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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00299
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: February 1993
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00299
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
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CONTENTS


PthaLcAarCrE C

-


AWARDS
NEWDESIGN
" II!8111 Al111 -


February 1993
Vol. 40, No. 1


Features


Architecture With A Brazilian Accent
Donaldson Group Architects is breaking
ground on a mixed-use project in Brazil.
A House For A Horse, Of Course
The equine facility at the UF's College of
Veterinary Medicine by Flad & Associates of Florida.
A City Lightens Up
Spacecoast Architects has injected new life
into an old library in Satellite Beach.
A Place In The Sun
Manausa & Lewis' design for a new public
swimming pool facility in Tallahassee.





Departments

Editorial
News
1992 AlA/Florida Graphics Awards

New Products
Chapter Awards
Viewpoint
Residential Design by Architects ... or by Anyone?
Nettie Bade, AIA


Cover rendering of affordable infill housing by Marilys R. Nepomechie, AIA. See page 5.


U. OF ,FLA. LIBRARIES


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993












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EDITORIAL


FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
Publisher/Executive Vice President
George A. Allen, CAE, Hon. AIA
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertising
Carolyn Maryland
Design and Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Printing
Boyd Brothers Printers
Publications Committee
Roy Knight, AIA, Chairman
Keith Bailey, AIA
Gene Leedy, AIA
Will Morris, AIA
Don Sackman, AIA
Editorial Board
Ivan Johnson, AIA
Dave Fronczak, AIA
Roy Knight, AIA
President
Jerome Filer, AIA
7438 S. W. 48th Street
Miami, FL 33155
Vice President/President-elect
John Tice, AIA
909 East Cervantes
Pensacola, FL 32501
Secretary/Treasurer
Richard Reep, AIA
510 Julia Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Past President
Henry C. Alexander, Jr., AIA
4217 Ponce De Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Regional Directors
James H. Anstis, FAIA
444 Bunker Road, Suite 201
West Palm Beach, FL 33405-3694
John Ehrig, AIA
7380 Murrell Rd., Suite 201
Melbourne, FL 32940
Vice President/Member
Services Commission
Karl Thome, AIA
P.O. Box 14182
Gainesville, FL 32604
Vice President/
Public Affairs Commission
Rudy Arsenicos, AIA
2560 RCA Blvd., Suite 106
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410
Vice President/Professional
Excellence Commission
William Blizzard, AIA
11300 Fourth St. N., Ste. 100
St. Petersburg, FL 33716


U. O V. 1 BRARIES


This is the first of just four issues of Florida Architect which you will receive
this year. The decision to cut two issues is clearly budget-driven and I hope,
only temporary. Regrets for the abbreviated publication schedule aside, I
hope that 1993 will be the year that the economy improves... not just for the ar-
chitecture professional, but for everyone in every profession who is tired of hear-
ing about the depressed economy. And, I hope each of you shares my fond hope
that 1994 will see the return of six issues of FA and many fine projects to fill its
pages.
This issue is marked by a number of articles related to awards and unpub-
lished projects. There is no theme at work here, just a coincidence of related ma-
terial arriving on my desk simultaneously. If there is a theme at work here, it is
that several of the articles allude to the rebuilding of Dade County, something
that all Florida building professionals ought to be concerned about. In addition,
there are several features dealing with projects as disparate as equine barns and
swimming pools. No theme there. Just interesting designs.
While I'm on the subject of awards, I'd like to share with you the substance of
a letter (an article really) that I received last fall following the AIA/Florida
Awards for Excellence in Architecture program. The author, a Florida architect,
was "expecting to see the excellence" that is alluded to in the title of the awards
and instead saw projects that were "uninspiring" and he inquired what the basis
for the awards selection was.
As stated most eloquently, the writer asked: "Are we, in our time, so willing
to accept and live and work in and around buildings that are as limited in their
ability to move us to something grander than we dare ourselves to feel? Are we
so willing to forfeit a grander feeling of the generosity and quality of a space, and
perhaps a quieter feeling of repose and shelter? Are we so willing to relinquish a
sense of the rightness of all things, of joyfulness with our humanity and our con-
nectedness with our world? The abundance or lack of these qualities, can and
will, of course, be seen in our architecture, in spite of ourselves."
It is not my place to defend the jury's choices. We may agree or disagree with
any choices that any jury makes and I've often wondered if, a year later, even the
jury members could tell you why selections were made. But, that's not impor-
tant. What is important is that individual pieces of architecture are being recog-
nized on the basis of a set of criteria which can be unique to a single juror or
common to all three. The projects are judged on the basis of photography, not
the genuine article. This is a less than perfect way of assessing architecture, or
much of anything else. So, until the system of evaluating the submitted projects
improves and we can assemble a jury that is truly not regionally or stylistically bi-
ased, we may not get a group of "winners" that pleases everyone...or anyone.
This probably sounds like a copout to the architect who wrote to me. Maybe
it is. But, what's the alternative? That nothing of any quality is being produced in
our region. I doubt that. DG


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NEWS AND AWARDS







Competition Champions
Affordable Infill Housing
During the summer of 1992,
the City of Delray Beach and its
Community Redevelopment
Agency held a design competi-
tion, the focus of which was the
provision of well-designed, easi-
.ly maintained, affordable infill
housing for the less affluent I
neighborhoods in that city. It
was, and is, the hope of the com-
petition sponsors that the con-
struction of good buildings to fill
"missing teeth" in the existing
city fabric wold shore up
neighborhoods in danger of dis-
integration while maintaining
the historic character of 1920's
Delray Beach.
The First Place submittal did
just that. Designed by architect T -3
Marilys R. Nepomechie, it pro- _E
vided, at $32 per sf, a 1250 sf
three bedroom, two bath house
that would fit comfortably on a
narrow suburban site either in a
mid-block or corner condition. [I I
A typological hybrid of tradition-
al Florida shotgun and sideyard -
houses, the design submittal " u "
sought to present the quintes-
sential tropical house a struc-
ture only one room in depth, al-
lowing for cross-ventilation
throughout, as well as maxi-
mum privacy and considerable
protection from sun and heat.
Since the competition was
held, the landscape of South
Florida has changed consider-
ably. Hurricane Andrew has re-
configured the needs of South
Dade in such a way that the City
of Delray Beach and CRA offi-
cials have suggested that the af-
fordable housing proposed for
their context might also find
fruitful application in devastated
areas of South Dade County. At
only 14 feet in overall width, the
proposed house might prove to
be a viable alternative to the mo-
bile homes that were so com-
pletely destroyed in the hurri-
cane. At present, architect
Nepomechie is exploring ways
to fulfill that potential.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993















. . . . . .&,-',. .. i ~ -;:
S- -.-. ,.N
VAN


Richard Allen Awarded
For Educational
Facilities
Richard G. Allen Architects,
Inc., has been named the recipi-
ent of the James D. MacConnell
Award which recognizes the sig-
nificant contributions made to
the profession of planning edu-
cational facilities. The award
was presented to Allen during a
ceremony attended by members
of the Council of Educational
Facility Planners, International
(CEFPI) in San Diego, Califor-
nia. The award-winning project
is the Manatee Community Col-
lege South Campus in Venice,
Florida.
According to the architect,
"Something different was need-
ed at the Venice campus...some-
thing that took the site and the
climate into consideration and
expressed the relationship with
the area." What evolved was a
village concept which met with
great approval from students,
faculty and staff.
CEFPI Executive Director,
Tony J. Wall, describes the Mac-
Connell Award as "the most sig-
nificant project award in educa-
tional facilities today. The
award encompasses all aspects
of delivery of a school project -


quality planning, design and
construction."
Richard G. Allen Architects,
Inc. has been practicing in Sara-
sota since the mid-1970s.- The
firm bases its designs on the
"form follows function" theory
and the necessity of a structure
to respond to its context and en-
vironment.


Resource Guide Available
From FPL
As the rebuilding of Dade
County begins and rapid growth
throughout the state continues,
professionals involved in the
building process have a unique
opportunity to make South
Florida more energy-efficient.
With that in mind, FPL has
developed the "Rebuild Re-
source Guide", a handbook de-
signed for Dade residents who
are rebuilding their homes due
to the hurricane. The Guide,
which is available free of
charge, was written to educate
consumers and building profes-
sionals on how to rebuild to
lower home energy use.
The Guide addresses a vari-
ety of energy-efficient options
including site orientation and
lifestyle amenities. FPL wants
building professionals and con-


sumers to be fully aware that
simple design and construction
decisions made during the re-
building stage can significantly
decrease monthly utility bills.
The Guide may be received
by contacting FPL at (305) 552-
2814.


Planning Council Gives
"Future of the Region"
Award

Harvard, Jolly, Marcet & Ass-
ciates, Architects, P.A., AIA, of
St. Petersburg, has been award-
ed the Meritorious Award for
Outstanding Achievement in the
Development Category for the
design of the Seminole Commu-
nity Library by the Tampa Bay
Regional Planning Council 1st
Annual "Future of the Region"
Awards.
The new Seminole Library
has already exceeded the expec-
tations of the library and city
staff in terms of utilization. Book
and library material circulation
has increased by five times the
amount formerly used. New
member registration increased
from 150 members per month to
3,100 new members in the first
month of the library's operation.
The $1,530,000 project was de-


signed by the Harvard Jolly team
of Jonathan R. Toppe, AIA, as
Principal-in-Charge, Ward J. Fris-
zolowski, AIA, as Project Archi-
tect, and Jacquelyn S. Spears,
ASID, as Interior Designer. It is a
light, airy, functional facility
which provides complete library
service, including periodicals,
videos, a fully-staffed children's li-
brary and reference. In addition,
the library includes a 3,000 sf
Community Center which can be
subdivided into three separate
meeting rooms. The facility has
already begun to serve as a focal
point for community activities.


CORREX

The credit which was given
for the drawing of the Martinez
House, which appeared on the
cover of the November/Decem-
ber, 1992, issue of FA, was incor-
rect. The project was the recipi-
ent of an AIA/Florida Unbuill
Design Award and the designers
of the house were Tom A. Spain
and Rolando Llanes as associat-
ed architects. Apologies to Mr.
Llanes, whose name was deleted
from the credits on the cover and
the project description.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993















































Tampa Theatre Architect: John Eberson, 1926
National Register of Historic Places


GEORGE


Architectural/Interior Design Photography


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993
















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costs-money that could be put back in
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Architecture With A Brazilian Accent


Morumbi Mixed Use
Center
Sao Paula, Brazil

Architect: Donaldson Group
Architects, Boca Raton
Principal-in-Charge: Barry
Donaldson, AIA
Lead Project Designer: David
Herbert
Asst. Project Designers:
Danilo Guiso, Ashley Long
CADD Production: Brian
Honaker
On-site Architect: Roberto
Linhares, Linhares, LTD.
Sao Paolo
Owner: La Fonte Empresa De
Shopping Centers SA

A small site zoned for mixed
use in the Morumbi District
just outside Sao Paolo represent-
ed a unique challenge for Florida
architects. The site is fronted on
one side by an interstate and on
the opposite side by an aging
shopping center known as Mo-
rumbi. The intention was to cre-
ate a retail/office center for the
Brazilians that provides a spirit-
ed shopping environment within
the festive and colorful vocabu-
lary of Brazilian architecture.
The Morumbi Center, now
under construction, consists of a
16-story office tower floating
above the retail complex, a col-
lection of shops, a festival food
market, two department stores,
a food court, a 600-seat theatre
with stage and two movie the-
atres surrounding a 30,000 sf
themed entertainment center.
This space becomes the interior
focal point of the project acting
as a central plaza around which
all the elements are organized.
Shoppers arriving from ei-
ther of the two below grade
parking levels will first see an
abundance of curved turquoise
steel trusses which rise five sto-
ries. These trusses are support-
ed on brick and granite piers
which float on multicolor terraz-
zo floors. The image of turn-of-
the-century railway stations is

FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993


recalled in the decorative metal
light fixtures and railings. These
forms and materials culminate
in the 85-foot high themed en-
tertainment center which will in-
clude such rides as a balloon lift
and swinging ship.
The exterior of the center is


the product of the complexity of
both the diverse interior spaces
and the odd L-shaped site. Tall
decorative towers signal and
strengthen the corners of the
center and repeat the materials
used on the interior. The four
main facades that are crowned


nation and section courtesy of the architect.
in various places with curving
red metal roofs are detailed with
intricate patterns of tile pla-
quettes which are manufactured
in Brazil.


0100


M











A House For A Horse, Of Course


College of Veterinary
Medicine
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Architect: Flad & Associates of
Florida
Prinicpal-in-Charge: John
Blassick
Project Manager/Designer:
Paul Luther
Project Architect: Bob Filippi
Interiors: Valerie Walker
Consulting Engineers:
Mechanical/Electrical/Fire
Protection Affiliated Engineers,
P.E.
Civil/Structural Blum
Schumacher & Associates
Landscape Architect- Flad &
Associates
Owner: Florida Board of
Regents
Contractor: Charles R. Perry
Construction

L ike the anatomy of the horse
itself, this building layers in-
ward along a central spine. Not
just a barn, but a facility which
addresses the comfort, sanitation
and safety of the horse, was envi-
sioned within an easily-main-
tained and durable enclosure.
The facility contains the exami-
nation, treatment and housing
needs of its prized patients.
The equine facility has two
components of 8,800 sf each
consisting of treatment and
housing facilities. Housing pro-
vides 20 single stalls and 16
mare/foal stalls with veterinary
support spaces. Buildings are of
masonry bearing wall with
wood-framed, metal-covered
roof. Exterior surface is split
face block veneer with precast
quoins and coping. Entrance
surrounds are stucco and stall
floors and base are heavy rub-
ber tile.
Due to the existing air quali-
ty problems of previously devel-
oped facilities, individual, natu-
rally-ventilated components
were developed. Large operable
exterior openings allow air to
pass through paddle-fanned


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993















stalls up to the central aisle
clerestories. Allowing for future
expansion, these components
are linked through their centers
with central support services
perpendicular to the central
aisle. Oriented to allow for pre-
vailing breezes, these compo-
nents can proliferate as required
in the future while maintaining
controllable natural air changes
in each of the stalls.
Durability, sanitation and
safety were of prime concern
during the process of material
selection and detailing. All sur-
faces and edges are eased to
eliminate the possibility of abra-
sion. Building finishes must
withstand regular cleaning with
chemicals and high pressure
hoses. Floors are nonslip and re-
silient.
The treatment and care of
man's most enobled companion,
the horse, and the sensitive
training of veterinarians was the
driving force of the design. The
concept of an inpatient care and
training center derived from this
premise. The result is man's gift
to the horse who can now be
cared for with the exactitude of
science and the concern de-
served of such a noble beast.


Opposite page: east elevation show-
ing split face block veneer with cus-
tom pre-cast quoins. Note the entry
doors were customed-designed hori-
zontal sliding doors recessed in a
stucco entry. Photos this page, top:
interior view of central spine showing
clerestory for natural ventilation.
Bottom left: custom designed treat-
ment stock located in the central
treatment area. Right: interior of
stall showing feed/water access door
with metal grille to accommodate
utilities. All photos by Kathleen
McKenzie.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993












A City Lightens Up

Architect: Spacecoast
Architects, PA
Principal-in-Charge/Design
Architect: Linda Dunyan, AIA
Project Team: Lawrence
Maxwell, AIA, John McCaffrey
Consulting Engineers:
Gardner, Griffith & Associates,
Inc.
Contractor: PAV.C.O.
Construction, Inc.
Owner: City of Satellite Beach

r she City of Satellite Beach is
I sandwiched between the At-
lantic Ocean and the Banana
River south of Cocoa Beach and
Patrick Air Force Base. It's still
the "old Florida" of low scale,
pastel residences and it has a
decidedly sleepy ambiance.
The decision to renovate the
old library for use as a City Hall
was carefully considered. The
City already had a completed
design for a new police station.
That fact, plus the severe reces-
sion, tilted the scales in favor of
the renovation of the library
rather than building a new
structure.
With a $350,000 budget,
there was a limited amount that
could be accomplished on the
exterior. Both the 6,000 SF roof
of the library and the same size
roof on the Civic Center, its sis-
ter building in the complex, had
to be replaced. Since the interi-
or had to be gutted, it necessi-
tated that the majority of the
funding be spend inside. An ex-
terior finish system (including
insulation) for both buildings,
new storefronts, new window
openings and windows, lighted
bollard/columns and signage
were the only additions to the
outside.
The interior layout was dri-
ven by the location of existing
entries, plumbing lines and me-
chanical room. The Building
and Zoning offices, which were
formerly in a separate location,
had to be incorporated into the
6,000 SF as did the new council
chambers. In addition, City Hall
personnel wanted individual


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993















offices which precluded the pos-
sibility of an open plan.
The budget prohibited costly
finishes, although porcelain tile
was utilized in the foyer and
public restrooms. Color ap-
peared to be the primary avenue
for significant visual impact.
False, varied-colored beams un-
dulate in the corridor ceiling
and create a procession down to
the City Manager's office. Dry-
wall soffits and other inexpen-
sive elements create interest,
but at the same time, kept the
project within budget. Ceiling
tile with a rose tint, purple and
silver signage and built-in lami-
nate furniture all work to create
a consistent design concept
even though the City is revising
older furniture in many areas.
The City Hall's new persona
is one which reflects the light-
ness and informality of this Cen-
tral Florida seaside community.


Photos, facing page: Before
and after renovation. This page,
lobby, hall and council chamber.
Photos by Linda Dunyan.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993












A Place In The Sun

New Levy Park Swimming
Pool Facility
Tallahassee, Florida

Architect: Manausa & Lewis
Architects, Inc.
Tallahassee, Florida
Principal-in-Charge: C. Trent
Manausa, AIA
Project Architect: Randolph
G. Lewis, AIA
Project Designer: Lawrence
Rubin
Consulting Engineers:
Tomlinson & Associates and
Copeland Engineers
Contractor: Allstate
Construction and Paddock
Pools
Owner: City of Tallahassee
Parks and Recreation
Department

The existing 1950's swimming
. pool and bathhouse complex
was unable to meet accessibility
requirements and building code
criteria and was therefore demol-
ished by the City of Tallahassee
to accommodate a new facility. The
client requested a simple block
building with a tan and brown
color scheme, which had been
the city criterion. The architect
felt this did not provide the best
approach to a stimulating sum-
mer respite and one of the major
design objectives became the
creation of a building which ex-
pressed the excitement of child-
hood.
After convincing the city that
a new approach might succeed,
the design was realized with
children's preferences in mind.
This was accomplished by using
eye catching colors, rough-tex-
tured walls and open breeze-
ways. The designer also endeav-
ored to accommodate adult needs
by providing covered spaces for
parents along the building edge.
To accomplish the goal of
making the building a focal
point of summertime water-ori-
ented community activities, the
new building and pool were
made larger than the original
and a classroom building with


Photos by Randy Lovoy.
FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993

























































considerable storage space was
added. This allowed the Parks
and Recreation Department to
expand its instructional services
and provide storage for various
types of recreational equipment.
Since the pool opened, atten-
dance has increased and hours
of operation have been extend-
ed to accommodate the increased
demand. Most important, how-
ever, is the fact that the building
has helped change a long-stand-
ing attitude toward the value of
thoughtful design of public
recreation buildings.


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1992 ALA/Florida Graphics Awards




This new awards program was implemented to recognize and encourage excellence in graphic communica-
tions in architecture. Entrants were judged on the quality and effectiveness of the graphic design submitted rather
than on the merits of the project it represented. Graphics were judged in the categories of architectural delin-
eations, conceptual sketches and sketch books, renderings, presentation drawings, schematic drawings, working
drawings, diagrams for built and unbuilt projects and business graphics.
The jury for the 1992 program included Joel Fuller of Pinkhaus Design Corporation in Miami, Thomas A.
Spain, Architect, of Miami and Jacques Auger of Jacques Auger Design Associates, Inc. in Coral Gables. The four
graphic designs which were premiated are represented here along with the jury's comments.


Goodland Marina
Artist: Andrea Clark Brown, AIA, with Nancy Sanders, Assistant
Category: Sketches/Renderings
Media: Water soluble crayon on watercolor paper using hand and brush
blending
Jury: "This is an example of a match between the image and the project.
The painting has a similar attitude to the actual building in that it is layered
and textural, ambiguous and deliberately surreal..almost Salvador Dali-like."


Churches of
Europe
Artist: Clyde A.
Brady, Ill, FAIA
Hunton Brady
Pryor Maso Architects,
PA
Category: Travel
sketches
Media: Rapidograph
and ink on board
Jury: "Very interesting
series of sketches.
Admirable draftsman-
ship and commendable
time and energy spent
producing this work.
Architects should be
thinking about market-
ing graphics like this."

Photography by:
Ross-Ehlert


Photography by: Ed Chappell


Annual
Christmas
Poster
Artist: Green Apple
Publishing Co., Inc.
Jennifer Campbell,
Director
Architects Design
Group, Inc.
I.S.K. Reeves, IV,
AIA
Category: Printed
graphics
Media: Full color
commercially printed
Jury: "Good outreach
marketing effort in a
manner that is untradi-
tional for an architec-
ture firm. The poster
does not make it clear
what kind of architec-
ture this firm does, but
it makes one curious.
As an internal tradi-
tion, it must help com-
pany morale. It looks
like a good place to
work."


I


from Architects Design Group


Photography by:
BrosiusPhotography
FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993


Atrium Studies
Artist: Maurizio J. Maso, AIA, Timothy R. Baker, AIA
Hunton Brady Pryor Maso Architects, PA.
Owner: Orlando Utilities Commission
Category: Sketches
Media: Marker and prismacolor pencil on yellow tracing paper
Jury: "This technique has a certain natural friendliness. It is loose, not
harsh, with an element of abstraction. There is a fine art quality present
while still maintaining the architectural detail."

Photography by: Ross-Ehlert


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ravage his home for well over an
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Chapter Design Awards





Orlando Chapter


Honor Award
Disney's Contemporary Resort Meeting Facility
Gwathmey Siegel & Associates, New York


Jury: "Skillfully thought out transition to existing
building. Usually projects of this nature are very
large and overwhelming, but this design reflected
the architect's sensitivity to the human scale. A
simple, sophisticated and polished composition."


Honor Award
Team Disney Office Building
Arata Isozaki & Associates, Tokyo and
Hunton Brady Pryor Maso Architects, Orlando


Jury: "Fantasy architecture at its best The archi-
tect accepted a basic office building program and
created a beacon of quality and imagination.
Superior use of natural light"


Photography by: Esto Photographics Peter Aaron Photography by: Esto Photographics Jeff Goldberg

Merit Award
Orange County Juvenile Justice Center
Hunton Brady Pryor Maso Architects, Orlando 1u,,-+ AV rrl


Merit Award
Disney's Contemporary Resort Hotel Lobby
Daroff Design Inc. and
DDI Architects, Philadelphia


Jury: "Engaging use of form. Lighting design pro-
motes a sense of mystery which is harmonious
with the overall minimalist approach. Very seduc-
tive in its appeal. Color, form and function merge
as one."


Photography by: Esto Photographics


Orlando International Airport Major Expansion
KBJ Architects, Orlando


Jury: "A well-organized, logical and intelligent
plan. The architect expressed sensitivity to the
intention of the program, providing good separa-
tion of public and protected areas. The design
reflects a true sense of civic permanence."

Photography by: Stephen C. Traves


Jury: "In this expansion, one senses an immedi-
ate feeling of futuristic flight, yet the spaces pro-
vide a welcoming to Florida's tropical environ-
ment You know you're not in Kansas anymore."

Photography by: Cheuvront & Associates


W N_.


Merit Award for Unbuilt Projects
The Maso Residence
Hunton Brady Pryor Maso Architects, Orlando


Merit Award for Unbuilt Projects
Orange County Courthouse
Hansen Lind Meyer Inc., Orlando


FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993













Broward Chapter



Award of Excellence
Miles Residence
Robert J. Vick, AIA, Tuthill Vick Architecture


Award of Merit
Poinciana House
William S. Hoffman, Hoffman Arts
and Architecture, with John E.
Meeks, P.E.


Award of Merit
School for the Severely Emotionally Disturbed
Michael A. Shiff & Associates
Designers: Richard Buell, AIA & Lyn Graziani,
FAIA


Jury: "Everything is taut, available to the outside,
beautifully constructed and a wonderful solution."

Photography by: William H. Sanders


Jury: "(This renovation was) done
with style and a real love of details.
The bathroom is a craft, in and of
itself, and the creation of a loggia
is to be applauded."

Photography by: William H. Sanders


Jury: "This project is beautifully handled and very
strong, very well organized."

Photography by: William H. Sanders


Honorable Mention
Deerfield Utilities
Maintenance Facility
Robert McDonald & Associates
Designer: Ronald G. Trebbi, AIA

Photography by: William H. Sanders













I'i t. i i IL
7-_,


Designer: Donald Singer, FAIA


Photography by: William H. Sanders
iPhotography by: William H. Sanders


t..al i.. i.. .i..









Honorable Mention
Sebastian House
William S. Hoffman, Hoffman Arts and
Architecture

Photography by: William H. Sanders


Honorable Mention
Noble House
Terrence O'Connor Architect

Photography by: William H. Sanders

FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1993






VIEWPOINT




Residential Design By Architects...Or By Anyone?
by Nettie Bacle, AIA


Architecture is not a luxury. It
is an essential part of mod-
em living and should be treated
as such. Recent damage to hous-
es in South Florida as a result of
Hurricane Andrew attest to the
fact that residential buildings are
not architecture at all, but are
the work of anyone wishing to
construct a building for human
habitation.
We, as architects, should be
much more concerned with this
much-ignored segment of the
built environment. Why haven't
we been?
One possible answer is that
in Florida "dwellings" for one
and two-family occupancy are
not legally considered architec-
ture and are not required by law
to be designed by a registered
architect. Only recently, and es-
pecially after Hurricane Elena in
1985, have coastal dwellings
been legally elevated to the sta-
tus of architecture. Since then,
by special legislation of the
State of Florida and by criteria
imposed by the Federal Emer-
gency Management Agency, the
construction of dwellings in
coastal areas, those outside the
Coastal Construction Control
Line (CCCL) and those exposed
to wind and flood, require con-
struction documents to be
signed by an architect or an en-
gineer. These critical areas are
rarely easily definable, are con-
stantly changing and their loca-
tions are a mystery to almost
everyone, including some of the
authorities who are supposed to
enforce the building code. First
of all, the CCCL is often shown
as a wavy unsurveyed line on
the plat maps. Also, many laws
relating to residential construc-
tion are ambiguous as to inter-
pretation and lax as to enforce-
ment. Architects and engineers
must spend an inordinate
amount of time trying to resolve
these ambiguities and potential
homeowners do not understand
why the process takes so long.
In Florida, architects are not


employed for the design of most
dwellings and so there is no one
acting on behalf of the home-
owner to see that construction is
in accordance with building
codes and with the eccentrici-
ties of nature. The one excep-
tion might be a concerned build-
ing inspector. In some
jurisdictions, the only inspec-
tions required are for the septic
tank.
Hurricanes are obviously not
the only threat to dwellings. So
are sinkholes, shifting sand, tor-
rential rain, floods and fire, al-
though most of these potential
perils are ignored in residential
design and construction that
does not utilize the services of
an architect. Architects are
trained to address these prob-
lems and their innovative solu-
tions add interest and individual-
ity to the homes that they
design.
The mystery about hiring ar-
chitects to design homes is
shrouded in ignorance about
the services that architects per-
form, in the politics of neglect
and greed and in the time-hon-
ored notion that a man's home
is his castle and he will build it
as he pleases. Unfortunately,
this leaves homeowners with
shoddy construction and many
architects without work. It
seems to take a disaster to
prompt people to ask why build-
ings fall down and who's to
blame. Ironically, much of that
blame is targeted at architects.
Using an architect does not
insure that a house will not fall
down, blow away or fall into a
sinkhole. What it does insure is
that careful attention has been
paid to building codes and local
conditions and that necessary
testing such as soil analysis will
be accomplished before con-
struction begins.
The decision to require ar-
chitects to design dwellings is a
four-sided consideration involv-
ing the homeowner, the contrac-
tor, the building official and the


architect. Each entity has rea-
sons why the services of an ar-
chitect should or should not be
required. The dominant factors
include finances, aesthetics and
public safety and the importance
of each. Above everything else,
however, is the fact that every
house should be safe for human
habitation and suitable to its en-
vironment whether it's a tract
house, a custom-built home or a
prefabricated home.
It must be stated that the
standard AIA agreement forms,
with either the architect or the
contractor, are written with jar-
gon that can be very confusing
to the layman. In addition, most
people are surprised to find
owner responsibilities included
in the contract, a fact which usu-
ally leads to the hiring of an at-
torney to review and explain the
document. An alternative form
of contract, a letter of agree-
ment, is usually drafted by the
architect during the pre-project
phase and he or she is rarely
compensated for the task.
Contractors' attitudes vary
from those who would like to
see architects design everything
they build because it relieves
them of guesswork and prob-
lem-solving and those who think
an architect is merely a nui-
sance. In Florida, the one who
"pulls the permit" is responsible
for the construction and it may
cost the contractor more to do
the job when an architect insists
that all rules are closely fol-
lowed and craftsmanship is ex-
cellent.
Confronted with a situation
in which the contractor tells the
homeowner that architects tend
to over-design everything, the
best solution might be to ask
the homeowner to transfer the
structural and engineering de-
sign contracts to the contractor
and let his engineers sign off on
that part of the work. This re-
moves both fees and responsi-
bilities from the architect and if
the engineer and contractor are


reasonable people, they usually
try to follow the architect's con-
ceptual design and even assist
in locating materials and work-
ing out construction details in
the field. When an architect is
not hired for the bidding and
construction phases of the pro-
ject, a trustworthy contractor is
an asset to the architect because
of their mutual interest in pleas-
ing the homeowner and comply-
ing with codes. Experienced
contractors are well aware of the
services an architect performs
and they seem to appreciate the
expertise they bring to the pro-
ject.
While most public authori-
ties appreciate the efforts which
architects make on behalf of
guarding the public safety, their
politics often disagree when it
comes to hiring architects to de-
sign residences. The disagree-
ment seems to stem from the
fact that they feel it is one more
expense that has to be borne by
the homeowner and might pre-
vent the construction of an oth-
erwise affordable home. Howev-
er, in the aftermath of a tragedy
like Hurricane Andrew, these
same authorities seem to be-
lieve that the expertise of an ar-
chitect or an engineer should be
required for residential design.
Abundant opportunities for infe-
rior work exist in many places
where there is not a qualified
building official to perform thor-
ough building inspections.
Where no such person exists,
the homeowner is left with the
responsibility for monitoring
construction.
While residential design
might be very rewarding to a
number of architects, it seems
that most of Florida's housing
design is in high risk locations
that are subject to severe storm
damage. The cost of liability in-
surance can be prohibitive, the
reliability of insurers can be
questionable and homeowners
do not want to pay for this insur-
ance if it is outside the normal

FLORIDA ARCHITECT February 1992












architectural fee. Because resi-
dences are small in scale yet
have the same components as
larger buildings, the documents
required are extensive relative
to the cost of the project and to
the fees that homeowners are
willing to pay. All of this com-
bines to make it too expensive
for an architect to specialize in
residential design. This can be
particularly devastating to fe-
male architects who have tradi-
tionally been edged out of com-
mercial architecture, but would
be able to sustain a practice in
residential design. On the flip
side of the issue is the fact that
it is not profitable for architects
to design residences as part of a
general practice because they
are so time-consuming.
If there were a law passed
whereby more types of resi-
dences were designed by archi-
tects, the design and permitting
process would need to be
streamlined and some consider-
ation given to the liability risks
facing architects. There is no
logical reason why an architect
should be responsible for a pro-
ject for fifteen years. Manufac-
turers of the various building
components have very short
warranty periods on their prod-
ucts and the contractors who
construct the buildings are
mostly free of responsibility
within a year of building com-
pletion.
The point is that all four peo-
ple involved must realize that ar-
chitects make an important con-
tribution to residential design
just as they do to commercial
and institutional design. So long
as government does not legally
require architects to design
homes, the homeowners, con-
tractors and public authorities
will continue to have a dimin-
ished respect for the architect's
role. In order to revamp the sys-
tem to make it practical for
these changes to occur, the
whole process of designing and
building homes needs to be sim-
plified, from permitting to code
enforcement to insurance.


Florida

Architect

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your firm and
your firm's logo.

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Circle 9 on Reader Inquiry Card


DESIGN SECURITY
INTO YOUR BUILDING!
Atlas Safety & Security Design,
Inc. is a full service, independent,
non-vested security consulting firm
servicing architects, private sector,
and government agencies. We de-
sign systems for intrusion detection,
perimeter protection, weapons
screening, electronic and detention
locking systems, access control,
communications, ADA barrier free
accessibility features, criminal jus-
tice facility programming, and Crime
Prevention Through Environmental
Design. (CPTED).
We conduct vulnerability/risk and
threat analysis in order to develop
security systems drawings, speciica-
tions, bid documents. We also con-
duct shop drawing review, installa-
tion supervision, and cost estimates.
When it comes to security design,
architects turn to

A
ATLAS
SAFETY&
SECURITYDESIGN

For more information and qualifi-
cations, contact:
Randall Atlas, Ph.D., AIA, CPP
1 Palm Bay Court
Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 756-5027
FAX: (305) 754-1658
1-800-749-6029
Circle 19 on Reader Inquiry Card


Loosen

Up.
That File Drawer
And Trash
Outdated AIA
Documents.
Call Us For An
Up-To-Date List
And Supply.





Florida Association/
American Institute
of
Architects
Marianne Jensen
(904) 222-7590

































Just the way you pictured it.

From concept to construction, you never
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You know how every finished detail should
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Circle 29 on Reader Inquiry Card


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