Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00303
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: Spring 1994
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00303
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text






4-41
LSI i -y rr









W Ai




*i
42s ~ R%~-44: tId:Vk- ~~4~ taj<*-
*-- 4 t -"4-


tt~~4: .WtL





4 -






I-i r-- -t



-~it 3' t--4









Don'tyou wish

we couldjust do this to CFCs.

In a way we can-
if we cool our buildings with
natural gas.
Natural gas absorption
cooling equipment cools with
water, rather than with CFCs,
which deplete the ozone layer.
It also has fewer moving
parts than conventional cooling
systems, which means mainte-
nance costs are lower.
And, because it costs
much less to operate, it cuts the
energy costs of cooling-by
up to 50%.
There's another big benefit,
too. It saves electricity during
the heat of the summer, when
demand is at its highest.
As a result, we can help
our cities avoid brownouts.
And help reduce the need for
power plants. Best of all, we
can help America balance the
use of its energy resources.
No doubt about it, natural
gas is a high-tech, low-cost
way to keep cool without
CFCs.
It's a cool way to help save
our ozone layer, too.












Clean, economical natural gas. Think what we'll save.


Florida Natural Gas Association






If you le Hardle siding, you'll love HardisoffitT
Soffit and siding from James Hardie have the same
masonry-like composition. A concrete reason
why both can weather some of the
most humid climates.
No problem.


Looks like wood, acts like m aoni
Hardie siding has all the advantages of wood,
but none of the drawbacks. It has the look and warmth of
wood and is installed in the
same manner.


Talk about
coverage -
James Hardie
is a world
leader in fiber
cement technology with over 100 years
experience. To date, billions of square
feet of Hardie siding and Hardisoffit"
have been installed.

Another strike against wood
Hardie siding and
Hardisoffit"are non-
combustible. Their cemen-
titious compositions make
them some of the most fire-
A resistant building materials
S money can buy.


SThis covers just about everything
Any products that can survive sweltering humidity, sizable
Termites and tremendous winds deserve a good warranty. Good
reasons why Hardie siding and Hardisoffit" come with a transferable, 50 Year
Limited Product Warranty. Read the details and compare
wherever the product is sold.


Jame Huardle Buling Products, hno.
A James Harde Company
Building Confidence for Over 100 Years
10901 Elm Avenue, Fontana, CA 92337
1-800-9-HARDIE
1255 La Quinta Drive, Ste. 218, Orlando, FL 32809
1-800-343-5771
* S HardSe .Sdimn ml HdibV dh. m ne ipr ae r lo. d lery, hd. in
wac.,o.ech ASTm 1 H Mb e..d4 aD4
l053. Jm.s Hnilt BiM g Pmrlc IS.. A .hlirUyd m Ia Hle indusba, IJ.
H#rdolf In a gr k J Ha. Budit Predcts. I..
Circle 2 on Reader Inquiry Card


. A
.41







GALLERY
OF
AUSTRALIAN ART


Come see us, call, or send a ABORIINAl ART
FAX. It takes minutes to order
your AIA Documents from us. Traditional and
Contemporary
Aboriginal Artwork
4 + Canvas Paintings
S+B Bark Painting
PY + Boomerangs
S + Didgeridoos
Adorning the walls of
corporate offices
and homes all over
A A Tt Hh Ausralia, P the
50,000-year-old
tradition and culture
has properly arrived in
AIA FLORIDA Florida.

AMY BENNETT WELCOME TO TftE DREAMTIME

(904) 222-7590 OR FAX (904) 224-8048 4123 South MacDill Avenue / Tampa, FL
Phone or fax 8 3-839-8065

Circle 3 on Reader Inquiry Card Circle 4 on Reader Inquiry Card




What Do Architects Say About The

AIA Trust Health Insurance Plan?


N 83% of participants say they are very satisfied.
N 59% say the plan is a reason to belong to AIA.*

And in its December 1992 issue, MONEY
Magazine says the AIA Trust's plan is an
excellent example of a comprehensive
medical coverage at a reasonable price.
Call for information... 1-800-343-2972



AIA Trust
S The American Institute of Architects
Benefit Insurance Trust

AIA member insurance evaluation & needs assessment study, wave #3.
Wiese Research Associates, October 1992.
Circle 8 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT Spring 1994


Short Stop.





CONTENTS


DUPLICATE


Features


Form Follows Function
in Marine Science Complex
VOA Associates' design for the Galbraith
Marine Science Lab at Eckerd College
A Promised Rose Garden ... Delivered
The Mitchell Residence in Melbourne was designed by
Spacecoast Architects for a discerning client.

Like Its Namesake, This House is
Unique to Its Locale
Little Sand Pine Lodge at Seaside is a new home
by Architect Richard Gibbs.

State of the Art
S Lewis Brown has designed a high tech facility
for studying turfgrass production.

Finishing Touch
Maintaining a competitive edge.
E. "Manny" Abraben










Departments
Editorial
News
President's Message
New Products
Viewpoint


Cover photo of Seaside by Carlos Domenech.


FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring 1994


Spring, 1994
Vol. 41, No. 1










THE FLORIDA DESIGN

INITIATIVE IS LOOKING FOR A

FEW GREAT PROJECTS THAT

DEMONSTRATE "BEST

PRACTICES" IN ENERGY-


EFFICIENCY DESIGN.

INITIATIVE, WHICH IS FUND-

ED BY THE FLORIDA ENERGY

OFFICE, IS LAUNCHING A

DESIGN COMPETITION THAT

WILL FOCUS ON HIGH

PERFORMANCE BUILDINGS.

ELIGIBLE PROJECTS MUST

HAVE A VERIFIABLE RECORD

OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT


PERFORMANCE. FOR

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

OR TO RECEIVE A "CALL FOR

ENTRIES," CONTACT HOLLIS


BLISS, FLORIDA DESIGN

INITIATIVE, FLORIDA A & M

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE,

1936 S. MARTIN LUTHER KING

BLVD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32307

OR CALL (904) 599-3244 OR


FAX (904) 599-3436


FIORIDA ARCHfTECT Spring 1994










EDITORIAL


FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
Publisher/Executive Vice
President
George A. Allen, CAE, Hon. AIA
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertising
Carolyn Maryland
Design and Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Printing
Boyd Brothers, Inc.
Communications Committee
Paul Renker, AIA, Chairman
Ivan Johnson, AIA
JohnTotty, AA
Robert McCarter, AIA
Karl Thorne, AIA
Sam Ferreri, AIA
Roy Knight, AIA
President
John Tice, AIA
909 East Cervantes
Pensacola, FL 32501
Vice President/President-elect
Richard Reep, AIA
510 Julia Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Secretary/Treasurer
Bruce Balk, AIA
290 Coconut Avenue
Sarasota, FL 34236
Past President
Jerome Filer, AIA
7438 SW 48th Street
Miami, FL 33155
Regional Director
John Ehrig, FAIA
7380 Murrell Road
Suite 201
Melbourne, FL 32940
Regional Director
Thomas Marvel, FAIA
1555 Francia Street
Santurce, PR 00911


I am very excited and enthusiastic about the FLORIDA DESIGN INITIA-
TIVE. You first read about the INITIATIVE in Florida Architect last Spring
in an article by the program's director Larry Peterson. Since then a lot has
happened as you'll see in his updated article which appears in this issue.
Part of what I like about the INITIATIVE is the words it uses to describe
"good architecture." Terms like "best practices", "energy efficiency", "build-
ing performance" and "sustainable design" appeal to me, not for their seman-
tics, but because they imply a product that should be important to every one
of us right now. So, I guess words like "building performance" seem chal-
lenging to me at a time when I've seen far too many buildings look good,
seem to function well initially and then fall flat on their faces when the utility
bills roll in, people in the workplace become ill or the heating and air-condi-
tioning systems are inefficient.
For a long time I had a particular dream of finding a true vernacular archi-
tecture for Florida a prototype that was responsive to climate, terrain, eco-
logical and environmental concerns, was flexible enough to meet any pro-
gram and that also looked good. The fact that there is no discernable style
associated with such a building left me with the hope that it would simply
take on the character of its region historical or otherwise.
Well, no such animal has materialized and in a state as climatically diverse
as Florida, it'll probably never happen. But that isn't meant to suggest that
Florida architects should be any less committed to designing responsible
buildings. Nor can we say, "Aesthetics be damned." Beauty of form will
always be the architect's responsibility.
Architects should be the leaders of any movement designed to produce
energy-efficient buildings. Unfortunately, that is not always the case. How
many of you, for example, know what "commissioning" is? Well, it's some-
thing you may want to know a lot about in the not too distant future.
Particularly if more Florida cities follow Tallahassee's lead and state in their
Requests for Proposals that 1) the Architect will design the buildings/facility
with energy efficiency as a primary goal, and 2) the Architect will provide all
the necessary input data to the Florida Solar Energy Center, Building Design
Assistance Center which will use energy simulation software to analyze the
proposed buildings.
Can other cities be far behind in terms of what they may soon require of
architects? Probably not. At this point, a little preparation and a lot of aware-
ness about the issues involved is certainly in order. And so is the idea of
beginning to think about a building as a working system and of the design
process as a collaborative way of responding to critical issues. DG


FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring, 1994






NEWS


NC

SBC





Important Conference on
Building Commissioning
Coming Up
At its Second National Con-
ference on Building Commis-
sioning, commissioning-industry
leaders from utilities to profes-
sional societies, panelists and
roundtable groups will discuss
the benefits, opportunities, re-
search and current activities in
commissioning whole buildings
and energy-efficient equipment
in new and existing buildings.
The conference provides an edu-
cational forum to examine the
state of the art in commercial
building commissioning, as well
as current trends and new oppor-
tunities.
Topics such as "Costs and
Savings of Commissioning", 'The
Long-Range Value of Commis-
sioning", "Indoor Air Quality"
and "Operation and Mainte-
nance" will be discussed. Case
studies with the latest data and
measurements and post-occupan-
cy strategies to insure persis-
tence and reliability will be pre-
sented as well as approaches to
commissioning in utility pro-
grams. Conference sponsors in-
clude the Florida Energy Office,
Florida Power Corporation, New
England Electric, Pacific Gas and
Electric and the U.S. Department
of Energy.
The conference is designed to
be particularly beneficial to build-
ing design professionals, utility
technical staff and program man-
agers and commissioning agents.
The conference will be held at


TradeWinds Resort on St. Peters-
burg Beach, May 9 11, 1994.
It is being presented by Port-
land Energy Conservation, Inc.
For further information, contact
Conference Program Manager,
Portland Energy Conservation,
Inc., 921 SW Washington, Suite
840, Portland, OR 97205. Tele-
phone (503) 248-4636 or Fax
(503) 295-0820.


AIA Jacksonville Works
With FAMU Students
For the past two years, design
studios in the Florida A & M
School of Architecture have been


Physical Therapy Center & Medical Hotel La Villa Community
Design Study Jacksonville, Florida


Cathedral District Housing Study by: Fred Bothello


AA ~
', ,l" t- "

~ ~ " -


A-
ter -.c n iSt y b

Cathedral District Housing Study by: AlbertoVargas


involved in investigating urban
architecture, urban design and
community development This ef-
fort has been greatly supported


by the AIA Jacksonville and it has
now become an integral part of
the school's graduate design pro-
gram and has been loosely de-


fined as the Jacksonville Studio.
Jacksonville Studio has proven
to be a successful effort on the
part of the School to become a
resource to the city of Jack-
sonville. The Jacksonville AIA
has provided monetary support
to the students and has hosted
reviews of the student work.
Professor Michael Alfano, AIA,
has been directing the A & M ef-
fort and working closely with
him are Tom Reynolds and Jan
Smith of the Jacksonville AIA.
Spring 1993 term brought
William Morgan, FAIA, to work
with the students on exploring
ways to provide a catalyst within
historic LaVilla. This community
has been traditionally African-
American and through the years
it has lost much of its economic
and social vitality. The students
focused their attention on revi-
talizing the main thoroughfare
and using it to link new develop-
ment to the older fabric of the
community.
In the Fall of 1993, the A & M
students worked closely with the
Downtown Development Author-
ity and the focus of their work
was the design of housing for the
Cathedral District.
This Spring, the students will
be designing in relation to the
proposed extension of the down-
town fixed-rail people mover.
There is also a study under-
way of the feasibility of long dis-
tance education or education
between facilities in different lo-


FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring, 1994




























Cathedral District Housing Study by: AlbertoVargas


Cathedral District Housing Study by: AlbertoVargas


cations. The results of the study
should allow the school to clari-
fy the potential for continuing
education in Jacksonville.

The "Ultimate Public-
Private Partnership"-
Spillis Candela's Minority
Mentor Program
An innovative inter-discipli-
nary program is being hailed as
the "ultimate public-private part-
nership-a reaffirmative action"
as minority architecture and en-
gineering students in the Florida
University System begin work on
a terminal expansion project at
Orlando International Airport.
Sponsored by Spillis Candela
& Partners, itself a minority
enterprise, the new program
is supported by the Greater Or-


lando Aviation Authority and the
Florida University System.
Also known as the "Minority
Mentor Program", it is the first
internship program that links
multiple institutions within the
university system and also the
first interprofessional internship
in an Orlando International Air-
port (OIA) project.
Participants will be minority
students in architecture, engi-
neering and computer sciences
selected from Florida A&M Uni-
versity and the Universities of
Florida and Central Florida. In-
terns will be chosen during the
Fall, 1994, and begin working on
the OIA Airside-1 Terminal Ex-
pansion by December. Students
will perform basic drafting and
drawing, conceptual design de-
velopment, model building, com-


puter-aided design and drafting
and three-dimensional virtual re-
ality computer modeling.
According to Florida Univer-
sity System Chancellor Charles
Reed, the added strength of
"Reaffirmative Action" is that it
comes directly from the business
community in voluntary coopera-
tion with Florida's University
System. The program is a good
example of government, acade-
mia and business working to-
gether and hopefully it will be-
come a model of full minority
participation in other projects.

Research Suggests
Cautious Optimism for
Future of Architects
A significant percentage of
businesses and institutions are
planning construction projects in
the next 18 months or so, sug-
gesting some optimism about the
construction industry. In a recent
study conducted by The Roper
Organization for The American
Institution of Architects, 53% of
the business, health-care, educa-
tional and nonprofit professionals
surveyed said they are planning
to undertake some sort of reno-
vation work in the next year-and-
a-half, and 36% indicated that they
plan new construction in the
same time period.
Historically, the construction
industry has been a good indica-
tor for the direction of the econ-
omy as a whole, but a factor that
may be contributing to the num-
ber of planned renovations is the
Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) which is on the minds of
business and institutional profes-
sionals. About one-third of the
businesses which were surveyed
had already made some modifi-
cation to their facility in direct
response to the ADA and anoth-
er quarter were in the process of
remodeling.
Other key findings of the sur-
vey include a 91% response that
architects are held in high es-
teem. Among 14 professions that
respondents were asked about,
architects ranked in the top
third.
Institutional and business


clients alike place a greater pri-
ority on building functions than
on aesthetics and when select-
ing architects for projects,
clients said they first look for
professionals who listen and re-
spond well to their needs and
goals and are able to manage the
complex maze of regulations, po-
litical approvals and zoning re-
quirements.
A complete report entitled
"What Clients Need" is now
available through the AIA. The
cost is $35 for members and $70
for nonmembers. Call 800-365-
2724 to place an order.


BOOKS
Point of View
The Art of Architectural
Photography
by E. "Manny" Abraben, AIA, RIBA
Van Nostrand Reinhold
202 pages, bw & color photos

The photographing of build-
ings demands technical skill, a
fundamental understanding of the
intent of a building design and an
awareness of how the building
fits into its surroundings. All of
these keys to fine architectural
photography are explored in a
new book by Florida architect
Manny Abraben.
This guide combines step-by-
step techniques and advice on
equipment and uses hundreds of
photographs, including 75 in
color, to illustrate the text.
Detailed advice is provided
on setting up the shot, complete
with technical information on
cameras, lenses, film, lighting
and filters. Also discussed are
ways to exploit the latest tech-
niques in computer-aided de-
sign, electronic imaging, instant
photography and image transfer.
Point of View also explains the
basics of understanding perspec-
tive, in addition to clarifying the
relationship between photogra-
phy and illustrations.
Anyone interested in develop-
ing the technical skills and vi-
sion necessary to capture perfect
architectural images will benefit
from reading this book.


FLoRIDAARCHrJEcrSpig, 1994








HEALTH


CARE

















AIA



AND


PCA



HEALTH


PANS


FLORIDA AIA HAS FORMED

A UNIQUE PARTNERSHIP WITH

THE STATE'S SECOND LARGEST

MANAGED CARE COMPANY TO

OFFER YOU A COST EFFECTIVE,

QUALITY ALTERNATIVE IN HEALTH

CARE COVERAGE.


THE ASSOCIATION AND PCA

HEALTH PLANS BRING A SPECIAL

PROGRAM TO ASSOCIATION

MEMBERS AND THEIR FAMILIES.

PCA REQUIRES NO DEDUCTIBLES,

NO COINSURANCE, NO CLAIM

FORMS, NO HASSLES AND NO

RATE INCREASES FOR TWELVE

MONTHS.
FA I




FOUNDED BY PHYSICIANS,
DEDICATED TO YOUR HEALTH.

Circle 18 on Reader Inquiry Card
FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring, 1994












Membership Empowerment


In 1993, AIA Florida reinvent-
ed itself. This reinvention
involved a broad range of input
and a lot of support from the
membership. Now, we begin
1994 with a clearly articulated
"preferred future" toward which
we will control the destiny of
our profession. This vision sees
us as a united profession that is
involved in creating, planning
and directing Florida's future.
In response to the question,
"Why do we, and more impor-
tant, why should we, exist as a
state association?"...our collec-
tive response should be, "To
unite architects, to promote and
advance excellence, public
awareness.and political effec-
tiveness." With that goal in our
sights, we have developed a
Strategic Plan which focuses
our energies toward prioritized
objectives in each of our "rea-
sons for being." We have also
created a Strategic Business
Plan which allocates our avail-'
able resources to support four
fiscal goal areas: 1) the accom-
plishment of measurable Stra-
tegic Plan objectives; 2) building
and maintaining adequate oper-
ational and legal reserves; 3)
attracting and retaining quali-
fied staff; and 4) developing
growth and more predictability
in our income.
As we begin 1994, we have a
Plan of Work that is vision dri-
ven, strategically prioritized


and focused and is responsi-
bly funded. With this sound
foundation we must now make it
happen. A key dimension of our
new organization and approach
is the empowerment of our
membership. This empower-
ment is, in theory, positive.
However, in reality, it can work
against us if our membership
does not responsibly exercise
its empowerment opportunities.
As your president, I am ask-
ing each AIA Florida member
to:
1) become more knowledge-
able about what is happen-
ing, and not happening at the
state level;
2) get involved, either directly
through a committee or
resource group, or indirectly
through your Chapter
Directors, and
3) make the system and
process work for you person-
ally and for our collective
profession.
As we begin the new year,
we also begin a process that
needs to be ever-evolving. If suc-
cessful, it will give us unprece-
dented control of our profes-
sional destiny. We can make it
happen, but only if each and
every one of us gets personally
involved.

John Tice, AIA
President


FLORIDA ARCHITECT Spring, 1994











Form Follows Function In Marine Science Complex


Galbraith Marine Science
Laboratory
Eckerd College
St. Petersburg, Florida

Architect: VOA Associates,
Inc., Orlando, Florida
Project Principal: Calvin H.
Peck, AIA
Project Architect: S. Keith
Bailey, AIA
Job Captain: Skip Downs
Consulting Engineers: GRG
Vanderweil, M/E/P, Paul J.
Ford, Structural, Fred C. Dueull,
Civil
Landscape Architect: Phil
Harris
Programming Consultant:
RFD, San Diego, CA
General Contractor: Ellis
Construction Co.
Owner: Eckerd College

I hen George K Reid articu-
Ve lated his dream for a ma-
rine science program at Eckerd
College, his objectives were
succinct and practical. Reid was
one of the founding faculty of
the college and he is generally
credited with having the origi-
nal vision for the school's ma-
rine science program.
Today, the small private col-
lege has a new facility for its
marine science program. The
Galbraith Marine Science Lab-
oratory is an undergraduate
marine lab located on Boca
Ciega Bay. The obvious advan-
tage of its location is the ability
to bring live seawater into the
building for study purposes.
The facility's redundant piping
system allows live seawater -
temperature controlled and
alive with nutrients, oxygen and
other dissolved gases to be
piped throughout the marine
labs and returned to Boca Ciega
Bay. The pipes are used inter-
changeably for fresh and live
seawater after undergoing a
weekly cleaning process. This
proximity to the Bay makes it
possible for students to observe
marine life through live sea ta-
bles, just one of the opportuni-


FLORIDAARCHIECT Spring, 1994






















































ties that are not normally avail-
able in an undergraduate
facility.
The design theme for the fa-
cility is a direct expression of
the marine environment it
serves. A strong nautical state-
ment is evidenced through de-
tails like the bow-shaped entry
and overhead sail-like tension
fabric structure that provides
protection from the elements on
the wooden observation deck.
The V-shaped structure af-
fords views of the Bay from the
laboratories that line each wing.
Support services are situated
between the two wings. The
building shape was deliberately
chosen so that students and fac-
ulty could get a sense of the ex-

FLORIDAARCHIEC Spring, 1994


terior environment from virtual-
ly anywhere inside. The facil-
ity's exterior palette of materi-
als, also dictated by the salt air,
is composed of nearly mainte-
nance-free concrete, glass and
epoxy-clad metalwork.
Design and construction is-
sues regarding the building's
site on Boca Ciega Bay also in-
volved strict permitting issues
and code restrictions. Plans
were scrutinized by the Envir-
onmental Protection Agency
and the Department of Natural
Resources for any impact on
protected areas in the coastal
zone environment. One design
problem included locating the
pier so as not to disturb sea
grass with the propeller wash of


the school's vessel. Code regu-
lations involving storm surges
were a deciding factor in de-
signing the building on pilings.
For example, since no part of
the permanent structure of the
building could be built below 12
feet above sea level, the me-
chanical rooms are located on
the roof and a ramp was substi-
tuted for the traditional elevator
pit. The area beneath the com-
plex, currently utilized for stor-
age tanks and outdoor seminar
areas, has been graveled to ac-
commodate the eventual addi-
tion of more retention tanks.
Heralded as "the most mod-
em undergraduate marine labo-
ratory in the United States," the
$2.7 million, 17,000 sf complex


contains classrooms, laborato-
ries, A-V auditorium and sup-
port facilities. It was officially
dedicated in April, 1993.




Opposite page top: The project's
site overlooking Boca Ciega Bay
allows live seawater to be piped.
throughout the marine laborato-
ries and returned to the Bay.
Below and this page: A strong
nautical theme is evidenced
through details like the bow-
shaped entry and overhead sail
providing shade on the wood-
planked observation deck.

Photos by: Carmel Brantley











A Promised Rose Garden... Delivered

The Mitchell Residence
Melbourne, Florida

Architect: Spacecoast
Architects, PA, Melbourne,
Florida
Principal Designer/Project
Manager: Linda Dunyan, AIA
Project Architect: Arcadio
Zavalla
Engineer: Gardner, Griffith &
Associates, Inc.
Contractor: Mills Construction
Co., Inc.


The site of the Mitchell
Residence provides a 270-
degree view of the Indian River
lagoon with its playful otters,
graceful blue herons, leaping
dolphins and sparkling water.
The natural beauty of the site
was not wasted on Melbourne
attorneys, Bruce and Karen
Mitchell, who also realized the
potential design limitations that
stringent setback requirements,
existing fill, few trees and an ex-
posed location might impose.
In many ways, these stric-
tures were turned to advantage
as the design was developed.
The setback requirements
forced a tight footprint with
very little space being utilized
for circulation. The openness of
the site to the elements with no
surrounding structures casting
shadow or giving protection
helped create the small circular
garden enclosure. The garden
also evolved as the integrating
front facade element, both fram-
ing the entry and breaking up
the side garage elevation.
The clients wanted an old
European ambiance, both inside
and out. Rather than determin-
ing a definitive style at the out-
set of design, the program re-
quirements resulted in the
varied massing of the building
and an amalgam of the Palm
Beach and Spanish Colonial
styles.
Spacecoast Architects creat-
ed varied outdoor spaces to en-
hance the experience of out-
door living and to enrich the


visual aspects of the architec-
ture. The South front has a
patio at the second floor which
is accessible from the interior
stairwell. One can view the sun-
rise or the lagoon from this van-
tage point. Another second floor
patio faces west, as does a
screened balcony. The north-
facing loggia is partially protect-
ed by the guest wing and also
creates a private pool area.
The clients wanted interior
spaces to be comfortable with
volumes in proportion to room
dimensions. Views from indoor
spaces were also of paramount
importance and every interior
space has a different framed
vista. Axial relationships are re-
inforced by classical elements
such as the fountain in the rose
garden seen through a door in
the foyer. The natural stone
columns create the main axis in
the living room.
Whether detailing is contem-
porary or historical, it is what
makes any design truly unique.


FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring, 1994






































The cut stone medallion with a
grape cluster accentuates the
front entry and has meaning for
the owners who are true wine
connoisseurs. Many other de-
tails were individually crafted
for the client, including the
front doors, the walnut stairwell
and the ornamental metalwork.
A custom residence can only
be successful when there is a
discerning and knowledgeable
client with whom the architect
can develop a good working
rapport. Add to this relation-
ship a general contractor with
high standards and subcontrac-
tors who take pride in excel-
lence. The architect, knowing
this cast is in the wings can, in
fact, meet the clients design ex-
pectations and create a "rose
garden".



Opposite page: main entrance
with rose garden tucked behind
circular wall. This page, top,
left to right: cut stone details
include fountain, columns and
capitals. Photo left, living room
into entry hall and below, pool
terrace.

Photos by Linda Dunyan


FLORIDA ARCHITECT Spring, 1994











Like Its Namesake, This House Is Unique To Its Locale


Little Sand Pine Lodge
Seaside, Florida


Architect: Richard Gibbs
Design
General Contractor: Benoit
Laurent
Cabinetmaker: David Higgs
Owners: Richard Gibbs, Randy
Harelson

In 1987, the owner/designer
of this building completed
construction of a tiny guest-
house at the rear of a 40x73-foot
lot in the sand pine scrub at
Seaside. That guesthouse re-
mains farther from the Gulf
than any Seaside residence,
hence its name Wayback
Cottage. A special fondness for
Wayback's native garden, camp-
like simplicity, privacy and out-
door orientation, moved the
owners to design a larger house
on the same site. In their desire
to maintain the cottage garden
and an existing stand of pines,
the new house has a modest
16x34 footprint, but it rises to a
height which permits a view of
both town and Gulf.
Little Sand Pine Lodge, as
the main house is known, is
sited right on the front fence
line of the property. Wide
screened porches double as cir-
culation space and allow tran-
soms, windows and doors to be
left open in good weather. The
two private bedroom and bath
units downstairs share access to
a laundry room and porch show-
er for keeping beach sand out-
doors. The big "lodge" room
upstairs contains living room,
library, dining room, kitchen,
half bath and a wall of windows
and doors that open wide to the
screened porch, effectively dou-
bling the size of the room. A spi-
ral stair leads to a roof deck that
provides a view of the Gulf and a
private spot for sunbathing and
-stargazing.
An exploration of Florida's
backroads helped the architect
to create Little Lodge's style and


This page, south elevation of main lodge. Opposite top: left to right, lower level screened porch on west,
main entrance and view into living room. Lower photo shows main lodge with paybackk Cortage at rcar.
Photos by: Carlos Domenech.


FLORIDAARCHrrECT Spring, 1994















































































































FLORIDAARCHHTECTSpring, 1994




















































personality. The weathered
cypress logs, for example, echo
the eccentric construction of an
S old inn in Vero Beach. Wood is
the primary building material
with natural cork floors in the
bathroom. The theme that
begins with plywood and batten
walls and unfinished pine ceil-
ings includes log beds and twig
tables. Little Sand Pine Lodge,
like it namesake Pinus Clausa
which only grows along the
Gulf, is unique to its locale.









Photo of kitchen/dining area by
Carlos Domenech. Drawings
courtesy of the Architect.


I *V ^ J I- \ T h :
I iK c~ _w r w w n
---- U.f HU _, NC --, ---
a~sclcu~ auoc


FLORIDAARCHIECT Spring, 1994












State of the Art

Turfgrass Envirotron
Research Facility
for the Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences
Gainesville, Florida

Architect: Lewis Brown, Jr.-
Architect
Principal-in-Charge: Lewis
Brown, Jr.
Project Architect: Jack
Ponikvar
Production Coordinator and
Contract Administrator:
Robert Williams
Consulting Engineers:
Liebtag, Robinson & Wingfield,
Inc. -mechanical/electrical/
plumbing; Bodo & Associates,
Inc. structural; Rory Caus-
seaux, Chance & Causseaux,
Inc. civil
Contractor: The Brentwood
Company
Owner: University of Florida

his is the only facility of its
1 kind in the nation and as
such, it allows scientists to
study the entire turfgrass sys-
tem, from roots to blades, on
one site. Additionally, the
Envirotron enables scientists to
control the environment tem-
perature, water, light as well as
other stresses such as insects,
fungi and nematodes to deter-
mine how turfgrass responds to
changing conditions. Scientists
study root growth through spe-
cial observation chambers
where pesticide, water and fertil-
izer flow are monitored.
Funded through the Florida
Turfgrass Research Foundation
and matching state funds, this
design serves as a prototype for
other universities throughout
the country. The 3,100-sf
Envirotron is comprised of a
greenhouse, four climate-con-
trolled glasshouses, two walk-in
growth chambers, two research
labs, study/living quarters,
classrooms and offices. Perhaps
the most unusual feature of the
Envirotron is the rhizotron, a
laboratory for studying root
growth.
FLORIDA ARCHnECT Spring, 1994


Most rhizotrons are built
underground, allowing scien-
tists to study roots up to a depth
of six feet But at UF, the rhi-
zotron features a hoist system
that lifts glass-walled research
plots out of the ground so scien-
tists can inspect the root sys-
tems in the laboratory.
By studying the entire turf-
grass system, Envirotron scien-
tists will try to find ways to
reduce inputs such as water and
fertilizer and to genetically engi-
neer new varieties that are resis-
tant to heat, cold, drought and
disease.




Top: Turfgrass Envirotron -
Rhizotron is shown in center of
photograph, with the climate con-
trolled greenhouses on either side
Right: Rhizotron Showing the
sliding rain shelter transparent
roof

Photography by: George Cott











FINISHING TOUCH: Maintaining a Competitive Edge
E. "Manny"Abraben, AIA (Emeritus), RIBA


Our Biblical ancestors knew,
as do the computer hackers
of today, that you can only
advance when the quality of
your work represents the high-
est standards you can achieve.
Whether you say "how ye
sow, so shall ye reap" or "gar-
bage in, garbage out", the con-
cept is identical.
Have you reviewed your
photo file recently?
I will wager you found that
the last few projects you de-
signed are not at all represent-
ed.
It is quite remarkable that
we, as professionals, whatever
our discipline, cannot come to
grips with the facts of business
that are so obvious to all other
industries.
We live in a demanding so-
ciety, that wants everything
graphically displayed. We live in
a world of commerce where
multi-millions are paid for a few
moments on national television.
We spend hours peering into a
computer screen to prepare our
drawings, then the evening
viewing the latest sitcoms on
television. Newspapers and


magazines fill the gap, deliver-
ing the pictures that compose
the life of our community.
Yet as much as we rely upon
graphics to convey our ideas, in
the end we fail to complete the
circle and record for our use
and posterity the product of our
dreams, imagination and cre-
ativity.
What will potential clients be
looking for when they peruse
your brochure? For openers,
that it is current. Anything more
than three to five years old, pro-
jects that do not reflect your
firm's design genesis and pho-
tographs of marginal quality
have no place representing your
business.
If you are totally objective
and use these criteria, you may

"Jacks" at the entrance to the
Naples Philharmonic and Arts
Center, Naples, Florida.
Architect: Gene Aubrey,
Creative Design for Humphrey
& Associates. Drawings: Martin
Fritz, Project Architect; Camera:
NIKON F3hp; Lens: NIKKOR
20mm f/3.5 w/yellow filter;
Film: ILFORD HP 4. ISO 100
Exposure: f/11 @ 1/60th sec.


Mizner Park, Boca Raton, Florida. Architect: Cooper Carey Assoc., AIA, Camera: HASSELBLAD 500
CM with ZEISS DISTAGON 40mm f/4 w/orange filter; Film: ILFORF FP4 ISO 125; Exposure: f/11 @
1/125


have one or two usable images
left in an otherwise totally bare
cupboard. What lies ahead is
the task of filling the space left
by the culled items.
It is quite remarkable that
the concept of having all your
consultants on tap from the start
of a project eludes us complete-
ly when it comes to public rela-
tions and photography. Yes, I
know we retain all of the engi-
neering disciplines up front,
however, putting an architectur-
al photographer on the team
early on seems an anathema. It
is always the last thing to be
done.
I was fortunate that I em-
ployed a fulltime photographer
in my own practice for over 35
years, so all of my projects
received the full treatment from
the foundations to the ashtrays.


FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring, 1994





























Wharfside at Boca Pointe, Boca Raton, Florida. Architect: Richard Martin Associates, Camera:
HASSELBLAD 500 CM with ZEISS DISTAGON 40 mm f/4 w/orange filter; Film: FILFORD ISO 125
Exposure: f/11 @ 1/125


Bringing in a photo consul-
tant early on has the advantage"
of acquainting him or her with
the scope of the program and of
enabling the photographer to
comprehend the subtleties of
the design.
In retrospect, I found that
from the beginning of my prac-
tice, I spent a great deal of time,
effort and resources producing
outstanding sales tools. In later
years, as the pressures of the
practice increased, there were
lapses of commitment. This
became painfully apparent in the
early 70's when I had to mount a
Herculean task of bringing
everything up to date. It was
expensive and time-consuming
when my partners and I could ill
afford the time. But, attempting
to deal with potential clients
without current marketing tools
and embarking on a lecture tour
without material to hand out
was a critical challenge. We
found that there was a lesson
implicit in having neglected a
major part of our practice pub-
lic relations and marketing -
neglect we could no longer
tolerate.
For the cost-conscious and
the small office who find it diffi-
cult to compete in the market-
ing arena, turning to black and
white photography can produce
a dynamic and effective tool.
Despite the advent of color
copiers, which do an adequate
job at 40 to 60 cents a copy, a


printed black and white bro-
chure can reduce those costs to
pennies per page.
It is critically important that
you take advantage of the design
talent available from your staff.
They may be the ones who will
eventually have to sell your ser-
vices and should feel comfort-
able with the art and the opera-
tional illustrations that should be
a part of the brochure.
Exploring the possibilities of
the ultimate brochure led me to
conclude that for a small to
medium-sized office something
akin to a single printed 24" x 36"
poster which could be updated
should serve its purpose for
many years. Copies may then be
run off on an Ozalid printing
machine (blackline paper) or at
a photo lab specializing in large
format printing.
Initially, a new practice will
have to rely upon renderings. As
soon as is practical, however,
they should be replaced by pho-
tographs, even if it is only of one
project.
What are the costs to employ
an Architectural Photographer?
The creative fees can range
from $500 $2,000 per day plus
the costs of film, processing and
prints. You can count on no
more than two projects per day
depending upon the size of the
buildings and their orientation.
For the purposes of this arti-
cle I have chosen to address
black and white only, not only


as a matter of economics, but
because I firmly believe that
"there is more color in black
and white than in actual color
film."
With the full range from
white to black including perhaps
a hundred or more shades of
gray, the texture of materials is
dominated by its contribution to
the design and does not over-
whelm the viewer with splashes
and gashes of extraneous color.
Can anyone deny that the
original versions of John Wayne
motion pictures filmed in black
and white in Monument Valley
are superior to the colorized
and Technicolor versions now
in circulation. The stone, sky
and clouds are virtually three-
dimensional.
I could wax poetic and spew
paroxysms about the virtues of
black and white for more pages
than are available. I hope that
the examples represented here
will provide the stimulus for you
to employ more black and white
in your public relations and mar-
keting programs.
One of the most striking
brochures I ever produced was
one of the simplest most inex-
pensive. First of all, it was
designed to fit into a #10 letter
envelope. The cover stock
(150#) was a bright orange
embossed and imprinted in
black. The pages were 100#
coated stock (6) which repro-
duced the black and white pho-


tos superbly. Since I had saved
considerable money on printing,
I had the cover stock embossed
with the firm logo. This piece
was mailed all over the world
and was responsible for follow-
up inquiries which ultimately
led to commissions.
Printed pages inserted in
dramatic covers, single printed
posters and printed bound
books are all variations on a
theme that is only limited by
funds and imagination.
With all of this said, I must
also caution you about doing all
this work yourself. You are a pro
at what you do, so let the graphic
professionals do what they do
best. Let them design the pro-
gram, and if you want to con-
serve resources, use your CAD
system for desktop publishing
with integrated CD ROM. You
can reproduce almost everything
you may require, including
image manipulation.
The key is to start with the
best images that money can
buy. Don't skimp on photogra-
phy because each step in the
printing process deteriorates
the image about 5% 10%, partic-
ularly reproductions in news-
print which eats ink and will
turn an Ansel Adams work of art
into the blob from the black
lagoon.
There is no mystery about
quality; all it requires is commit-
ment. The best advice that any-
one could give you is to apply
the same standards to a bro-
chure that you would to your
design. After all, it will represent
you as a silent salesman for
years to come.

E. "Manny"Abraben has been
a practicing architect in Florida
and 18 countries during the last
35 years. He is the author of
POINT OF VIEW, THE ART OF
ARCHITECTURAL PHOTO-
GRAPHY, Van Nostrand
Reinhold, 1993. He is now devot-
ing his full time to Architectural
Photography and has two more
books in the works.


FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring,. 1994








When Coverage Counts...













AIA Florida Insurance Trustees'
Endorsed Group Life and Health
Insurance Program

For more information, please contact Lori Orr
at Association Adminisktators & Consultants,
Inc. by calling 1-800-854-0491 toll free.

AA&C.
Putting People First

Circle 15 on Reader Inquiry Card



TROPIC TOPTM
ARTIFICIAL THATCH















At last, the demand has been met for a thatch that is virtually
indestructible. Tropic TopTM, a lightweight metal shingle,
colorfast, 100% fireproof, installs as easily as ordinary roof
shingles, and has the appearance of natural thatch without any of
the disadvantages.
It is cost effective because you will never have to replace it.
We are able to help with design and installation requirements for
your particular roofing application.
2028-3 EASTBOURNE WAY, ORLANDO, FL 32812
407/273-0069 FAX 407/273-0069
Circle 16 on Reader Inquiry Card


..or wanted to?
Concerned about the rules and regs?

Now there's a book that has the answers!
Florida Project Development Manual was written for Archi-
tects, Engineers, Contractors, and Administrators to provide
the essential information needed to get projects done. It covers
the entire process from planning through occupancy giving you
the facts on CON, plan review, local agencies, and inspections.
This 218 page book is packed with material that will help you
move easily all the way through the planning and design phases
for hospitals, nursing homes, ambulatory surgery centers, and
even medical office buildings. Written and edited by a team of
hospital and code experts, FPDM is the best place to start when
your client asks: "Ever done a hospital?"
To get your copy, send $39.95 plus $4.95 for shipping plus
Florida sales tax (at the rate for your business location) to:
Health Facility Publishers, Inc.
10991 San Jose Boulevard, Suite 55
Jacksonville, Florida 32223
Florida Project Development Manual A Guide to Planning, Design & Construction of Healthcar
Facilities in the State ofFlorida, edited by Kenneth N. Dickerman, ALA. Foreword and contributions by
Ralph W. Swain, PhD and Forewordby Richard C. Rosenvold, RA; 218pp; 15illus; 8 1/2" x I" softbound.
ISBN: 1-81556-03 Circle 17 on Reader Inquiry Card


OF INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AWARDS
AWNIUGSGQF DISTINCTION


CUSTOM DESIGN CANVAS, VINYL AWNINGS
FABRICATION-INSTALLATION CANOPIES, CABANAS, CURTAINS
CUSHIONS, CUSTOM WELDING


844-4444
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL' INDUSTRIAL

MEMBER I.F.A.I. Circle 14 on Reader Inquiry Card LICENSE #U-10179
FLORIDAARCHITECT Spring 1994






NEW PRODUCTS


or working space without threat-
ening to damage skin or retina
from ultraviolet UVA and UVB
rays. Fading caused by heat and
UV ray deterioration is also
drastically reduced.
For more information,contact
the International Window Film
Association at (609) 951-3997.


able in a variety of colors and in
addition, the company offers
energy-efficient, split-color, com-
posite replacement windows to
match. Colors are applied by an
exclusive seven-step paint
process and are guaranteed with
a 50-year, no nonsense warranty
against chipping and cracking.


The "Petal" ceiling fan from


"Petal" Fan From Emerson
Ceiling fans get a breath of
fresh air and move further into
the realm of home design with
the introduction of Emerson's
contoured 50-inch "Petal" ceil-
ing fan.
The new fan concept blends
engineering acumen with
design artistry and is targeted
specifically at people who
choose a fan as much for aes-
thetics as for function. The
"Petal's" softly sculptured
blades curve inward at the
flange couplings with the grace
of flower petals.
The AirDesign Petal comes
with the Emerson K55LX motor,
the highest quality fan motor
available today, and a 100-watt
integrated "globe" light fixture.
The motor has a patented triple-
capacitor speed control with
three forward and three reverse
speeds and three light levels, all
controlled from the QuietSmart
wall control and canopy mount
"smart module."
Strong die cast zinc allows
fine details in the housing and
provides a superior surface for
painting. It is available in tex-
tured appliance white and
Navaho white. For information,
contact Dorothy Hopkins, (212)
721-0509.


Window Film Facts
Window film has been
around since 1969, but recently
it has come a long way. Now its
possible to make windows ener-
gy conservers, UV ray screeners
and safety barriers. Whether
used on residences, commercial
buildings or vehicles, con-
sumers will use less energy to
stay cool or warm a real help to
everyone's environmental well-
being.
In terms of environmental
energy conservation, window
film cuts solar heat gain by as
much as 89%. The film comes in
a wide range of colors in visible
and invisible and reflective capa-
bilities from clear to very dark.
Film can now reflect heat back
toward its source, thus keeping
you warmer in winter. Instal-
lation of window film can cut
residential utility bills and for
every 16 feet of film installed,
energy savings could amount to
a barrel of oil per year.
As a safety feature, film cre-
ates a strong plastic envelope
that holds glass in place after
impact. The film will also stop
glass shard projectiles from
becoming dangerous missiles. It
has also been found that protec-
tive quality film deters theft.
Film cuts ultraviolet radiation
by up to 99%. It allows natural
light to fully illuminate a living


Premium Storm Doors from Sugarcreek feature double hollow con-
struction


Sugarcreek Storm Doors
Sugarcreek Window and
Door Corporation has a new cat-
alog available introducing their
Premium Storm Doors. Exclu-
sive features include double hol-
low construction for superior
strength and an insulated frame
core to provide additional pro-
tection against energy loss and
decrease outside noise levels.
The storm doors are avail-


For a free brochure, contact
Sugarcreek Marketing Services
at (216) 852-2416 and call col-
lect

Seamless Flooring System
From Vitricon
Vitricon, a manufacturer of
surfaces for the construction
and recreational/athletic indus-
tries, has a new brochure avail-
able describing VITRITURF


FLORIDAARCHrJETSpring, 1994














Cushioned Seamless Flooring
Systems. There are three dis-
tinct types of system available
for playgrounds, decks and run-
ning tracks. The Vitriturf
Systems are trowel-applied and
porous providing for a nonslip
surface.
The Vitriturf Playground
System utilizes shredded tires
as a base and a multi-colored
wearing course. The system has
been tested for shock attenua-
tion under the guidelines of
ASTM-F-1292. The system is
composed of multicolored rub-
ber particles and a proprietary
urethane binder. It is well uti-
lized around pools, in weight
rooms, pro shops, miniature golf
courses and verandas.
For more information contact
Vitricon, Inc., (516) 231-1300 or
(800) 777-6596.


of HVAC duct systems as well
as on walls, ceilings, piping and
duct exteriors. Foster's 40-20
Fungicidal Coating has excep-
tionally strong fungus killing
characteristics and it improves
indoor air quality by guarding
against the regrowth and prolif-
eration of harmful mold and bac-
teria throughout the building
and its air handling system. It
effectively inhibits a wide range
of gram-positive and gram-nega-
tive bacteria, including Legion-
ella, plus many different fungi
forms.
Foster's 40-20 can easily be
sprayed on the interior of lined
"or unlined ductwork after pro-
fessional source removal. On
other surfaces, it can be applied
by spray or brush. It drys to
form a tough elastic finish that
will stand up to most commer-


Foster 40-20 fungicidal protective coating effectively stops the growth
of mold on and around the dried film, in this petri dish culture.


Foster Introduces
Fungicidal Coating
Foster Products has intro-
duced the first and only EPA-
registered Fungicidal Protective
Coating for use on the interior


cial and institutional mainte-
nance programs including
steam cleaning. The coating is
also UV stable and can be used
outdoors. Field applications are
still performing after 2 1/2


years, and long term weath-
erometer testing shows no loss
of activity on aging.
Technical service and specifi-
cation assistance is available by
calling 800-346-5898 and
through the Foster sales organi-
zation.


Self-Adhesive Padding From
No-Muv
Zip Grip is the trademark for
a commercially-reliable, two-
sided, pressure-sensitive carpet
cushion. The advantages of this
new product include a savings
on installation time, there is no
stretching, no tack strip, no liq-
uid adhesive and no perceptible
odor and there is no destruction
of the carpet and cushion to cor-
rect "bubbles."
Zip Grip goes down easily
and removes even more easily,
without scraping or sanding.
Yet, it holds so strongly that
fork lifts, let alone golf carts,
cannot dislodge it. The more it
is walked on, the stronger the
bond gets.
Get Zip Grip samples, techni-
cal data and the name of your
No-Muv distributor by calling
(800) 227-7237.

Scofield Introduces
Designer Colors
The LM. Scofield, a leading
manufacturer and marketer of
concrete coloring and texturing
products, has added eight new
pastel designer colors to its
LITHOCHROME Color Harden-
er product line. The new pastels


provide lighter, more contempo-
rary color options for a variety
of concrete flatwork applica-
tions.
Scofield's Lithochrome Color
Hardener is a permanent and
non-fading, dry-shake material
that produces a hard, freeze/


thaw and abrasion-resistant sur-
face for concrete slabs. It is
ideal for coloring, hardening
and finishing new architectural-
concrete hardscapes and floors.
For a color chart and addi-
tional information on the new
Lithochrome pastel colors and
Scofield's complete line of prod-
ucts including color condition-
ing admixtures, dry-shake color
hardeners, form liners, precast
drainage systems, as well as
cures, caulks and coatings, con-
tact the Scofield Company at
(800) 800-9900.


RDRIDAARCHrIECr Spring 1994


Zip-Grip Adhesive Padding from No-Muv.










1994 AIA CONVENTION

HOLLYWOOD NIGHTS PARTY

ON PARAMOUNT PICTURES' BACK LOT

Hang a left on Wall Street. Enjoy an Epicurean Asian feast in China-
town. Check out strolling musicians on the Upper East Side and deli
fare in the Bronx. Choose dinner from gourmet ethnic menus, dance
to the tunes of a studio band, watch jugglers, singers, and scores of
other entertainers as you wander the "streets of New York:" eight
blocks of the Big Apple in Hollywood on the back lot where Sam pro-
posed to Diane in "Cheers" and Harrison Ford fought the bad guys on
Chesapeake Bay in "Patriot Games." It's a once-in-a-lifetime party --
the AIA Host Chapter Party on the back lot at Paramount Pictures.


SATURDAY, MAY 14,1994 7:00- 10:00 PM

LIMITED ATTENDANCE...PLEASE RESERVE NOW
ADMISSION IS $85
Payable to: AIA/LA-Convention '94
Please mail to: AIA/LA, 3870 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 900, Los Angeles, CA 90010
NO PHONE ORDERS



FOR TICKETS, PLEASE FILL OUT FORM, TEAR ON DOTTED LINE, AND MAIL TO:
AIA/LA, 3870 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 900, Los Angeles, CA 90010.
Please enclose your check for $85 per ticket payable to AIA/LA-Convention '94
THANK YOU

NAME:
Address:


Phone:






In-House Computer
Training Programs

Short and to-the-point, computer
software training programs to help
architectural firms become computer
literate and stay competitive!
10 hrs. WordPerfect
20 hrs. Desktop Publishing
10 hrs. Lotus 1-2-3
20 hrs. AutoCAD
20 hrs. Project Management



I
Brought to your firm or to a group of firms to train
professionals and staff. Price varies according to
expenses and number of people (Plorida State
enrolled. We can work with you IU NIVERS ITY
to make this happen center for Professional
Developnert and Pubic Service
l J a 904-64- 5 o A
to :46 5 for more inform


%Lil1c SHOULD NEVER GET BAD ECHOES
ON POOR ACOUSTICS ...


ARCHICOUSTICS inc.
consulting engineers in :


architectural acoustics
noise & vibration control
design of music & entertainment spaces


sound systems design & engineering
lab / field acoustical measurements
community noise surveys


12350 SW 132 court, suite 208
Miami, FL 33186
tel : (305) 254 8450
fax : (305) 254 8455


Circle 8 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT Spring 1994


AN INVITATION
TO GRADUATES WITH 4-YEAR
PRE-PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ARCHITECTURE
The School of Architecture at Florida A&M invites you to
complete your formal education requirement for licensure with a:

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

In operation since 1975, the M. Arch at FAMU is a NAAB fully
accredited, 55 credit, 4 semester program that balances
THEORY, DESIGN and PRACTICE.
The program values your experience and emphasizes the
accommodation of YOUR interests in the selection of the thesis
topic and promotes DIVERSITY in design and practice
ideologies.
A spirit of INQUIRY guides all coursework with the intent of
providing you the opportunity to pursue an area of interest that
will enhance your VALUE and EFFECTIVENESS, as an
architect.
All admitted students receive financial aid.
For more information, please call or write: Tim White, Graduate
Coordinator, School of Architecture, Florida A&M, Tallahassee,
Florida 32307. 904-599-3244
Circle 6 on Reader Inquiry Card







DESIGN SECURITY
INTO YOUR BUILDING!
Atlas Safety & Security Design,
Inc. is a full service, independent,
non-vested security consulting firm
servicing architects, private sector,
and government agencies. We de-
sign systems for intrusion detection,
perimeter protection, weapons
screening, electronic and detention
locking systems, access control,
communications, ADA barrier free
accessibility features, criminal jus-
tice facility programming, and Crime
Prevention Through Environmental
Design. (CPTED).
We conduct vulnerability/risk and
threat analysis in order to develop
security systems drawings, speciica-
tions, bid documents. We also con-
duct shop drawing review, installa-
tion supervision, and cost estimates.
When it comes to security design,
architects turn to

A
ATLAs
SAFETY&
SECURITYDESIGN
INC.
For more information and qualifi-
cations, contact:
Randall Atlas, Ph.D., AIA, CPP
1 Palm Bay Court
Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 756-5027
FAX: (305) 754-1658
1-800-749-6029
Circle 19 on Reader Inquiry Card


Florida

Architect

Reprints







For more
information
call
Carolyn Maryland
at 904-222-7590.


TM



SAII you ever wanted to do
with Glass Block but couldn't...
Now you can
with DECO-BLOC.
*5 times lighter & 200 times the impact
strength of glass block *Higher R
value *Stronger-made from LEXAN*
with special UV coating *Snap-Lock
installation feature *Drill or saw-cut
*Available grout system-no more messy
mortar *Standard & custom colors
available *Call today for FREE brochure.


DIMENSIONAL
In Fla. 1 800 940-4527


SURIACING, INC.
Outside Fla. 1 800 456-7093


Circle 20 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDAARCHTIECT Spring 1994








SPECIALTY TIMBERS
P.O. Box 422347 Kissimmee, FL 34742-2347
-. ~ 407-933-6595 800-345-5361
FAX No. 407-933-8469
Ridge
Beams
Ceiling


Window


A. FStair
Treads
Basement Stringers
Beamed.
Garage Door
Header
* Largest Selection in Florida of In Stock AITC Certified
Glulam Beams and LVL's

BUILDING CODE ACCEPTANCE -
SBCCI ACCEPTANCE as well as
acceptance in all jurisdictions
throughout the U.S.

ASSOCAT Residential, Industrial, Commercial and
MEMBER Institutional Buildings and Bridges
Circle 11 on Reader Inquiry Card



SPECIALISTS IN INSURING THE
DESIGN PROFESSIONAL
WITH COMPETITIVE
PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY PROGRAMS

INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING
VALUE ADDED SERVICES
CONTRACT REVIEW
Loss PREVENTION
RISK MANAGEMENT
OTHER AVAILABLE COVERAGES
PROJECT COVERAGE
UMBRELLA LIABILITY
COMMERCIAL GENERAL LIABILITY
COMMERCIAL AUTOMOBILE LIABILITY
WORKERS' COMPENSATION
THE ONLY A/E PRONET MEMBER IN FLORIDA
W. MEADE COLLINSWORTH,
CPCU, ARM, AIM, AAI
COLLINSWORTH, ALTER, NIELSON, FOWLER & DOWLING, INC.
15979 N.W. 151ST STREET, SUITE 105, MIAMI LAKES, FL 33014
305-822-7800 FAX 305-362-2443 305-463-8601
Circle 10 on Reader Inquiry Card


Express your imagination with


BiLacrD


OVER 60 DESIGNS SIZES COLORS


HIGH SECURITY
THERMAL INSULATION
SOUND INSULATION
LIGHT TRANSMISSION


GLASS MASONRY INC.
P.O. Box 8325
Pembroke Pines, FL 33024
(305) 584-8774
FL 800-940-4527 NATL 800-456-7093
Circle 9 on Reader Inquiry Card


PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED


ESTIMATES
WE DELIVER AN UNBIASED, INDEPENDENT,
ACCURATE OPINION AND ESTIMATE OF:
Design and Development Costs
Theme Park and Leisure Entertainment Costs
Construction Costs
Contractor Evaluation
Bid Evaluation
Change Order Analysis
Delay and Impact Claims
Expert Witness Service
M-CACES (Corps of Engineers) Estimates
CES (NAVFAC Navy) Estimates
International and Foreign Markets
Specialist in Prototype (one-of-a-kind) Projects
Environmental Restoration Costs
Contact: Michael Thornton
ASSOCIATED COST ENGINEERS, INC.
4201 Vineland Road, Suite 1-12
Orlando, Florida 32811-6626
(407) 425-0612 Fax (407) 425-0354
Circle 7 on Reader Inquiry Card


L LL1
k i1. L


(SLAW





VIEWPOINT




Florida Design Initiative An Update
by Larry Peterson


The last time I wrote for
Florida Architect in Spring
1993, I described the activi-
ties of the FLORIDA DESIGN
INITIATIVE and its mission to
implement "best practices" in
energy efficiency as the stan-
dards of practice for all design
professions. In that May-June
issue on energy, I outlined the
Guidelines being developed by
the FLORIDA DESIGN INITIA-
TIVE which would insure ener-
gy-efficient buildings. These
Guidelines are being discussed
among the state agencies' design
service procurers and the leader-
ship of the professional design
associations. The INITIATIVE
has received funding from the
Florida Energy Office for two
more years to continue the activi-
ties now underway and to
expand the effort to include lead-
ership from both academic insti-
tutions and local government in
the on-going forum of discus-
sions and strategic planning.
Since last Spring, several new
initiatives have begun that could
change the standards of practice
for architects and provide some
of the new opportunities for
expanded service delivery. One
of these initiatives could have
broad and sweeping implications
for all design professionals in
Florida and the other could pro-
dice specific changes in the pro-
curement of design services by
state and local government. At
this time, I am not sure which
initiative will have which effect,
but that is the nature of change
in complex systems it is
unpredictable with respect to
specific time and place, but it is
predictable in general pattern.
The first initiative is the plan-
ning of the Second National
Conference on Building Com-
missioning, to be held in St.
Petersburg Beach on May 9, 10,
and 11. The FLORIDA DESIGN
INITIATIVE is assisting Portland
Energy Conservation, Inc. in the
planning of this conference, with
the Florida Energy Office as the


host sponsor. The INITIATIVE's
interest in this conference is to
bring the importance of commis-
sioning to the attention of state
and local government; and to
provide all design professionals
with the opportunity to under-
stand how commissioning can
assist them in designing more
energy-efficient buildings and
providing 'better client services
by insuring that their designs
will be accurately constructed.
Commissioning is one of the
most important new activities in
the Guidelines proposed by the
INITIATIVE for adoption by all
state agencies. Building commis-
sioning is a rapidly growing field,
already sponsored and funded by
several of the largest utilities on
both coasts. Commissioning
involves bringing in third parties
to start up and test a building or
facility, and confirm that it has
been constructed to the design
standards and specifications
agreed upon in the contract doc-
uments. This process can
include inspections and tests,
data acquisition and interpreta-
tion, computer simulations,
equipment calibration, operator
training, and a number of other
activities depending upon the
project.
Two important accomplish-
ments of commissioning are that
the design team receives confir-
mation that the building was con-
structed according to the con-
tract documents and will perform
as it was intended and an operat-
ing baseline is established that
specifies the operations and
maintenance costs to be expect-
ed over the lifetime of the build-
ing. This information provides
the criteria for the owner/opera-
tor to compare actual building
performance against and pro-
vides the data for life-cycle cost
analysis to determine when the
building equipment should be
upgraded and/or the building
should be renovated.
As design teams are
successful in providing "best


practices" in their service deliv-
ery package they will gain repu-
tations for buildings that meet
and exceed energy-efficiency
performance criteria. Architects
could receive bonus points on
future RFQ's from the state and
could receive reductions in their
premiums for liability insurance,
since well-designed, total perfor-
mance buildings have fewer lia-
bility problems. The INITIATIVE
has started discussions with its
members on all of these issues
and is assisting PECI in identify-
ing insurers and lenders to par-
ticipate in the conference agen-
da.
The second new initiative has
been started by the City of
Tallahassee to improve the per-
formance of public buildings it
finances. The City of Tallahassee
is implementing several of the
activities outlined in the INITIA-
TIVE Guidelines in its newest
construction project a new
office and warehouse for the
Water and Sewer Department.
The RFP states that, "The
Architect will design the build-
ings/facility with energy efficien-
cy as a primary goal." The archi-
tect's plans will be submitted to
the Building Design Assistance
Center at the Florida Solar
Energy Center for computer sim-
ulations and development of two
alternate energy-efficiency
designs, one of which will be
selected by the City and the
building will be commissioned
by an independent party selected
by separate RFP.
With the recommendations
from the Office of Energy Policy
and the Electric Utility Depart-
ment, and with the full coopera-
tion of the City Manager, the
City of Tallahassee is implement-
ing important changes in procur-
ing design services. This com-
mitment and the experience
gained can lead to an exciting
new program to provide the
energy efficiency, indoor air
quality, human comfort and per-
formance, and lower life cycle


costs for city financed buildings.
The FLORIDA DESIGN INI-
TIATIVE will be monitoring the
City's experiences, making the
lessons learned available to other
communities in Florida, and
reporting them to the members
of the INITIATIVE for discus-
sion and analysis of their implica-
tions. By gaining new core com-
petencies in designing high-per-
formance buildings, architects
have an immediate opportunity
to define a new aesthetic in this
rapidly emerging area of "Green
Architecture". Hopefully, this
new aesthetic will be based upon
principles and concepts that will
endure and cannot be swept
away by the new fashion or style
that is amplified by media expo-
sure.
Architects have the opportu-
nity to gain public confidence in
their profession by demonstrat-
ing their mastery of integrating
site and building components
into high-performance buildings
that look and feel their worth and
substance. The alternative is to
learn to master the manipulation
of media in an attempt to keep
design in the forefront of the
public's mind by masking poor
performance and lack of sub-
stance with hubris and style.

Larry Peterson is Associate
Professor of Architecture at
Florida A & M University and
Director of the FLORIDA
DESIGN INITIATIVE.




This (material) was prepared under
the direction and funding for the
Florida Energy Office (FEO),
Department of Community Affairs
with the support of the U.S.
Department of Energy, Grant
Number DEFG44-77CS-60210.
However, any opinions, findings, con-
clusions, or recommendations
expressed herein are those of the
authors and do not necessarily reflect
the views of DOE, FEO, or the
Department of Community Affairs.


FLORIDAARCHTECT Spring, 1994


















The power
Children have a very special
relationship with Grandma and
Grandpa. That's why grandparents
can be such powerful allies in
helping keep your kid off drugs.
Grandparents are cool.
Relaxed. They're not on the firing
line every day. Some days a kid
hates his folks. He never hates his
grandparents. Grandparents ask
direct, point-blank, embarrassing
questions you're too nervous to ask:
"Who's the girl?"
"How come you're doing
poorly in history?"
"Why are your eyes always
red?"
"Did you go to the doctor?
What did he say?"
The same kid who cons his
parents is ashamed to lie to
Grandpa. Without betraying their
trust, a loving, understanding
grandparent can discuss the dan-
ger of drugs openly with the child
he adores. And should.
The average age of first-time


)f a Grandpa.
drug use among teens is 13.
Some kids start at 9.
1 out of 6 American kids
between 9 and 12 is approached
to try illegal drugs. 34% of the
time it's a friend. 29% of the time,
it's a kid their own age.
Illegal drugs are a direct link to
increased violence in many com-
munities, to AIDS, to birth defects,
drug-related crime, homelessness.
As a grandparent, you hold a
special place in the hearts and
minds of your grandchildren.
Share your knowledge, your love,
your faith in them. Use your power
as an influence to steer your
grandchildren away from drugs.
If you don't have the words,
we do. We'll send you more infor-
mation on how to talk to your kids
about drugs. Just ask for your free
copy of "A Parent's Guide to
Prevention." Call 1-800-624-0100.
Grandma, Grandpa. Talk to
your grandkids. You don't realize
the power you have to save them.


PARTNERSHIP FOR A DRUG-FREE FLORIDA
fhneshipForADn-Free Ameca




























KEYSTONE
for that natural look.

Keystone is real Florida cut coral, a shell traver-
tine from the Florida Keys. Diamond sawed, cut
six sides to your specifications. A natural light
cream with rich tones of red-brown and black.


I ~--J-,




KEYSTONE PRODUCTS, INC.
1414 N.W 3rd Avenue / Florida City, FL 33034
(305) 245-4716
Circle 12 on Reader Inquiry Card


Watclijor CallfivI





























Predicting trends is no mystery

for us. We simply listen.

trying contemporary in any business means
knowing not guessing what the market
wants. That's why we're in constant touch with
architects and developers.
And because each has a different concept of which
roof is ideal for a particular structure, we feature
the broadest selection of roof tiles available today.


Tiles that help promote the unique, distinctive
look of your architectural designs, in just the right
colors and styles.
Lifetile. We stay progressive because we listen.


M LIFETILE
Fire-Safe roofing with the Concrete Advantage


Rialto, California Stockton, California Casa Grande, Arizona Katy, TIxas San Antonio, Texas Lake Wales, Florida
(714) 822-4407 (209) 983-1600 (602) 836-8100 (713) 371-2634 (512) 626-2771 (813) 676-9405


Member of National Tile Roofing Manufacturers Association, Inc.


LIFETILE is a division of BORAL INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED


Circle 13 on Reader Inquiry Card




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs