Hobe Sound, but due to the proximity
of the Riviera Beach power plant, environmental data from it were used for
Hobe Sound.

The residuals from the regression of counts against the minimum air
temperature one day prior to survey tend to be higher in the middle of the
winter than at the beginning or end (Appendix A). However, not all counts
made during the winter are higher than would be predicted by the regression.

As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variation in manatee
counts was influenced by date, the maximum air temperature on the day of
survey and two days prior to survey, the type of survey, water clarity, and
intake water temperature. In the initial analysis for heterogeneity of
slope, the following variables were included: winter (WINTER), maximum air
-temperature on the day of survey (MAXTEMPO) and its squared value
(MAXTEMPO2), date (DATE) and its squared value (DATE2), and terms for the
interaction between WINTER and MAXTEMPO and WINTER and DATE. This analysis
indicated that the slopes of the regressions for each winter were not
significantly different, thus analysis of covariance was appropriate.

The analysis of covariance included the variables WINTER, MAXTEMPO,
MAXTEMPO2, DATE, and DATE2 (Table 7). The R2 value for the overall
regression was 0.28. In comparing winters, there was no significant
difference (P > 0.05) in the adjusted mean number of manatees sighted each
winter.

Riviera Beach

Ninety-one surveys were analyzed from Riviera Beach (Appendix G). The
average number of manatees observed was 26 with a range of 0 to 168. Survey
conditions and water clarity averaged fair, and surface conditions averaged
choppy. Compared to the more northerly plants, maximum air temperatures were
a few degrees higher (100C to 300C) as were minimum air temperatures (-10C
to 25C) on survey days. The mean intake water temperature (220C) and mean
effluent water temperature (290C) were also warmer. The mean difference
between intake and effluent water temperature was 70C.

Examining the plots of the residuals of counts regressed on the minimum
air temperature one day prior to the survey against time (Appendix H), there
seems to be more variation in counts during mid-winter, but it is not a
strong pattern. High positive residuals tended to occur in mid-winter in all
years except for winter 81-82.









As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variance in manatee
counts was influenced by the maximum air temperature on the day of the
survey, the average of the maximum and minimum air temperatures two days
prior to the survey, winter, and survey conditions (Table 6). In the
analysis for heterogeneity of slope, the following variables were included:
winter (WINTER), maximum air temperature on the survey day (MAXTEMPO) and its
squared value (MAXTEMPO2), and a term for the interaction between WINTER and
MAXTEMPO. TEMP2 was not included in the model because it was highly
correlated with MAXTEMPO (P = 0.003). The slopes were not significantly
different, and the analysis of covariance included the variables WINTER and
MAXTEMPO. The R2 value for the overall regression was 0.32. Winters were
significantly different (F statistic, P = 0.05). In comparing winters,
80-81 and 81-82 had a significantly higher mean adjusted count than winter
78-79 and winter 80-81 had a significantly higher mean adjusted count than
77-78 (P < 0.05).

Fort Myers

Eighty-six surveys were analyzed from Fort Myers (Appendix G). The
average number of manatees observed was 63 with a range of 0 to 271. Survey
conditions and water clarity averaged fair, while surface conditions were
usually rippled. On survey days, maximum air temperatures had a wider range
(100C to 31C) than Riviera Beach while minimum air temperatures ranged from
-3C to 250C. The mean intake water temperature (200C) was between that of
the northern plants and Riviera Beach, as was the mean effluent water
temperature (240C). The mean difference between intake and effluent water
temperature (4C) was similar to Cape Canaveral.

In the residuals of counts regressed on the minimum air temperature one
day prior to the survey against time (Appendix H), there is considerable
variation in counts, but it seems to be spread over the entire winter. In
three out of the five winters, high positive residuals tended to occur in
mid-winter.

As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variance in manatee
counts was influenced by the intake water temperature, survey conditions, and
the average of the maximum and minimum air temperatures one day prior to
survey (Table 6). In the analysis of heterogeneity of slopes, the following
variables were included: winter (WINTER), the intake water temperature
(INTKTEMP) and its squared value (INTKTEMP2), and a term for the interaction
between WINTER and INTKTEMP. The slopes of the regressions for each winter
were significantly different indicating a change in the relationship between
INTKTEMP and counts over winters. Because this relationship was not
constant, analysis of covariance was not appropriate. An analysis of
variance without controlling for the effect of temperature indicated that
winter had a significant effect on the number of manatees observed (P <
0.05). In comparing mean number of manatees between winters, winter 77-78
had significantly (P < 0.05) higher number of manatees than winters 80-81 and
81-82.

Fort Lauderdale

Eighty-two surveys were analyzed from Fort Lauderdale (Appendix G). The
average number of manatees observed was 8 with a range of 0 to 54. Survey









conditions and water clarity averaged poor and surface conditions averaged
rippled. Maximum air temperatures (120C to 310C) and minimum air
temperatures (00C to 260C) were similar to those of Riviera Beach. The mean
difference between intake and effluent water temperature (40C) was similar to
Cape Canaveral and Fort Myers.

When plotting the residuals of counts regressed on the minimum air
temperature one day prior to survey against time (Appendix H), there tended
to be more variation in counts during mid-winter. High positive residuals
tended to occur during mid-winter.

As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variation in manatee
counts was influenced by minimum air temperature one day prior to survey, the
air temperature range two days prior to survey, the maximum air temperature
on the day of survey, the type of survey, the surface conditions, and the
intake water temperature (Table 6). In the analysis for heterogeneity of
slopes, the following variables were included: winter (WINTER), the minimum
air temperature one day prior to survey (MINTEMP1) and its squared value
(MINTEMP12), the air temperature range two days prior to survey (TRANGE2) and
its squared value (TRANGE22), and terms for the interaction between WINTER
and MINTEMP1 and WINTER and TRANGE2. The slopes of the regressions were not
significantly different, and the analysis of covariance included the
variables WINTER and MINTEMPI. TRANGE2 was not included in the model because
it was highly correlated with MINTEMP1 (P = 0.0002). The R2 value for the
overall regression was 0.36. Winters were significantly different
(F statistic, P = 0.0138). In comparing winters, winter 80-81 had a
significantly higher mean number of observed manatees than winters 77-78,
78-79, and 81-82 (P < 0.05).

Port Everglades

Eighty-seven surveys were analyzed from Port Everglades (Appendix G).
The average number of manatees observed was 28 with a range of 0 to 125.
Survey conditions and water clarity averaged fair and surface conditions
averaged choppy. Maximum air temperatures (120C to 310C) and minimum air
temperatures (0OC to 240C) were similar to those of Fort Lauderdale. The
mean intake water temperature was 220C and the mean effluent water
temperature was 25C. The mean difference between intake and effluent water
temperature (20C) was low.

Variation in the residuals of counts regressed on the minimum air
temperature one day prior to survey plotted against time (Appendix H) was
spread over the entire winter. However, there was a tendency for high
positive residuals to occur in mid-winter and for high negative residuals to
occur at the beginning-and end of the winter.

As indicated by the stepwise linear regression, variance in manatee
counts was influenced by the average of the maximum and minimum air
temperatures two days prior to survey, water clarity, maximum air temperature
on the day of survey, and date and its squared value (Table 6). In the
analysis for the heterogeneity of slope, the following variables were
included: winter (WINTER), the average of the maximum and minimum air
temperatures two days prior to survey (TEMP2), the date (DATE) and its
squared value (DATE2), and terms for the interaction between WINTER and TEMP2









and WINTER and DATE. MAXTEMPO was not included in the analysis because it
was highly correlated with TEMP2 (P = 0.002). The slopes of the regression
lines were not significantly different, and the analysis of covariance
included the variables WINTER, TEMP2, DATE, and DATE2. The R2 value for the
overall regression was 0.60. In comparing winters, there was no significant
difference in the adjusted mean number of manatees sighted each winter.

Comparison of Adjusted Means and Maximum Counts

In general, trends indicated by adjusted means were quite similar to
trends indicated by maximum counts (Figure 2). However, fluctuations
apparent in maximum counts were not as great in adjusted means.

The slope of the trends indicated by both indices were similar at three
sites. Both slopes were negative at Port Everglades, although adjusted means
showed less of a decline (b = -0.6) than maximum counts (b = -8.3), and
analysis of covariance indicated no significant difference among winters. At
Riviera Beach, both slopes were positive, although the magnitude of the
increase in adjusted means was lower (b = 7.4) than maximum counts (b =
24.2). The change in counts at Fort Lauderdale was very slight, as indicated
by both adjusted means (b = 0.6) and maximum counts (b = -0.7), although
adjusted counts varied significantly among winters.

Trends in the two indices differed slightly at the remaining sites.
Although a slow decline is suggested by maximum counts at Indian River (b =
-4.7) and Hobe Sound (b -3.1), adjusted means indicate little change (b =
0.4, b = 1.8, respectively). The apparent increase in maximum counts at Cape
Canaveral (b = 9.4) contrasts with little change in adjusted means (b =
-1.4). Adjusted counts at Cape Canaveral and Hobe Sound did not vary
significantly among winters.

DISCUSSION

Analysis of covariance appears to be a promising technique for
developing an index of manatee abundance that accounts for variation among
surveys due to temperature differences among winters. However, we consider
the present analyses to be preliminary because the covariance models we used
were not necessarily the best models for this index. The low R2 values for
these models suggest that the temperature variables we included were not
sufficient to account for much of the variation in counts.

Several alternatives could be pursued in subsequent refinement of these
analyses. The data set contains a high frequency of near-zero manatee
counts. Such distributions might be brought closer to normality if the data
set was partitioned to exclude surveys on which no manatees were counted, or
if a log transformation of manatee counts was performed prior to the
analyses.

However, exclusion of zero values will reduce sample sizes substantially
within the subset of data for each site and each year. If analysis of
covariance is to be used to compare indices in the future, surveys should be
designed to meet sample size requirements. Techniques for estimating
required sample sizes are described by Eberhardt (1978).









and WINTER and DATE. MAXTEMPO was not included in the analysis because it
was highly correlated with TEMP2 (P = 0.002). The slopes of the regression
lines were not significantly different, and the analysis of covariance
included the variables WINTER, TEMP2, DATE, and DATE2. The R2 value for the
overall regression was 0.60. In comparing winters, there was no significant
difference in the adjusted mean number of manatees sighted each winter.

Comparison of Adjusted Means and Maximum Counts

In general, trends indicated by adjusted means were quite similar to
trends indicated by maximum counts (Figure 2). However, fluctuations
apparent in maximum counts were not as great in adjusted means.

The slope of the trends indicated by both indices were similar at three
sites. Both slopes were negative at Port Everglades, although adjusted means
showed less of a decline (b = -0.6) than maximum counts (b = -8.3), and
analysis of covariance indicated no significant difference among winters. At
Riviera Beach, both slopes were positive, although the magnitude of the
increase in adjusted means was lower (b = 7.4) than maximum counts (b =
24.2). The change in counts at Fort Lauderdale was very slight, as indicated
by both adjusted means (b = 0.6) and maximum counts (b = -0.7), although
adjusted counts varied significantly among winters.

Trends in the two indices differed slightly at the remaining sites.
Although a slow decline is suggested by maximum counts at Indian River (b =
-4.7) and Hobe Sound (b -3.1), adjusted means indicate little change (b =
0.4, b = 1.8, respectively). The apparent increase in maximum counts at Cape
Canaveral (b = 9.4) contrasts with little change in adjusted means (b =
-1.4). Adjusted counts at Cape Canaveral and Hobe Sound did not vary
significantly among winters.

DISCUSSION

Analysis of covariance appears to be a promising technique for
developing an index of manatee abundance that accounts for variation among
surveys due to temperature differences among winters. However, we consider
the present analyses to be preliminary because the covariance models we used
were not necessarily the best models for this index. The low R2 values for
these models suggest that the temperature variables we included were not
sufficient to account for much of the variation in counts.

Several alternatives could be pursued in subsequent refinement of these
analyses. The data set contains a high frequency of near-zero manatee
counts. Such distributions might be brought closer to normality if the data
set was partitioned to exclude surveys on which no manatees were counted, or
if a log transformation of manatee counts was performed prior to the
analyses.

However, exclusion of zero values will reduce sample sizes substantially
within the subset of data for each site and each year. If analysis of
covariance is to be used to compare indices in the future, surveys should be
designed to meet sample size requirements. Techniques for estimating
required sample sizes are described by Eberhardt (1978).










Cape Canaveral


100


50-


-.9-- -- S


F7 78 79 80 81
Year

Hobe Sound


, +- S --- -0- -~T


SI I1
77 78 79 80 81
Year


'7 78 79 80 81
Year


Riviera Beach*


Year


Fort Lauderdale*


100-


50-


I I I I
!7 78 79 80 81
Year


Port Everglades






-I -.- ,--14 S5 -


I I i 1 I
77 78 79 80 81
Year


Comparison of maximum winter counts (solid line) and mean
adjusted counts based on the covariance models (dashed line).
Star indicates winter had a significant effect in analysis of
covariance. Winters are indicated by the year in December; thus
77 represents winter 77-78.


100 -


50-


150-


100-


50-


Figure 2.


Indian River*


..,=Q,. u .Q., .,.,









Covariate models that account for more of the variance in manatee counts
should be developed. Partial correlation analysis could be used to test for
interactions between covariates and to indicate different model variables.
We suspect that the differences in importance of variables as indicated by
the correlation analysis (Table 5) and regression analyses (Table 6) was
related to interactions among variables as accounted for by the regression
analysis. We introduced quadratic terms to account for apparent non-linear
relations between temperature variables and manatee counts, because we
noticed that high positive residuals from the regressions tended to occur
during mid-winter. Indeed, survey date was chosen as a variable useful for
explaining variance in counts at several sites (Table 6). However, there are
other ways of accounting for non-linear relationships within covariance
models. We did not pursue alternatives of improving covariance models
because we considered existing sample sizes to be too small to justify
extensive multivariate analyses and complex transformations.

In this analysis, we were not able to identify a set of conditions that
would predict optimal survey conditions to obtain maximum counts at each
site. Maximum counts were rarely repeated at each site as indicated by high
standard deviations.

If it is not possible to obtain replicate counts under standard survey
conditions, we are concerned that a significant change in manatee abundance
could go undetected or that an apparent trend could be erroneous. For
example, a similar maximum count (Yi) could be obtained during two winters
that varied in temperature (Ti in Figure 3). By adjusting counts to a mean
temperature, significant differences in the mean adjusted count (Yi) could be
detected. Such differences might go undetected if only maximum counts were
examined.

The differences in trends indicated by maximum counts and adjusted
counts may be due to several factors. The maximum counts at each site are
not obtained on the same day. Movements of individual manatees among power
plants have been documented (Shane 1983). This may explain why trends
indicated by maximum counts are more irregular than trends indicated by mean
adjusted counts. Alternatively, the analysis of covariance technique
"removes" the variation due to environmental factors from adjusted counts, in
contrast to maximum counts which are not "corrected" for temperature
differences among years.

In order to develop an index based on mean adjusted counts, aerial
surveys should be designed differently than those used in these analyses.
For example, results indicated an interaction between counts and survey
conditions (Tables 3 and 4). We could not control for the effects of survey
conditions in analysis of covariance because the variables were ordinal (i.e.
rank values were assigned rather than measurement of real units). Although
the rules are sometimes bent to include such data in covariate models, we
found irregularities that indicated observers had not been consistent in the
subjective evaluation of survey conditions.

There are several alternatives to resolve the problem of variation in
survey conditions. If surveys are conducted immediately following cold
fronts (as was done by FAS), survey conditions are likely to be poor. Under
this survey design, some means of measuring survey conditions (as a



































.0



I--
C 32




















Figure 3.


ACTUAL VALUES ARE SAME
ALTHOUGH COVARIATE
DIFFERS


VALUES ADJUSTED
TO MEAN COVARIATE
ARE DIFFERERENT


mean


Covariate


Illustration of the difference between an index based on
maximum counts (y1, y2) and an index based on mean adjusted
counts (Y~, 72). Bold lines indicate the regression of the
dependent variable (e.g. manatee counts) against covariates
(e.g. temperature) based on data from two time periods.









continuous variable) should be incorporated. It might be possible to develop
a technique to measure the ratio of manatees observed by means of radio
telemetry or marked animals (Packard et al. 1983). Alternatively, visibility
could be monitored by recording the threshold at which marks at different
depths are visible on submerged platforms located at several sites along the
route of the survey. We recommend aborting flights at times when visibility,
as indicated by some measurable criteria, is poor.

There is no need to wait for cold fronts if the effects of temperature
can be controlled for by analysis of covariance. In order to test for
statistical differences between winters, it would be better to have more
samples (surveys) at a range of temperatures than a few samples at colder
temperatures. In the present analysis, sample size was reduced at several
sites or during certain winters due to missing information; this contributes
to the possibility of spurious results.

Additional work is needed to identify which measures of temperature best
account for the variation in manatee counts at each site. For example, the
correlations between air temperature variables and manatee counts were not as
high as the correlation between temperature of the Intracoastal Waterway and
manatee counts at Riviera Beach/Hobe Sound (Packard 1981). Although intake
water temperature was predictive of manatee counts, the data were not
consistently available. These results suggest that it would be valuable to
monitor water temperature from the waterways that manatees leave when they
gather at power plants. Automatic monitoring stations could be established
for this purpose. Changes in barometric pressure or some other means of
identifying manatee behavior relative to cold fronts might also be
considered. The measure of days following a cold front used in this analysis
was not satisfactory because the criteria defining a front (see Appendix A)
were too restrictive. Few fronts were identified' each winter even though the
visual pattern in temperature graphs indicated several cold spells each
winter. The possibility of non-linear relations between temperature measures
and manatee counts should be explored further. A better understanding of
manatee behavior may help explain what changes in environmental and
physiological conditions trigger manatee movements. Combination of sites
located within 100 miles (i.e. Cape Canaveral and Indian River) may be
desirable if manatees move between such sites. In an unfamiliar area,
individuals may behave differently than in a familiar area.

Analysis of covariance was not possible at Fort Myers where the
relationship between temperature and manatee counts differed among winters.
Site-specific studies should be initiated to discover the reason for such
variation. As Eberhardt (1982) suggested, it maybe necessary to include a
larger area in the survey route. A means of comparing changes in survey
conditions from one year to the next should be considered. For example,
higher counts were obtained at Fort Myers in winter 77-78 when surveys were
two days long. In successive winters, Fort Myers was the last site on a
one-day survey route, thus altering the time of day that surveys were
conducted. Except on very cold days, manatees at Riviera Beach tended to
leave the power plant in the afternoon (Packard 1981); behavior at Fort Myers
may be similar.

We are optimistic that an index of manatee abundance can be
statistically compared among years by means of analysis of covariance or some









other regression technique. Although the currently available survey data are
not appropriate to make conclusions regarding significant changes in past
years, an appropriate survey design should be developed to collect the
necessary information in the future. This would involve appropriate sample
size at each site, some means of standardizing survey conditions, and
consistent monitoring of temperature variables. Analysis of trends indicated
by adjusted counts would complement rather than replace maximum counts since
the two indices measure different aspects of manatee use of warm-water
refuges.









LITERATURE CITED


Bass, 0. L., Jr., in preparation. Summary of manatee sightings in
Everglades National Park. December 1979 September 1981. Everglades
National Park, Homestead, FL.

Eberhardt, L. L. 1978. Appraising variability in population studies. J.
Wildl. Manage. 42:207-238.

Eberhardt, L. L. 1982. Censusing manatees. Prepared for U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, P.O. No. 40181-0414. Manatee Population Research
Report No. 1. Fl. Coop. Fish and Wildl. Res. Unit. Gainesville, FL.
18pp.

Hartman, D. S. 1979. Ecology and behavior of the manatee (Trichechus
manatus) in Florida. Am. Soc. Mammal. Spec. Publ. No. 5. 153pp.

Irvine, A. B., and H. W. Campbell. 1978. Aerial census of the West Indian
manatee, Trichechus manatus, in the southeastern United States. J.
Mammal. 59:613-617.

Kochman, H. I., G. B. Rathbun, and J. A. Powell. 1983. Use of Kings Bay,
Crystal River, Florida by the West Indian Manatee (Trjchechus manatus)
Pages 69-124 in J. M. Packard, ed. Proposed research/management plan
for Crystal RTver manatees. Volume III. Compendium. Technical Report
No. 7. Fl. Coop. Fish and Wildl. Res. Unit. Gainesville, FL.

McGehee, M. A. 1982. Manatees (Trichechus manatus): abundance and
distribution in and around several Florida power plant effluents during
the winter of 1981-1982. Final report prepared for the Florida Power
and Light Company. Contract No. 31534-86419. 67pp.

Odell, 0. K. 1977. Distribution and abundance of marine mammals in the
waters of the Everglades National Park. Univ. of Miami, FL.
Unpublished rep. 16pp.

Packard, J. M. 1981. Abundance, distribution, and feeding habits of
manatees (Trichechus manatus) wintering between St. Lucie and Palm Beach
inlets, Florida. Final report prepared for the U.S. Fish and Wildl.
Serv. Contract 14-16-0004-80-105. 142pp.

Packard, J. M., R. Summers, and L. Barnes. 1983. Correction factors for
observability of manatees during aerial surveys. Manatee Population
Research Report No. 3. Technical Report No. 8-3. Fl. Coop. Fish and
Wildl. Res. Unit. Gainesville, FL. 10pp.

Patton, G. W. 1980. Studies of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus
manatus) in Tampa Bay (Florida). Report prepared for Tampa Electric
Co. (J.O No. 12408.04, ESSOW No. 13205). Mote Mar. Lab.,
Sarasota, FL. 52pp.









Powell, J. A., and G. B. Rathbun. 1983. Distribution and abundance of
manatees along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Pages 1-68 in
J. M. Packard, ed. Proposed research/management plan for Crystal
River manatees. Volume III. Compendium. Technical Report No. 7. Fl.
Coop. Fish and Wildl. Res. Unit, Gainesville, FL.

Raymond, P. W. 1981. Manatees (Trichechus manatus): abundance and
distribution in and around Florida power plant effluents. Final
report prepared for the Florida Power and Light Co. Contract
No. 31534-81511. 62pp.

Rose, P. M., and S. P. McCutcheon. 1980. Manatees (Trichechus manatus):
abundance and distribution in and around several Florida power plant
effluents. Final report prepared for the Florida Power and Light
Co. Contract No. 31534-86626. 128pp.

SAS Institute Inc. 1982. SAS user's guide: statistics. SAS Institute, Inc.
Cary, N.C. 584pp.

Shane, S. 1981. Abundance, distribution and use of power plant effluents
by manatees (Trichecus manatus) in Brevard County, Florida. Final
report prepared for National Fish and Wildlife Lab, Gainesville,
Florida. NTIS PB81-147019, Dept. Commerce, Springfield, VA. 140pp.

Shane, S. H. 1983. Abundance, distribution, and movements of manatees
(Trichechus manatus) in Brevard County, Florida. Bull. Mar. Sci.
33:1-9.

Snedecor, G. W., and'W. C. Cochran. 1980.- Statistical methods, 7th ed.
Iowa State Univ. Press. Ames, Iowa. 507pp.





















APPENDIX A: Power plants surveyed by Florida Audubon Society for Florida
Power and Light Company. For detailed descriptions of surveys,
see Rose and McCutcheon (1980), Raymond (1981), and McGehee
(1982). Data were taken from original data sheets, but wherever
there was a discrepancy between the values on data sheets and in
reports, the values from the report were used.









Explanation of variables and ranges of values for FAS aerial surveys.


DESCRIPTION

Location of survey



Year of survey date

Month of survey

Day of survey

Time survey began


BEGTIM

ENDTIM

TYPSURV


VALUE RANGE

CC, HS, RV, FL, PE,
FM, VB, FP (FPL) and
IR (OUC)

77 to 82

1 to 12

1 to 31

0723-1725


0808-1815

1: all sites flown in
1 day
2: sites flown in 2
days

1: very good, 2: good,
3: fair, 4: poor, 5: very
poor

1.0: very good, 2.0: good,
3.0: fair, 4.0: poor,
5.0: very poor (0.5
increments)

10: calm/smooth, 20:
rippled,
30: choppy, 40: very choppy
(increments of 5, scale
x 10 )

0: calm, 1O:light air, 20:
light breeze, 30: gentle
breeze, 50: fresh
breeze, 60: strong
breeze (increments of 5,
scale x 10 )

0 to 271


0 to 52

0 to 227


VARIABLE


SITE


YEAR


MONTH


Time survey ended

Type of survey



Survey conditions



Water clarity



Water surface condition




Beaufort scale (McGehee
1982)




Total manatees
(includes calves)

Total calves

Total manatees in effluent
zone (includes calves)


SURVCOND


WATCLAR


SURFCOND


TOTMAN


CALVES


TOTMANEF









VARIABLE

TOTMANIN

MAXTEMPO


MINTEMPO


MAXTEMP1


DESCRIPTION

Total manatees in intake
zone (includes calves)

Maximum air temperature
on day of survey (OC)

Minimum air temperature
on day of survey(oC)

Maximum air temperature
1 day prior to survey


Minimum air temperature
1 day prior to survey (oC)

Maximum air temperature
2 days prior to survey (oC)

Minimum air temperature
2 days prior to survey (oC)

Effluent water temperature
on day of survey (C)


Mean intake water temp,
on day of survey(oC)

Discharge volume on day
of survey(millions of
gallons)

(MAXTEMPO + MINTEMPO)/2

(MAXTEMP1 + MINTEMP1)/2

(MAXTEMP2 + MINTEMP2)/2

(EFFTEMP INTKTEMP)

(MAXTEMPO-MINTEMPO)

(MAXTEMP1-MINTEMP1)

(MAXTEMP2-MINTEMP2)

- (DAYS ELAPSED SINCE
1 Nov.)


VALUE RANGE

0 to 13

+8 +31


-4 +25


+6 +34


-1 +28


+6 +31


0 +29


1977-78 to 1979-80-minimum
+16 to + 31
1980-81 to 1981-82-mean
+19 to +34

+1 to +29


0 to 1250


+4 to + 27.5

+3 to +29.5

+3 to +29.5

- 1.0 to +20.0

+1.0 to +22.0

+1.0 to +23.0

+1.0 to +21.0

-150.0 to -1.0


MINTEMP1


MAXTEMP2


MINTEMP2


EFFTEMP


INTKTEMP


DISCHARGE


TEMPO

TEMP1

TEMP2.

WTRANGE

TRANGEO

TRANGE1

TRANGE2

DATE









VARIABLE DESCRIPTION VALUE RANGE

DATE2 (DATE)2 +22500 to +1.0

FRONT Number of days since end of
last front (front defined
as a run of at least 3 days
on which MINTEMPO was below
10C and MAXTEMPO dropped
below 100C on at least one
day)























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
--- SITE=CAPE CANAVERAL


M
0
0 N
8 T
S H
1 12
2 12
3 12
4 1
5 1
6 1
7 1
8 2
9 2
LO 2
11 3
12 3
13 3
14 3
15 3
16 4
17 5
18 5
19 5
20 6
21 6
22 7
23 7
24 8
25 8
26 9
27. 9
T

C T
A M
L A
0 V N
8 E E
S S F


12 77
19 77
27 77
2 78
11 78
26 78
30 78
6 78
20 78
22 78
1 78
7 78
13 78
24 78
30 78
17 78
1 78
17 78
31 78
13 78
28 78
12 78
27 78
8 78
23 78
6 78
19 78


E
G
T


1227
1140
1040
1205
818
1018
1020
1020
1245
838
1123
832
843
835
1047
III
1110
940
1110
1215
1205
1225
1240
1205
905
1215
1200


T M NM
0 A I A
T X N X
M T T T
A E E E
N M M M
I P P P
N 0 0 1
0 22 19 22
1 20 5 23
0 12 4 14
0 17 14 20
0 14 3 11
0 20 8 26
0 10 2 14
0 10 -1 15
0 10 9 16
0 11 2 18
0 24 14 22
0 23 9 19
0 24 9 22
o 27 16 26
2 21 12 23

0 .
0 .
0 C


3 S
0 *
0 C


E
N
D
T
1

1305
1220
1132
1328
902
1242
1222
1155
1355
918
1208
902
942
905
1204
1145
1034
1255
1355
1328
1355
1338
1315
1045
1335
1315



T
I

E
M
P
1
16
12
8
12
1
16
2
5
J2
9
9
5
9
14
17


















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
---- SITE=CAPE CANAVERAL


8
E
Y G
E T
A I
R M

78 154
78 120
78 80
78 113
78 90
78 120
78 94
78 144
78 93
78 101
79
79 85
79 91
79 91
79 84
79 90
79 90
79 161
79 91
79 8a
79 84
79 91
79 84
79 8z
79 160
79 85
79 9f
M M,
A I
X N
T T
E E
M M
P P
0 0

*

29 19
27 20
28 17
30 21
22 19
22 13
21 18
8 0
21 11
14 5
18 5
13 6
15 3
12 2
20 14
25 15
23 16
14 5
21 10
18 16
25 15
22 12

*


S
T U W
S Y R A
I P V T
I S C C
U 0 L
R N A
I V D R

35 1 5.0
10 2
105 1 4.0
235 2 3.5
30 2 3.5
21 2 3.5
140 2 3.5
05 2 5 5.0
38 2 2 3.0
10 2 4 4.0
55 1 5
00 1 4 4.0
155 1 5 4.0
43 1 5 4.0
15 1 4 4.0
40 1 3 4.0
40 1 5 4.0
55 1 4 4.0
25 1 3
20 1 5 4.0
05 1 3 3.5
20 1 2 3.0
15 1 3 3.5
15 1 3 3.5
'05 1 3 3.5
05 1 5.0
105 1 5.0
05 1 5*0
M M M
I. A I E
N X N F
T T T F
E E E T
M M M E
P P P M
1 2 2 P

*

28
21 28 18 27
16 24 15 25
21 27 16 27
11 28 19 25
16 26 13 23
16 18 16 21
3 26 18 20
0 23 3 16
11 8 0 18
11 24 17 19
11 24 19 21
7 19 12 18
7 19 7 20
13 17 11 19
12 20 8 20
12 26 15 22
7 22 14 23
11 18 10 26
15 25 12 26
14 28 14 28
9 21 12 28
*


0 16
10 13
O0 9
10 12
)5 11
10 13
,0 10
5 16
17 II
78 11
t8 11
S 13
i0 10
.5 9
.3 9
O0 9
10 9
12 10
.5 16
5L 10
50 10
2 9
17 10
,5 10
13 10
i0 17
50 10
i5 10
M
A
X
T
E
M
P
1




26
28
28
18
20
20
23
8
21
26
21
19
17
23
25
15
15
21
26
27
18
*


C
A
L
a V
8 E
S S
28 0
29 1
30 1
31 1
32 0
33 L
34 0
35 0
36 3
37 0
38 0
39 2
40 0
41 0
42 0
43 0
44 0
45 0
46 4
47 1
48 1
49 6
50 0
51 0
52 2
53 0
54 0





















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER ANO LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=CAPE CANAVERAL
S S
T U I U
B E Y R A R T
M E N P V T F 0
0 Y G D S C C C T
0 N O E T T U 0 L 0 B M
8 T A A I I R N A N F A
S H Y R M M V 0 R 0 T N

55 5 23 79 920 1021 1 4.0 30 0
56 6 5 79 925 1145 1 3.5 20 9
57 6 21 79 900 958 1 5.0 20 1
58 7 2 79 915 1200 1 3.0 30 24
59 7 18 79 930 1135 1 3.5 30 15
60 7 30 79 915 1030 1 3.5 20 7
61 8 17 79 915 1110 1 4.0 30 6
62 8 29 79 920 1120 1 3.5 20 4
63 9 10 79 914 1055 1 5.0 300 14
64 9 24 79 815 913 1 5.0 20 4
65 10 10 79 910 1005 1 4.0 30 1
66 LO 23 79 1700 1742 1 20 1 2
67 11 5 79 906 1016 1 4.0 30 16
68 11 20 79 833 959 1 2 1.0 20 7 7
69 11 30 79 920 1010 1 3 3.0 30 29
70 12 6 79 842 1042 1 4 4.0 30 9
71 12 12 79 1430 1530 1 5 4.0 1
72 12 18 79 838 950 1 5 5.0 30 32
73 12 27 79 1445 1550 1 4 4.0 20 75
74 1 2 80 835 1000 1 3 65
75 1 7 80 1600 1658 1 3 3.5 30 27
76 1 11 80 938 1025 1 4 4.0 20 8
77 1 20 80 854 1019 1 3 3.5 30 44
78 1 30 80 930 1036 1 4 4.0 30 40
79 2 2 80 814 908 1 5 4.0' 30 0
80 2 7 80 835 916 1 5 4.0 30 3
81 2 14 80 840 929 1 2 3.0 20 1
T T M M M M M M I D
0 0 A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
O V N N M M M M M M E E A
B E E 1 P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
55 0 0 0 .
56 2 0 0 .
57 0 0 0 a .
58 1 0 0 .
59 1 0 0 .
60 2 0 0 .
61 2 0 0 .
62 1 0 0 *
63 0 0 0 .
64 1 0 2
65 0 0 1 .
66 0 0 1 *
67 0 5 0 ..
68 1 6 25 18 24 16 23 14 23 21 750
69 1 29 0 15 6 19 9 27 19 24 23 800
70 0 6 1 27 19 23 15 21 14 22 21 800
71 0 1 0 26 a1 24 20 24 17 27 22 400
72 0 29 1 18 9 17 9 17 15 24 22 700
73 5 74 0 19 6 14 6 18 12 20 19 750
74 3 65 0 18 5 16 4 13 7 18 17 750
75 3 26 0 21 7 12 2 14 6 18 16 800
76 0 8 0 25 15 24 15 23 16 19 19 700
77 2 36 O 22 12 22 12 23 13 20 21 750
78 0 39 0 21 12 16 10 18 12 20 21 800
79 0 0 0 12 4 12 5 23 12 20 17 800
80 0 3 0 10 5 19 6 15 5 17 14 800
81 0 1 0 17 13 20 6 14 6 19 19 750






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED 'Y FLOtIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIOA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=CAPE CANAVERAL


E
G
T
I
M

853
901
1525
840
843
832
845
855
1710
837
842
843
935
931
1635
902
904
1625
851
840
857
905
830
825

857
828


E
N
D
T
I
M

940
1020
1620
920
929
930
935
957
1735
925
920
930
1015
1017
1722
955
1002
1720
950
949
1050
1015
908
909

911
856


s
T U
Y R
P V
S C
U 0
R N
V D


4.0 20
4.0 20
3.0 20
4.0 30
4.0 20
4.0 30
5.0 30
4.0 20
4.0 20
5.0 30
3.0 30
5.0 30
4.0 30
5.0 30
4.0 30
4.0 20
4.0 30
3.0 30
3.0 30
4.0 30
4.0 30
3.5
3.5
4.0
2.0
4.0
2.5


0
8
S

82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108





0
B
S

82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108


M
0
N D
T A
H Y

2 21
2 27
3 4
3 12
3 20
12 1
12 12
12 19
12 29
1 2
1 7
1 13
1 23
2 3
2 11
2 19
2 25
3 6
3 11
3 17
3 24
11 25
12 3
12 10
12 15
12 16
12 18
T
0
a
C T
A M
L A
V N
E E
S F
4 42
o 17
2 19
0 0
0 0
0 17
0 2
3 25
0 0
0 11
0 0
0 0
O 2
0 11
0 0
0 0
2 22
10 43
6 42
12 96
1 39
2 14
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 10


22 11
15 4
7 -1
23 15
25 19
* 0
18 11
18 6
7 3
20 5
20. 6
9 0
17 2
21 9
25 17
25 18
24 7
27 15
23 10
26 13
19 10

25. 2
19 8
26 10
25 10
21 7


19 11
25 16
17 0
27 18
30 19
* 9
26 17
17 9
14 4
* *
18 5
16 2
19 7
23 16
21 10
23 18
20 9
24 11
23 12
24 7
21 11
29 19
23 7
21 9
26 10
15 6


T- M M M
0 A I A I
T X N X N
M T T T T
A E E E E
N M M M M
I P P P P
N 0 0 1 1


0 27
0 18
0 19
0 26
0 28
0 24
0 21
0 20
0 14
0 12
0 23
0 12
0 15
0 11
0 27
0 24
0 20
5 19
7 23
0 19
0 20
1 20
3 20
0 13
0 25
0 15
1 25


T
0
T
M
A
N

43
17
32
0
4
18
2
25
0
11
0
0
2
11
0
1
22
56
50
102
42
15
3
0
0
0
11

I
S
C
H
A
R
G

800
400
400
400
750
792
767
773
781
765
728
725
377
396
396
377
396




















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED SY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=CAPE CANAVERAL


109 12 20 81 839 901 1 5 4 20 0
110 12 21 81 830 848 1 3 3 0 6
111 1 6 82 828 848 1 3 3 0 37
112 1 12 82 815 833 1 5 4 10 2
113 1 16 82 834 854 1 4 4 10 1
114 1 19 82 857 915 1 2 2 0 28
115 1 23 82 754 816 1 2 2 0 5
116 1 26 82 756 818 1 2 2 10 13
117 1 31 82 747 808 1 2 2 10 5
118 2 21 82 1015 1031 1 2 2 10 20
119 3 4 82 733 847 1 1 2 0 40
120 3 10 82 816 833 1 1 2 0 120
121 3 19 82 1225 1235 1 2 2 10 1
122 3 31 82 939 953 1 3 3 10 8


0 13 1 6 0 25
0 20 3 13 1 6
0 26 10 19 11 29
0 12 -4 8 0 15
0 19 5 10 0 22
1 25 10 24 6 18
1 28 18 26 12 27
0 17 10 20 6 20
0 27 16 25 15 22
13 26 13 22 12 27
7 25 16 23 11 21
4 25 12 21 13 18
1 30 18 27 18 29
0 26 16 25 20 22


SITE=FORT LAUDERDALE


1100
108




1250
1210
E



1526
T









1140
I




114





1155
1100
1040
1250
1210
1150
1152
1313
1215





1310
1230
1140
1145
1155





1145
1205
1205
1235
1125
1215




1315





1503
1545
1235
1310
1230
1144





1400
1315




1420
1214
1430
1335
1503
1545
1435
1310
1400
1330
1420
1219


123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150 1
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160


T
0
T
a M
F A
T N


E
N
0
T
I
M

1105
1055
1304
1230
1215
1538
1330
1225
1200
1153
1205
1157
1218
1220
1250
1243
1245
1335
1255
1335
1300
1215

1155
1200
1335
1300
1445
1350
1515
1605
1500
1326
1418
1341
1442
1233


0 25
0 26
0 28
0 23
0 20
0 16
0 26
0 29
0 27
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 ,
0


S28
0
0 .
0 28
0 28
0 29
0 29
0 26
0 26
0 24
0 15
0 24
0 20
0 16
0 17
0 15
0 29



















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=FORT LAUDERCALE
S S
T U W U
B E Y R A R T
M E N P V T F 0
0 Y G D S C C C T
0 N 0 E T T U O L 0 B M
B T A A I I R N A N P A
S H Y R M M v D R 0 T N
161 2 16 79 1610 1637 1 4 20 11
162 2 20 79 1540 1605 1 4 4.0 30 3
163 2 27 79 1315 1340 1 5 5.0 30 4
164 3 9 79 1515 1532 1 4 4.0 30 3
165 3 15 79 1355 1420 1 4 4.0 20 2 2
166 3 22 79 1312 1330 1 3 3.5 20 6
167 3 27 79 1200 1230 1 3 13
168 5 9 79 1452 1528 1 3.5 30 5
169 5 23 79 1438 1504 1 5
170 6 5 79 1500 1510 1 4.0 20 0
171 6 21 79 1410 1425 1 30 30 0
172 7 2 79 1528 1550 1 4.0 20 I 1
173 7 18 79 1445 1515 1 4.0 30 4
174 7 30 79 1340 1353 1 4.0 30 6
175 8 17 79 1420 1450 1 4.0 30 12
176 8 29 79 1510 1545 1 4.0 20 7
177 4 12 79 1435 1455 1 4.0 30 1
178 9 24 79 1225 1251 1 4.0 30 0
179 10 10 79 1403 1425 1 4.0 10 t 2
180 10 23 79 1037 1053 1 4.0 0
181 11 5 79 1445 1503 1 4.0 20 1
182 11 20 79 1340 1355 1 5 5.0 20 0
183 11 30 79 1417 1436 1 5 5.0 3
184 12 6 79 1520 1535 1 4 4.0 20 7
185 12 12 79 1030 1051 1 4 30 1
186 12 18 79 1408 1439 1 5 4.0 4
187 12 27 79 1 4" 0
T T N M M M M I 0
0 0- A I A I A I E I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A N T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 V N N N M M M M M E E A
8 E E P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
161 0 10 0 25 11 24 11 21 11 23 21
162 0 2 0 24 18 26 18 26 17 29 23
163 0 4 0 17 8 20 11 29 20 27 22
164 0 0 0 26 14 25 8 25 13 .
165 1 2 0 25 16 27 16 25 17 25 23
166 0 4 0 27 15 27 15 25 15 28 23
167 2 O 0 21 10 25 15 29 19 28 23
168 0 .
169 0 0 0 .
170 0 0 0 .
171 0 0 0 .
172 0 0 0. .
173 0 0 0 .
174 1 0 0 .
175 1 0 0 .
176 1 0 0 .
177 0 0 0 .
178 0 0 0 .
179 0 0 0 *
180 0 0 0
181 0 0 0
182 0 0 0 26 22 26 20 25 20 30 23
183 0 0 0 20 9 23 13 28 22 28 24 .
184 1 5 0 26 23 24 20 23 20 25 22
185 0 0 0 27 19 26 23 26 22 30 24
186 0 2 0 22 12 22 17 26 19 29 23
187 0 0 0 22 10 19 10 23 17 26











36





















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOU.0N SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
---- SITE=FORT LAUDERDALE


o N
8 T
S H
188 1
189 1
190 1
191 1
192 1
193 2
194 2
195 2
196 2
197 2
198 3
199 3
200 3
201 12
202 12
203 12
204 1
205 1
206 1
207 1
208 2
209 2
210 2
211 2
212 3
213 3
214 31
T
0
C T
A M
L A
0 V N
8 E E
S S F


8
E
G
T
I
M

1115
1512
1516
1403
1354
1505
1435
1204
1617
1505
1407
1333
1412
1337
1343
1410
1523
1412
1336
1415
1440
1305
1353
1411
M
I
N
T
E
M
P
0
6
8
22
21
15
4
8
18
14
9
6
22
23
16
13
17
12
13
0
7
9
20
20
10
16
13
10


E Y
N P
D S
T U
I R
M V

1
1150 1
1
1542 1
1525 1
1
1416 I
1410 1
1518 1
1458 1
1225 1
1636 1
1519 1
1430 1
1350 1
1425 1
1355 1
1359 1
1435 1
1549 1
1444 1
1355 1
1434 1
1451 1
1320 1
1409 1
1423 1

M M M
A I A
X N X
T T T
E E E
M M M
P P P
1 1 2

21 11 24
15 6 18
26 21 26
26 17 24
25 16 26
21 13 27
23 12 19
23 11 20
24 13 21
24 12 29
14 1 23
24. 19 29
28 20 28

28 19 28
23 10 21
23 8 18
22 11 23
12 3 20
20 9 26
27 14 25
27 22 27
24 23 26
25 8 26
28 19 23
27 18 23
25 14 25


4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
4.0
3.5
4.0
3.5
4.0
3.5
4.0
3.5
4.0
4.0
5.0
4.0
4.0
3.5
4.0

E
F
F
T
E
M
P

22

26
22

25
28
25
24
28
30

,o





















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=FORT LAUDEROALE


215 11 25 81 1 4
216 12 10 81 1 4
217 12 3 81 1348 1400 1 4
218 12 16 81 1352 1359 1 4
219 12 18 81 1246 1257 1 3
220 12 21 81 1238 1245 1 4
221 1 6 82 1214 1227 1 2
222 1 12 82 1213 1221 1 5
223 1 16 82 1245 1255 1 3
224 1 19 82 1313 1325 1 3
225 1 23 82 1246 1253 1 3
226 1 26 82 1201 1212 1 4
227 1 31 82 1240 1247 1 4
228 2 21 82 1408 1415 1 3
229 3 10 82 1238 1243 1 3
230 3 19 82 1655 1707 1 2
231 3 30 82 1115 1123 1 3


SITE=FORT MYERS


232 12 13
233 12 20
234 12 28
235 1 3
236 1 11
237 1 16
238 1 25
239 1 31
240 2 7
241 2 21
242 2 22
243 2 28


232 2 23
233 .5 36
234 33 132
235 12 53
236 52 227
237 15 176
238 5 32
239 12 81
240 10 106
241 18 102
242 7 59
243 0 26


1445 1523 2
1417 1505 2
1325 1435 2
1318 1440 2
1330 1445 1
723 1018 2
1408 1436 2
1500 1555 2
1340 1436 2
1023 1112 2
1640 1722 1
1533 1629 2


26 16 25
25 7 22
16 3 14
17 10 20
16 4 12
21 1 12
27 19 26
20 4 15
13 1 15
15 10 13
12 5 15
23 16 25


22 20
22 21
19 18
20 19
19 18
20 17
22 20
19 18
21 18
22 18
23 17
22 21






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

----SITE=FORT MYERS


Y
0 E
A A
Y R

6 78
14 78
23 78
1 78
18 78
2 78
18 78
1 78
27 78
15 78
11 78
25 78
7 78
22 78
5 78
18 78
2 78
2 78
16 78
21 78
29 78
6 78
12 78
19 78
3 79
8 79
9 79

T T M
0 0 A
T T X
M M T
A A E
N N M
E I P
F N 0

71 0 24
3 O 29
8 0 27
3 a .
0 0 .
0 0
o0 0
0 0
o0 0
o a
0 0 a

0 0
0 0
1 0
o a 31
0 0 29
0 0 31
0 0 31
7 0 21
31 0 26
73 0 10
99 0 26
170 0 18


1345
1258
E
G
T
I
M

1345
1323
1415
1247
1301
1258
1355
1305
1500

1325
1355
1045
1415
1355
900
1315
1225
1245
1415

1420
1625
1725
1615
1455

M2
I
N
T
E
P
0
6
19
15












19
21
20
18
11
11
14
8


T
E Y
N P
0 S
T U
I R
M V

1410 2
1425 2
1521 2
1349 2
1350 2
1410 2
1452 2
1355 2
1543 2
2
1500 2
1450 2
1514 2
1514 2
1511 2
1540 2
1018 1
1445 1
1320 2
1335 2
1505 2
1455 2
1545 2
1725 2
1755 1
1
1550 1
M M N
A I A
X N X
T T T
E E E
M M M
P P P
1 1 2

15 6 18
28 13 22
27 16 28
. .












30 19
30 20 30
31 28 31
29 19 31
24 14 21
25 6 27
24 8 29
27 14 25
26 14 27


S
U
R
F
C
a
N
D

20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
*

20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
20
20
20
20

I
N
T
K
T
E
M
p
P

18
21
23













24
25
25
25
23
20
18
18
18






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=FORT MYERS ----- ----------


79 1450
79 5 .
79 1520 1620
79 1540 1635
79 1007 1053
79 1725 1815
79 1645 1735
79 1550 1725
79 1620 1717
79 1510 1605
79 1412 1500
79 945 1103
79 1530 1629
79 1610 1715
79 1545 1600
79 5
79 1503 1547
79 1735
79 1600 1643
79 1540 1620
79 1310 1340
79 1335 1415
79 1515 1550
79 1145 1337
79 1639 1704
79 1448 1536
79 1545 1635


0
A
Y

15
22
29
1
7
16
20
27
9
15
22
27
12
9
23
5
21
2
18
17
10
24
10
23
5
20
30
T
0
T
M
A
N
E
F

75
161
70
72
60
47
67
104
28
7
1
32
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7


T
Y
P
S
U
R
V

1

I
1


1
1

16
10
I

10
12
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
1
1






I
N
T
E
M
P
I

13
16
10
10
12
10
14
13
9
14
12
12











28
20
*
N
T
*
*
P


4 5
3
5 5.0 20
5 5.0 20
5 5.0 40
3 20
3 3.5 30
2 3.5 30
4 4.0 30
4 4.0 30
4 20
3 3.5 30
* 5.0 30
40
* 3.0

* 3.5 40
20
S 20
S 3.5 20
S 4.0 30
* 4.0 20
30
S 4.0 10
S 4.0 30
3 35
3 3.5 30


0
I
S
C
H
A
R
G

400
400
3CO
400
400
400
550
100
150
150
150
150











450
400


20 6
17 10
16 6
14 5
25 16
26 12
27 .13
18 6
25 13
25 14
28 13
26 7




* a




0 19

30 20
30 19






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
------- ------ SITE=FORT MYERS ---------- ---
S S
r u W u
B E Y R A R T
M E N P V T F 0
0 Y G 0 S C C C T
0 N O E T T U O L 0 B M
B T A A I I R N A N F A
S H Y R M M V O R D T N

298 12 6 79 1619 1710 1 4 4.0 20 43
299 12 18 79 1525 1627 1 2 4.0 20 55
300 12 27 79 1 2 10 74
301 1 2 80 1 3 70
302 1 7 80 1 2 97
303 1 20 80 1630 1735 1 3 4.0 20 63
304 1 30 80 1629 1732 1 4 4.0 20 54
305 2 2 80 1 4 20 37
306 2 7 80 1520 1 3 4.0 20 142
307 2 21 80 1624 1709 1 3 4.0 20 61
308 2 27 80 1553 1649 1 4 4.0 20 52
309 3 4 80 930 1030 1 3 4.0 20 97
310 3 12 80 1724 1810 1 3 4.0 20 0
311 3 20 80 1655 1 3 0
312 12 1 80 1515 1602 1 3 3.0 20 43
313 12 12 80 1433 1512 1 2 2.0 20 41
314 12 19 80 1505 1600 1 3 3.0 20 136
315 12 29 80 1040 1135 1 3 3.5 20 110
316 1 2 81 1447 1530 1 3 3.0 30 127
317 1 7 81 1457 1541 1 3 3.0 20 100
318 1 13 81 1520 1600 1 2 2.0 20 119
319 1 23 81 1630 1710 1 3 3.0 10 92
320 2 3 81 1605 1645 1 3 3.5 20 115
321 2 11 81 1000 1045 1 4 4.0 30 35.
322 2 19 81 1517 1557 1 4 4.0 30 25
323 2 25 81 1537 1620 1 2 30 0 0 68
324 3 6 81 102.0 1100 1 3 3.0 20 25
T T M M N M M M 1 0
C o A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 V N N M M M M M M E E A
B E E I P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
298 2 35 0 27 20 25 16 24 16 24 21 150
299 1 53 0 22 9 22 12 24 19 24 21 500
300 6 68 0 21 7 20 11 22 15 24 20 450
301 3 70 0 16 6 18 11 22 14 22 20 550
302 10 87 0 23 5 15 7 18 7 25 19 550
303 6 52 0 26 15 25 15 26 14 0
304 4 45 0 26 10 24 13 22 16 22 19 500
305 4 37 0 17 2 19 5 25 12 24 19 550
306 21 141 0 18 6 22 4 20 3 22 16 550
307 3 61 0 29 11 25 10 23 10 21 18 450
308 2 52 0 21 5' 20 12 28 20 22 20 500
309 5 97 0 22 4 13. 1 19 6 21 17 550
310 0 0 0 30 18 28 22 28 19 22 21 150
311 0 0 0 30 20 34 20 30 21 30 25 150
312 5 35 0 26 12 26 21 520
313 5 29 23 10 23 15 27 13 26 22 420
314 14 112 0 24 11 21 5 21 12 25 20 400
315 14 103 0 18 8 13 4 17 8 24 17 560
316 23 99 0 19 7 22 5 17 7 24 19 540
317 16 86 0 23 13 23 8 21 7 24 19 500
318 16 90 0 15 -3 10 1 10 1 23 16 560
319 13 85 0 19 6 18 6 23 12 23 17 520
320 20 81 0 13 6 23 12 28 14 23 20 440
321 5 24 0 28 16 30 17 26 14 25 20 460
322 5 18 0 28 17 23 18 30 18 26 22 400
323 9 54 0 25 5 24 7 22 8 25 21 400
324 3 19 0 28 13 22 15 29 13 30 24 180






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
-- SIT EFFORT MYERS


M
0 Y
O N 0 E
8 T A A
S H Y R

325 3 17 81
326 3 24 81
327 11 25 81
328 12 3 81
329 12 10 81
330 12 16 81
331 12 18 81
332 12 21 81
333 1 6 82
334 1 12 82
335 1 16 82
336 1 19 82
337 1 23 82
338 1 26 82
339 1 31 82
340 2 20 82
341 3 2 82
342 3 8 82
343 3 30 82
344 4 7 82
345 4 16 82
T T
0 0
C T T
A M M
L A A
0 V N N
8 E E I
S S F N
325 15 69 0
326 11 64 0
327 5 27 0
328 1 10 0
329 10 39 0
330 17 81 0
331 5 48 0
332 13 56 0
333 4 8 0
334 15 70 0
335 18 70 0
336 7 25 0
337 3 18 0
338 2 24 0
339 5 30 0
340 4 10 0
341 1 2 0
342 3 0 0
343 0 1 0
344 0 *
345 1 *



'Value should be 50.
Value should be 20.


M M V

1450 1537 1
1515 1555 1
1610 1650 1
1453 1539 1
1512 1614 1
1520 1621 1
1542 1660 1
1521 1606 1
1430 1510 1
1450 1545 1
1512 1606 1
1550 1630 1
1507 1557 1
1425 1518 1
1453 1537 1
1330 1403 1
1112 1150 1
1155 1230 1
1425 1457 1
946 1112 .
947 1115 .

4 M M M
A I A I
X N X N
T T T T
E E E E
M M M M
P P P P
0 0 1 1
24 12 24 17
25 11 21 15
25 12
25 15 30 21
20 10 23 13
20 ,10 23 12
25 11 25 11
25 3 15 1
30 25 26 12
15 0 10 3
23 6 17 7

28 15 28 13
22 8 26 9
30 15 26 12
29 13 30 15
22 12 22 17
21 10 27 -15
29 20 23 19

. *


A
T
C
I L
I A
R

4.0
3.0
3.5
3.0
I 3.0
I 3.0
I 3.0
: 3.0
* 2.0
2.0
I 3.0
I 3.0
I 3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
1 2.0
1 2.5
* 2.0
2.0
. 2.0
2a0
M M
A I
X N
T T
E E
M M
P P
2 2
28 20
22 13

30 16
26 10
27 12
20 10
12 6
27 20
18 10
25 11

30 15
22 13
26 11
30 17
30 20
31 21
29 16

*


*-----


T
0
T
B M
F A
T N

95
85
32
10 11
15 49
10 84
10 51
5* 76
10 18
0 112
0 127
0 55
15 23
10 44
15 39
10 22
10 7
2** 18
15 2
15 10
10 7
I D
N I
T S
K C
T H
E A
M R
P G

21 140
21 180

25 488
21 564
20 564
21 459
15 564
24 564
18 564
18 564

23 518
14 538
21 517
25 455
24 497
24 564
24 564

S *






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=FORT PIERCE ------
S S T T M M MM M 0
TU W U O A I A IA IENI
B E Y R A R T CTTX NX NX N F T S
M E N P V T F O A M M T TT T T T F K C
0 Y G D S C CC T L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 N E T U L 0 8 M V N N MM MM E E A
8 T A A I R N A N F A E E I P P P P o P M M
S H Y R M M V O R D T N S P N 0 0 1 1 2 P P G
346 1 2 78 922 940 2 3.0 30 18 0 . .
347 1 11 78 946 950 1 3.0 20 22 4 . .
348 1 17 78 1340 1345 2 20 0 0 . .
349 1 26 78 910 917 2 30 15 1 . .
350 1 30 78 1320 1340 2 20 29 0 . .
351 2 6 78 912 920 2 4.0 30 5 0 . .
352 2 20 78 1110 1114 2 3.0 20 27 3 . . .
353 2 22 78 1049 1105 1 4.0 30 24 1 . . .
354 3 1 78 941 946 2 3.5 20 11 1 . .
355 3 7 78 1122 1130 2 22 0 . . .
356 3 13 78 1155 1207 2 3.0 41 0 . . .
357 3 23 78 914 918 2 3.0 20 5 0 . .
358 3 30 78 926 932 2 3.5 30 0 0 o . .
359 4 17 78 1038 1042 2 3.0 30 0 0 . . .
360 5 1 78 943 947 2 3.0 20 0 0 . . .
361 5 17 78 1235 1237 2 3.5 30 0 0 . .
362 5 31 78 956 1007 2 3.0 10 1 0 . . .
363 6 13 78 955 1002 2 2.5 20 3 0 . . .
364 6 28 78 935 952 2 10 10 a0 0 .. .
365 7 12 78 1010 1016 2 2.5 20 0 0 . .
366 7 27 78 1035 1042 2 0 0 .
367 8 8 78 917 921 2 3.0 1 0 .
368 9 6 78 1015 1015 2 .* 0 0 . .
369 12 19 78 1125 1130 2 3.0 20 9 1 . .
370 12 27 78 1204 1212 2 4.0 30 0 0 ... . .
371 1 3 79 1429 1435 1 % 4.0 30 3 1 .
372 1 8 79 1145 1150 1 5 5.0 30 12 0 . .
373 1 9 791118 1123 1 4.0 30 24 1 . .
374 1 15 79 1024 1030 1 30 11 0 . . .
375 1 22 79 1047 1047 1 o 4.0 20 10 1 o. . .
376 1 29 79 1127 1330 1 o 4.0 20 5 0 . .
377 2 1 79 1116 1120 1 4.0 11 1 . .
378 2 20 79 1 171 . . .
379 3 15 79 1114 1117 1 4 0 . . .

---- SITE=HOBE SOUND -------------
S S TT M 4 M MM M
T U W U O O A I A I A I E N I
8 E Y R A R T C T TX N X N X N F T S
M E N P V T F O A M M T T T T T T F K C
0 Y G D S C C C T L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 N D E T T U 0 L O B M V N N M M M M MM E E A
8 TA A I I RN A N F A E I PPPPPP M MR
S HY R M M V O R T N SF N 0 01 1 2 2 P P G
380 1 11 78 1 2 1 0. . .
381 1 17 78 2 3 .- 39 4 . .
382 1 25 78 2 3 12 1 . .....
383 1 31 78 920 2 3 3.5 20 0 .
384 2 7 78 2 4 4.0 20 2 1 .
385 2 20 78 1021 1055 2 3 3.5 10 13 3 . .
386 2 22 78 1 5 5.0 40 0 0 .
387 2 28 78 945 2 2 2.5 20 56 7 .
388 3 14 78 930 955 2 5 4.0 40 0 0 .
389 3 6 78 918 2 3 3.5 30 18 1 .... ...
390 3 23 78 1004 2 3 35 20 3 1 . .
391 4 1 78 959 1014 2 3 4.0 20 1 0 .
392 4 18 78 933 958 2 3.5 40 1 0 .
393 5 18 78 955 1020 2 3.0 20 o 0 0 .
394 6 1 78 945 2 4.0 0 0 .. .
395 6 14 78 945 1006 2 3.0 20 0 0 .
396 6 27 78 2 0 0 .
397 7 11 78 .2 2 0 0 . . .






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=HOBE SOUND
5 S T T M M M M ID
TU U O AIA I A E N I
B E Y R A R T C T T X N X N X N F T S
SE N P V T F O A M MT T T T T T F K C
0 Y G O SC C C T LA A E E E E E E T T H
0 N O E T TUO L 0 B M V N N M M M M M M E A
B T A A I I R N A N F A E E I P P PP P P M M R
S H Y R M M V 0 R D T N S F N O 0 1 1 2 2 P G
398 7 25 78 2 1 0 . .
399 8 7 78 1055 1114 2 4.0 20 9 0 . *
400 8 22 78 1450 1508 2 3.0 20 2 1 .
401 9 5 78 957 1014 2 4.0 20 0 0 .. .
402 9 18 78 955 1020 2 4.0 20 4 1 .
403 10 2 78 1413 1430 1 4.0 20 0 0 a . .
404 10 19 78 920 940 2 5.0 20 1 0 . . .
405 11 2 78 1045 1055 1 4.0 30 0 0 .
406 11 16 78 955 1010 2 5 4.0 20 1 0 . . .
407 11 21 78 925 935 2 4 4.0 20 0 0 . .
408 11 29 78 1115 1125 2 4 4.0 20 0 0 .
409 12 6 78 1025 1055 2 3 1 0 . .....
410 12 15 78 1230 1250 2 3 4.0 20 3 1 ... .
411 12 19 78 1155 1227 2 3 3.5 20 7 1 . .
412 12 27 78 1223 1245 2 4 4.0 20 2 0 .
413 1 3 79 1447 1500 1 4 4.0 40 5 1 .
414 1 8 79 1204 1225 1 3 4.0 21 2 .. .
415 1 9 79 1135 1150 1 3 4.0 30 5 1 .. . .
416 1 15 79 1042 1112 1 4 4.0 30 26 0 . .
417 1 22 79 1120 1202 1 3 3.5 20 40 6 .. .
418 1 29 79 1132 1205 1 3 4.0 30 13 2 . *
419 2 1 79 1132 1146 1 3 4.0 30 7 2 .
420 2 7 79 1430 1510 1 5 5.0 40 44 2 . .
421 2 16 79 1232 1330 1 3 3.5 20 97 10 .
422 2 20 79 1317 1340 1 3 4.0 30 20 3 . . .
423 .2 27 79 1055 1113 1 3 4.0 30 4 0 *
424 3 9 79 1214 1233 1 4 4.0 20 11 1 .
425 3 15 79 1128 1142 L 4 4.0 40 8 1 .
426 3 22 79 1008 1122 1 4 4.0 20 1 0 .
427 3 27 79 1440 1507 1 4 4.0 30 6 1 .
428 4 12 79 1 2 0 ..... .
429 5 9 79 1210 1225 1 3.5 30 0 0 .. . .
430 6 5 79 1245 1300 1 3.0 20 0 0 .. . .
431 6 21 79 1205 1217 1 4.0 30 0 0 .
432 7. 2 79 1222 1337 35 350 4 1 .
433 7 18 79 1255 1242 1 . 0 0 . .
434 7 30 79 1215 123.0 1 20 0 0 a .
435 8 17 79 1150 1205 I 4.0 30 0 0 .. . .
436 8 29 79 1248 1300 1 3.5 20 0 0 . .
437 9 24 79 1001 1014 1 5.0 30 0 0 . .
438 10 10 79 1203 1217 1 4.0 10 2 1 . .
439 10 23 79 1455 1521 1 4.0 30 5 1 . .
440 11 5 79 1205 1222 1 4.0 5 0 ... .
441 11 20 79 1052 1109 1 4 4.0 20 4 0 .
442 11 30 79 1135 1150 1 4 4.0 30 5 1 . .
443 12 6 79 1230 1248 1 3 4.0 30 3 1 .
444 12 12 79 1210 1235 1 2 3.5 26 2 *. *
445 12 18 79 1147 1206 1 3 4.0 30 3 0 .
446 12 27 79 1 3 3.5 20 17 1 . .
447 1 2 80 1140 1200 1 3 4.0 30 8 2 . .
448 1 7 80 1410 1425 1 3 0 6 1 . .
449 I 11 80 1200 1318 1 2 3.0 20 38 7 . .
450 1 20 80 1155 1225 1 4 4.0 30 30 4 *
451 1 30 80 1215 1238 1 4 4.0 10 20 3 .
452 2 2 80 1030 1057 1 4 4*0 30 0 0 . .
453 2 7 80 1034 1051 1 4 4.0 20 # 0 0 .
454 2 14 80 1104 1133 1 4 4.0 20 # 23 7 -.
455 2 21 80 1127 1201 1 5 20 23 4 . .
456 2 27 80 1108 1137 1 4 4.0 20 22 4 .
457 3 4 80 1340 1400 1 4 4.0 20 5 0 ... .
458 3 12 80 1059 1142 1 3 4.0 17 2 .
459 3 20 80 1118 1157 1 4 4.0 20 9 2 .
460 12 1 80 1055 1123 1 3 3.5 20 8 2 . *
461 12 12 80 1107 1127 1 2 2.0 20 6 3 .
462 12 19 80 1130 1157 1 3 20 30 3 .























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
------------ SITE=HOBE SOUND ------------


M
0
O N
8 T
S H


80 1516
81 1105
81 1111
81 1100
81 1219
81 1154
81 1436
81 1140
81 1147
81 1418
81 1125
81 1155
81 1135
81 1010
81 1005
81 1011
81 1035
81 1020
82 1015
82 1000
82 1030
82 1100
82 1013
82 952
82 1003
82 1200
82 1053
82 1017
82 1425
82 833


E
N
0
T
I
M

1532
1128
1210
117
1247
1223
1500
1210
1220
1455
1146
1243
1134
1111
1120
1142
1124
1119
1100
1050
1205
1128
1058
1120
1306
1205
1140
1601
1017


SITE=INDIAN RIVER


493 12 12 77 1227 1305
494 12 19 77 1140 1220
495 12 27 77 1040 1132
496 1 2 78 1205 1328
497 1 11 78 818 902
498 1 26 78 1018 1242
499 1 30 78 1020 1222
500 2 6 78 1020 1155
501 2 20 78 1245 1355
502 2 22 78 838 918
503 3 1 78 1123 1208
504 3 7 78 832 902
505 3 13 78 843 942
506 3 24 78 835 942
507 3 30 78 1047 1137
508 4 17 78
509 5 1 78 1145 1235
510 5 17 78 905 *
511 5 31 78 1255 1325
512 6 13 78 1215 1355
513 6 28 78 1205 1328
514 7 12 78 1225 1355


40 0
20 1
30 0
30 0
30 0 0
30 12
20 0
20 0 0
20 1
30 0 0
20 3
20 10
20 42
20 2
20 3
* 19
30 6
20 4
20 13
20 1
20 1
20 12


* 17
* 20
* 16
* 16
* 16
17
* 14
* 13
18
S17
18
* 19
* 21
.24
* 25























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY


-- SITE=INDIAN RIVER


O
8
S

515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541





0
8
S
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541


D
A
Y

27
8
23
6
19
2
18
2
15
20
28
4
11
18
29
3
8
9
15
22
29
1
7
16
20
27
9

T T
O 0
T T
M M
A A
N N
E 1
F N

0 4
0 0
0 10
0 0
o 1
0 1
0 3
0 0
9 2
2 0
5 0
2 2
0 0
6 0
0 0
4 0
18 0
8 0
23 0
22 0
16 0
23 0
30 1
19 2
0 1
28 0
18 1


Y
E
A
R

78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
78
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79

M
A
X
T
E
M
P
0








29
27
28
30
22
22
23
8
21
14
18
13
15
12
20
25
22
14
21


B
E
G
T
I
M

1240
1205
905
1215
1200
1540
1200
800
1130
905
1200
940
1445
937
1018
1305
850
915
913
840
900
902
915
915
850
905
917.

M M
I A
N X
T T
E E
M M
P P
0 1



* *



19
20 20
17 28
21 28
18 s18
13 20
18 20
0 23
11 25
4 21
6 25
6 21
3 19
2 16
14 23
15 25
16 15
5 14
10 21


T
E Y
N P
0 S
T U
I R
M V

1338 2
1315 2
1045 2
1335 2
1315 2
1635 1
1310 2
905 1
1235 2
1130 2
1321 2
1040 2
1605 2
1138 2
1110 2
1355 1
1000 1
955 1
943 1
915 1
940 1
1040 1
1655 1
1025 1
1020 1
930 1
1020 1

M M
I A
N X
T T
E E
M M
P P




1 27





16 24
2.1 27
11 28
16 25
16 18
3 26
16 24
11 25
11 24
11 24
7 19
7 20
13 16
12 20
11 26
7 22
11 18


S
u
R T
F 0
C T
0 B M
N F A
0 T N

) 30 4
30 6
20 11
S 20 17
S 30 4
) 40 1
40 3
S 30 4
5 30 18
5 20 14
5 20 6
5 30 9
3 30 0
S 10 27
0 20 0.
3 40 7
S 30 18
S 30 8
S 30 23
S 20 22
3 30 16
3 40 23
S 30 31
20 26
3 30 1
5 30 28
3 20 21

I D
N I
T S
K C
T M
E A
M R
P G








24
25
23
24
21
20
19
17
18
18
18
18 I
15
16
16
17
22
20
20






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=INDIAN RIVER
S 5
T U W U
8 E Y R A r T
M E N P V T F 0
a Y G O S C C T
0 N 0 E T T U 0 L 0 B M
B T A A I I R N A N F A
S H Y R M M V D R D T N
542 3 15 79 845 1015 1 3 3.5 30 20
543 3 22 79 833 1015 1 3 3.5 30 2
544 3 27 79 1600 1705 1 3 3.5 30 10
545 4 12 79 850 1005 1 5.0 40 1
546 5 9 79 955 1005 1 5.0 40 13
547 5 23 79 920 1021 1 4.0 30 e
548 6 5 79 925 1145 1 3.5 20 1
549 6 21 79 900 958 1 5.0 20 0
550 7 2 79 915 1200 1 3.0 30 2
551 7 18 79 930 1135 1 3.5 30 8
552 7 30 79 915 1030 1 3 3.5 20 11
553 8 17 79 915 1110 1 4.0 30 2
554 8 29 79 920 1120 1 3.5 20 2
555 9 10 79 914 1055 1 5.0 30 14
556 9 24 "79 815 913 1 4.0 20 0
557 10 10 79 910 1005 1 4 4.0 30 1
558 10 23 79 1700 1742 1 20 0
559 11 5 79 906 1016 1 4.0 30 13
560 11 20 79 833 959 1 2 1.0 20 10
561 11 30 79 920 1010 1 3 3.0 30 22
562 12 6 79 842 1042 1 4 4.0 30 8
563 12 12 79 1430 1530 1 5 4.0 14
564 12 18 79 838 950 1 5 5.0 30 6
.565 12 27 79 1445 1550 1 4 .4.0 20 0 9
566 1 2 80 833 1000 1 3 13
567 1 7 80 1600 1658 1 3 3.5 30 27
568 1 11 80 938 1025 1 4 4.0 20 41
T T M M M M M M I D
0 0 A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
O V N N M M N M E E E A
8 E E I P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
542 3 7 11 18 15 26 15 24 10 22
543 0 0 2 26 15 27 16 27 16 23
544 0 6 1 22 8 19 8 21 12 21
545 0 0 1
546 0 0 7
547 0 0 0
548 0 0 0 .
549 0 0 0
550 0 0 2 .
551 0 0 5 j *
552 2 0 7 .
553 0 0 2 .. .
554 0 0 2
555 1 0 6
556 0 0 0
557 0 0 1
558 0 0 0
559 3 13 0
560 2 6 2 25 18 24 16 22 13 23
561 1 19 1 15 5 19 9 26 19 20
562 0 7 2 26 19 23 14 21 16 20
563 1 9 5 26 18 24 20 24 17 22
564 1 6 0 17 9 17 13 18 15 21
565 0 8 0 20 6 14 6 18 11 19
566 1 13 0 13 7 18 10 23 14 17
567 0 27 0 21 7 13 2 14 6 16
568 3 35 1 25 15 24 15 23 16 19























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=INDIAN RIVER


M
0
O N O
8 T A
S .H Y

569 1 20
570 1 30
571 2 2
572 2 7
573 2 14
574 2 21
575 2 27
576 3 4
577 3 12
578 3 20
579 12 1
580 12 12
581 12 19
582 12 29
583 1 2
584 1 7
585 1 13
586 1 23
587 2 3
588 2 11
589 2 19
590 2 25
591 3 6
592 3 11
593 3 17
594 3 24
595 11 25
T
0
C T
A M
L A
0 V N
8 E E
S S F

569 2 29
570 2 13
571 0 0
572 3 33
573 5 29
574 3 21
575 2 23
576 6 33
577 0 2
578 -0 0
579 1 14
580 0 11
581 2 7
582 4 24
583 1 6
584 5 31
585 2 20
586 3 34
587 1 17
588 1 5
589 3 6
590 5 34
591 7 18
592 2 6
593 8 31
594 6 33
595 1 9


Y
E
A
R

80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
'81
81
81
81
81
81
81
81
81
81
81
81
81

M
A
A
T
E
p
P
0
22
21
12
10
16
26
18
19
26
28
24
21
20
14
12
23
12
15
10
26
24
20
20
23
19
20
20


9;
8
8



8
82
3:


T
8 E Y
E N P
G D S
T T U
I I R
M M V

54 1019 1
30 1036 1
14 908 1
35 916 1
40 929 1
53 940 1
O1 1020 1
25 1620 1
40 920 1
43 929 1
32 930 1


845
855
1710
837
842
843
935
931
1635
902
904
1625
851
840
857
905


957
1735
925
920
930
1015
1017
1722
955
1002
1720
950
949
1050
*


M N M M M
I A I A I
N X N X N
T T T T T
E .E E E E
M M M M M
P P P P P
0 1 1 2 2

12 22 15 23 14
12 16 10 18 12
4 12 5 23 12
5 19 6 15 5
13 20 7 14 6
15 22 12 20 11
6 15 4 25 16
4 7 -1 17 0
17 23 15 27 18
21 25 19 29 19
12 -
10 18 11 26 17
7 18 6 17 9
5 6 4 14 5
-3 20 5 16 6
12 20 5 17 5
-3 9 0 15 0
3 16 2 19 7
2 20 9 23 16
14 25 17 21 15
13 25 17 22 10
5 24 6 20 10
10 27 15 23 11
10 23 10 23 13
9 25 13 23 8
9 19 10 20 11
1 *


W U
A R
T F
C C
L C
A N
R 0

3.5 30
4.0 30
4.0 30
4.0 30
3.0 20
4.0 20
4.0 20
3.0 20
4.0 30
4.0 20
4.0 30
5.0 30
4.0 20
4.0 20
5.0 30
3.0 30
5.0 30
4.0 30
5.0 30
4.0 30
4.0 20
4.0 30
3.0 30
3.0 30
4.0 30
4.0 30
2.0 20

I D
E N I
F T S
F K C
TT H
E E A
M M R
P P G

21
21
16
15
19
19
19
15
S 23
S 25
22 18 600
21 1
20 13 440
21 1o 500
22 18 500
28 23 580
29 16 420
23 14 520
27 20 580
34 29 620
34 29 600
32 28 620
28 22 600
23 20 600
25 18 300
* *























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=INDIAN RIVER-


596 12 3 81
597 12 10 81
598 12 15 81
599 12 16 81
600 12 18 81
601 12 20 81
602 12 21 81
603 1 6 82
604 1 12 82
605 1 16 82
606 1 19 82
607 1 23 82
608 1 26 82
609 1 31 82
610 2 21 82
611 3 4 82
612 3 10 82
613 3 19 82
614 3 31 82


808
815
832
830
904
914
855
854
838
900
920
824
828
814
1038
816
843
1243
959


908 1 4 4.0 20
916 1 4 2.5 15
940 1 2 3.0 20
850 1 4 3.5 35
920 1 3 2.5 10
925 1 5 3.5 20
911 1 3 2.0 0
905 1 3 2.0 0
858 1 5 2.0 10
916 1 3 3.0 10
936 1 3 20 0
842 1 3 2.0 10
847 1 2 3.0 20
831 1 2 2.0 10
1056 1 2 2.0 25
835 1 1 2.0 10
900 1 1 2.0 0.
1254 1 2 2.0 15
1012 1 3 2.0 15


2 5 21 10 25 3 28
1 3 13 3 19 8 23
6 3 .25 10 26 10 21
12 2 15 7 25 10 26
9 0 25 8 21 7 15
3 0 13 2 6 0 25
14 0 20 2 13 2 6
5 1 26 10 20 11 29
0 0 12 -4 9 0 16
4 0 19 5 10 0 22
11 1 25 10 24 7 18
2 0 28 18 27 12 27
1 0 18 10 20 8 20
6 0 28 17 25 16 21
0 6 26 13 22 12 27
4 7 25 16 23 11 21
3 6 25 13 22 13 18
0 1 30 18 27 18 29
0 1 26 17 25 20 22


SITE=PORT EVERGLAOES

T U
B E Y R
E N P V
G 0 S C
T T U 0
I I R N
M M V D


615 12 13
616 12 20
617 12 28
618 1 11
619 1 17
620 1 25
621 1 31
622 :2 7
623 2. 21
624 2 22
625 2 28


6 0 27
8 0 25
35 0 20
83 0 21
80 0 26
22 0 28
112 0 23
95 0 21
29 0 18
58 0 14
74 0 26


1138 1227
1108 1128
1125 1145
1125 1205
1013 1123
1201 1248
1120 1205
1120 1145
1243 1313
1425 1526
1310


25 22 24 15 23
23 9 27 13 25
17 6 21 10 21
16 5 19 8 28 21
21 5 15 7 27 22
24 19 24 17 28 22
17 4 17 6
17 7 20 13 28 20
16 11 22 16 28 21
18 10 16 11 29 21
26 13 25 10 29 23


0

S
C
H
A
R
G
950
1250
1250
1250
1150
1200
1250
1250
1250
1250
900


--- --- --- -- --- --- --























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED 8Y FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=PORT EVERGLADES

S S
T U W U
B E Y R A R T
1 E N P V T F 0
0 Y G 0 S C C C T
0 N O E T T U 0 L 0 8 M
8 T A A I I R N A N F A
S H Y R M M V O R O T N
626 3 6 78 1040 1058 2 2 3.0 20 35
627 3 14 78 1046 1130 2 4 3.0 30 11
628 3 23 78 1203 1243 2 4 4.0 20 10
629 4 1 78 1105 1108 2 3.5 20 0
630 4 18 78 1126 1153 2 3.5 20 3
631 5 2 78 1037 1105 2 3.5 1
632 5 18 78 1145 1225 2 3.5 5
633 6 1 78 1130 1205 2 3.0 30 0
634 6 14 78 1135 1205 2 4.0 20 0
635 6 27 78 1155 1235 2 4.0 20 1
636 7 11 78 1145 1225 2 5.0 30 0 O
637 7 25 78 1130 1214 2 4.0 20 3
638 8 7 78 1155 1235 2 4.0 20 2
639 8 22 78 1335 1405 2 4.0 20 0
640 9 5 78 1222 1310 2 3.5 20 *
641 9 18 78 1150 1230 2 4.0 30 0
642 10 2 78 1215 1245 1 4.0 20 0
643 10 19 78 1115 1140 2 40 0
644 11 2 78 1135 1150 1 3.5 20 0
645 11 16 78 1117 1140 2 3 3.5 20 0
646 11 21 78 1110 1142 2 4 4.0 30 0
647 11 29 78 1205 1240 2 3 3.5 20 0
648 12 6 78 1223 1248 2 3 3.5 20 0
649 1.2 15 78 1450 1520 2 3 4.0 20 0
650 12 19 78 1438 1500 2 3 4.0 10 4
651 12 27 78 1427 1500 2 4 4.0 20 5
652 1 3 79 1530 1545 1 4 -4.0 30 12
T T M M M M M M I D
0 0 A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 V N N M M M M M M E E A
B E E I P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
626 2 34 0 23 10 21 12 24 17 28 22 750
627 1 10 0 28 21 25 17 26 13 29 23 500
628 2 9 0 27 16 28 18 27 19 30 23 800
629 0 0 0
630 0 3 0 .
631 0 1 0 .
632 0 3 0 .
633 0 0 0 .
634 0 0 0 .
635 0 0 0 .
636 0 0 0 .
637 0 0 .
638 0 0 0 .
639 0 0 0
640 0 0 0
641 0 0 0 .
642 0 0 0 .
643 0 0 0 .
644 0 0 0 .
645 0 0 0 27 2 2 21 29 26 1050
646 0 0 0 29 22 29 23 29 21 27 26 1100
647 0 0 0 29 22 29 23 28 20 27 26 1100
648 0 0 0 29 20 31 22 29 23 28 25 1150
649 0 0 0 26 15 25 15 25 14 27 24 1200
650 0 0 0 26 14 24 16 26 18 27 24 400
651 0 5 0 24 20 27 20 27 20 28 24 500
652 0 12 0 16 4 26 11 27 23 24 23 1250























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED 8Y FLORIDA AUOU90N SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=PORT EVERGLADES -- ----
S S
T U W U
B E Y R A R T
M E N P V T F 0
0 Y G D S C C C T
0 N D E T T U O L 0 B M
B T A A I I R N A N F A
S H Y R M M V D R D T N
653 1 8 79 1315 1 4 4.0 20 18
654 1 9 79 1240 1310 1 3 30 28
655 1 15 79 1240 1310 1 3 3.5 30 22
656 1 22 79 1325 1400 t 4 4.0 30 34
657 1 29 79 1303 1330 1 3 3.5 125
658 2 1 79 1355 1425 1 .2 3.0 40 78
659 2 7 79 1238 1313 1 5 5.0 40 14
660 2 16 79 1505 1542 1 4 4.0 30 22
661 2 20 79 1420 1455 1 3 35 11
662 2 27 79 1245 1315 1 2 2.0 30 14
663 3 9 79 1352 1441 1 4 4.0 30 5
664 3 15 79 1317 1355 1 3 3.5 40 3
665 3 22 79 1240 1310 1 3 3.5 30 3
666 3 27 79 1230 1300 1 2 3.0 30 3
667 4 12 79 1315 1347 1 4.0 30 0
668 5 9 79 1430 1452 1 30 0
669 5 23 79 1410 1437 1 4.0 30 0
670 6 5 79 1 0
671 6 21 79 1252 1330 1 30 0
672 7 2 79 1250 1627 1 4
673 7 18 79 1320 1 30 2
674 7 30 79 1310 1340 1 4.0 30 5
675. 8 17 79 1245 1320 1 3. 3.5 30 0
676 8 29 79 1350 1425 1 4.0 20 1
677 9 24 79 1135 1210 1 .5 20 1
678 10 10 79 1251 1320 1 4.0 .
679 10 23 79 1000 1034 1 4.0 0
T T M M M M 4 M 1 0
0 0 A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T P K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
O V N N M M M M M M E E A
B E E I P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
653 3 14 2 24 18 26 17 26 18 23 22 1250
654 1 28 0 21 11 24 18 26 17 24 22 1150
655 2 18 0 21 9 31 16 28 19 23 21 1900
656 1 34 0 17 10 24 16 26 15 26 21 1200
657 3 125 0 17 7 21 11 25 8 22 20 1250
658 2 77 0 15 6 26 10 22 8 23 19 1200
659 0 14 0 29 17 26 15 26 13 22 21 1200
660 0 18 0 26 11 24 12 21 11 23 22 1050
661 0 11 0 24 18 26 18 26 18 26 22 1200
662 2 14 0 17 & 20 11 29 19 24 21 1200
663 1 3 0 26 14 25 8 25 17 23 22 850
664 0 3 0 25 16 27 16 24 18 22 23 800
665 1 3 0 28 15 27 15 25 15 24 23 800
666 0 3 0 21 10 25 15 30 19 22 22 1200
667 0 0 0
668 0 0 0 .
669 0 0 0 *
670 0 0 0 .. .
671 0 0 0 *
672 1 0 0 .
673 1 0 0 *
674 1 0 0 *
675 0 0 0 *
676 0 0 0
677 0 0 0 .
678 0 0 0
679 0 0 0























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUOUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=PORT EVERGLADES ----- ------

S S
T U W U
B E Y R A R T
M E N P V T F C
0 Y G 0 S C C C T
O N D E T T U O L 0 8 M
B T A A I I R N A N F A
S N Y R M M V 0 R 0 T N
680 11 5 79 1411 1436 1 4.0 20 0
681 11 20 79 1236 1305 1 3 4.0 20 1
682 11 30 79 1417 1 5 4.0 20 0
683 12 6 79 1344 1435 1 4 4.0 40 28
684 12 12 79 1051 1121 1 3 4.0 30 13
685 12 18 79 1240 1325 1 4 30 11
686 1 2 80 1330 1419 1 3 50
687 1 7 80 1230 1309 1 3 30 70
688 1 11 80 1450 1540 1 2 3.0 20 17
689 1 20 80 1330 1412 1 5 5.0 40 22
690 1 30 80 1324 1409 1 3 20 28
691 2 2 80 1230 1330 1 4 4.0 20 27
692 2 7 80 1241 1312 1 3 4.0 20 86
693 2 14 80 1210 1252 1 4 4.0 20 31
694 2 21 0s 1346 1419 1 3 4.0 20 47
695 2 27 80 1313 1345 1 5 4.0 20 20
696 3 4 80 1230 1255 1 4 4.0 0 28
697 3 12 80 1440 1 3 4
698 3 20 80 1339 1411 1 3 4.0 20 0
699 12 1 80 1202 1239 1 3 3.0 30 12
700 12 12 80 1205 1257 1 3 3.0 20 14
701 12 19 80 1235. 1310 1. 4 3.0 20 46
702 1 2 81 1215 1244 1 3 3.0 30 110
703 1 .7 81 1225 1252 1 3 3.0 30 61
704 1 13 81 1305 1335 1 3 3.0 '20 70
705 1 23 81 1335 1425 1 3 3.0 20 98
706 2 3 81 1314 1335 1 4 4.0 20 32
T T M M M M M M I 0
O O A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 V N N M M M M M M E E A
B E E I P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G

680 0 0 0 .
681 0 1 0 26 22 26 20 25 17 24 24 500
682 0 0 0 20 9 23 14 28 23 23 23 550
683 1 26 0 26 23 24 20 23 20 23 22 500
684 1 12 0 27 19 26 23 26 22 24 23 650
685 0 11 0 23 12 22 16 26 19 22 23 700
686 7 49 0 18 7 21 11 24 16 20 21 700
687 8 69 0 20 9 16 6 18 13 20 20 650
688 1 15 0 26 22 26 21 26 21 22 21 500
689 1 19 0 24 21 -26 17 24 19 23 23 400
690 0 27 0 24 15 25 16 26 18 22 22 500
691 3 27 0 17 5 21 13 27 15 21 21 800
692 12 86 0 20 8 23 12 19 6 22 22 700
693 3 27 0 24 17 23 12 20 8 22 22 1050
694 2 43 0 24 14 24 13 21 15 21 21 850
695 3 20 0 20 9 24 12 29 20 22 22 1000
696 2 28 0 19 6 14 1 23 16 22 20 1000
697 0 4 0 28 22 26 19 29 19 23 23 650
698 0 0 0 28 23 27 20 28 22 26 24 950
699 2 9 0 26 16 27 23 800
700 1 12 0 26 14 28 18 28 20 26 24 750
701 5 42 0 24 18 22 10 20 13 23 23 650
702 7 110 0 21 12 22 12 22 8 26 22 700
703 3 59 0 25 13 22 11 23 7 24 21 700
704 8 70 0 16 0 12 3 20 6 21 20 1250
705 1 87 0 20 .7 20 10 26 15 23 20 1200
706 1 32 0 17 9 28 15 25 20 21 20






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=PORT EVERGLADES
S S
T U W U
B E Y R A R T
M E N P V T F 0
0 Y G D S C C C T
0 N 0 E T T U O L C a M
B T A A I I R N A N F A
S H Y R M M V 0 R 0 T N
707 2 11 81 1215 1242 1 4 4.0 30 17
708 2 19 81 1246 1323 1 4 4.0 30 a 0
709 2 25 81 1255 1333 1 2 2.5 20 14
710 3 6 81 1149 1225 1 3 3.0 30 4
711 3 17 81 1228 1255 1 4 4.0 20 3
712 3 24 81 1300 1323 1 3 3.0 30 10
713 11 25 81 1437 1500 1 3 3.5 20 7
714 12 3 81 1321 1344 1 3 2.5 10 4
715 12 10 81 1201 1216 1 3 3.0 15 56
716 12 16 81 1330 1348 1 3 3.5 10 38
717 12 18 81 1223 1240 1 3 3.0 10 34
718 12 21 81 1213 1235 1 3 3.0 10 59
719 1 6 82 1154 1211 1 1 2.0 10 2
720 1 12 82 1149 1209 1 4 4.0 10 23
721 1 16 82 1222 1239 1 5 3.5 10 90
722 1 19 82 1248. 1307 1 3 3.0 10 45
723 1 23 82 1219 1243 1 3 3.5 10 7
724 1 26 82 1136 1153 1 4 3.5 10 17
725 1 31 82 1210 1237 1 3 3.5 15 12
726 2 21 82 1355 1420 1 2 2.5 10 4
727 3 10 82 1221 1235 1 2 2.5 10 3
728 3 19 82 1640 1652 1 2 2.0 5 0
729 3 30 82 1055 1104 1 3 3.0 t 10 2
T T M M M M M N I D
0 0 A I A I A I E N I
C T T X N X N X N F T S
A M M T T T T T T F K C
L A A E E E E E E T T H
0. V N N M M M M M M E E A
8 E E I P P P P P P M M R
S S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
707 2 16 0 29 20 27 22 27 18 22 21
708 0 0 0 27 19 25 23 27 22 24 21
709 1 13 0 25 10 25 12 27 13 22 21
710 1 4 0 28 17 28 19 23 20 24 21 734
711 0 3 0 22 13 28 20 23 20 25 21 947
712 0 10 0 21 10 25 14 26 19 22 20 995
713 0 7 26 15 29 25 972
714 1 4 0 25 19 30 23 27 21 29 25 836
715 7 56 0 27 10 24 15 26 15 27 23 677
716 5 38 0 21 12 28 16 26 15 25 23 895
717 4 34 0 26 16 26 16 21 12 26 24 863
718 9 58 0 22 7 16 2 17 5 25 21 841
719 0 2 0 28 20 25 19 29 23 27 24 902
720 3 21 0 18 1 15 5 20 9 26 22 965
721 9 80 0 21 9 16 5 26 11 25 21 938
722 2 44 0 26 15 25 14 25 12 24 23 651
723 0 7 0 27 22 26 16 "26 16 25 23 837
724 1 14 0 23 13 26 15 29 19 25 23 907
725 1 12 0 26 21 25 20 24 16 24 23 919
726 0 4 0 29 17 29 17 27 17 24 23 511
727 0 3 0 25 20 25 13 26 12 24 22 1224
728 0 0 0 30 22 30 21 30 22 29 25 1249
729 0 1 0 26 22 25 22 25 22 25 23 806























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=RIVIERA- BEACH
S S T TM M M M M M I 0
T U W U O A I A I A I EN I
8 E Y R A R T C T T X N X N X N F T S
M E N P V T F 0 A M T T T T T T F K C
0 G D S C C C T L A A E E E E E E T T H
0 N D E T T U O L O 8 M V N N M M M M M M E 5 A
8 T A A I I R N A N F A E E IP P P P P P M M R
S H Y R M M V DR 0 T N S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
730 12 13 77 950 1035 2 1 4.0 30 4 1 1 0 26 21 25 21 23 16 23 .
731 12 20 77 1010 1030 2 2 3.0 30 0 0 0 0 25 10 22 10 26 14 23
732 12 28 77 935 1025 2 2 47 10 6 0 19 4 16 6 20 8 20 .
733 1 3 78 945 1035 2 4 30 1 0 0 0 19 15 23 16 27 16 22 .
734 1 11 78 1025 1125 1 1 2.0 20 60 9 18 3 19 6 15 3 18 7 20 .
735 1 17 78 1208 1255 2 3 3.5 30 9 2 3 0 27 20 21 3 13 3 20
736 1 25 78 1005 1045 2 2 3.0 30 1 0 0 0 28 22 25 20 24 17 20 .
737 1 31 78 940 1020 2 3 3.5 20 34 2 16 0 22 5 16 4 16 5 19 *
738 2 7 78 930 1030 2 3 3.5 20 68 7 43 0 17 4 17 5 20 13 .18
739 2 20 78 933 1021 2 3 3.5 20 14 2 10 0 16 10 21 16 25 17 21.
740 2 22 78 1245 1327 1 2 3.0 30 32 4 0 0 13 4 13 11 16 10 20 .
741 2 28 78 1030 1113 2 3 2.5 30 10 1 1 0 28 12 25 9 25 7 .
742 3 6 78 952 1025 2 2 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 24 9 18 7 22 10 22 .
743 3 14 78 955 1025 2 3 5.0 40 0 0 0 0 27 20 26 13 26 9 .
744 3 23 78 1038 1108 2 2 3.0 20 0 0 0 0 26 15 27 18 27 20 22
745 4 1 78 1015 1043 2 3 3.0 20 0 0 0 0 . .
746 4 18 78 1000 1032 2 4.0 30 0 0 0 0 .
747 5 2 78 930 1012 2 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 o .
748 5 18 78 1022 1050 2 3.0 20 0 0 0 0 .
749 6 1 78 1010 1035 2 3.0 20 0 0 0 0 . .
750 6 14 78 1007 1033 2 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 .
751 6 27 78 1035 1105 2 4.0 20 0 0 0 0 .
752 7 11 78 1019 1055 2 4.0 20 0 0 0 0 .
753 7 25 78 957 1150 2 & 5.0 20 0 0 0 0 .
754 8 7 78 1114 1140 2 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 .
755 8 22 78 1426 1450 2 2.5 20 0 0 0 0 .
756 9 5 78 1015 1050 2 3.5 20 1 0 0 0 *
757 9 18 78 1020 1052 2 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 .
758 10 2 78 1335 1413 1 3.5 2 1 0 0 . .
759 10 19 78 1030 2. 0 0 0 .. 00.
760 11 2 78 1055 1120 1 40 40 0 0 0 0 .
761 11 16 78 1010 1040 2 4 4.0 20 *0 0 0 0 27 22 27 22. 26
762 11 21 78 935 1010 2 4 4.0 20 0 0 0 0 27 19 27 23 27 19 26 .
763 11 29 78 1125 1147 2 2 3.0 30 0 0 0 0 29 19 28 19 27 19 26
764 12 6 78 1055 1130 2 3 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 29 18 30 21 27 21 26
765 12 15 78 1250 1325 2 3 3.5 20 5 1 0 0 25 16 22 13 23 12 23
766 12 19 78 1227 1307 2 1 1.0 20 10 2 0 0 24 14 22 15 25 16 24 .
767 12 27 78 1245 1315 2 4 4.0 20 1 0 0 0 22 16 25 18 24 19 24
768 1 3 79 1500 1520 1 2 3.0 30 20 2 20 0 14 2 25 10 26 22 22 .
769 1 8 79 1225 1255 1 4 4.0 30 1 0 0 0 23 16 26 20 25 19 23
770 1 9 79 1150 1210 1 3 3.5 30 13 1 13 0 20 12 23 16 26 20 23
771 1 15 79 1112 1130 1 3 4.0 30 13 2 0 0 22 9 27 15 26 17 23
772 1 22 79 1202 1225 1 3 30 11 1 2 0 17 8 24 14 25 14 22
773 1 29 79 1205 1240 1 2 2.0 30 88 10 84 0 17 5 19 10 22 10 21
774 2 1 79 1146 1237 1 1 1.5 30 99 7 82 0 14 4 25 9 20 5 21
775 2 7 79 1410 1430 1 4 4.0 40 0 0 0 0 29 19 26 18 24 12 22
776 2 16 79 1330 1405 1 2 1.5 20 17 1 0 0 27 10 24 10 22 9 22
777 2 20 79 1340 1405 1 3 3.5 30 0 0 0 0 25 20 25 17 26 18 21
778 2 27 79 1114 1138 1 2 2.0 30 7 0 0 0 18 6 20 12 27 18 21
779 3 9 79 1233 1252 1 4 4.0 20 0 0 0 0 25 12 25 8 22 11 23
780 3 15 79 1143 1200 1 4 4.0 40 0 0 0 0 24 15 26 17 24 18 22
781 3 22 79 1122 1140 1 3 3.5 30 2 1 0 0 28 14 27 13 26 13 23
782 3 27 79 1420 1440 1 5 5.0 30 0 0 0 0 24 8 21 13 26 13 22
783 4 12 79 1236 1300 1 a 4.0 40 0 0 0 0 .. .
784 5 9 79 1225 1300 1 4.0 30 0 0 0 0 .
785 5 23 79 1231 1250 1 o 5.0 30- 0 0 0 . .
786 6 5 79 1300 1328 1 4.0 20 0 0 0 0 .. .
787 6 21 79 1217 1239 1 9 4.0 30 0 0 0 0 .
788 7 2 79 1337 1400 1 o 2.5 1 0 0 .
789 7 18 79 1242 1305 1 3.0 30 0 0 0 0 .
790 7 30 79 1230 1255 1 o 3.5 30 0 0 0 .
791 8 17 79 1205 1230 1 3.5 30 0 0 0 0 .
792 8 29 79 1300 1330 1 3.5 20 0 0 0 0 .
793 9 24 79 1013 1035 1 5.0 30 0 0 0 0 . .
794 10 10 79 1217 1438 1 3.0 20 0 0 0 0 .









54
























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY

SITE=RIVIERA BEACH --- -----------


B
E
G
T
I
M

1438
1230
1110
1150
1248
1140
1206
1225
1200
1325
1318
1235
1238
1057
1050
1138
1201
1137
1310
1142
1157
1123
1128
1158
1445
1128
1140

M
A
X
T
E
M
P
0


27
18
26
27
23
23
17
23
26
24
24
18
18
23
26
21
20
28
29
26
26
24
17
21
25


E
N
D
T
I
M

1455
1245
1125
1220
1320
1210
1226
1245
1235
1410
1340
1305
1303
1125
1123
1150
1229
1340
1340
1220
1215
1143
1150
1217
1516
1200
1210


* *

2 2.0
3 3.0
4 4.0
2 3.0
3 3.5
3 *
2 2.0
3 .
3 4.0
2 3.5
2 3.0
3 4.0
3 4.0
4 4.0
2 4.0
3 4.0
4 5.0
3 4.0
3 4.0
'3 3.5
2 2.0
2 2.0
2 1.0
1 1.0
2 2.5


22 26 15
8 23 12
22 26 20
17 26 22
10 20 13
7 18 10
4 19 9
5 "16 6
20 26 20
18 26 14
13 24 15
4 19 6
7 24 11
18 23 10
12 24 10
8 21 9
6 11 1
22 27 20
19 29 19
15
12 27 17
15 23 9
7 13 6
7 23 6
11 22 14


S
U
R
F
C
0
N
D

30
30
20
30
30

40
20





30
20
20
20
20
30
20
30
20
20
20
20
20

E
F
F
T

M
P



















29
29
30
30
30
28


B
F
T








30
30
30

20
30












I
N
T
K
T
E
M
P


25
25
24
24
23
24
24
22
23
23
23
20
22
22
24
22
21
24
24
24
24
23
22
21
22


T
0
T

A
N

0
0
0
0
4
9
1
6
20
108
4
28
9
46
97
10
23
14
83
1
I
1
2
38
100
132
59

0
I
S
C
H
A
R
G



















260
260
260
520
580
500






















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
--- SITE=RIVIERA BEACH


B
E
G
T
I
M

1117
1247
1223
1410
1210
1220
1355
1146
1221

1134
1111
1120
1142
1124
1119
1106
1132
1205
1128
1058
1120
1306
1205
1140
1601
1017

M
A
X
T
E
M
P
0

16
21
15
29
28
25
25
23
21
25
23
16
21
25
22
25
18
22
25
26
23
27
25
29
26
30
25


0
8
S

822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
832
833
834
835
836
837
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
845
846
847
848





0

S

822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
832
833
834
835
836
837
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
845
846
847
848


E Y
N P
D S
T U
I R
M V

1147 1
1320 1
1300 1
1436 1
1230 1
1238 1
1418 1
1209 1
1243 1
1
1142 1
1138 1
1136 1
1200 1
1153 1
1130 1
1125 1
1159 1
1225 1
1152 1
1118 1
1140 1
1326 1
1221 1
1155 1
1614 1
1032 1
M M M
I A I
N X N
T T T
e E E
M M M
P P P
0 1 1

0 12 4
7 18 7
7 28 13
19 26 21
19 25 21
8 25 7
13 28 13
11 26 15
8 24 13
10
15 29 19
5 22 18
10 26 13
15 26 15
5 17 2
16 25 17
-1 12 2
5 13 3
10 25 10
20 26 15
11 25 11
22 25 20
15 28 15
21 25 13
21 26 21
21 30 20
21 23 21


B
F
T









10
30
20
10
10
10
10
to10
15
10
30
10
25

25
1
E N
F T
F K
T T
E E10
S 30
P P
27 16
26 21
29 21
28 23
29 22
28 22
22
22
22
30 25




* *


T
0
T
M
A
N

93
141
80
8
2
11
I
1
3
5
9
L
88
54
21
137
0
159
168
6
5
13
16
0
1
0
0
0

o
D
I
S
C
H
A
R
G

720
280
600
380
380
480


523







-f























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
DATA COLLECTED BY FLORIDA AUDUBON SOCIETY
FOR FLORIDA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY
SITE=VERO BEACH--------------------
S S T T M M M M IM
TU W U AIAI I N I
B E Y R A R T C T T X N X N X N F T S
M E N P V T F O A M M T T T T T T F K C
0 Y G 0 S C C C T L A A E E E E E T T H
O N O E T T U O L O B M V N N M M M M M E E A
8 T A A I I R N A N F A E E 1 P PP P P M M R
S H Y R M M V 0 R 0 T N S F N 0 0 1 1 2 2 P P G
849 12 12 77 1100 1130 2 2.0 30 19 5 19 . .
850 12 19 77 1005 1005 2 4.0 30 9 0 9 . .
851 12 27 77 941 1000 2 3.0 20 23 5 23 . .
852 1 2 78 952 1052 2 20 6 0 5 .
853 1 11 78 927 942 1 4.0 20 1 0 1 . .
854 1 17 78 1345 1410 2 3.5 30 4 1 3 . .
855 1 26 78 923 942 2 3.5 20 2 0 2 . .
856 1 30 78 1240 1313 2 3.0 20 0 0 0 . . .
857 2 6 78 927 942 2 3.5 20 0 0 0 . .
858 2 20 78 1120 1140 2 3.5 20 4 0 3 . . .
859 2 22 78 949 1005 I 40 8 1 7 . .
860 3 1 78 1024 1040 2 3.5 20 3 0 3 . 4 .
861 3 7 78 1054 1118 2 3.5 20 12 1 7 . .
862 3 13 78 1127 1150 2 3.0 20 39 6 25 . .
863 3 23 78 835 908 2 4.0 20 4 0 1 .* . .
864 3 30 78 937 1013 2 4.0 4 0 4 . .
865 4 17 78 1000 1035 2 3.5 20 3 1 . . .
866 5 1 78 1020 1055 2 4.0 30 1 0 . .
867 5 17 78 1145 1230 2 3.5 20 0 0 . .
868 5 31 78 1115 1150 2 3.0 20 2 0 . .
869 6 13 78 1110 1104 2 3.0 20 14 0 .
870 6 28 78 1000 1100 2 3.0 20 0 0 . .
871 7 12 78 1020 1110 2 3.5 0 0. .......
872 7 27 78 1044 1120 2 4.0 30 0 0 . . .
873 8 8 78 1023 1052 2 3.5 20 I1 0 . .
874 8 22 78 1532 1610 2 4.0 20 2 1 . .
875 9 6 78 1105 1155 2 3.0 20 0 0 . .
876 9 19 78 1033 1054 2 5.0 20 0 0 . . .
877 10 2 78 1449 1518 1 30 0 0 . .
878 10 18 78 1005 1045 2 4.0 30 0 0 . . ...
879 11 2 78 940 1015 1 5.0 30 0 0 *. . o .
880 11 29 78 1025 1055 2 4.0 20 1 0 . . .
881 12 6 78 905 945 2 3.5 10 0 0 . . .
882 12 15 78 1005 1115 2 4.0 30 12 3 . .
883 12 16 78 905 937 2 4.0 20 0 0 . .
884 12 19 78 955 1033 2 3.0 10 6 1 . .
885 12 27 78 1005 1100 2 4.0 20 8 1 .
886 1 3 79 1415 1430 1 4.0 30 6 0 . .
887 1 8 79 1030 1110 1 3.5 30 6 0 . .
888 1 15 79 1010 1020 1 4.0 30 4 0 . . .
889 1 29 79 1105 I 1 4.0 30 1 0 . ...
890 2 1 79 1055 1114 1 3.0 30 0 0 . .
891 2 7 79 1529 1545 1 4.0 30 0 0 . .
892 2 16 79 1050 1120 1 3.0 20 2 0 . .
893 2 20 79 1200 1218 1 19 3 . .
894 2 27 79 1023 1033 1 30 13 2 . .
895 3 9 79 1120 1145 1 3.0 20 15 1 . .
896 3 15 79 1105 1110 1 4.0 30 2 0 . .
897 3 27 79 1 .* 6 0 . .
898 4 12 79 I e 0 0 . .





















57



















APPENDIX B:


Brevard County. For detailed descriptions of surveys, see Shane
(1981). Survey conditions were determined subjectively following
each flight. Air temperature was collected in the shade at the
airport prior to each flight. The number of manatee and dolphin
calves included in the total count is given in parentheses
following the total. An asterisk (*) indicates that the
observers were not the 2 regular observers. Two asterisks (**)
indicate a flight was incomplete. Dashes (-) indicate no data
recorded.


















BANANA RIVER FLIGHTS


DATE CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (OC) NO. OBSERVERS

1-5-78 2*

1-7-78 1-2*

1-22-78 1-2*

2-11-78 2*

3-5-78 2

3-12-78 2*

3-26-78 Good 2

4-9-78 1

4-23-78 -- 1-2*

5-7-78 Poor 2

5-21-78 Excellent 2

6-2-78 2

6-20-78 2

7-4-78 2*

7-20-78 2*

8-23-78 -- 2*

9-1-78 Good 2*


9-14-78 -

9-29-78

10-25-78 Pair

11-13-78 Excellent

11-28-78 Excellent

12-11-78 Poor

12-29-78 Pair to
Poor

1-11-79 Very Good

1-24-79 Fair

2-8-79

2-23-79 Good -

3-6-79 Fair to
Good

3-20-79 Very Good,to
Excellent

4-2-79 Poor to Fair

4-18-79 Excellent


2'

2'

2*

2*

2*

2*


ROUTE MANATEES DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

A** 0 9

A 6(1) 35

A 0 28

A 0 28

A 3 10

A 58 30

A 130(1) 37

A 106(6) 16 2

A** 60(4) 11 1

A 37 13 3

A 29(1) 19(2) 14

B 39(1) 10 12

B 48(4) 11 15

B 65(6) 22 6

B 68(5) 15 15

B" 52(4) 21 13

B 87(7) 31 28


B 67(2)

B 55(7)

B 36(3)

B 89(5)

B 135(14)

B 52(3)

B 2


44

40

9

39(2)

38(2)

19

11


0 37(2)

1 20

0 61

60(11) 48

94(8) 68(1)


B 177(19) 57(1) 6


16.0


22.4

20.4


128(14)

165(16)


52(3)

53(1)



















BANANA RIVER PLIGHTS (continued)
DATE CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (0C) NO. OF OBSERVERS ROUTE MANATEES DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

5-1-79 Good 21.5 2 B** 13(1) 1 12
5-2-79 air 23.0 2 B 105(10) 36 6

5-16-79 Poor to Fair 25.0 2 B 62(1) 27 5

5-29-79 Excellent 25.3 2 B 114(8) 23(2) 6

6-12-79 Very Good 2 B 93(12) 60(1) 18

6-26-79 Very Good to 25.5 2 B 87(11) 52(2) 20
Excellent

7-10-79 Excellent 28.0 2 B 102(17) 37(1) 15

7-26-79 Excellent 28.4 2 B 146(17) 48(1) 13

8-9-79 Good 26.0 2 B 44(2) 22 15

8-22-79 Excellent 26.0 2 B 115(11) 64(3) 38

9-9-79 Fair 26.8 2 B 38 41 28
9-20-79 Good 22.7 2 B 58(4) 23(1) 8

10-4-79 Very Good 22.5 2 B 70(7) 37(1) 12

10-16-79 Poor 24.5 2* 8 33(1) 25(1) 4

11'--79 Good 19.8 2 B 75(6) 19 6

11-20-79 Very Good 18.7 2 B 101(12) 37(2) 6


12-3-79 Fair 19.0 2 B 20(2) 38(3) 0

12-19-79 Excellent 2* B 17(1) 39(1) 2

1-4-80 Excellent 11.5 2 B 1 40(2) 3

1-17-80 Very Good 11.8 2 B 8 101 5

1-29-80 Fair 9.7 2 B 0 20(1) 0

2-12-80 Very Good 8.0 2 B* 0 54(2) 1

2-28-80 Very Good 7.0 2 B 4 60(2) 0




















INDIAN RIVER FLIGHTS
DATE CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (0C) NO. OBSERVERS ROUTE MANATEES DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

1-S-78 -- 2 A* 48(4) 24

1-7-78 1-2* A 36(4) 11

1-22-78 1-2* A 6 8

2-11-78 2* A 29(2) 27

2-19-78 2* A 8 5

3-5-78 -- 2 A 0 4

3-12-78 2 A 63(1) 5

3-26-78 Good 2* A 18 2

4-9-78 1 A 15(1) 11 0

5-7-78 Poor 2 A 5 3 1

5-21-78 Excellent 2* A 6 7 1

6-1-78 2* C 34 38(1) 0

6-21-78 2* C 9 23(1) 0

7-5-78 2 C 32(1) 33(3) 0

7-21-78 Poor to Fair 2 C 25(2) 35(2) 0

8-25-78 2 C 23 75(2) 2

9-15-78 Poor 2* D 52 1

9-28-78 2* E 15(3) 42 0

10-13-78 2* P 11 51(1) 1

10-26-78 2* 6(1) 25 0

11-29-78 27.0 2* P** 10 11 0

12-14-78 Poor 11.8 2* F** 10 3 0

12-27-78 13.8 2 P 14 6 0

1-17-79 Very Good 15.8 2 F 60(4) 38 0

1-23-79 Good 8.0 2 F 89(7) 39(1) 0

2-9-79 Poor 7.8 2 F** 53(5) 15 0

2-22-79 Fair 20.2 2 F 25(4) 16 0

3-7-79 Poor 11.8 2 F** 33(1) 7 0

3-19-79 Excellent 13.4 2 F 68(11) 40 0

4-3-79 Poor 23.2 2 F 23(2) 3 0

4-17-79 Good 17.8 2 F 71(5) 34(1) 0

5-3-79 Poor 23.0 2 F 35(9) 20 2

5-15-79 Fair to Good 23.8 2 F 32(3) 53 0

5-30-79 Excellent 29.0 2 F 22(3) 27 1


















INDIAN RIVER FLIGHTS (continued)


DATE CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (oC) NO. OBSERVERS ROUTE MANATEES DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

6-15-79 Pgor-to Fair 26.2 2 P 20(2) 31(2) 0

6-29-79 Good 27.0 2 F 28(1) 60 3

7-9-79 Fair 25.7 2 F 14 12 0

7-25-79 Very Good 28.0 2 P 18(2) 16 0

8-8-79 Very Good 25.0 2* P 34(2) 40 1

8-23-79 Fair 25.4 2 P 19(2) 68(1) 1

9-7-79 Pair 25.5 2 P 43(5) 43(1) 2

9-24-79 Poor to Fair 24.0 2 F 38(2) 54 2

10-3-79 Pair 23.0 2 F 35(2) 47 0

10-15-79 Poor 23.0 2 F 8 3 0

11-5-79 Poor to Fair 22.2 2 F 27 5 0

11-21-79 Fair ta Good 19.7 2 F 38 6 0

12-4-79 Good 15.0 2 F 25(1) 31 0

12-18-79 Poor 10.0 2 F** 27(1) 33 ; 0

1-2-80 Poor to 3.0 2* F 37(1) 24(1) 0
Excellent

1-18-80 Good 16.5 2 P 47(3) 21 0



2-1-80 loof 5.5 2 F** 7(1) 6 0

2-14-80 Good 15.0 2* P 39(5) 58 0

2-27-80 Fair 8.3 2 F 48(3) 43 0
















INTENSIVE SURVEY FLIGHTS

DATE CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (oC) NO. OBSERVERS RCUTE

10-19-78 oor 20.1 2* H**

11-3-78 Poor 21.2 2* G**

11-15-78 21.0 2* G

12-6-78 Good 17.0 2* G

12-21-78 20.0 2 G

1-3-79 Poor 0.5 2 G**

1-5-79 Excellent 10.5 2 G

1-30-79 Poor 7.0 2 G

2-12-79 Excellent 7.8 2 H

2-13-79 Poor to Fair 9.5 2 H

2-14-79 Excellent 10.0 2 H

2-15-79 Excellent 13.0 2 H

2-16-79 Good 14.8 2 H

2-27-79- Poor 5.8 2 H

3-12-79 Poor to Fair 10.0 2 G

3-27-79 Good 11.0 2 G

4-12-79 Poor 23.5 2 G

11-15-79. fair 13.0 2 H

11-28-79 Good 25.8 2 H

12-10-79 Very Good 17.0 2 H

12-11-79 Excellent 18.8 2 H

12-12-79 Poor to 21.0 2 H
Excellent

12-13-79 Excellent 19.8 2 H

12-14-79 Fair to Good 18.0 2 H

12-28-79 Excellent 9.8 2* H

1-10-80 Excellent 16.0 2 H

1-10-80 Good 2 H

1-21-80 Excellent 11.3 2 H

1-22-80 Poor 13.4 2 H

1-24-80 Poor 5.0 2 H**

1-26-80 Poor 15.2 2 H

2-7-80 Pair 4.7 2 H

2-19-80 Poor 14.2 2 H

2-20-80 iery Good 11.3 2* H

2-21-80 Very Good 14.3 2 H

2-21-80 Very Good 22.0 2 H

2-22-80 Good 16.5 2 H

2-26-80 Poor 9.0 2 H**


MANATEES

5

0

7(1)

16(1)

30(2)

2

106(9)

31(1)

47(3)

35(3)

76(7)

95(7)

67(12)

39(2)

74(2)

77(10)

25(1)

26(1)

18

41(4)

57(4)

69(5)


65(9)

32(3)

89(7)

70(3)

68(1)

105(8)

49(4)

34(2)

38(1)

33(4)

17(1)

66(7)

76(9)

87(6)

83(9)

12


DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS
9 0

0 0

3 0

29(3) 0

1 0

0 0

39 0

35 0

6 0

15 0

15 0

14 0

14 0


30(1)

6

1

9(2)

11

42

40


30

39(1)

30

26(1)

36

26

8

0

25

41(1)

0

7

18

12

29

0















MOSQUITO LAGOON FLIGHTS
(Outside Intracoastal Waterway)


CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (OC) NO. OBSERVERS

21.2 2*

21.0 2*

Good 17.0 2'

20.0 2

Good 10.5 2

Excellent 15.8 2

-7.0 2

Poor 5.8 2

Poor to Fair 10.0 2

Very Good 11.0 2

Poor 23.5 2

Poor to Fair 23.0 2

Good 23.8 2

Very Good to 29.0 2


Excellent

6-15-79 Fair

6-29-79 Very Good


Pair to Good

Good

Very Good

Good

Pair

Pair

Fair to Good

Poor


ROUTE

I

I

I

I

I

J

J

J

J

J

J

J

J

J


MANATEES DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

0 0 0

0 1 0

1 1 0


25.7 2 J 0

28.0 2 J 0

25.0 2* J 0

25.4 2 J 0

25.5 2 K 0

24.0 2 K 0

23.0 2 K 0

23.0 2 K 0


NORTHERN INDIAN RIVER FLIGHTS (North of Railroad Bridge)


DATE CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (oC) NO. OBSERVERS ROUTE MANATEES

9-7-79 Pair 25.5 2 K 2

9-24-79 Fair 24.0 2 K 0

10-3-79 Fair to Good 23.0 2 K 4

10-15-79 Poor 23.0 2 K 0

11-5-79 Fair 22.2 2 L 0

11-21-79 Good 19.7 2 L 0

12-4-79 Good 15.0 2 L 0

12-18-79 Poor to Fair 10.0 2 L 0

1-2-80 Fair 3.0 2* L 0

1-18-80 Fair 16.5 2 L 0

2-14-80 Good 15.0 2* L 0

2-27-80 Good 8.3 2 L 0


DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

8 O

3 0

0 0

0 0

0 0


0 0

0 0
0 0

3 0

2 0


DATE

11-3-78

11-15-78

12-6-78

12-21-78

1-5-79

1-17-79

1-30-79

2-27-79

3-12-79

3-27-79

4-12-79

5-3-79

5-15-79

5-30-79


7-9-79

7-25-79

8-8-79

8-23-79

9-7-79

9-24-79

10-3-79

10-15-79




















INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY AND SPOIL ISLAND FLIGHTS
(Northern Indian River and Mosquito Lagoon)


DATE

11-3-78

11-15-78

12-6-78

12-21-78

1-5-79

1-17-79

1-30-79


CONDITIONS AIR TEMP. (C)

21.2

21.0

Good 17.0

20.0

Good 10.5

Excellent 15.8

7.0


2-27-79 Poor

3-12-79 Poor to Fair

3-27-79 Very Good

4-12-79 Poor

5-3-79 Poor to Pair

5-15-79 Good

5-30-79 Very Good to
Excellent

6-15-79 Fair

6-29-79 Very Good


7-9-79 Fair to Good

7-25-79 Good

8-8-79 Very Good

8-23-79 Good

9-7-79 Fair

9-24-79 Pair

10-3-79 Fair to Good

10-15-79 Poor

11-5-79 Fair

11-21-79 Good

12-4-79 Good

12-18-79 Poor to Fair

1-2-80 Fair

1-18-80 Fair

2-14-80 Good

2-27-80 Good


5.8

10.0

11.0

23.5

23.0

23.8

29.0


NO. OBSERVERS

2*

2*

2*

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2


2

2


ROUTE

I

I

I

I

I

J

J

J

J

J

J

J

J

J


J

J


J

J

J


K

K

K

K

L
L

L

L
L


L

L


MANATEES

3

I

1
5(1)


0
0

1

0

0

0

1

7(2)

5

3

2


1 .

3


1.

0



8

5

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

0


DOLPHINS ALLIGATORS

7 0

4 0

5 0

4 0

S 0


26(1)

14


8

0

3

0

28(4)

5

6

0

1

6

15

0

1

14(1)

2

0



















APPENDIX C: Riviera Beach/Hobe Sound. For detailed descriptions of surveys,
see Packard (1981).









VARIABLE DESCRIPTION

POWER Number of manatees in effluent of power
plant

TOTAL Number of manatees sighted on entire
survey

PREV Mean air temperature (OC) on day prior
to survey

HOBE Minimum water temperature (OC) in Hobe
Sound on day of survey

SURF Morning water temperature (OC) at Carlin
Park life guard station on day of survey

TIDE Tidal stage: (1) low, (3) increasing or
outgoing, (2,4) high

CLARITY Water clarity (mean of 22 zones):
(1) no bottom features visible
(2) bottom features visible near shore
(3) bottom features visible in channel




















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
HOBE SOUND
DATA COLLECTED BY PACKARD (1981) FOR USFWS


Y
D E
A A
Y R


0 4
0 8
3 26
0 16
19 38
40 67
8 34
53 .62
67 71
107 115
79 99
87 121
156 161
124 142
133 134
69 146
110 132
20 95
149 152
29 161
5 50
1 18
1 25
1 22
2 25


12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2


1 80
4 80
8 80
11 80
16 80
18 80
23 80
26 80
29 80
2 81
5 81
9 81
12 81
15 81
19 81
22 81
26 81
30 8.1
5 81
9 81
14 81
18 81
20 871
23 81
26 81


0.0
0.0
0.0
1.7
1 .5
1.4
1 .3
1.3
1.9
2.2
2.4
2.1
2.0
2.3
2.0
2. 1
2.2
2.2
1.7
1.4
1 6
1.3
1.3
1.4
1.4



















APPENDIX D:


Tampa Bay Big Bend Power Plant. See Patton (1980) for detailed
description of surveys conducted around Big Bend Unit 4 of the
Tampa Electric Company.






















STUDY BY


OBS

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22.
23
24
25
26


MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
TAMPA dAY
PATTON (1980) FOP TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES


SITE

TB
T9
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB
TB


MONTH

6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
1
1
1
1
1
2
2


DAY YEAR


TCTMAN

0
0
9
5
4
11
7
4
6
2
4
15
0
5
6
11
20
25
17
15
'35
15
33
19
32
55

















APPENDIX E: Northwest Coast. For detailed description of aerial surveys,
seePowell and Rathbun (1983) and Kochman et al. (1983). The
data for Kings Bay are listed as a separate site, as well as
included in the total counts for Crystal River.























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
KINGS BAY, FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFOS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TGTAL MANATEES
SITE=KINGS BAY

CBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN

1 11 17 77 50
2 11 29 77 46
3 12 7 77 59
4 12 22 77 51
5 12 29 77 37
6 1 3 78 61
7 1 21 78 58
8 1 26 78 78
9 1 27 78 59
10 2 7 78 51
11 2 15 78 64
12 2 15 78 69
13 2 15 78 72
14 2 25 73 62
15 2 25 78 71
16 2 25 78 61
17 3 2 78 59
18 3 7 78 55
19 3 7 78 45
20 3 7 78 31
21 3 12 78 46
22 3 17 78 26
23 3 23 78 13
24 3 31 78 17
25 4 7 78 5
26 4 8 78 2
27 4 20 78 9
28 5 5 78 0
29 5 11 78 3
33 5 25 78 2
31 6 8 78 0
32 6 19 78 0
33 6 21 78 0
34 7 6 78 6
35 7 22 78 4
36 7 23 78 5
37 8 25 78 5
38 8 26 78 3
39 8 28 78 6
40 8 29 78 10
41 9 8 78 3
42 9 9 78 4
43 9 29 78 3
44 9 30 78 0
45 10 16 78 19
46 10 17 78 19
47 10 17 78 26
48 10 18 78 30
49 10 18 78 31
50 10 19 78 33
51 10 19 78 38
52 10 19 78 38
53 11 1 78 31
54 11 10 78 34
55 11 13 '73 50
56 11 20 78 37
57 12 7 78 55
58 12 12 78 40
59 12 26 78 60
60 1 0 79 56
61 1 22 79 80
62 1 23 79 57
63 2 3 79 62
64 2 3 79 71
65 2 14 79 66
66 2 15 79 76
67 2 24 79 17
68 3 8 79 41
69 3 9 79 44
70 3 19 79 &1
71 3 20 79 24























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
KINGS BAY, FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES

SITE=KINGS BAY

OBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN
72 3 21 79 11
73 3 26 79 21
74 4 10 79 0
75 4 18 79 0
76 5 5 79 2
77 5 6 79 0
78 5 7 79 0
79 5 10 79 3
80 5 11 79 1
81 5 22 79 0
82 7 3 79 3
83 7 4 79 5
84 7 18 79 1
85 7 19 79 2
86 7 31 79 6
87 8 I 79 7
88 8 14 79 16
89 8 IS 79 3
90 8 27 79 12
91 8 28 79 19
92 9 8 79 13
93 9 9 79 19
94 9 18 79 9
95 9 19 79 17
96 10 1 79 7
97 10 2 79 14
98 10 17 79 31
99 10 22 79 26
100 10 23 79 27
101 10 29 79 44
102 11 6" 79 40
103 11 7 79 53
104 11 14 79 71
'105 11 27 79 70
106 11 27 79 49
107 12 12 79 73
108 12 13 79 62
109 12 18 79 62
110 1 2 80 68
111 1 2 80 87
112 1 9 80 80
113 1 16 80 73
114 1 16 80 59
115 2 2 80 64
116 2 5 80 73
117 2 26 80 57
118 3 4 80 51
119 3 14 80 3
120 3 26 80 1
121 4 2 80 1
122 4 16 80 13
123 5 5 80 0
124 5 21 80 5
125 6 4 80 0
126 6 19 80 0
127 7 10 80 2
128 7 29 80 1
129 8 21 80 2
130 8 22 80 8
131 9 3 80 6
132 9 25 80 13
133 10 5 80 14
134 10 8 80 21
135 10 9 80 17
136 10 17 80 37
137 10 27 80 46
138 10 31 80 30
139 10 31 80 48
140 11 4 80 64
141 11 29 80 63
142 11 29 80 76























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
KINGS BAY. FLORIDA
OATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES
SITE=KINGS BAY---------

085 MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN

143 12 3 80 76
144 12 5 80 78
145 12 10 80 61
146 12 11 80 61
147 12 17 80 84
148 12 18 80 71
149 12 26 80 7Q
150 12 26 80 97
151 1 5 81 91
152 1 5 81 88
153 1 5 81 79
154 1 13 81 77
155 1 26 81 85
156 1 27 81 96
157 1 27 81 95
158 1 27 81 80
159 1 30 81 82
160 2 9 81 70
161 2 25 81 58
162 3 3 81 45
163 3 4 81 25
164 3 9 81 45
165 3 25 81 43
166 3 26 81 32
167 4 27 81 6
168 5 11 81 0
169 5 22 81 0
170 6 5 81 5
171 6 19 81 7
172 7 6 81 15
173 7 17 81 7
174 8 3 81 5
175 8 17 81 11
176 8 31 81 13
177 9 14 81 15
178 9 14 81 37
179 9 22 81 22
180 9 28 81 31
181 9 29 81 23
182 10 8 81 19
183 10 9 81 25
184 10 15 81 57
185 1i 26 81 56
186 10 22 81 51
187 11 4 81 68
188 11 18 81 110
189 11 18 81 93
190 11 24 81 106
191 12 3 81 80
192 12 3 81 94
193 12 3 81 117
194 12 11 81 113
195 12 11 81 88
196 12 7 81 83
197 12 20 81 71
198 12 20 81 72
199 1 7 82 86
200 1 10 82 88
201 2 4 82 80
202 2 8 82 61
203 2 11 82 53
204 2 14 82 59
205 2 19 82 34
206 3 14 82 0
207 3 31 82 4
208 4 13 82 8
209 4 30 82 4
210 5 3 82 2
211 5 12 82 0
212 5 28 82 1
213 6 8 82 O















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
KINGS BAY. FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES
SITE=KINGS BAY

08S MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN
214 6 25 82 3
215 7 8 82 8
216 7 23 82 0
217 8 3 82 0
218 8 23 82 8
219 9 1- 82 12
220 9 16 82 6
221 10 7 '82 26
222 10 19 82 31
223 10 29 82 56
224 1I 15 82 84
225 12 19 82 99
226 12 30 82 68
227 1 16 83 112
228 1 7 83 119
229 1 7 83 83
230 1 28 83 116
231 3 3 83 50
232 3 3 83 42
233 3 11 83 28













MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
CRYSTAL RIVER POWER PLANT (FPL)
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEESs INTKTEMP=INTAKE WATER TEMPERATURE(C)

SITE=CRYSTAL RIVER POWER PLANT
OBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN INTKTEMO

1 4 10 79 0 26
2 5 5 79 0 26
3 5 11 79 0 26
4 5 22 79 0 27
5 7 3 79 0 30
6 7 18 79 0 30
7 7 31 79 0 29
8 8 14 79 0 27
9 8 27 79 0 30
10 9 18 79 0 28
11 10 22 79 0 25
12 11 6 79 0 20
13 12 12 79 0 17
14 1 2 80 0 14
15 2 26 80 1 17
16 3 26 80 1 20
17 4 2 80 0 21
18 5 5 80 0 24
19 5 21 80 3 29
20 6 4 80 0 27
21 6 19 80 0 29
22 7 10 80 0 31
23 7 29 80 0 25
24 8 21 80 0 31
25 9 3 80 0 29
16 9 25 80 0 30
27 10 8 80 1 24
28 10 27 80 1 21
29 12 5 80 0 16
30 12 18 80 0 16












77


























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS. FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TCTAL MANATEES
SITE=CROSS FLORIDA BARGE CANAL

OBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN

1 3 9 79 0
2 3 20 79 0
3 3 26 79 0
4 4 10 79 4
5 5 5 79 0
6 5 11 79 0
7 5 22 79 0
8 7 3 79 0
9 7 18 79 0
10 7 31 79 0
11 8 14 79 0
12 8 27 79 0
13 9 18 79 0
14 10 22 79 0
15 11 6 79 0
16 12 12 79 0
17 1 2 80 0
18 3 26 80 1
19 4 2 80 0
20 5 5 80 0
21 5 21 80 0
22 6 4 80 1
23 6 19 80 0
24 7 10 80 0
25 7 29 80 0
26 8 21 80 0
27 9 3 80 0
28 9 25 80 0
29 10 8 80 0
30 10 27 80 0
31 12 5 80 0
32 12 18 80 0
33 3 9 81 0
34 3 25 81 0
35 4 8 81 2
36 4 27 81 1
37 5 11 81 0
38" 5 22 81 0
39 6 5 81 0
40 6 19 81 1
41 7 6 81 0
42 7 17 81 0
43 8 3 81 0
44 8 17 81 2
45 8 31 81 2
46 9 14 81 0
47 9 22 81 0
48 9 29 91 0
49 10 15 81 0
50 2 19 82 0
51 3 14 82 0
52 3 31 82 18
53 4 13 82 8
54 4 30 82 2
55 5 3 82 2
56 5 12 82 0
57 6 8 82 0
58 6 25 82 0
59 7 8 82 2
60 7 23 82 2
61 8 3 82 5
62 3 23 82 1
63 9 1 82 4
64 9 16 82 0
65 10 7 82 0


























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS. FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES

SITE=CHASSAHOWITZKA RIVER ---

OBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN

66 3 9 79 2
67 3 20 79 4
68 3 26 79 0
69 4 10 79 8
70 5 5 79 7
71 5 11 79 1
72 5 22 79 0
73 7 3 79 0
.74 7 18 79 0
75 7 31 79 2
76 8 14 79 1
77 8 27 79 0
78 9 18 79 2
79 10 22 79 8
80 11 6 79 1
81 12 12 79 0
82 1 2 80 0
83 3 26 80 3
84 4 2 80 2
85 5 5 80 3
86 5 21 80 6
87 6 4 80 4
88 6 19 80 0
89 7 10 80 3
90 7 29 80 0
91 8 21 80 7
92 9 3 80 3
93 9 25 80 2
94 10 8 80 4
S95 10 27 80 0
96 12 5 80 0
97 12 18 80 0
98 3 25 81 1
99 4 8 81 8
100 4 27 81 1
101 5 11 81 4
102 5 22 81 6
103 6 5 81 3
104 6 19 81 5
105 7 6 81 0
106 7 17 81 0
107 8 3 81 0
108 8 17 81 1
109 8 31 81 0
110 9 14 81 0
111 9 22 81 1
112 9 29 81 0
113 10 15 81 0
114 2 19 82 0
115 3 14 82 0
116 4 13 82 4
117 4 30 82 2
118 5 12 82 3
119 5 28 82 10
120 6 8 82 5
121 6 25 82 3
122 7 8 82 5
123 7 23 82 6-
124 8 3 82 6
125 8 23 82 1
126 9 1 82 2
127 9 16 82 3
128 1 7 82 4























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS, FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES
-- --- SITE=CRYSTAL RIVER --------

OBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN

129 1 23 79 58
130 2 14 79 66
131 3 9 79 45
132 3 20 79 53
133 3 26 79 23
134 4 10 79 12
135 5 5 7q 6
136 5 11 79 3
137 5 22 79 2
138 7 3 79 15
139 7 18 79 9
140 7 31 79 18
141 8 14 79 15
142 8 27 79 21
143 9 18 79 21
144 10 22 79 34
145 11 6 79 47
146 12 12 79 73
147 1 2 80 63
148 1 4 80 69
149 1 6 80 51
150 1 9 80 82
151 1 26 80 68
152 2 26 80 55
153 3 4 80 69
154 3 26 80 11
155 4 2 80 1
156 5 5 80 11
157 5 21 80 16
158 6 4 80 0
159 6 19 80 6
160 7 10 aO 5
161 7 29 80 1
L62 8 21 80 18
163 9 3 80 6
164 9 25 80 19
165 10 8 80 21
166 10 27 80 48
167 12 5 -80 79
163 12 18 80 58
169 1 30 81 80
170 2 25 81 60
171 31 9 81 56
172 3 25 81 56
173 4 8 81 5
174 4 27 81 12
175 5 11 81 5
176 5 22 81 3
177 6 5 81 9
178 6 19 81 11
179 7 6 81 17
180 7 17 81 8
181 8 -3 81 7
182 8 17 81 9
183 8 31 81 13
184 9 14 81 26
185 9 22 81 25
186 9 28 81 31
187 9 29 81 26
188 10 15 81 58
189 11 4 81 69
190 11 18 81 93
191 12 3 81 117
192 12 20 81 72
193 1 7 82 86
194 2 4 82 86
195 2 11 82 54
196 2 14 82 59
197 2 19 82 13
198 3 14 82 0
199 3 31 82 12

















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS. FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFwS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES
--------- SITE=CRYSTAL RIVER--------

OBS MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN


- STEM=OMOSASSA RIVER ----------


MONTH

1
2
3
3
3
4
5
5
5
7
7
7
8
8
9
10
11
12
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
3
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
9
9
1C
10
12


YEAR

79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
80
80
80
0O
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
d0


TOTMAN

18
19
29
7
18
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
7
3
3
12
9
15
10
13
8
14
17
36
3
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
2
1
7
10
8























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS. FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES
SITE=HOMOSASSA RIVER------


MONTH

12
1
2
3
-3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
9
9
10
11
11
12
12
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
10
12'
12
12
1
I
1
1
3
3
3


SITE=

OBS MONTH

318 3
319 3
320 3
321 4
322 5
323 5
324 5
325 7
326 7
327 7.
328 8
329 a


DAY YEAR

18 80
30 81
25 91
9 81
25 81
8 81
27 81
11 81
22 81
5 81
19 81
6 81
17 81
3 81'
17 81
31 81
14 81
22 81
28 81
29 81
15 81
4 81
18 81
3 81
20 81
19 82
14 82
31 82
13 82
30 82
12 82
28 82
8 82
25 82
8 82
23 82
3 82
23 82
1 82
16 82
7 82
19 82
29 82
15 82
19 82
30 82
7 83
7 83
16 83
28 83
3 83
3 83
.11 83

POWER PLANT
DAY YEAR

9 79
20 79
26 79
10 79
5 79
11 79
22 79
3 79
18 79
31 79
14 79
27 79


TOTMAN
9
16
22
12
24


0
1
2
0

1
0



7
7
6
4
5
9
4
8
14
20
12
8
20
1
2
2
2
1
8
8
5
6
7
5
1
11
2
21
14
5
9
8
15
17
11
13
24


TOTMAN

3
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS, FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES


--------SITE=

OBS MONTH

330 9
331 10
332 11
333 12
334 1
335 2
336
337 4
338 5
339 5
340 6
341 6
342 7
343 7
344 8
345 9
346 9
347 10
348 10
349 12
350 12
351 3
352 3
353 4
354 4
355 5
356 5
357 6
358 6
359 7
360 7
361 8
362 8
363 8
364 9
365 9
366 9
367 10
368 2
369 3
370 12
371 12
372 1
373 1
374 1
375 3


POWER PLANT

DAY YEAR

18 79
22 79
6 79
12 79
2 80
26 80
26 80
2 80
5 80
21 80
4 80
19 80
10 80
29 80
21 80
3 80
25 80
8 80
27 80
5 80
18 80
9 81
25 81
8 81
27 81
11 81
22 81
5 81
19 81
6 81
17 81
3 81
17 81
31 81
14 81
22 81
29 81
15 81
11 82
14 82
15 82
19 82
7 83
7 83
16 83
11 83


SITE=SUWANNEE

GBS MONTH DAY

376 5 5
377 5 22
378 7 3
379 7 18
380 7 31
381 8 14
382 8 27
383 9 18
384 10 22
385 3 26
386 5 5
387 5 21
388 6 4
389 6 19
390 7 10
391 7 29
392 8 21
393 9 3
394 9 25


RIVER

YEAR

79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
79
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80
80


-----------

TOTMAN

0
0
0
0
0
I
1
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
5
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1

0
0
0
0
12


TOTMAN

36
15
8
4
14
19
3
6
0
0
2
15
28
1
18
6
7
14
4























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS, FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED BY USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES

SITE=SUWANNEE RIVER ----


08 MONTH DAY YEAR

395 10 8 80
396 10 27 80
397 4 8 81
398 4 27 81
399 5 11 81
400 5 22 81
401 6 5 81
402 6 19 81
403 7 6 81
404 7 17 81
405 8 3 81
406 8 17 81
407 8 31 81
408 9 14 81
409 9 22 81
410 9 29 81
411 10 15 81
412 2 19 82
413 3 14 82
414 3 31 82
415 4 13 82
416 4 30 82
417 5 3 82
418 5 12 82
419 5 28 82
420 6 8 82
421 6 25 82
422 7 8 82
423 7 23 82
424 .8 3 82
425 8 23 82
426 9 1 82
427 9 16 82
428 10 7 82


TOTMAN

2
15
0
13
20
19
1
22
22
11
3
30
7
28
21
7
2
3
2
1
.3
2
4
0
15
28
23
3
12
15
25
8
8
2


SITE=WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER

MONTH DAY YEAR TOTMAN

3 9 79 0
3 20 79 3
3 26 79 0
4 10 79 0
5 5 79 3
5 22 79 1
7 3 79 2
7 18 79 0
7 31 79 1
8 14 79 0
8 27 79 3
9 18 79 0
10 22 79 0
11 6 79 0
12 12 79 0
1 2 80 0
3 26 80 14
4 2 80 10
5 5 80 8
5 21 80 20
6 4 80 6
6 19 80 0
7 10 80 5
7 29 80 0
8 21 80 0
9 3 80 0
9 25 80 0
10 8 80 0
10 27 80 0
12 5 80 0
12 18 80 0


08S

429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459


























MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
GULF COAST RIVERS, FLORIDA
DATA COLLECTED 3Y USFWS SIRENIA PROJECT
TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES

SITE=WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER----------

0OS MONTH CAY YEAR TOTMAN

460 3 9 81 0
461 3 25 81 0
462 4 8 81 2
463 4 27 at 8
464 5 11 81 4
465 5 22 81 1
466 o 5 81 7
467 6 19 81 1
468 7 6 81 5
469 7 17 81 3
470 8 3 81 0
471 8 17 81 1
472 8 31 81 2
473 9 14 81 0
474 9 22 81 0
475 9 29 81 0
476 10 15 81 0
477 2 11 82 0
478 2 19 82 2
479 3 14 82 1
480 3 31 82 2
481 4 13 82 0
482 4 30 82 3
483 5 3 82 3
484 5. 12 82 3
485 6 8 82 4
486 6 25 82 2
487 7 8 82 0
488 7 23 82 3
489 8 3 82 0
490 a 23 82 0
491 9 1 82 1
492 9 16 82 1
493 10 7 82 0

















APPENDIX F: Everglades National Park. For detailed descriptions of
surveys, see Odell (1977) and Bass (in prep.).
















MANATEE AERIAL SURVEY DATA
EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, FLORIDA
(BASS, IN PREP.. ODELL 1977)
BEGTIM=BEGIN TIME* ENDTIM=END TIME. TOTMAN=TOTAL MANATEES
SITE=EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK

08Q MONTH DAY YEAR BEGTIM ENOTIM TOTMAN CALVES
1 9 28 73 -3 0
2 10 16 73 a 8 0
3 12 18 73 0 1 0
4 1 16 74 0 0
5 2 15 74 2 27 0
6 3 12 74 0 0
7 5 5 74 0 1
8 5 23 74 0 0
9 6 19 74 1 0
10 8 14 74 20 4
11 9 13 74 7 0
12 9 28 74 4 1
13 10 8 74 2 0
14 10 31 74 16 1
15 11 30 74 0 0
16 12 7 74 11 0
17 1 6 75 73 1
18 1 26 75 30 2
19 2 3 75 24 1
20 3 5 75 2 0
21 3 20 75 3 0 3 0
22 4 1 75 0 0
23 4 12 75 0 0
24 4 27 75 a 0 0
25 5 5 75 25 2
26 5 25 75 17 1
27 6 27 75 6 0
28 7 7 75 46 0
29 7 22 75 13 2
30 8 5 75 22 1
31 8 18 75 0 55 1
32 9 3 75 0 0
33 9 23 75 2 0
34 10 2 75 31 4
35 10 14 75 18 1
36 10 22 75 1 0
37 11 11 75 0 0
38 11 25 75 .5 0S
39 12 9 75 71 4
40 12 23 75 18 0
41 1 5 i 76 54 5
42 1 19 76 19 2
43 2 17 76 e 63 5
44 3 15 76 8 0
45 3 29 76 12 0
46 4 12 76 0 6 0
47 5 10 76 35 1
48 6 7 76 13 1
49 12 31 79 830 1115 93 7
50 1 31 80 845 1130 45 1
51 2 27 80 830 1130 30 5
52 .4 29 80 815 1050 23 6
53 5 22 80 830 1035 30 2
54 6 25 80 840 1055 25 2
55 7 29 80 830 1040 40 8
56 8 28 80 830 1110 48 6
57 9 30 80 820 1120 47 3
58 10 22 80 920 1155 11 1
59 11 24 80 925 1503 32 1
60 1 2 81 1300 1600 5 0
61 1 22 81 815 1200 165 25
62 3 5 81 840 1100 23 1
63 3 25 81 830 1100 67 11
64 4 30 81 910 1220 4 0
65 5 28 81 1230 1530 9 0
66 7 1 81 830 1010 8 2
67 8 6 81 900 1215 9 0
68 9 3 81 1200 1525 21 4
69 9 24 81 845 1145 12 1



















APPENDIX G. Summary statistics for FAS surveys (winters 1977-78 to 1981-82).









LOCATION

Indian
River















Cape
Canaveral














Hobe
Sound


VARIABLE

TOTMAN
SURCOND
WATCLAR
SURVCOND
MAXTEMPO
MINTEMPO
TEMPO
MAXTEMP1
MINTEMPI
TEMP1
MAXTEMP2
MINTEMP2
TEMP2
EFFTEMP
INTKTEMP
WTRANGE


TOTMAN
SURFCOND
WATCLAR
SURVCOND
MAXTEMPO
MINTEMPO
TEMPO
MAXTEMP1
MINTEMP1
TEMP1
MAXTEMP2
MINTEMP2
TEMP2
EFFTEMP
INTKTEMP
WTRANGE

TOTMAN
SURFCOND
WATCLAR
SURVCOND


X

13.6
2.6
3.5
3.5
16.3
9.8
14.9
20.1
10.2
15.2
21.2
11.5
16.4
25.9
19.1
7.3


18.8
2.6
3.6
3.5
20.1
9.9
15.0
19.9
9.8
14.8
21.1
11.3
16.2
22.4
18.7
3.7

15.6
2.4
3.5
3.2


S.D.

11.7
0.6
0.8
1.2
8.4
6.1
5.6
5.3
5.5
5.0
4.5
4.8
4.3
4.8
4.3
4.5


23.7
0.6
0.8
1.2
5.6
6.0
5.5
5.4
5.5
5.1
4.8
5.0
4.5
3.4
3.4
2.3

17.3
0.7
0.8
0.8


MIN

0.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.0
-4.0
4.0
6.0
-1.0
3.0
6.0
0.0
3.0
20.0
1.0
3.0


0
1
1
1
8
-4
4
6
-1
3
6
0
3
16
11
-1


MAX

42.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
30.0
21.0
25.5
28.0
21.0
24.5
29.0
20.0
24.0
34.0
29.0
20.0


120
4
5
5
30
21
25
28
21
24.5
30
20
24.5
33
27
8.0

97.0
4.0
5.0
5.0


0.0
1.0
2.0
2.0









LOCATION VARIABLE N X S.D. MIN MAX

Riviera TOTMAN 91 26.2 41.3 0.0 168.0
Beach SURFCOND 65 2.6 0.6 2.0 4.0
WATCLAR 84 3.0 1.0 1.0 5.0
SURFCOND 89 2.6 0.9 1.0 5.0
MAXTEMPO 89 23.0 4.8 10.0 30.0
MINTEMPO 89 12.6 6.3 -1.0 25.0
TEMPO 89 17.8 4.9 8.0 25.5
MAXTEMP1 87 23.0 4.5 11.0 30.0
MINTEMP1 87 13.1 5.7 1.0 23.0
TEMP1 87 18.1 4.8 6.0 25.5
MAXTEMP2 86 24.0 3.5 13.0 30.0
MINTEMP2 86 13.9 4.9 3.0 22.0
TEMP2 86 19.0 3.9 8.0 25.5
EFFTEMP 13 28.7 1.3 26.0 30.0
INTKTEMP 70 22.4 1.8 16.0 26.0
WTRANGE 13 6.7 1.9 5.0 11.0

Fort TOTMAN 86 63.3 51.7 0.0 271.0
Myers SURFCOND 60 2.2 0.6 1.0 4.0
WATCLAR 69 3.4 0.8 2.0 5.0
SURVCOND 84 3.0 0.9 1.0 5.0
MAXTEMPO 83 23.1 5.2 10.0 31.0
MINTEMPO 83 10.7 5.8 -3.0 25.0
TEMPO 83 16.9 5.2 5.5 27.5
MAXTEMP1 81 22.6 5.5 10.0 34.0
MINTEMP1 81 11.8 5.7 1.0 28.0
TEMP1 81 17.2 5.2 5.5 29.5
MAXTEMP2 80 23.9 4.9 10.0 31.0
MINTEMP2 80 13.1 5.1 1.0 29.0
TEMP2 80 18.5 4.7 5.5 29.5
EFFTEMP 81 23.9 3.5 17.0 32.0
INTKTEMP 81 20.1 2.7 14.0 25.0
WTRANGE 81 3.8 2.7 0.0 17.0









LOCATION

Fort
Lauderdale


Port
Everglades


VARIABLE

TOTMAN
SURFCOND
WATCLAR
SURVCOND
MAXTEMPO
MINTEMPO
TEMPO
MAXTEMP1
MINTEMP1
TEMPI
MAXTEMP2
MINTEMP2
TEMP2
EFFTEMP
INTKTEMP
WTRANGE

TOTMAN
SURFCOND
WATCLAR
SURVCOND
MAXTEMPO
MINTEMPO
TEMPO
MAXTEMP1
MINTEMP1
TEMPI
MAXTEMP2
MINTEMP2
TEMP2
EFFTEMP
INTKTEMP
WTRANGE


X

8.4
2.1
3.8
3.7
23.8
14.1
19.0
24.0
14.6
19.3
24.6
15.8
20.2
26.2
22.3
3.9

28.0
2.5
3.4
3.2
23.7
13.9
18.8
23.9
14.5
19.2
24.6
15.7
20.2
24.7
22.3
2.4


S.D.

11.4
0.6
0.6
0.7
4.0
6.1
4.8
4.1
5.7
4.6
3.5
5.0
3.9
2.6
2.2
1.9

30.9
0.7
0.7
0.9
3.9
6.0
4.7
4.1
5.5
4.6
3.4
4.8
3.8
2.6
1.6
2.2


MIN

0.0
1.0
2.0
2.0
15.0
0.0
8.0
12.0
1.0
7.5
15.0
5.0
10.5
22.0
18.0
-1.0

0.0
1.0
2.0
1.0
14.0
0.0
8.0
12.0
1.0
7.5
15.0
2.0
11.0
20.0
19.0
-1.0


MAX

54.0
3.0
5.0
5.0
31.0
23.0
26.5
31.0
26.0
27.0
31.0
23.0
27.0
31.0
27.0
8.0

125.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
30.0
24.0
26.0
31.0
23.0
26.5
30.0
23.0
26.0
30.0
26'.0
8.0
















Appendix H.


Plots of residuals vs. date for the regression of TOTMAN against
MINTEMP1.


Abbreviations for sites are:


IR = Indian River, C(
HS = Hobe Sound, RV
FM = Fort Myers, FL
PE = Port Everglades


C = Cape Canaveral,
= Riviera Beach,
= Fort Lauderdale, and


Codes for winters are:


winter
winter
winter
winter
winter


77-78,
78-79,
79-80,
80-81,
81-82























RES ID
130

120

110

100

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0

-10

-20

-30

-40

-50

-60

-70

-80

-90

-100




NOTE:


4lUDEL T TI4 ,P'=rliINTEM.P1
RE3SIU)AL'S VS.)AYS ELAPSED SINCE INnv.
FC; EACH SITE. ALL wINTEbR
11:00 MOND]JAY. AP, IL. 2. I 133
SITE=IR

PLOT OF RESID*0 LEGEND: A =I O1BS, H = 2 BaS. ETC.



























A
4-

i






1.








+










A A
A A A A
A A A AA A A A A
A A A AAA A. A A A
A A A A A
.--------A----A----A----A--AA--------B--------A-A----------------
A A 8 AA A AA A A A A A B
A A A A BA AA A A A AA A A
+ A A A A
AA A A B
A A A


I.
41A


















------------- --- -----------------------------------------4
*-














-+-------+---.---_+----_---+-------+-------+.-------+_------+_-------+
0 20 40 o0 a8 100 120 140 160

Si;r HAi ISLIFI;; V L E 0
Cl.lG HAD MISLIN; VALUES











MODEL TUTMAN=MINTEMP1
RESIDUALS VS.DAYS ELAPSED SINCE INOV.
FOR EACH SITE AND EACH WINTER
11:00 MONDAY. APRIL 25. 1983
SITE=IR IINTER=1

PLOT OF RESIDED LEGEND: A = 1 OHS. 8 = 2 OBS ETC.
RESID
50 +


40 +
A

30 +

20

10 +
SA
A
0 ------------- ----------- ---------------------------------
A A A A A A A
A A A A A
-10 +

-20 +

-30 +



I
-40 +

-50 +
-+---- -+---- ---------- ------+----- -+----- -- --------------
0 20 40 f3 30 13J 120 140 160


PLOT OF RESID*O


SITE=IR WTNTER=2

LEGEND: A = 1 OBS. B = 2 pBS, RTC.


A A
A A A A A
A
-------- A---------------- -------A-- --------------------
A


+4
4.-------------- --- ----+--------------------+-------
C0 0 40 60 30 103 123 14) 163


RESID
50

40

30

20

10

0

-10

-20

,-30

-40

-50


NCTF:




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