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Florida architect
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00302
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: 1993
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00302
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text

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IIJ/
Winter, 1993
Vol. 40, No. 4


CONTENTS





Features


Editorial 7
1993 FA/AIA Awards 9
Awards for Excellence in Architecture
Sarasota Memorial Hospital, Child Care Center II
Carl Abbott FAIA
Land Yacht
Cooper Johnson Smith Architects, Inc.
Windsor Rowhouses
Scott Merrill
Naples Airport Fire Station
Victor J. Latavish, AIA
Concha Marina
Smith Architectural Group, Inc.
Seaside Motor CourtI
Scott Merrill
Gelfman Studio
Suzanne Martinson
The Netherland Adaptive Reuse and Expansion
Giller & Giller, Inc.
Samuel Baker House Restoration
Renker Eich Parks Architects
Unbuilt Awards 23
Federal Building and Courthouse
Spillis Candela & Partners
Spring Training Baseball Stadium
Lescher and Mahoney
Rowe House
Rowe Architects

Test of Time Award 27
Coconut Grove Residence
George F. Reed, FAIA
Firm Award 29
Bullock *Tice Associates
Legal Notes 31
Florida Supreme Court Limits Liability of Architects
in Condominium Case
David F. Tegeler, Esq., AIA
1994 FA/AIA Firm Directory D-1







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EDITORIAL


FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
(904) 222-7590
FAX: (904) 224-8048
Publisher/Executive Vice President
George A. Allen, CAE, Hon. AIA
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertising
Carolyn Maryland
Design and Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Printing
Boyd Brothers Printers
Publications Committee
Roy Knight, AIA, Chairman
Keith Bailey, AIA
Gene Leedy, AIA
Will Morris, AIA
Don Sackman, AIA
Editorial Board
Ivan Johnson, AIA
Dave Fronczak, AIA
Roy Knight, AIA
President
Jerome Filer, AIA
250 Catalonia Avenue
Suite 805
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Vice President/President-elect
John Tice, AIA
909 East Cervantes
Pensacola, FL 32501
Secretary/Treasurer
Richard Reep, AIA
510 Julia Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Past President
Henry C. Alexander, Jr., AIA
4217 Ponce De Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Regional Directors
James H. Anstis, FAIA
444 Bunker Road, Suite 201
West Palm Beach, FL 33405-3694
John Ehrig, AIA
7380 Murrell Rd., Suite 201
Melbourne, FL 32940
Vice President/Member
Services Commission
Karl Thorne, AIA
P.O. Box 14182
Gainesville, FL 32604
Vice President/
Public Affairs Commission
Rudy Arsenicos, AIA
2560 RCA Blvd., Suite 106
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410
Vice President/Professional
Excellence Commission
William Blizzard, AIA
11300 Fourth St. N., Ste. 100
St. Petersburg, FL 33716



FLORIDAARCHITECTWinter 1993


When Leon Battista Alberti described "exactly whom I mean by an
architect" in 1443, his definition was broad and generous and
addressed lofty goals in an age in which beauty and classical ideals
were the primary determinant of form. To practice architecture in the 15th
century, a man had to devise buildings "fitted out for the noble needs of man",
but he also had to have a patron, funding and be politically acceptable to the
ruling family, the church and the other humanists of his day. None of the
prerequisites for becoming "l'uomo universal" were taught in a school of
architecture.
The politics and economics of architectural practice are as complex and
confounding today as they were when Alberti wrote that an architect must
have "understanding and knowledge of all the highest and most noble
disciplines."
The criticism that schools of architecture are not rising to the challenge of
the demands being made by a rapidly changing world are at best vague, and
at worst, incorrect. Architecture has always been in critical transition. And it
has always risen to the challenges heaped upon it. Inherent in the practice of
architecture is the realization that it is a profession, perhaps more than any
other, that is defined by timeless values, including a quest for beauty, improv-
ing the human condition, making cities livable and protecting the environ-
ment. Architects have historically had to fight for recognition which is ironic
considering the demands that have always been made on the profession.
But, each era has produced a body of professionals who have risen to the
challenges of the body politic.
It is no less true today than it was when Alberti wrote, "Him I consider the
architect, who by sure and wonderful reason and method, knows both how to
devise through his own mind and energy, and to realize by construction,
whatever can be most beautifully fitted out for the noble needs of man." With
that in mind, we can change university curricula to address issues related to
practice, technological advances, environmental considerations and codes,
but we must never lose site of the timeless goals of one of the most noble of
all professions. DG


































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it9 9 FAA AWARDS


The 1993 FA/AIA Awards programs produced
entries from all over the region in a number of cat-
egories. Prestigious juries met around the state,
as well as in Connecticut, to select those projects,
built and unbuilt, and those individuals who best
met the criteria for architectural excellence that
the awards' program demands.
In the New Haven, Connecticut office of Cesar
Pelli, jury members in photo at right included
Cesar Pelli, FAIA, on the left, and architectural his-
torian, author and professor Vincent Scully, FAIA
(right). Robert Taylor, AIA, Senior Designer in the
Pelli firm, who is not pictured, also met to review
the 92 projects.
The projects which were selected to receive an
Award for Excellence in Architecture ranged from a tiny
airfield fire station to the restoration of several histori-
cally important properties in South Florida.
In the category of Unbuilt Awards, 43 projects
were juried by Frank Folsom Smith, AIA, Andrea
Clark-Brown, AIA, and James Moore, AIA. The
jury convened in the Sarasota office of Frank
Smith and selected three very diverse unbuilt pro-
jects for recognition.
From six entries, William Morgan, FAIA, Ted
Pappas, FAIA, and Robert C. Broward, ALA, select-
ed one project which best demonstrated the quali-
ties inherent in "timeless" architecture. The archi-
tecture firm which was chosen in recognition of its
many contributions both public and professional -
was selected by jury members Walter Taylor, AIA,
Forrest Kelly, FAIA, and Bill Scaringe,
Department of Management Services, State of
Florida.




