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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00279
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November-December 1989
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00279
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertising
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text












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Features


November/December, 1989
Vol. 36, No. 6


Florida Architect. Official Journal of the
Florida Association of the American Institute
of Architects, is owned and published by the
Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. ISSN-0015-3907. It is published six
times a year at the Executive Office of the
Association, 104 East Jefferson St., Tallahas-
see. Florida 32302. Telephone (904) 222-7590.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the FA/AIA. Editorial
material may be reprinted only with the ex-
press permission of Florida Architect.
Single copies. $4.00; Annual subscription.
$19.08. Third class postage.


Tallahassee's Government Center
Comes Full Circle 1:
The Leon County Courthouse is Barrett Daffin and Carlan's classical
response to a contemporary dilemma of combining public offices with
justice facilities.
Marty Gridley and Diane Greer

At Epping Forest, New Design
Pays Homage To The Old 14
Pappas Associates has restored the Alfred I. duPont home to its original
grandeur.
Diane D. Greer

The Evolutionary Chair 1!
Carlo Scarpa designs a chair for the future.

Futuristic Lasers Beckon A Return To The City 2(
Miami's Bayfront Park is a showcase for a spectacular laser display.
Colleen Logan

A Slice of White Cuts Tallahassee's Skyline 2:
The Florida Department of Education building is the latest addition
to Tallahassee's highrise Capital Center.
Diane D. Greer


1989 Award of Honor For Design 2(
Jacksonville architectRobert C. Broward, AIA, has devoted
his career to design excellence that stands the test oftime.


Departments
Editorial 5
News/Letters
Chapter News
Office Practice Aids 29
Code Changes Affect Stair Design: Watch Your Step
Randall I. Atlas, Ph.D., AIA, CPPI











Cover photo of interior of Epping Forest Yacht Club in Jacksonville by Dan Forer.
Architect: Pappas Associates, Architects, Inc.









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FLORIDAARCHITECT EDITORIAL



Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Poet Office Box 10388
'allahassee, Florida 32302


Publisher/Ezcutive Vice President
George A. Allen, CAE
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertisin
Carolyn Maryland
Design and Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Printing
Boyd Brothers Printers
Publiations Committee
Ivan Johnson, AIA, Chairman
Gene Leedy, AIA
Will Morris, AIA
Keith Bailey, AIA
Don Sackman, AIA
Editorial Board
Ivan Johnson, AIA
Dave Fronczak, AIA
Roy Knight, AIA
President
H. Dean Rowe, FAIA
100 Madison Street
T'mnpa, Florida 33602
ice President/President-elect
Larry Schneider, AIA
25Seabreeze
Delray Beach, Florida 33483
Secretaryrneasu
Bruce Balk, AIA
290 Coconut Avenue
Sarasota, Florida 33577
Past President
John P. Ehrig, AIA
4625 East Bay Drive, Suite 221
Clearwater, Florida 34624
Regional Directors
John M. Barley, AIA
5346 Ortega Boulevard
Jacksonville, Florida 32210
James A. Greene, FAIA
254 Plaza Drive
P.O. Box 1147
Oviedo, Florida 32765
Vice President for
Professional Society
Raymond L. Scott, AIA
601 S. Lake Destiny Road, Suite 400
Maitland, Florida 32571
Vice President for
Governmental Relations
Rudolph Arsenicos, AIA
2560 RCA Boulevard, Suite 106
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410
Vice President for
Profesional Development
John Tice, AIA
909 E. Cervantes
Pensacola, Florida 32501
Vice President for
Public Relatons/Communicatons
Henry C. Alexander, AIA
Smith Korach Hayet Haynie
175 Fontainbleau Road
Miami, Florida 33172


n early June, I visited the campus of the University of Virginia for the first time. It
was an important experience that I'd put off for too long. After leaving Charlot-
tesville, I drove further into the mountains to Oakhurst Farm near White Sulphur Springs,
West Virginia. I remained there at my uncle's farm for several wonderful days of cool
mountain air and relaxation. While I rested and read, I heard persistent stories about the
man who'd been a guest at Oakhurst the preceding week. That man, as described by my
uncle, was the enigmatic, white-haired Dan Kiley.
Dan Kiley is a legend, I'd have to say. He is probably the best known living landscape
architect. He received his education at Harvard and earned the Legion of Merit from the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the design and construction of the Nuremberg trials
courtroom. His career spans fifty years and includes collaborations with Eero Saarinen,
I.M. Pei and Kevin Roche.
When I expressed interest in hearing about Kiley, I was given a large stack of reading
material which I tackled vigorously. I wanted to know more about the man whose most
famous quote is, "I like to step lightly on this earth."
One of the most interesting articles I read during my mountain retreat was the transcript
of a University of Virginia seminar entitled "A Dialogue on Design Theory." The text of
that seminar, which featured Dan Kiley as one of a distinguished panel of architects and
landscape architects, has been published in a number of professional journals, and for good
reason. His words show great insight into the practice of architecture, as well as landscape
architecture. With the permission of the School of Architecture at the University of
Virginia, I have reproduced one little anecdote:
"I like to travel lightly, step lightly on this earth. I like as Henry David Thoreau said,
to live in a tent, as it were, in this world, hitting only the high points. I leave the low,
katabatic valleys to the regional planners and ecologists, since they insist on staying in
those dammed-up areas, and I propose that the one good thing Olmstead said was
"aptness" things should be apt, appropriate."
Having just visited the University of Virginia, I was interested in reading Kiley's
thoughts on the subject of Jefferson's lawn. Clearly, Kiley feels that Jefferson's lawn is
extremely apt, but that it got closed off by the small thinking of McKim, Meade and White,
who put a building at the end which is below ground level as you look across the lawn. The
building stopped the movement out into nature that Jefferson wanted. Their work was not
apt- not appropriate to Jefferson's design and not a solution that any Beaux-Arts designer
would accept.
In retrospect, the 1989 Awards For Excellence in Architecture produced fourteen proj-
ects which a distinguished jury considered "apt" to the geography of Florida. For the most
part, the winning projects glisten white on the landscape in reaction to either a harsh cli-
mate or an unwieldy terrain. The buildings appear to be "cool" distractions from the hustle
and bustle of daily life in the tropics. Much of what the jury seemed to see as excellence
in Florida architecture was this year keyed to climatic considerations. All of the winning
projects, with the exception of one in Atlanta, are located south of Tampa, and for
that clime, they are apt. I only regret that nothing was selected that is apt to the other
one-half of the state. DG


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989







NEWS


ATTENTION: Archi-
tects Working on State
Facilities

The Division of Cultural Af-
fairs reminds architects working
on State facilities to keep in mind
the Art in State Buildings Program
through which artwork is acquired
for office buildings and state uni-
versities. Established in 1979, the
program allows up to one-half of
one percent of the construction
appropriation for a facility to be
allocated for the purchase or
commission of artwork. The works
are to be displayed only in spaces
that are accessible to the public.
Artists are solicited by local
user-based selection committees,
which include the project archi-
tect as a voting member. Follow-
ing presentation of site-specific
proposals, committee recommen-
dations are forwarded to the Flor-
ida Arts Council for approval.
Administered by the Division
of Cultural Affairs, the program
has to date acquired over four
hundred artworks at more than
ninety sites around the state. The
collection ranges from monumen-
tally scaled exterior sculptures by


internationally recognized artists
to small scale prints, drawings and
photographs by emerging artists.
For information about the pro-
gram, contact the Department of
State, Division of Cultural Affairs,
The Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-0250 or phone (904) 487-
2980.

"The Art of
Architecture"
Exhibit Open

Until November 15, an exhibit
entitled "The Art of Architecture"
will be on display at the Cason
Cottage Museum in Delray Beach.
The exhibit will include sketches,
renderings, models and drawings
illustrating the role architecture
has played in the development of
South Florida.
The exhibit will include dis-
plays depicting "Lost Delray", "The
Spanish Style", "Resort Life", "Art
Deco Architecture" and "The
Contemporary Collection."
The exhibit hours are 10:00
AM to 3:00 PM, Tuesday through
Saturday at the Cason Cottage
Museum on Northeast First Street
in Delray Beach.


At the 1989 FAIAIA Fall Convention which was held at the Boca Raton Hotel and
Club in September, H. Dean Rowe, FAIA, presented the Award of Honorfor
Design to Robert C. Broward, AIA, for the high quality of his design work over a
long period of time. (See the story on page 26). The Award of Honorfor Design is
the highest award the FAIAIA presents in recognition of design excellence.


University News....from
the University of Flor-
ida...

The highest paid and best edu-
cated Floridians prefer not to live
in either the state's small cities or
its suburbs, a UF study has found.
The study, based on a random
telephone survey, asked Floridi-
ans where they would prefer to
live if they had to relocate. While
attitudes about urban life varied,
the downtown of major cities were
preferred over the downtown of
small cities by people in all in-
come and education categories.
Those people with incomes at the
high end of the spectrum, $25,000
to $45,000 and over, showed the
strongest preference for big-city
urban life.
The study also showed a marked
distaste for the suburbs. The sub-
urbs were less popular than the
downtown of major cities
like Tampa and Miami. What
respondents in all categories fa-
vored were rural and semirural
locations.
In a rural environment, both
high and low income households
can trade off urban services for
more land, less congestion and
lower taxes, and rural life often
provides an alternative to unavail-
able, unaffordable suburban hous-
ing.

from the University of
Miami...
"More than any other single
feature of the twentieth century,
the roadway corridors of a city
reveal the particular character of
the community." Gary Greenan,
an architecture professor at the
University of Miami further adds
that the character they most often
reveal is ugliness and the viewer
responds with disappointment,
frustration and confusion. The
ugliness may be nothing more than
confused signage, uninspired archi-
tecture, lack of landscaping and a
general disregard for environmental
quality.
After a study of the road corri-
dors of Dade County, Florida,


Greenan has proposed solutions
that are applicable to the streets of
any city. Some of his principles
relate to architectural continuity,
trees (which he calls the basic
element of urban design), clearly
defined street edges for safety and
clarity, controlled signage, ade-
quate street furniture and lights.



William T. Arnett Passes

William T. Arnett, who served
on the University of Florida's
architecture faculty for 28 years,
died in May from complications
due to heart failure. He was 83.
He became professor of archi-
tecture at the University of Florida
in 1946 and served as the Dean of
the College of Architecture and
Fine Arts from 1946 56. He
retired as Professor Emeritus in
1974.


Correx

The following credits were
deleted from the Unbuilt Design
Awards description of Bay Plaza
Waterfront Retail District which
appeared in the July issue of FA.
Our apologies to those who were
inadvertently deleted.

Plaza Concept Architect:
Linscott Haylett Wimmer & Wheat
Kansas City, Missouri
Urban Planner: BRW
Phoenix, Arizona
Research/Economist:
GA Partners
Coral Gables, Fl
Local and Historic Specialist:
Willingham & Associates
St. Petersburg, Fl
Landscape and Cityscape
Specialist: Phil Graham & Co.
St.Petersburg, Fl
The photo of Arquitectonica's
Banco de Credito in Lima, Peru,
which appeared on the cover of the
September/October, 1989 issue of
FA was by Timothy Hursley, as
were all of the interior shots of that
building. In the section featuring
Arquitectonica's Miracle Center, all
photos were by Patricia Fisher.


FLORIDA ARCHTECT November/December 1989






LETTERS


Dear Editor:
It would be foolish of me to at-
tempt to match rhetorical wits with
Bob Segrest. Indeed, his "mapping
of the common ground" article is
eloquent and, on first reading, got
all of my "warm and fuzzy" juices
flowing.
Unfortunately, his premise that
"If [Architecture] has become a sec-
ondary service profession, less and
less able to maintain the tradition of
architecture as a cultural art" is, in
my opinion 180 off course and
prompts me to wonder just what
type of vacuum he must be living
in up there in Gatorland. What I'm
observing today, not just in the
glossy mags or the work of a few
"superstars," is an incredible in-
crease in the level of quality and so-
phistication of built work all around
us. One need look no further than
the 1989 FA/AIA Awards for Excel-
lence in Architecture (same issue,
next article, September/October
1989 FloridaArchitect) to find four-
teen such examples. In fact, there
were a total 169 submittals and it
would be my guess that well over
half could be considered "able to
maintain the tradition of architec-
ture as a cultural art."
But even more important, and
certainly at the very heart of the de-
bate to which he makes reference
is his implication that architecture
as a service profession is perhaps
less than a proper attitude or some-
how beneath our dignity as archi-
tects; that what we really should be
doing out here in the trenches is prac-
ticing architecture as some sort of
an art form. How naive!
If the University of Florida De-
partment of Architecture is not fo-
cusing its attention upon the prag-
matics of training its students to
become "good architects," I'm afraid
it's missing the whole point. Almost
without exception, students in our
universities and colleges today, be
they students of architecture, busi-
ness, medicine, law, or whatever,
are there primarily to develop the
skills necessary for them to be able
to matriculate into the work place
and become viable wage earners
and productive members of society.
As architects, that equates first and
foremost to providing competent
professional service to our clients.


If that happens to include the oppor- tent product to them, all in the face
tunity to advance the tradition of of the myriad bureaucratic and reg-
architecture as a cultural art, that's ulatory constraints that lie in our
just great, but first and foremost is paths.
the responsibility and obligation to The message that's being sent
serve the needs (and wishes) of our from the profession to Mr. Segrest
clients, to meet their budgets and and his academic colleagues is a
timelines, and to deliver a compe- plea for his program to provide for


its graduates the tools of competence
and attitudes of professional re-
sponsibility so critically needed in
our profession today. That message
either isn't being heard or maybe it
simply isn't being understood.


D.E. Holmes, FAIA


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT Novbr/December 1989






CHAPTER NEWS





It's For The Birds


n April, 1989, the Palm Beach
Chapter of the Society of Archi-
tectural Administrators sponsored a
birdhouse design competition for
Palm Beach County architects. The
objective was to encourage design
excellence and to design a birdhouse
for native Florida wild birds.
The winner of the $100 prize was
Betsy Rossin, AIA, of Omura Casey,
Inc. in North Palm Beach.
She describes her design:
The prototypical lifeguard station
provides the inspiration for "The
Perch," a birdhousefor wild, native
birds. The lifeguard station embodies
the protective qualities f shelter and
offers a unique, voyeuristic vantage
point. This elevated Bird Nesting
Proper provides safety from land
and creatures.
The structure is superimposed
against a lattice work of nature-
oriented themes. Silhouettes of palm
fronds, branches, clouds and gras-
ses are symbolic of the interdepen-
dence of birds and nature. The na-
ture-oriented "screens" allow for
ventilation, while protecting the
birds from potential predators.
The colorful canvas canopy is a
tribute to the water-oriented envi-
ronment and associated homosa-
pien's sun-shaded canopies.
Nofeatheredfriend would be sat-
isfied without a nearby birdbath
and this scheme incorporates one
at the front door.
While "The Perch" is constructed
of wood structural members and
exterior grade plywood, the bird-
bath incorporates a waterproof
membrane.
Betsy Rossin attended the Geor-
gia Institute of Technology and is a
graduate of the University of Miami
School of Architecture. She has been
with the firm of Omura Casey, Inc.
for six months and was the winner
of the 1988 design competition for
the Palm Beach Chapter AIA's chap-
ter poster.
Entries were judged by the win-
ners of the 1988 Palm Beach Chap-
ter AIA Design Awards represented


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by Currie Schneider Associates
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AIA and Barretta & Associates.
Their decision was unanimous, cit-
ing her attention to detail and imag-
inative concept.


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989










Broward County Chapter AIA Student Design Competition


Each year, the Broward County
Chapter of the American Institute
of Architects (BCC/AIA) and the
School Board of Broward County
sponsor an architectural design
competition for students through-
out the public school system. The
competition has traditionally been
open to any student in grades K
through 12, in Vo-Tech or Adult
Education or in Broward Commu-
nity College.
Students prepare their designs
from a program issued early in the
school year and they submit re-
quired drawings based upon the
student's age group. Work on the
competition entries is completed
in the student's art, drafting or
vocational arts classes as part of
the regular class assignment. In
instances where the curriculum
schedule does not allow classroom
participation, students may pre-
pare entries on their own time.
Each student design is pre-judged
at the school level. The best of
these entries is submitted for county-
wide judging by a select group of
architects, chosen from the local
chapter of the AIA. Entries com-
pete to win either first, second,
third or honorable mention awards.
Cash prizes are made to the win-
ners according to a prize schedule
ranging from $10 to $100.
The Grand Prize Winner of the
competition is chosen from the
high school level entrants. The
winning high school entrant re-
ceives a paid scholarship (includ-
ing room, tuition, board and a sti-
pend to offset other costs) to at-
tend the University of Florida's
Summer Design Exploration. This
intense program, conducted by the
College of Architecture allows
prospective students to see first-
hand the rigors and rewards of
studying and practicing architec-
ture. Many of the participants sent
to the Design Exploration have
gone on to further their architec-
tural studies.


A SO S COMPLEX
1989 STUDENT COMPETITION
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UPOYVnr .:OUrIT I ,CHTE,,
AMERhCtN 04STIYUTE OC F Ar,,TECTI
I THE sc0,cs:.i. U.ARD OLF BF,:,'*kfD T-rN r


Above, the poster designed to promote the 1989 Broward Student Design Competition. Below, left: 1stplace winner in Grades 2-3
was Michael Gonzalez. Below, right: 1st place winner in high school category was Troy Barnes. Photos courtesy of Broward Chap-
ter/AIA.

THE BARNES SPORTS COMPLEX


a


The Student Design Competi-
tion has grown over the years,
becoming more popular with both
students and teachers. The Stu-
dent Design Committee, composed
jointly of AIA members and edu-
cators, is striving to improve and
enlarge the program. One idea
that has been put forth is that the
Student Program be conducted at a
statewide level and administered
by the FA/AIA.
In concert with the Student
Design Competition, the Commit-


tee is encouraging local architects
to become more active in support-
ing the schools by participating in
career days. Additionally, more
local practitioners are participat-
ing in the "Partners in Excellence"
program, where architects are asked
to promote education by sharing
their expertise with students. To
allow students a firsthand expo-
sure to the daily practice of archi-
tecture, members of the Student
Design Committee are working to
create and implement a "Mentor


Program" where high school and
older students would be placed
with an architectural firm in an
observing and learning role.
Overall, the Student Design
Competition gives many students
that first exposure to architecture
and design. Members of the Brow-
ard County Chapter/AIA hope that
the lessons that participating stu-
dents learn will help them to look
at cities, buildings and even their
own homes with new and better
understanding.


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Tallahassee's Government Center Comes Full Circle


Leon County Courthouse
Tallahassee, Florida


Architect/Engineer: Barrett
Daffin and Carlan, Inc.,
Tallahassee
Architect/Director: C. Ernest
Daffin, AIA
Architect/Principal-in-Charge of
Design: Warren A. Emo, AIA
Collaborating Architect: Craig
Huffman, AIA. H'
Production Architect: Pat Hoy,
AIA
Production Manager: Buster
Carter
Structural Engineers: Donovan- .
Norris, P.E., Emmett Anderson,
P.E.
Mechanical/Electrical Engineers:
Newcomb & Boyd, Inc.
Interior Design: Mike Dudek,
Bobby Johnston, Barry Gardebled,
Barbara Vallella
Construction Administration:
Barrett Daffin and Carlan, Inc.
Keith McVicar, P.E., Bill Moore,
Dave Wronski
Construction Manager: Gilbane/
Culpepper Joint Venture


P philosophically and aestheti-
cally, the Leon County i,
Courthouse is the crowning jewel
in a triad of public buildings that
mark the focus of Tallahassee's
government center. The Florida
Capitol and the Tallahassee City
Hall are both on axis with the new
courthouse and all three occupy
historic downtown city blocks.
The design concept for the E .
courthouse respects the formal
five-square organization of the
Original Town Plan for Tallahas- .
see. Through careful planning on
the part of Barrett Daffin and
Carlan, an historically significant
dialogue was established between
the three buildings. The integra-
tion of new architecture into the
Old Town Plan was an attempt on
the part of the architects to
resurrect the symbolic government
center of the city, the county and
the state.
The program for the court-
house called for consolidating the


























E-4

























Leon County Commission, county
constitutional offices, circuit and
county court system and ancillary
departments into approximately
270,000 square feet of integrated
county government and justice
system facilities. In addition, the
program specified parking for 525
cars. The design of the building
was significantly complicated by
the fact that the site parameters
include six majestic live oak trees
and an existing courthouse annex
located in the northeast corner.


Opposite page, view ofplaza showing
arcade that connects justice section of
building with county offices on the
north. This page, top: Exploded
axonometric ofcourthouse showing the
three primary axes and the vertical
hierarchy of the rotunda and light
court and the different scale and mate-
rials of the enclosure. Drawing by
Craig Huffman, AIA. Left, photo of
east facade by Gary Knight. Parking
for 525 cars is below ground.












































The design of the courthouse 1 .. .
was an intricate and intelligently _; 3 --.
thought out process based not only. : . -
on client imperatives, but on a io^..
thorough knowledge of classical -
architecture and the importance of =- == ,
public buildings within the context -L ..
of the city. While the overall
massing and geometry of the .-
building are not strictly classical,
the vocabulary is. The architec- 4 ,
tural vocabulary includes the :
contextual and symbolic elements ( -
of a rough granite base from which "
a series of limestone colonnades
rise. The wrap of emerald green
glass at the uppermost level is
symbolic of Leon County's --
abundant "greenness". The L s
composition of the building, with
its rhythmical loggia of classical [ i '
proportions and the tripartite base, ,' -J
colonnade and epistyle, strives to
make a monumental statement .
while presenting an inviting quality ----- -- .. -
to the user. .. ..........
The paradox of housing a
friendly, public service-oriented






county government in the same
building with a formal, highly
symbolic justice facility was
handled by designing a dualistic
structure. The justice center
occupies the south half of the
building and it has its own rather
monumental entrance. As the
visitor passes through a flagcourt
and "ascends to justice" by
mounting a grand stair at the south
end of the building, he enters an
atrium which is open to the sky.
The scale at this end of the
building is rather grander than that
of the north end which is occupied
by county offices. The north half
of the building is composed of
space that belongs "to the people"
and its scale is very human and
relates to the pedestrian.
On both the interior and the ex-
terior of the courthouse, the square
is the geometry used throughout.
The architects felt that Tallahas-
see's rhythm of grid-patterned
streets, parks and city blocks could
be mathematically interpreted in
the courthouse in a very clear way.
The foursquare motif was carried
out in tremendous detail and can be
seen in every aspect of the building
from railings to door handles. The
interior color scheme is buff, russet
and teal, but the predominant color
throughout is green.
There are ten courtrooms in the
justice section of the building with
a hallway behind so that the judges
may come and go from their
offices. The prison holding facility
rises through the core of the
building and provides exits to
courtrooms on either side. A long
hall/lobby connects the justice
section with the other public
sections of the building. The
County Commission chamber and
the commissioner's offices are lo-
cated in the north end of the
building. The offices are situated
in an arc pattern around the central
commission chamber for easy
access. Diane D. Greer and Marty
Gridley

Marty Gridley is a Tallahassee
writer specializing in architecture.


/


I

u


:~J~


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989


-tBV /,(c


Opposite page, top: View from court-
house looking south shows its juxta-
position on axis with the Florida
Capitol. Bottom: Plaza level plan cour-
tesy ofBarrett, Daffin & Carlan. This
page, top: Preliminary sketch by col-
laborating architect Craig Huffinan.
Bottom left: Secondfloor, justice end,
overlooking atrium. Bottom right:
County Commission Chamber. Note
glass blocks in floor. All photos by
Gary Knight.








At Epping Forest, New Design Pays Homage To The Old



Epping Forest Yacht Club
Jacksonville, Florida



Architect: Pappas Associates,
Architects, Inc.
Jacksonville, Florida
Landscape Architect: R. Glen
Mitchell and Associates
Interior Designer: Catlin
Interiors, Inc.
Owner: Gate Petroleum
Company
Construction Manager: The
Stellar Group, Inc.


E pping Forest, has a long
colorful history beginning
with its 1926 construction by
Alfred I. duPont as his Florida
home. Built on six lots along the
St. John's River, the mansion
was designed by Jacksonville
architect Harold Saxelbye. The
Mediterranean-style building is
mixed with Gothic, Spanish
Renaissance and Baroque
influences, all of which were
popular in Florida at the time.
At the same time the house
was being built, the grounds
were being laid out by the
famous landscape architect Dr.
Harold H. Hume, Dean Emeritus
of the College of Architecture at
the University of Florida. The
large formal garden is a replica
of traditional English gardens
and the garden's fountain
features native Florida wildlife,
including alligators and frogs.
The trustees of the duPont
Estate sold Epping Forest in



Egypt used the home as the site
for a summit meeting.
In 1983, the mansion and sur-
rounding grounds were pur-
chased by Gate Petroleum
Company. Their goal was to
renovate the mansion and build a
residential community that would
preserve the natural beauty of the
area.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989








For architect Ted Pappas, the
design problem was to convert an
eclectic Mediterranean Revival
mansion into a clubhouse and
dining facility for a new yacht
club that would serve the
residential community. The
adaptive reuse of the mansion
required the addition of fire
stairs, mechanical systems and
covered dining areas to meet the
requirements of the new building
function and to bring the historic
structure into compliance with
current design and life safety
codes.
All of the new work was
carefully integrated with Harold
Saxelbye's existing architecture
so it did not jeopardize the
innate quality of the original
construction. The new work was
clearly identified as such
through the use of contemporary
materials. However, the new
work pays homage to the old by
using the same architectural
idioms employed by Saxelbye in
a contemporary, simple and
understated way.
The terrace dining addition is
light, delicate and clearly identi-
fied as new. The roof is shaped
to continue the profile of arched
openings which separate the ad-
dition from the historic struc-
ture. The walls of the addition
are made of glass to enhance the
ambience of the formal gardens
and to provide a simple ac-
knowledgement of the impor-
tance of the river to the site.
Located just to the north of
the renovated mansion is the
new fitness center and pool, also
designed by Pappas. This
building is adjacent to the
renovated Wheel House, which
duPont used to maintain water
pressure for the mansion and
grounds. The new construction is
in keeping with, and respectful
of, the original building. It
includes a Nautilus-equipped
gym, four swimming pools, four
lighted tennis courts, spa facili-
ties and jogging trails.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989


In all instances, the work
undertaken at Epping Forest
acknowledges the importance of
complimenting the beauty and
elegance of Harold Saxelbye's
historic Mediterranean Revival
residence. Diane D. Greer


















Opposite page, top: TheAlfred l.
duPont home, Epping Forest, as con-
structed in 1926. Below: New fitness
center and pool which adjoins the man-
sion. Photos by Bob Braun. This page,
top: Interior of renovated mansion,
now used as a yacht club. Photo by
Dan Forer. Below: Site plan, courtesy
of Pappas Architects.










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The Evolutionary Chair


F lorida architect Lawrence
Scarpa begins a description of
The Evolutionary Chair which he
and Michael Orth designed, with a
quote by the seventeenth century
German philosopher Frederick
Kiesler. "Our western world,"
wrote Kiesler, "has been overrun
by masses of art objects. What we
really need are not more and more
objects, but an objective."
The Evolutionary Chair had an
objective. Scarpa felt that he had to
express the entire history of "chair-
ness" in his design in order to give
fresh meaning to the simple act of
sitting down. Anything less, he
felt, would have been inadequate.
In his own words, Scarpa feels
that the real dynamism of a chair
derives from the fact that this "ob-
ject of art was inspired by the most
relevant and obtainable materials
that transcended the journey be-
tween work and sleep. The evo-
lution of rest gave birth to a con-
ceptually radical alternative known
as the chair."
Today technology continues to
dominate the chair. Diverse and in-
triguing materials have been bent,
twisted, molded and beat into
masses of what Scarpa feels are
"benign objects seemingly void of
a true objective."
The object of The Evolutionary
Chair is to return to meaning
through collective reflex. It is a nar-
rative describing the evolution of
the chair from its most primitive
form to its most technological
counterpart.
Scarpa's chair rests on a smooth
concrete stone. The crude base sup-
ports a finely crafted, hinged and
folding wooden back and a welded
metal swivel seat of stainless steel
mesh. The primitiveness of the
concrete chunk contrasts with the
subtlety of the wooden joinery and
the high tech gloss of the steel seat.
Diane D. Greer


"At first, it (the chair) was as simple as
a tree or the cave wall against the bar-
ren earth, then a welcome rock or log
followed by a cultivated stone or a
carved timber. As technology increased, -
so did the sophistication of the chair.
The evolution was directly proportional
to the construction and the limits of its
resistance." Carlo Scarpa.


:---?









Futuristic Lasers Beckon A Return To The City



Bayfront Park Tower of Light
Miami, Florida


Sculptor: Isamu Noguchi
New York, New York
Laser Artist: Dick Sandhaus
New York, New York
Design Architects: Fuller &
Sadao
Long Island City, New York
On-Site Architects: Pancoast
& Albaisa
Miami, Florida
Landscape Architects:
Seymour Henderson Rosenberg
Scully
South Miami, Florida
Structural Engineer:
DeZarraga & O'Donnell
Coral Gables, Florida
Lighting Designer:
Fisher-Marantz
New York, New York


T traditionally, a lighthouse
on the bay is a beacon in
the darkness, safely lighting the
course for ships and sailors
returning to their home port.
Now, a futuristic light tower
illuminates the route to down-
town Miami and beckons
tourists, suburbanites and natives
to return to the city. This
modem interpretation of form
and light is Miami's Bayfront
Park Tower of Light and it's the
first time that a municipality in
Florida has ever commissioned
the use of lasers in a permanent
installation, and as large-scale
public art.
The tower officially opened
on April 16, 1989. The struc-
ture was designed by the late
Japanese-American sculptor
Isamu Noguchi, who collabo-
rated with American laser artist
Dick Sandhaus to incorporate
lasers into the design. Now the
Tower is the centerpiece of
Bayfront Park, which Noguchi
also designed, and it is an
obvious lure for attracting
Miamians to the Park.
The total height of the Tower
of Light is 88 feet and it stands
at the midpoint of the Park


between Biscayne Boulevard and
the Bay. Rising 64 feet from the
base are two concentric concrete
cylinders. A slender white
column at the center is sur-
rounded by a 22-foot diameter
cylinder painted a dark eggplant
color. Crowning the entire
sculpture is a 24-foot tall white
concrete fin. Lighting instru-
ments mounted between the
tower's two cylinders illuminate
the interior column, leaving the
outer tower dark. A complete
circle cut in the western side and
a semi-circle sliced from the
eastern exposure reveal the
tower glowing from within.
Within and atop this
sculpture, powerful argon lasers
were mounted. Turquoise laser
beams streak from the tower,


visible from five to 10 miles
away depending on the weather.
The laser equipment was
manufactured and installed by
Sandhaus' company, Science
Faction Corporation. The
Science Faction "Laseriter"
computer controls the lasers and
the architectural lighting
systems. A perpetual clock
inside the computer automati-
cally cues the 20-minute laser
performances which begin at the
top of each hour. Each night at
dusk, light washes the inner
tower in a warm glow and then,
once per hour, the two argon
lasers begin their show. The
first laser is mounted high off
the ground and projects beams
360 degrees. The second laser is
mounted 12 feet above the


ground which allows visitors to
experience it intimately and this
laser raises and lowers a series
of "laser ceilings" over Bayfront
Park's rock garden many times
during the nightly performances.
Colleen Logan
The Tower of Light stands at the mid-
point of the Bayfront Park between
Biscayne Boulevard and the bay. Ris-
ing 64feetfrom the base are two con-
centric concrete cylinders. Crowning
the entire sculpture is a 24-foot tall
white concrete fin. Lighting instru-
ments mounted between the Tower's
two cylinders illuminate the interior
column, leaving the outer tower dark.
A complete circle cut in the eastern
side and a semi-circle sliced from the
eastern exposure reveal the Tower
glowing from within, a symbol of the
new Bayfront Park. Photos by Tetsu
Okuhora.


November/December 1989








A Slice of White Cuts Tallahassee's Skyline



The Florida Department of
Education Building
Tallahassee, Florida

Architect: Jim Roberson &
Associates, Tallahassee
Principal-in-Charge:
Jim Roberson, AIA
Project Manager:
Bobby Cresap, AIA
Design Consultant: The
Architect's Collaborative, Inc.
Cambridge, MA
Principal-in-Charge: Perry
Neubauer
Director, Division of Building
Construction, Dept. of General
Services: Bob Boerema, FAIA
Structural Engineer: Smith,
Hardaker, Huddleston & Collins
Mechanical/Electrical Engi-
neer: Hines, Hartman &
Associates
Landscape Architect: The
Architect's Collaborative, Inc.
Owners: Florida Department of
General Services
Contractor: Barton Malow/ -4i- r'
J. Kinson Cook

_( ----




F rom the south, the sight of
nineteen stories of blade
thin architecture rising from the
edge of Tallahassee's Capital
Center is impressive. This "slice
of white" is the new Department
of Education building, Tallahas-
see's newest highrise and
unquestionably the most
progressive new state building to
appear in Tallahassee's Capital
Center.
The evolution of the design
was unusual. After a two-day
planning session behind closed
doors, Tallahassee architect Jim
Roberson and TAC architects
emerged with a concept that
worked with the requirement that
the building be at least 100 feet
back from the street on the west
and 25 feet on all other sides.
With those setback lines drawn


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989









































FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989


00000o

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00001


.. -,






and a client needing 440,000
square feet of space, the
architects decided to twist the
building on a 45-degree angle
and chop off the Gaines Street
comer (see site plan) to create a
pedestrian plaza.
By turning the building and
focusing it toward the Old
Capitol, the architects anchored
the southwest comer of the
Capital Center. The northeast
facade is on a perfect axis with
the Old Capitol's cupola, and
there are excellent views of it
from every floor.
From the beginning, architect
Roberson established three im-
peratives. The first was that the
building would have a sloping
roof, no small feat for a building
of this scale. After years of
being hired by the state to repair
flat roofs weighed down by tons
of mechanical equipment, he
knew that a sloping roof would
be virtually maintenance-free.
Second, he wanted a way to
deal with the mechanical equip-
ment aesthetically. The sloping
roof created an attic, and that's
where the equipment went.
For the exterior of the
building, Roberson wanted a
fabric that would look as
substantial as concrete but be
lighter and easier to install, and
because of its non-porous quality
be easy to clean.
Metal was selected as the ex-
terior fabric. Although the initial
cost was somewhat higher than
concrete, the overall costs are
reduced because of minimal
maintenance. The light alumi-
num panels also resulted in
reduced structural steel and
foundation costs.
Another interesting feature of
the building is the gutter system
built into the vertical panels that
define the building's comers.
Behind each panel joint is a
gutter, so any water that leaks in
is "weeped" out at the next joint,
thereby averting damage to the
building.
Because the building has
6,000 panels of metal and glass,
the architect has provided a
permanent 18-inch stainless steel


catwalk at the top for window
washers.
On the northeast and
southwest sides of the building
are pedestrian plazas similar to
the intimate outdoor spaces that
one sees tucked in among the
skyscrapers in large cities.
Plazas such as these give the
building a humane quality by
offering a delightful place for
the user to pause and spend a
few minutes outdoors.
Most humane of all, however,
is the treatment of the 1,000-car
parking garage located to the
east of the building. It has a
plaza of its own, abundant
plantings, lots of light and
security features and a covered
bridge to the main building for
use in inclement weather.
A two-story lobby greets visi-
tors to the building. Above the
lobby level, the floors consist of
modular office units placed
around the perimeter so that no
windows are blocked or con-
tained within private offices.
Any offices that require privacy
walls are confined to the core of
the building along with the
elevators, utility spaces and rest
rooms.
The cafeteria, on the plaza
level, was originally planned as
part of the main building. But
the architects soon realized that
the required exhaust stacks
would have to penetrate all 19
floors. As an alternative, they
treated the cafeteria as a semi-
detached aesthetic enhancement.
Diane D. Greer


Preceding pages, left: Main entrance and right,
tower showing parking garage and bridge. This
page, top left: Cafeteria exterior and patio and
right, site plan. Below, left: Overview of Capitol
Center showing relationship between Capitol and
DOE. Right: Interior of main lobby. All photos by
Bob Martin.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989




























































FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989


I


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O







1989 Award of Honor For Design





Robert C. Broward, AIA
"The art of architecture at pres-
ent is beset by a myriad of painter-
architects more interested in their
own egos than in the more consider-
ate concern of how to design build-
ings to enhance the lives of the
users. I really must compare this
masturbatory period in architec-
ture to the turn-of-the-century re-
turn to the Ecole des Beaux-Arts
which short circuited the beautiful
surge in America towards an "archi-
tecture of sanity" as L.H. Sullivan
phrased it." Excerpted from "My
Outlook on the Present State of
Architecture (In The USA) by Robert
C. Broward, June 14, 1984.


Robert C. Broward, AIA, is an
architect, an architectural historian,
a writer and a "philosopher". Brow-
ard has a strong personal philoso-
phy about architecture and it shows
in his work, both the new projects
and those designed in the fifties and
sixties which are still being recog-
nized for the superior quality of
their design.
Broward's life has been one of
returning to Jacksonville where he
was born in 1926. After a Taliesin
Fellowship from the Frank Lloyd
Wright Foundation, followed by a
degree in architecture from Geor-
gia Tech and brief stints as a drafts-
man and designer with Atlanta firms,
he came home to Jacksonville to set
up practice. That practice, Robert
C. Broward Architect, has remained
small because Broward likes it that
way. But, through the years, the
commissions have been many and
so have the awards, recognition
and honors that his work has pro-
duced. From 1957 to the present,
his work has consistently been rec-
ognized at the local, state and na-
tional level and in 1986, The Flor-
ida Association of the American
Institute of Architects named him
the first recipient of its "Test of
Time award, given in recognition
of designs which merit recognition
many years after construction for
their importance to architecture and
their lasting impact on the built
environment.
As an author, Broward published
The Architecture of Henry John


Klutho/The Prairie School in ing to rebuild the City of Jackson- insight into why he wanted to meet
Jacksonville in 1984. The book ville after the devastating 1901 fire this "angular, nearly bald little man
explored the work of a man whom which destroyed its downtown. A with a slight stoop, a prominent
Broward met in 1950 and he is the description of their 1950 meeting in intelligent face and a welcoming
man most often credited with help- Broward's own words gives some smile."


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989





In the preface to his book, Brow-
ard writes, "In 1950 I had just re-
turned from an apprenticeship with
Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin.
Klutho's work intrigued me because
of its similarities to Wright's early
work and that of Wright's great
lieber meister, Louis Sullivan, the
poetic genius of modem architec-
ture. Together, the works of Wright
and Sullivan laid the philosophical
and design foundation for the inno-
vative architectural movement in
and around Chicago and the prairie
Midwest." Klutho's work must have
seemed to embody some of the ideals .i W ..
which Broward admired in the work U ... I -
of both Sullivan and Wright.
Broward is also the author of
numerous magazine and newspaper
articles, many of them with a philo-
sophical bent. His interest in the
philosophy of architecture and de- -f, I .o
sign has also served him well as a .
visiting professor at Georgia Tech, ' .,'
the University of Florida and Jackson- ; '. "
ville University.
One of the most widely recog- b k
nized of Broward's early designs is
his 1964 Wesley Manor Retirement
Village, the project for which he
received the "Test of Time" Award.
As with most of Broward's build-
ings, Wesley Manor is an example
of architectural excellence with a i
fitting sense of place. The scale,
massing and treatment of the archi-
tectural elements possess a timely
aesthetic quality. Other buildings
which have brought Broward rec-
ognition through the years include a
number of churches such as Jackson-
ville Unitarian built in 1966 and
Fellowship Lutheran built in 1963,. .
corporate structures such as the
Toyota Headquarters and a number
of private residences on hillsides
and sandy shores. Most people who
comment on Broward's designs say "', ,
that his buildings seem to rise out
the site. That may be the highest -"-
compliment one can pay an archi- -
tect, particularly in this time of critical I fy,4 'C,
concern for the environment. /
Diane D. Greer ",

Opposite page, Jacksonville Unitarian Church built in 1966. Photo by Judy Davis and D. Vedas Photographers. This page, top: Klein Oceanfront Residence, Ponte Vedra
Beach, 1984. Photo by Kathleen McKenzie. Right: Rendering for "Ilsenore," theAlbert Clark Residence in Jacksonville, 1966. Photo courtesy of Bob Broward.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989







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OFFICE PRACTICE AIDS





Code Changes Affect Stair Design: Watch Your Step
by Randall I. Atlas, Ph.D., AIA, CPP


This article is the first in a two-part
series of updated information on
changes in the building code govern-
ing the design of stairs, handrails,
ramps and steps. This information
was last published in Florida Archi-
tect in 1987, prior to code changes.

Falls are the second leading
cause of accidental death in the
United States. Only motor vehicle
accidents kill more people. In
1988, there were over 12,000 people
killed in falls or about 12% of the
accidental death total. Of these,
6,500 people were killed in falls
around the home and 5,500 deaths
occurred in public places. There
are more than 300,000 disabling
injuries in work-related falls each
year according to a 1989 report by
the National Safety Council.
Loss of footing is usually the
primary event involved in a fall,
with loss of balance or losing grip
on an object as secondary events.
More than 80% of the falls oc-
curred while the worker was de-
scending a stairway, according to
the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statis-
tics. As a result of the frequency
and devastating effects of slip and
fall injuries, the 1988 codes have
updated their requirements for user
safety.
An analysis of the National
Building Codes: BOCA, the Build-
ing Owners and Code Administra-
tors 1989; UBC, Uniform Build-
ing Code 1988; SBC, Southern
Building Code 1988; SFBC, South
Florida Building Code 1988; and
LSC, Life Safety Code 1988, as
shown in Table 1 reveals the vari-
ations in risers and treads for stair-
way construction.

1)There shall be no variation ex-
ceeding 3/16 of an inch in the
depth of adjacent treads or in the
height of adjacent risers and the
tolerance between the largest and
smallest riser or between the larg-
est and smallest tread shall not
exceed 3/8 of an inch.

2)SBC stair treads less than 10
inches shall have a one inch nos-
ing on the overhang.


3)For existing stairs, the maxi-
mum riser heights for Class A and
B are 7 1/2 and 8 inches, respec-
tively.

4)For existing stairs, the minimum
tread depth for Class A and B are
10 and 9 inches, respectively.

Despite some minor variations
between codes, the established
standards provide the necessary
critical dimensions that are required


of the steps. Designing such stairs
to provide slightly more than the
minimum required tread depth is
especially prudent in these cases.
In addition, those responsible for
maintaining stairs should keep in
mind that the addition of resilient
coverings may reduce the steps'
tread dimensions to below the
standard, and this will be made
even worse if the coverings are not
installed and maintained to be tight
to the underlying steps.


Table 1
Minimum Dimensions For Stairs


Code Section


Max. riser
Variation (1)
Min. Tread
(assembly &
institution)
Min. tread
(family dwell)


for safe use of stairs. The first
point in designing a safe and
compliant stair and ramp is to
understand and meet the locally
applicable code requirements. A
well-designed and properly-con-
structed stair system will have
handrails on both sides of the steps
which are elevated 34 to 38 inches
above the nosing of the tread. This
is an increase of 4 inches over
earlier codes. Tread surfaces should
have a static anti-slip coefficient
of friction of at least 0.50.
Stairs should have uniform
height and have a minimum of ten
risers per flight. Landings should
have an effective depth at least
equal to the width of the stairs.
Stairs with one, two or three risers
must have a wider tread of 13
inches and be designed more strin-
gently (LSC, 1988) than normal
stairways.
Stair designers should keep in
mind the possibility that a stair,
originally designed without a re-
silient covering, may someday be
carpeted, thereby significantly
reducing the effective tread depth


BOCA UBC SBC SFBC LSC
816.4.1 3306.a 1112.3.1 3103.3 5-2.2.2.1

7" 7" 7 3/4" 7" 7" (3)
3/16" 3/8" 3/16" 3/16" 3/16"


11" 11 10" 11" 11" (4)

3/16" 3/8" 3/16" 3/16" 3/16"


Floor coverings, whether rugs
or hard surface materials, should
be avoided if they have busy pat-
terns or they produce optical illu-
sions, especially when people with
weakened eyesight will be using
the area.
It is recommended that a subtle
or solid light-colored floor cover-
ing is safest. Obstructions can be
seen more easily on this type of
surface. Do not use dark carpeting


on stairs because dark colors ob-
scure the shadow cast by the step
and make it difficult to judge where
to place one's foot on the next
riser.
It is further recommended that
carpet specifications include
mention of non-skid backing for
area rugs. Tacks or double-faced
tape can be used. If ceramic tile is
used, specify those with slip-re-
sistant glazes.
Slip and fall accidents often
occur in transition zones between
carpet and highly-buffed floors
because of the change in coeffi-
cients of friction and texture. Thus,
care must be taken in areas where
surface textures change. Standards
for coefficients of friction do not
exist in the Southern Building Code,
Uniform Building Code, BOCA
code or Life Safety code. Thus, an
architect must use national stan-
dards from the National Bureau of
Standards, American National
Standards Institute or the Ameri-
can Society of Testing Materials.


In January, 1990, Part II of this
article will cover specifications
for the design of ramps.


The author is a registered architect, a
safety and security design consultant
and VP of Atlas Safety & Security
Design, Inc. in Miami, FL.


This ornamental stairway is an example of a good design that meets standards and re-
tains its aesthetic appeal. Photo by Randy Atlas.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989







ALUMINUM SERVICE ASSOCIATION
AMERICAN CLAY ROOF TILE
ATCON
BENCHMARK SHUTTERS
BREWER COTE OF FLORIDA, INC.
CADD CENTERS OF FLORIDA
CANAM-HAMBRO
CELETEX CORPORATION
CINDU USA, INC.
CLAY TILES & PRODUCTS, INC.
JAMES L. COX ASSOCIATES
COASTAL CONSTRUCTION
DAL-TILE CORPORATION
DESK & DOOR NAMEPLATE CO.
DESIGN CENTER OF THE AMERICAS
DESIGN WEST, INC.
DOUGLAS SASH & DOOR CO.
DUNAN MATERIALS
ETERNA ROOF TILE
FI-FOIL CO., INC.
FLORIDA CLAY SALES CO.
FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER
FLORIDA NATURAL GAS ASSOCIATION
FOAM FACTORY, INC.
FOLDING SHUTTER CORPORATION
FORMS AND SURFACES, INC.
FOUR SEASONS GREENHOUSES
FRY REGLET CORPORATION
GAF BUILDING MATERIALS CORPORATION
GARMONG & PADGETT SALES
GENE LIAS ASSOCIATES
GIMEOR
GLASS MASONRY
HANDI-LIFT, INC.


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December


I


1 1111


I













Encore!




Use reprints of articles that have appeared in
FLORIDA ARCHITECT magazine for mailings
and presentations.
Custom promotion brochures reproduce your article
as it appeared in FLORIDA ARCHITECT.


For information, cost estimates, and help with the CUSTOM DESIGN CANVAS, VINYL AWNINGS
layout and design of your reprints, contact: FABRICAION-INSTALLATION CANOPIES, CABANAS, CURTAINS
CUSHIONS, CUSTOM WELDING
Carolyn Maryland at (904) 222-7590 844-4444

RESIDENTIAL. COMMERCIAL* INDUSTRIAL
1125 BROADWAY, RIVIERA BEACH, FL
SINCE 1974
MEMBER I.F.A.I. LICENSE #U-10179
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DON'T GET STUCK WITH INFERIOR STUCCO.

Perma Cretef" Stucco is a quality-
controlled,pre-blended portland cement
and selected aggregate composition
which includes a waterproofing agent,
fade-resistant pigments, and other chemi-
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Perma Crete's finish coat is color
through so there is never a need to paint.
Available in white and many beautiful
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For further information write or call C.L. INDUSTRIES, INC.
P.O. Box 13704, 8188 South Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32859-3704
(407) 851-2660; 1-800-333-2660; FAX: (407) 240-2743 Circle 26on Reader inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989


WINNER OF INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AWARDS
A GSOF DISTINCTION

118ii













RANDALL ATLAS
ARCHITECTURAL SECURITY
CONSULTANTS
SECURITY SYSTEMS DESIGN

SECURITY PROGRAMMING

SECURITY AUDITS

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS

CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

ARCHITECTS FOR SECURITY
Randall I. Atlas, Ph.D., AIA, CPP
600 NE 36th St., Suite 1522
Miami, Florida 33137


(305) 576-6029
FAX (305) 576-1390

CALL NOW FOR CONSULTATION
Circle 19 on Reader Inquiry Card


It's easy!
Call (904)222-7590
or
FAX (904)224-8048
to order
and use your
American Express
MC or Visa card.


PREMIX-MARBLETITE
Manufacturing Co.

Serving the building industry since 1955

STUCCO, PLASTER, DRYWALL AND
POOL PRODUCTS
SOLD BY LEADING
BUILDING MATERIALS DEALERS
For Specifications and color chart
refer to SWEET'S CATALOG
3009 N.W. 75th Ave. e Miami, FL 33122
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Miami
(305) 592-5000
(800) 432-5097


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(407) 327-0830
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BUY YOUR

BOOKS

AND

DOCUMENTS

AT THE

FA/AIA

BOOKSTORE!


Classified
FLORIDASTATEUNIVERSITY
is seeking an Architect Supervisor
(position #51406). The applicant
must be registered as an architect in
accordance with Florida Statute 481
and have four years experience as a
registered architect. Knowledge of
NFPA and southern building codes
essential. Experience in preparing
specifications for contract docu-
ments preferred. Salary range of
$1,180.78 to $2,004.97 biweekly.
Salary commensurate with experi-
ence and education. Thepositionwill
close December 14,1989. To apply,
submittwo copies of the Florida State
University employment application
to:
FSUPersonnelRelations
216WilliamJohnstonBuilding
Tallahassee,FL32306
FSUisanAA/EEOemployer

ARCHITECT, 40 hrs. wk., 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., $700.00 a wk.
Bachelor's Degree in Architecture
and 3 years of experience are re-
quired. Personmusthave renovating
ideas that fulfill necessities of mod-
em and European styles. Must be
willingtowork inthe sites oftheproj-
ects. Prepare information regarding
designs, specifications, materials,
equipment,, estimated costs, and
building time after studying the re-
search of the development, and con-
struction ofthe real property. Person
must plan the layouts of the projects
of modifications. Person will design
structures and peripheral environ-
ments in accordance withplans ofthe
project and the integration of engi-
neering elements into unified de-
signs. Responsible for preparing the
scales andfull sizedrawings andcon-
tractdocumentsforbuildingcontrac-
tors and will supervise the admini-
strationofconstructioncontractsand
the on site workinprogress to ensure
that the design is being followed as
per specifications. Please send Res-
umeto JobService of Florida, 105E.
Broward Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, FL
33301.JobOrder#FL-0165422

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FLORIDA ARCHITECT November/December 1989


For more information about
Kohter Plumbing Products
see these Kohler distributors:

Lawrence Plumbing
Supply Company
Showroom:
5700 W. Flagler St.
Miami, Florida 33144
(305) 266-3338

31 S.W. 57th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33144
(305) 266-1571

405 N. Flagler Avenue
Homestead, Florida 33030
(305) 248-7020

8712 S.W. 129th St.
Miami, Florida 33176
(305) 251-7022

Wool Plumbing
Supply
Dstrbutors of Plumbing
and Decorative Hardttre

Showroom:
5910 Shirley St.
(off Pine Ridge Rd.)
Naples, Florida 33942
(813) 597-8155

Showroom:
1321 NE 12th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33304
(305) 763-3632

Showroom:
4340 SW 74th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33155
(305) 266-7111

Showroom:
6778 N. Military Trail
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
(305) 83-7788















Circle 6 or. Reacer Inquiry Card




































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