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ORIDAARCHITECTWmter 1993












Sarasota Memorial Hospital, Child Care Center II

Architect
Carl Abbott FAIA
Architects/Planners PA
Sarasota, FL
Project Managers
Mark Smith, Cooper Abbott
Consulting Engineer
Rast/Chang, Inc.
Owner
Sarasota Memorial Hospital ,
V-P Facilities Development
Rick Carlisle .,
Hospital Auxiliary
Gwynn Mitchell
Director Child Care
Martha Voyles

This center creates a sup-
portive, flexible, creative envi-
ronment for children who are
six weeks to five years of age.
Designed to serve young chil-
dren during a uniquely forma-
tive period in their cognitive and
social development, the center
is both fun and fully compliant
with HRS criteria.
Oriented on its irregular site
to take full advantage of natural
sunlight, the building's large,
shaded windows and focused
clerestory provide light and pat-
terns which change throughout
the day and the seasons. Rich
colors and sloping forms create
vibrant and interesting contrasts.
The building is formed of
two separate wings which cen-
ter on the main meeting room.
The wings with their individual
classrooms open out to the site.
The commercial-scale kitchen
was incorporated into the over-
all design and indoor air quality
is maintained through material _
choice and ventilation.

JURY: 'This center is so light, PhgtAgraphy by- Cooper Abbort
playful and colorful that it seems
to have been done with a lot of
love and care. There is a lot of
visual richness and the forms that
the architect has composed are
very well resolved. The building
is very relaxed."


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Sarasota, Florida


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FLODAARCHITECTWmter 1993











Land Yacht


Architect
Cooper Johnson Smith
Architects, Inc.
Tampa, Florida

Consulting Engineer
Johnson Creekmore Fabre

Contractor
Breaux Construction

Owner
Mark and Melissa Breaux

Dubbed the Land Yacht, this
house was designed to accom-
modate family vacations by the
sea. The owner requested that
living areas be on the second
floor to accommodate views of
the water which yielded "cab-
ins" below. Centering the mass
of the living area yielded a wrap
around deck.
Circulation into and through
the house is redundant to give a
sense of adventure and variety
to living aboard. Entry into the
house can be accomplished by
way of an exterior stair to the
second floor front door into a
canvas-covered side entry at the
ground floor that doubles as an
outside shower enclosure, or up
a spiral stair to the rear deck.
Interior circulation above the
second floor is by way of a
ship's ladder to the loft above
the kitchen and dining room
and ship's ladder to a rooftop
deck that affords panoramic
views of the town and sea.


JURY: "This charming house
feels like what a beachside house
should feel like. The big over-
hang working with the terrace
and the porch below are very
handsome elements. The house
seems very delicately designed. It
has a lightness about it and yet it
exhibits a high degree of control."


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Photography by: George Cott


FLORIDAARCHITECT Winter 1993


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Seaside, Florida


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OIDAARCHITECT Winter 1993


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AWARID


Windsor Rowhouses

Architect
Scott Merrill
Vero Beach, Florida

Consulting Engineer
Frank Farley

Landscape Architect
Deborah Nevins --

Interior Designer
Frank Lincoln, Susan Smith,
Rod Mickley

Contractor
Arcon

Owner l -
Windsor Development Corp.

These concrete masonry row-
houses with wood trusses have
an FAR that approaches 1, yet
each unit has a private court-
yard garden. The three lots are
32 by 100 feet and the program
ranges from 2200 to 2800 condi-
tioned square feet.
The garage apartments are
put forth as prototypes for an
accessory building type that is
illegal in many jurisdictions,
despite obvious advantages.
The north elevation reflects
an effort to create a single com-
position of three main units
without making the units identi-
cal. There is also an attempt to
avoid a cartoonish distinction in
property lines of these fee sim-
ple units.








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Windsor, Florida


JURY: "This is a very civilized,
very urban set of buildings with
well-resolved elements of architec-
ture and inner spaces. It is the
kind of building that our cities
need more of One can see that
this project has been passed
through a plain linear art disci-
pline which has made it crisp and
taut. Once the architect chose the
direction he wished to take, he
pursued it with great conviction.
The compositional details of the
window groupings tucked under
the eaves and the way the
entrances are carved into the stuc-
co block are all beautifully han-
dled. It is historical and it pro-
duces strong elements of other
places and other times."


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Phtgah b.y Thoas .e.ek ." ," ."."
Photography by: Thomas Delbeck


II
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LORIDAARCHITECT Winter 1993












Naples Airport Fire Station

Architect
Victor J. Latavish, AIA

Design Architect
Victor J. Latavish

Architect of Record
Schmitt Design Assoc.

Contractor
Kraft Construction

Owner
FAA/Naples Airport Authority

The fire station's unique
sculptural form should provide
a distinctive landmark for avia-
tors since the profile of the
roof matches that of an aerofoil.
However, the form was initially
a deliberate recollection of the
bowstring roof structure com-
mon to aircraft hangar construc-
tion.
Despite the building's char-
acteristic shape, the plans were
based primarily on the specific
and utilitarian needs of its users.
The program and building size
were strictly controlled by FAA
guidelines, and the building's
footprint, a rectangle, was deter-
mined by the site engineer prior
to the architect's involvement.
Predictably, the room layout
and building components are
straightforward, contrasting
with the curved metal roof. In
order to stay within budget limi-
tations, the building is con-
structed with reinforced con-
crete masonry walls, poured
concrete beams and the roof is
framed in a conventional man-
ner with prefabricated wooden
roof trusses.





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Naples, Florida


JIRY: "This is a very delightful
bit of utilitarian architecture
within an airport. It is one con-
textual gesture that is exactly
right in a vast space. The asym-
metrical curve of the aerofoil is
very beautiful. It is both impres-
sire and inspiring when people
make architecture out of such
limited resources, both program-
matically and economically."


FLUj.iLfi iP HI-~,: i Winter 1993





AWARDS
0011Lf


Concha Marina


Architect
Smith Architectural Group, Inc.
Palm Beach, Florida

Consulting Engineer
Carmo Engineering Assoc., Inc.

Contractor
R.S. Black, Inc.

Owner
Herbert S. Pheeney

Concha Marina was
designed in 1921 by Addison
Mizner as his personal resi-
dence. It was built in the
Mediterranean Revival style
which was unique to Florida and
Mizner. In 1989, the entire
structure was renovated, includ-
ing redesigning the sequence of
interior spaces as well as exteri-
or modifications. Unfortunately,
years of neglect and damaging
unsympathetic additions and
renovations had not served the
residence well. The current
owner's intention was to reclaim
the character which Mizner
intended for his house.
New materials incorporated
into the structure compliment
the original and emphasize his-
toric details such as cast stone
columns and fireplaces, door
and arch surrounds and interior
moldings. Round arches were
reintroduced on the exterior
when an early photograph
revealed that they were there
originally. The interior court-
yard was completely covered in
concrete paving and devoid of
landscaping. This area was com-
pletely restored condition as
were all the porticos and loggias
facing the courtyard.


Palm Beach, Florida


JURY: "Historic prse'rvation
ought to be encouraged. It is
often the kind of thing that
doesn't receive a pria because, it
doesn't seem inventive. But,
now especially, the cnt'ironmiint
as a whole needs pres,-cratio, .
In the case of a great architect
like Addison Mizner. it is partic-
ularly important to sar, and
rehabilitate his designs. Tins
restoration seems to have btLii
done with great care Not only
are the buildings beautlhully
restored, but also the outdoor
spaces. The courtyard and land-
scape are particularly bcauti6il."


Photography by: Sargent
Architectural Photogratphy


FLORIDAARCHITECT Winter 1993





k4lRKIT:


Seaside Motor Court


Seaside, Florida


Architect
Scott Merrill
Vero Beach, Florida


Consulting Engineer
Johnson. reekmore, Fabre

Landscape Architect
Douglas Duany

Contractor
New Citation Builders, Inc. and
Bright inage Construction

Owner
Seaside Community
Development Corp.

This project was obliged to
absorb the service facilities of a
small to :n center. Located in a
block b-etween a service alley
and a to'.tpath, the program was
initially to accommodate mini-
storage and employee parking
for downtown merchants. The
client latcr added a shipping and
recei ing office, a housekeeping
shed, an Asian restaurant and a
motor court motel with a head
building. The units which
accommodate all these varied
uses measure 12 by 24 feet.
Each unit is joined by a continu-
ous roof in order to define the
edge oi the footpath and alley.
There remain views between
each unit. through which
breezes are pulled into the
courtyard The courtyard's pro-
tection [rom sea breezes allows
for a grid .lf sycamore trees.
These plantings hide the cars,
frame a view of the tower and
provide a cool sheltered public
courtyard for the town.


0 a q1R!RI --W lip, -F



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Photography by: Scott Merrill


JURY: "This is an extremely
accomplished piece of architec-
ture. There is real elegance in all
of its proportions and the han-
dling of detail. The building is
highly developed and has great
authority, but not in any kind of
oppressive way. It is still very
light and playful with its composi-
tional moves and asymmetry.
There is a great classical
word...propriety, which seems to
apply to this design."


F DAARCHITECT Winter 1993












Gelfman Studio Miami, Florida:

Architect
Suzanne Martinson
Miami, Florida

Consulting Engineer
Riva, Klein & Timmons

Contractor
Charles Esher

Owner
Mr. and Mrs. D. Gelfman r -

This project involves the
addition of a painter's studio and
office to the north side of an
existing house which is sited in
a native Florida hammock. The
painting studio was added as a
separate structure but connect-
ed to the existing house. The
studio had to be lit with natural
light, but with no direct sunlight
entering the space during the
day. -~ -
Three large unobstructed
walls were required in the stu-
dio in addition to a second level
office with a private and con-
trolled view to the natural pro-
tected hammock on the east.
The design solution provided
for a double square, east-west
bar building forming the paint-
ing studio. It is lit only from the
north skylight and north win-
dow wall. The single cube pro-
vides canvas storage and desk ,
space for the studio and the sec- ..
ond level functions as a separate
office space. The six-foot wide
spine separates the two distinct
volumes and serves as a back
door connector to the existing
house and studio.

JURY: "It's great to see an archi-
tect do so much with so little. Photography by: Steven Brooke
This is very minimal, but each
move makes just the right note.
The way the addition handles
light...the shadows on the outside
and the way the north light
bounces around on the inside is
very well done. It is an example
of the way the International Style
looked in its early innocent
phase. It looks wonderful in
Florida. It has a very light-heart-
ed quality which just feels right
for this state."


f, 1 'itiL' I Vk iflflT r. F %inwr IL9






WmA


lTe Netherland, Adaptive Reuse and Expansion

Architect
Giller & Giller. Inc.
Miani Beach. Florida

Structural Engineer
Donnell & )DuQuesne, PA. "

Mechanical/Electrical
Engineer
McDowell-HelmickAsso., Inc.

Interior Designer
Barbara Hulanicki I

Contractor
DACRA C.mnstruction, Inc.

Owner
Netherland. Inc

The design requirement for
this project %\as to convert a
hotel built in 1938 into a mixed-
use facility and neighborhood
anchor. The Netherland Hotel is
within the Miami Beach Art
Deco District and the goal of the
architect was' to enhance the
existing structure through the
expression o D)eco forms. To
this end. the original design ele-
ments anr distinguished from
the new through the use of
color and \% r% simplified stucco
detail. The new customized alu-
minum railings incorporate
some of the original detail seen
in the stucco motifs.
Each apartment has a view of
both the city and the ocean. The
three-story addition atop the
existing ,% en-story structure
necessitated the introduction of
shear walls and strengthening
of the spread footing foundation.












Phot,)graphyi by: Ira Giller and
Scot DiStefano
FLtIifi, Hi i. i I Winter 1993


Miami Beach, Florida

JURY: "This award is given in
recognition of the outstanding
restoration of this hotel, but also
in recognition of the role that
architecture is playing in the
renewal of the Art Deco district.
The rehabilitation of that whole
district has been one of the great-
est demonstrations of the power
of historic preservation and
rehabilitation to change the eco-
nomic base of a place and
restore it to life. It is hard to
realize that little more than a
decade ago, there was serious
talk about trying to save Miami
Beach by bringing in gambling
casinos, which would have
destroyed it. Now the area is
enormously prosperous and this
restored hotel is a wonderful
improvement."


_ II _n r_ _~ ~_ I _~ Iii __





A jAPIN


Samuel Baker House Restoration Elfers-Holiday, Florida

Architect
Renker Eich Parks Architects
St. Petersburg, Florida

Contractor .
Halverson Construction

Owner
Pasco County

Constructed in 1882, this
residence was restored to its
original appearance to be used
as a center for interpreting pio-
neer life in Pasco County. The
project was undertaken by a
nonprofit corporation and an
architecture firm specializing in
historic restoration.
The original plan of the
house, including porches,
became visible after later addi-
tions were removed and nail pat-
terns and paint stains could be
seen. The structure employs
some very unusual building
techniques which probably
relate to the builder's associa-
tion with the sponge industry. It
appears that much of the origi-
nal joinery was the work of a
ship builder. The walls are con-
structed of boards which are
3/4" thick and of varying
widths.The butt joints of the ver-
tical boards are covered with a
molded batten on both sides.
The house rest on cedar log
piers and the roof is covered
with sawn cedar shingles on
original oak lath. In the restora-
tion, only very deteriorated
wood was replaced and original
hardware was reproduced.


JURY: "It is important to recog-
nize that architecture can occur
in any circumstance, with any
budget, in any tradition.
Architectural restoration must be
done with great sensitivity to the
original materials, to the place
where it was built and to the tra-
ditions the building represents.
This building, which is a pioneer
artifact, has been lovingly saved
and preserved." --

Photography by: George Cott
22 FLORIDA ARCHITECT Winter I '::





IJL AWARD


Rowe House


Tampa, Florida


Architect
ROWE ARCHITECTS
Incorporated
principal-in-Charge
Rick Rowe, AIA
The goal in designing this
modest 2,500 sf residence was
to create a house for a family
with two small children that is
respectful of its context and the
neighborhood's Mediterranean
Revival roots. These goals are
achieved through the use of
compatible materials, colors,
textures, massing and respect
for the climate.
The long narrow site necessi-
tated a one-room wide house
that parallels the existing line of
neighboring trees. The pro-
gram is divided into five sepa-
rate and discrete elements: the
living area (living, dining and
kitchen), the sleeping areas, the
library, the garage and the
swimming pool. Garage and
library are juxtaposed with the
swimming pool and its screened
enclosure to create a U-shaped
house that utilizes the existing
line of trees to create a four-
sided courtyard.


[1n- .. ---. pp~


I,


JURY: "Programmatically, this
house works very well. Repetition
is one of its strongest attributes
because it reiterates the idea of
passage from one space to anoth-
er on the outside and repeats the
pattern on the inside. The rela-
tionship between the inside and
the outside is almost musical and
it intrigues the imagination.
If architects are going to
address the notion that the ma-
jority of people want to live in a
single-family residence, they are
going to have to move toward a
courtyard type of building -
large buildings that include
spacesfor cars on small lots.
Here the architect has succeeded
very nicely in addressing the
needs of a family on a tight lot."


ORIDAARCHTECT Wmter 1993


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Coconut Grove Residence


Thirty years after it was
designed, a panel of architects
agreed that the Coconut Grove
residence designed by Miami
architect George F. Reed, FAIA,
was truly "timeless."
Designed in 1962 and built
one year later, architect Reed
created an award-winning home
that would be published nation-
ally and recognized consistently
for its climate-responsiveness.
The owners of the house,
known only as "Coconut Grove
Residence," were importers who
worked together, frequently
travelling abroad. Their lifestyle
included having frequent house-
guests, but they wanted a house
that would allow them privacy at
all times. I .
The house is sited on a flat
bluff near Biscayne Bay with a 'A
many large palms. By exploding
the house, the architect was
able to preserve all the existing
trees and provide expanded
space for entertaining. Owners'
quarters are separate from the ", . .
guest area and very private.
Ground floor pavilions are one-
room-deep which allows a
breeze to wash the interiors.
The second-floor suite offers
treehouse seclusion and it
opens onto a roof garden, sun
deck and tub. Wooden umbrel-
las define the entrance to the T
house which is beyond a natural -
archway of palms. Broad roof
overhangs shelter the house
against the tropical sun and fre-
quent sudden rain squalls. The
house is, according to the archi-
tect, "tropical." According to the .___
jury, the house is also "time- i- _,
less." .


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1993 Firm of the Year Bullock*Tice Associates


Bullock*Tice Associates
Architects, Inc. was established
in 1973 as a continuation of the
proprietorship of Ellis W.
Bullock, Jr., who opened his
office in Pensacola in 1958.
Since 1973, the firm has ope-
rated under several names, but
the current name, BTA, has
been in use since 1986. The cur-
rent staff of 25 includes ten
architects, three interior design-
ers, three CADD specialists, two
construction administrators and .
seven administrative personnel. A.U I*-- *13
BTA offers services in archi-
tecture, planning, programming,
space planning, interior design,
facility management support
services and a variety of supple-
mental services. The firm's
clientele is varied, focusing pri-
marily on the public and corpo-
rate sector. In recent years, the
practice has centered on
Department of Defense,
Educati,.,nal and Hazardous
Waste Lab', ratory market seg-
ments. BTA is currently design-
ing state-of-the-art facilities in all
three markets.
In the broadest sense, the
principal. at BTA believe that
the finn's business focuses on
fitting man with the environ-
ment and providing solutions to
multi-dimensional problems.
BTA has demonstrated a sus-
tained commitment to design
excellence a commitment that .
has been recognized by clients
and peers in the 38 awards for
design excellence that the firm
has received since 1974. In addi-
tion to design excellence, pro-
fessional and community leader-
ship are important components
of BTA's guiding principles.
Both BTA principals, Ellis
Bullock and John Tice, have
provided on-going support to
the profession of architecture
through leadership roles in the
AIA at both state and chapter
level.


, H I FF., _Winter 1993


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LEGAL NOTES




Florida Supreme Court Limits Liability of

Architects in Condominium Case
By David F. Tegeler, Esquire, AIA


It is always refreshing to hear
good news for architects com-
ing from the litigation forum,
especially given the infrequency
of such news. Earlier this year,
the Supreme Court of Florida
handed down a landmark deci-
sion in favor of architects in the
case known as Casa Clara Con-
dominium Association, Inc. v.
Charley Toppino and Sons, Inc.,
620 So. 2d 1244 (Fla. 1993). This
decision places extreme limita-
tions upon the situations in
which contractors, subcontrac-
tors, and subsequent purchasers
of buildings can successfully sue
an architect.
By giving strong support to a
technical legal theory known as
the "Economic Loss Rule," our
highest state court has essential-
ly limited the potential plaintiffs
in lawsuits against architects to
those parties who have a direct
contract with the architect. The
main exception to this ruling
which still remains to allow lia-
bility of an architect to a non-
contracting party arises where
the architect has undertaken to
exercise "supervisory control"
over the contractor's work. By
now, hopefully all architects reg-
ularly use the standard AIA con-
tract forms and General Condi-
tions which clearly state that the
architect has no control over the
means and methods of the con-
struction work. Therefore, the
architect does not undertake to
supervise the contractor's work
and now should not be success-
fully sued by it or its subcontrac-
tors for most monetary damages
under the Casa Clara decision.
To fully understand the effect
of this court ruling, it is neces-
sary to comprehend some legal
theory and terminology. Ar-
chitects are, unfortunately,
accustomed to the claim of "neg-
ligence" regarding the perfor-
mance of their services. When
such a claim is made by the
Owner with whom the architect
FlORIDAARCHITECTWinter 1993


has a contract, the owner's basis
of a lawsuit is actually a theory
of "breach of contract" due to
allegedly negligent performance
of the architectural services
under the contract.
A separate claim of negli-
gence to recover money, without
any contract, is permitted under
a legal "tort" theory. Courts'
allowance of such claims is
intended primarily to protect
societal interests concerning the
safety of one's person and prop-
erty, where a relationship be-
tween two parties creates a duty
for one to protect the other's
interest. A tort/negligence theo-
ry of recovery contrasts with a
breach of contract theory, under
which a court enforces two par-
ties' voluntary agreement of their
duties to each other. Under
tort/negligence legal theory, the
Economic Loss Rule, as applied
in Florida and most other states,
says that economic losses cannot
be recovered unless there was
physical injury to a person's body
or damage to other property.
In the Casa Clara case, the
court ruled that homeowners
could not sue a concrete suppli-
er for economic losses under a
negligence theory where the
homeowners did not have a con-
tract directly with the supplier.
The supplier, Toppino, furnished
concrete for the Casa Clara
Condominium project. Some of
the concrete contained a high
degree of salt which caused the
reinforcing steel in the concrete
to rust, resulting in the ultimate
failure of the concrete. The
Florida Supreme Court decided
that the homeowners could not
sue the concrete supplier for
negligence since there was no
claim for personal injury or dam-
age to other property. The court
specifically stated that the dam-
age to the structure from the
defective concrete was not "dam-
age to other property." This is
an important clarification and


means that a non-contracting
party cannot sue for negligence
to recover economic losses
when no property other than the
construction project is damaged,
under the definition of the
Economic Loss Rule.
The most important ramifica-
tion to architects from the Casa
Clara case is found in a footnote
which strictly limits the Florida
Supreme Court's previous ruling
in another case, A.R. Moyer, Inc.
v. Graham, 285 So. 2d 397 (Fla.
1973), to the particular factual
situation of that case. In the 1973
Moyer decision, the court
allowed a general contractor to
sue an owner's "supervising"
architect on a project even
though the general contractor
did not have a contract with the
architect. In that case, the arch-


tect did have supervisory control
over the contractor and the
power to stop its work. The
Florida Supreme Court's edict in
Moyer upset architects all across
the United States, and was a
major factor in the later revision
of the AIA documents to delete
the word "supervise" and an
architect's authority to stop the
contractor's work. Since then,
the AIA documents only allow
the architect to "reject" the work
of the contractor. The Moyer
case has been used as a basis of
support for countless claims by
contractors, subcontractors, and
condominium unit owners
against architects over the past
twenty years to successfully
argue before local judges that
the Economic Loss Rule should
not apply to architects.


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Now the Casa Clara case
firmly establishes that claims
against architects do not fall out-
side of the Economic Loss Rule.
The Florida Supreme Court
clearly stated in its decision that
the Moyer exception to the
Economic Loss Rule should only
apply to "supervising" architects
with power to control the con-
tractor on the project.
Despite this strong decision
by Florida's highest court, it is
still important to understand that
a trial court will look at each new
case on its own merits, and that
nothing is certain in litigation.
For example, Florida appellate
courts have created other excep-
tions to the Economic Loss Rule
and have allowed negligence
claims by non-contracting par-
ties against other professionals,
including abstractors, attorneys,
and accountants. Sometimes the
courts have rationalized that the
plaintiffs were intended third
party beneficiaries to a contract,
and other times that strong pub-
lic policies favored protection of
the particular plaintiffs interests.
Recently, a Florida appellate
court decided that subsequent
purchasers of condominiums
could sue an inspecting engi-
neer in tort for negligently sup-
plying them with false infor-
mation upon which they relied
in purchasing their units.
Nevertheless, the Casa Clara
decision is clearly and strongly
worded, and should serve archi-
tects well in defending against
non-contract claims for econom-
ic losses.
In conclusion, the Casa Clara
decision should provide an
excellent legal defense to claims
against architects by non-con-
tracting parties where those
claims do not involve personal
injury or damage to property
other than the building project.


David Tegeler is an attorney
with the Orlando law firm of Bull
and Associates, P.A., where he
concentrates his legal practice on
construction law, including the
representation of architects and
other design professionals. He is
also a Registered Architect in
Florida and a member of the
Board of Directors ofFA/AIA.


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ARCHITECTURE
DELINEATION


& DESIGN


5922 Richard Place
Sarasota, FL 34231
(813) 925-3106


HANSCOMB

Hanscomb Associates Inc.
2500 Maitland Center Parkway
Suite 311
Maitland, Florida 32751


Tony R. Lancelot, FRICS
Principal

(407) 875-0707
FAX (407) 875-0726


PROFESSIONAL
CONSTRUCTION
CONSULTANTS


INSTAKEY"LocK CORPORATION


For your nearest
INSTAKEY dealer
call:


3021 South Tejon Street
Englewood, CO. 80110
Phone (303) 761-9999
Fax (303) 761-6359


STAN HICKS
407/831-3341

Re-key your own locks in seconds!


FLORIDA ARCHITECT Winter 1993


O'DONNELL, NACCARATO & MIGNOGNA
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS


WILLIAM C. MIGNOGNA, P.E.
PRESIDENT


1665 PALM BEACH LAKES BOULEVARD
FORUM III, SUITE 803
WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33401
407-471-5166


Tiden Lobnitz Cooper
Engineering for Architecture


Orlando
407.841-9050


Mechanical Electrical Plumbing Structural Electronic Systems
1717 S. Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32806


__


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CUSTOM DESIGN CANVAS, VINYL AWNINGS
FABRICATION-INSTALLATION CANOPIES, CABANAS, CURTAINS
CUSHIONS, CUSTOM WELDING


844-4444
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL* INDUSTRIAL


When Coverage Counts...













AIA Florida Insurance Trustees'
Endorsed Group Life and Health
Insurance Program

For more information, please contact Lori Orr
at Association Administrators & Consultants,
Inc. by calling 1-800-854-0491 toll free.

AA&C.
Putting People First




TROPIC TOPTM
ARTIFICIAL THATCH














At last, the demand has been met for a thatch that is virtually
indestructible. Tropic Top", a lightweight metal shingle,
colorfast, 100% fireproof, installs as easily as ordinary roof
shingles, and has the appearance of natural thatch without any of
the disadvantages.
It is cost effective because you will never have to replace it.
We are able to help with design and installation requirements for
your particular roofing application.
2028-3 EASTBOURNE WAY, ORLANDO, FL 32812
407/273-0069 FAX 407/273-0069


AN INVITATION
TO GRADUATES WITH 4-YEAR
PRE-PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ARCHITECTURE
The School of Architecture at Florida A&M invites you to
complete your formal education requirement for licensure with a:

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE

SIn operation since 1975, the M. Arch at FAMU is a NAAB fully
accredited, 55 credit, 4 semester program that balances
THEORY, DESIGN and PRACTICE.

The program values your experience and emphasizes the
accommodation of YOUR interests in the selection of the thesis
topic and promotes DIVERSITY in design and practice
ideologies.

A spirit of INQUIRY guides all coursework with the intent of
providing you the opportunity to pursue an area of interest that
will enhance your VALUE and EFFECTIVENESS, as an
architect.

All admitted students receive financial aid.

For more information, please call or write: Tim White, Graduate
Coordinator, School of Architecture, Florida A&M, Tallahassee,
Florida 32307. 904-599-3244

FORIDAARCHITECT Wmter 1993

















ADVERTISING INDEX


A A & C .............................................. .......... .... 35

AIA Trust.......................................... ....... .... 33

Arcways ........................................... ........... ... 28

Associated Cost Engineers ................................. 30

Awnings By Jay ................................... ............ 35

Collinsworth, Alter, Nielson, Fowler &
Dowling, Inc ...................................... ............ 31

ConnStone .......................................... .......... .. 30

Florida Natural Gas Association .... Inside Front Cover

Florida Power & Light ............................................ 4

Florida Prestressed Concrete Association Inc ............ 2

Foam Factory .................................... .......... .. 28

Glass M asonry .................................... .......... 30

James Hardie Building Products, Inc ...................... 3

Keystone Products, Inc ......................................... 28

Lifetile ..................................................... Back Cover

Morton International ............................................ 26

Paver System s ..................................... ........... 6


Professional Services Listing ................................ 34
Bull & Associates, P.A.
Attorneys & Counselors at Law

Hanscomb Associates Inc.
Professional Construction Consultants

Phil Hamilton
Architecture Delineation & Design

InstaKey Lock Corporation
Security

O'Donnell, Naccarato & Mignogna
Structural Engineers
Rinker Materials Corporation ................................... 8
Construction Materials

Rinker Materials Corporation 1
PC Glass Block

Roepnack ............................................ .......... ... 33

School of Architecture at Florida A&M ................. 35

Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc ...................... 33

Specialty Timbers ................................... .......... 30

Tarm ac .............................................. ........ ... 33

Tremron M iami, Inc ............................................ 32

Tropic Top ......................................... ............ .. 35


Support Our Advertisers First
They Support Us


FLORIDA ARCHITECT Winter 1993









TarmacTarmac


Issue No. 1


1994 Annual Issue


TARMAC -- WE'RE MORE THAN YOU THINK!!..

Most people think of Tarmac as a major supplier of cement, concrete, concrete block,
aggregate and sand. True, we're an international company and one of the largest
companies of its kind in Florida, but we're a lot more. Recently, Tarmac added a host of
new products, many of which are consumer oriented. That's why you'll now find Tarmac
products in major retail outlets. Many of these products are manufactured in state-of-the-art plants
strategically located throughout Florida. Take a few minutes to look at what Tarmac has to offer.


THE KEYSTONE RETAINING WALL SYSTEM --
SENSIBLE WAY TO REPLACE CONVENTIONAL


THE BEAUTIFUL AND
SYSTEMS


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Tarmac's Keystone Retaining
Wall System is quickly catching
the eye of engineers, architects,
landscape architects, builders,
developers, DOT officials and
anyone who needs a retaining
wall system. The added
advantage of innovation and
aesthetics for a cost that makes
Sense. Already in use throughout


the nation, more and more
Florida projects -- road ways,
parking lots, office buildings,
walkways, bulkheads, seawalls,
landscaping plans and homes are
featuring the Keystone System.
In addition to beauty and
innovation, Tarmac's Keystone
Retaining System offers:


It's Never Too Late For Keystone.
If you've already started a project
using another system, don't fret.
Tarmac's experienced team offers
engineering and technical assistance
which will provide. you with an
alternative design for any project


Design Flexibility.
Performance.
Environmentally Friendly.
Beauty.
Cost Efficient
Engineeering and Design
Support.


~---






TOPBLOCK SERIES


Architectural Units.

The edge. Architects and builders looking for the edge need innovation, aesthetics, and quality in
their projects. That's why they look to Tarmac's TOPBLOCK series for answers.
TOPBLOCK offers a wide range of options for construction needs. From a variety of surface
textures -- fluted, smooth, ribbed, split-faced or scored -- to a wide choice of colors and shapes.
TOPBLOCK offers function, design and excellence.
Whether your needs are load-bearing or non-load bearing, internal or external walls, painted or clad,
or you have special custom needs, Tarmac's TOPBLOCK series can answer your needs.

Ground Face Masonry Units.

Ground face masonry units are ground
to expose the natural colors of the
aggregates.The surfaces can be polished and
coated with clear acrylic to achieve a satin
gloss or high resolution surface finish.
The surface appearance of ground face
units can be varied through vertical scores
and chamfereing. In addition, ground face
masonry units are available in many
architectural colors and a variety of special -
shapes. The units are produced in 4, 6, 8
and 12 inch thicknesses.
As with other TOPBLOCK products, the
ground face masonry units can be used for
non-load bearing or load bearing walls. Tarmac's TOPBLOCK series
offers a host of possibilines

Colored Units.

Tarmac's TOPBLOCK includes an integral colored block series. Architects, developers or other
specifiers can choose from a wide range of colors to add aesthetics and character to any project. Shape
options are endless. And like the other TOPBLOCK products in the series, integral colored block can be
used for non-load bearing or load bearing walls.

Variegated Units

Tarmac's Variegated Block features the look and richness of natural stone, for the price of
masonry Tarmac's Variegated Block System offers the designer touch in a variety of colors, adding
creativity never before seen in traditional systems. The Variegated Block System features a split face
design and comes in a selection of multiple color combinations ideal for a number of applications
including schools, shopping centers, commercial centers and government projects.






ROOFBLOK BALLAST SYSTEM
The ROOFBLOK Ballast System offered by Tarmac is an innovative roofing system that has been
developed through extensive research and development. ROOFBLOK is a system that is far superior to
other traditional ballast systems. ROOFBLOK is becoming the first choice among designers because
ROOFBLOK offers far superior wind resistance, which is extremely important when hurricane winds
affect the design consideration. The ROOFBLOK Ballast System features:

A "locked in" ballast assembly that allows
membrane inspection. A single-ply system ballasted .-
with Roofblok maintains its integrity in high wind '.
exposures.
A Class A fire rating and creates a non-combustible
surface. ROOFBLOK insures the best protection for
the roof from wind-blown embers and other external -
fire sources. .
An attractive walking surface. ROOFBLOK creates a -
smooth, non-skid surface which allows foot traffic and
protects the membrane from cuts and puncture. The
pleasing look of natural concrete may be enhanced Explore the ROOFBLOK Ballast Srstem.
with integral colors for architectural design flexibility the IIInnOI'Le alIern'atve
A lightweight system designed for uniform load distribution.
An economical installation. It is simple and efficient to install and ROOFBLOK"s built-in drainage
design eliminates the need for expensive pedestals

Of course, the ROOFBLOK Ballast System is supported by an outstanding warranty program.



GLASS BLOCK



The Solaris Glass Block line of products is a way to add
timeless beauty to any design. With a variety of colors, patterns &
and surface shapes, Solaris Glass Blocks add a brighter, more
cheerful and inviting environment. Solaris Glass Block can be
used in commercial and residential applications, for both the
interior and/or exterior of any project.
To create even more exciting projects. Tarmac offers .
engineered glass block panels, designed with steel, aluminum and .i";
concrete Glass Block panels add an entirely new look and feel to l'-
traditional designs. As with many of our products. Tarmac offers
engineering and design assistance.
Solaris Glass Block saves energy, reduces noise and discourages Explore the possibdities with
burglaries Solaris Glass Block.






UNIQUE AND BEAUTIFUL
CONCRETE INTERLOCKING PAVERS


Tarmac's paver division is setting records with an
attractive and durable stone selection that is taking the place
of asphalt, gravel, mulch and other bland applications.
Pavers add beauty, aesthetics and durability. Most of all,
with a variety of designs, shapes and colors, and ease of
installation, pavers are transforming average designs into
works of art.
Ideal for landscaping accents, pools, patios, driveways, -
walkways and a host of other applications. Perhaps that's .
why landscape architects, architects, engineers, developers
and home owners are turning to the paver alternative in
record numbers. Manufactured in one of Tarmac's Tarmac Concrete Interlocking Pavers
state-of-the-art facilities, pavers are environmentally friendly, can add beauty to any home or project
When it comes time for accenting a commercial project, and/or a landscape plan, "Think Pavers". It's
the best way to enhance curb appeal.


STUC-O-FLEX

Stucco has been a mainstay in Florida construction for years. And while stucco has served its
purpose, there's a new, improved and innovative product. One of this product's strongest assets is that it
elminates painting and is virtually maintenance-free.
The exciting new product is called STUC-O-FLEX and it's a highly resilient acrylic polymer
compound that performs like traditional stucco. STUC-O-FLEX is pre-mixed, pre-colored and ready to
apply. It can be applied by spray, brush or trowel for finishes that range from a fine surface to a rough
skip texture. Its elastomeric nature allows it to follow building movement and settling without unsightly
cracks
STUC-O-FLEX won't chip, crack or peel and is available in an endless choice of standard and custom
colors STUC-O-FLEX is sure to become the preferred choice for new construction and/or retrofit
projects. Best yet, STUC-O-FLEX requires no special training for field applications.
Just look at some of the STUC-O-FLEX advantages.

It's easy to apply.
Repairs E I.F S. and stucco projects
105 % elongation virtually eliminates cracks.
Outstanding water resistance.
Performance in the product
Cost savings in the application.
May be used on interior or exterior walls
May be top coated with exterior latex paint for
custom designs
custom designs STUC-O-FLEX is ionovative. virtuallh'
Five year warranty. Tan Eancfre akes
mainatenanice-fiee and makes sense.










Tarmac.


COMING


ATTRACTIONS !!


Tarmac will be introducing a number of new and innovative products in the upcoming year. Look
for high quality patio stone products that will revolutionize the design flexibility for pools, patio and
landscape areas. Just a hint. These products will offer aesthetics and affordability.
Also, look for a pre-mix mortar system that offers unmatched quality control along with cost
effectiveness. This new system pre-measures each batch -- be it mortar, stucco or grout -- virtually
eliminating guesswork. The job site is cleaner, less waste, and the mortar quality is more consistent

Need more information? Clip the bottom half of this page, affix the proper postage on the
reverse side and drop the completed form in the mail We'll respond with information, manuals,


TARMAC FLORIDA, INC.
(1-800-522-229)

CHECK AS MANY AS YOU WOULD LIKE


KEYSTONE RETAINING WALL SYSTEM
TOPBLOCK SERIES
Architectural
Ground Face
Variegated
ROOFBLOCK BALLAST SYSTEM
SOLARIS GLASS BLOCK
TARMAC CONCRETE INTERLOCKING
STUC-O-FLEX
HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE CONTACT,
I WOULD LIKE A TECHNICAL SEMINAR

Name:
Title:
Company:
Address:
City:
State:
Phone: ( )


Information requested

Manual
Color Kit
Color Sample
Video
Specifications






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Postage
Required


TARMAC FLORIDA, INC.
455 FAIRWAY DRIVE
DEERFIELD BEACH, FLORIDA 33441


Attn: Christine Apollo


__WA '-


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HEALTH



CARE



DESGNE














AIA



AND



PICA



HEALTH



PLANS


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IIII IIt IIIIIINII I IIIIIII ItIII 111111111
3 1262 04977 3772

FLORIDA AIA HAS FORMED

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FOUNDED BY PHYSICIANS,
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Just the way you pictured it.

From concept to construction, you never
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You know how every finished detail should
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And we're here to help.


From the broadest range of colors and styles
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Rialto, California Stockton, California Casa Grande, Arizona Katy, Texas San Antonio, lbxas Lake Wales, Florida
(714) 822-4407 (209) 983-1600 (602) 836-8100 (713) 371-2634 (512) 626-2771 (813) 676-9405


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LIFETILE is a division of BORAL INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED