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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00277
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July-August 1989
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00277
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
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    Back Cover
        Page 53
        Page 54
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July/August 1989
Vol. 36, No. 4


Florida Architect, Official Journal of the
Florida Association of the American Institute
of Architects, is owned and published by the
Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. ISSN-0015-3907. It is published six
times a year at the Executive Office of the
Association, 104 East Jefferson St., Tallahas-
see, Florida 32302. Telephone (904) 222-
7590.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the FA/AIA. Editorial
material may be reprinted only with the ex-
press permission of Florida Architect.
Single copies, $4.00; Annual subscription,
$19.08. Third class postage.


l ~IIIIIII


CONTENTS



Features





Paul Rudolph, FAIA
The Quintessential Modem Architect 11


1989 FAIA Unbuilt Design Awards 13
This year, a distinguished jury met in New York City and
selected twelve projects from 106 submittals. In building
type, the projects range from a beach house on the Gulfof
Mexico to a downtown shopping mall, a government complex
and a planned "company town" in the mountains of
Puerto Rico.


Chapel Dedicated to Nils Schweizer, FAIA 39

A Link To the Profession 49
University of Florida Architecture Professor Maelee Foster
has designed an award-winning teaching internship program.






Departments
Editorial 9

New Products 40
Books 42
Letters 43

Chapter Awards 45


















The drawing on the cover is of the Mayaguez Municipal Marina and proposed waterfront development designed by
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---S


1414













FLORIDAARCHITECT EDITORIAL


Florida Amociation of the
American Institute of Arditects
104 East Jefferson Street
Poet Office Box 10388
TIllahassee, Florida 32302
Pubiser/Executive ce Preident
George A. Allen, CAE
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Adverting
Carolyn Maryland
Design ad Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Printing
Boyd Brothers Printers
Publications Committee
Ivan Johnson, AIA, Chairman
Gene Leedy, AIA
Will Morris, AIA
Keith Bailey, AIA
Don Sackman, AIA
Editorial Board
Ivan Johnson, AIA
Dave Fronczak, AIA
Roy Knight, AIA
President
H. Dean Rowe, FAIA
100 Madison Street
Tanpa, Florida 33602
Vice Pridet/Presidentelect
Larry Schneider, AIA
25 Seabreeze
Delray Beach, Florida 33483
secretaryfnr
Bruce Balk, AIA
290 Coconut Avenue
Sarasota, Florida 33577
Pst Presidenat
John P. Ehrig, AIA
4625 East Bay Drive, Suite 221
Clearwater, Florida 34624
Regional Directors
John M. Barley, AIA
5345 Ortega Boulevard
Jacksonville, Florida 32210
James A. Greene, FAIA
254 Plaza Drive
P.O. Box 1147
Oviedo, Florida 32765
Vice President for
Professional Society
Raymond L. Scott, AIA
601 S. Lake Destiny Road, Suite 400
Maitland, Florida 32571
Vice President for
Government Relations
Rudolph Arsenicos, AIA
2560 RCA Boulevard, Suite 106
Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410
Vice President for
Professional Development
John Tice, AIA
909 E. Cervantes
Pensacola, Florida 32501
Vice President for
Pubic ReltionsCommunicatio
Henry C. Alexander, AIA
Smith Korach Hayet Haynie
175 Fontainbleau Road
Miami, Florida 33172

FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


I In May, I was asked to serve as a judge for the 1989 Tallahassee Parade
of Homes. There were fifty-one homes by Tallahassee builders open
for inspection over a two weekend period. The least expensive house was
$73,000 and the term "modest" doesn't even come close to describing it. The
rest of the homes were between $90,000 and $525,000, with over half of them
costing over $200,000.
"The time to buy is now," touted Parade literature, "whether it's your first
house or you're ready to move up because of family." Surely they're not
suggesting to young couples that their first house should cost $200,000.
All of this brought home what I've been reading lately about the housing cri-
sis we're experiencing in Florida. Now, the experts are saying that housing will
be Florida's biggest crisis of the 1990's.
Anthony Catanese, dean of the University of Florida's College of Architec-
ture, says that the lack of affordable housing hasn't been called a crisis because
everyone thought it was a lower class problem that could be swept under the rug.
Now, however, it's become a middle class problem, and as such, will be the
major problem of the nineties.
According to a National Association of Realtors survey,
"less than fifty percent of families can qualify for an average-income home in
their counties. In many of Florida's higher priced markets, such as Hillsbor-
ough, Orange and Palm Beach counties, the figure dips to as low as thirty
percent.
"The only solution for these families," according to Catanese, "is to continue
renting. The American dream of home ownership is no longer possible for many
families."
Catanese predicts that the housing crisis will cause more elderly people to
move in with their adult children, more married children to live with their
parents and more single adults to delay moving out of their parents' homes.
When a young, college-educated couple who are both working full time
cannot afford to buy a house, that's serious. Affordable housing shortages hurt
the poor the most, but they're not the only ones affected anymore.
One of the problems that the housing industry is facing today in addition to
rising material costs is impact fees imposed by local governments. These fees
are taxes added onto the price of a home to pay for local services such as road
maintenance, parks and other community infrastructure. The imposition of
impact fees by various localities has wrought great controversy, with homebuy-
ers resenting the extra taxes and homebuilders complaining that the extra fees
make it even harder to find buyers who can afford the price.
To solve the housing crisis, Catanese feels that government must make
affordable housing a major priority. The government must offer incentive
programs and grants to get developers and builders interested in providing
moderately priced quality homes. Housing costs would go down if the
government overhauled its complicated construction permit system to make it
speedier and more efficient.
From what I was able to see on my recent tour of new Tallahassee homes,
there is a serious shortage of affordable housing. Without action, the problem
will only worsen. Diane D. Greer



































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Paul Rudolph, FAIA

The Quintessential Modern Architect
by Diane D. Greer


T he 1989 FA/AIA 'Unluilt
Design Awards jury met in
New\ York C'it in March. Amid
the stimulating surroundings of
Paul Rudolph's Beckman Place
apa;rtmllnt. jury members, Rudolph.
Gene Leedy and Bert Brosnmith
considered 11)6 projects from the
Florida/Caribbean region.
During a break in the delihera-
lions. one topic that;l was discussed
w as Rudolph's continuing fixationl
with the possibilities offered
architects by the mobile home
industry. His projects using
modular units olf that type clearly
stand out in his mind. and in his
conversation. Much has heen
made of Rudolph's fascination
\with mohil homes. which he has
called the true twentieth cenlurv
"urhan brick." Left to his own
devices, he nmay yet insure that
prefabricateded" does not remain a
dirty word in the architectural
profession.
The fact that Rudolph is com-
fortable working with modules
that can he stacked in various con-
Iigurations is not surprising. After
all. Walter Gropius was his teacher
at Harvard and while Architectural
Record Editor Mildred Schmertz
Ieels that Rudolph's work evolved
as a reaction against the miinimalist
design that (;ropius tried to teach
him. the Bauhaus influence must
still have been strong. Rudolph
himself described his 1957 w ork
on the Riverview Jr.- Sr. High
School in Sarasota this way: "I
was happy to he again in a familiar
climate and (I) reverted to the
much more simplistic demands ol
the International style. 'Following
the rules' insures a degree of
completeness. a sophistication. a
refinement which is not possible
when one deals with the search for
the unknown."
In short. the basic elements of
the International style are still
present in his swork although there
are strong spatial differences.
Rudolph's is not linear space. hut
multi-directional. Also. unlike
Gropius is the way hie chooses to
asym metrically arrange his details.

FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


In Rudolph's recent design for
the Colonnade Conldominiunms in
Singapore. one sees stacked
modules and might he reminded of
some of his early projects like the
Walker Guest House on Sanibel
Island with its interior spaces
clearly defined by plywood panels.
Although drawing a parallel be-
tween the Walker project and the
Colonnade is stretching the point
in terms of time and technology.
both show an obvious concern
with spatial complexities. A more
obvious and more recent parallel is
between his unbuilt Graphic Arts
Center for the city of New York
and the Colonnade.
Rudolph began, as so many
architects do. in wood. and he has
evolved to the concrete frame


mnegastruclures that are now dotted
throughout Southeast Asia. But
through the years, and regardless
of the materials. he has held onto
the basic tenets of modernism. His
concerns with function. materials
and space are consistently
apparent. His buildings have rich
textures and wonderful three-di-
mensional surfaces that seem to
breathe. He remains staunchly
post-modern in his refusal to adorn
his buildings w ith historic motifs.
His work clearly demonstrates that
he believes modern buildings
should he shaped to show oi the
exterior the specific interior
function of the space.
In many ways, Rudolph has
come a long way since his early
years in Sarasota w ith Ralph


Twitchell designing small
residences. But. it was these small
residences. like the Cocoon House
on Siesta Key. that first brought
him national attention. The
transition he has made from the
residences of the fifties to the
megastructures of the eighties is
fascinating because the parallels
are so clear. What is also clear is
that Paul Rudolph is probably the
quintessential modern architect.


Above. Riverview Jr.lSr. High School (originally SmaraotaI H.S.) wvas completed in 1957. Photo by Ezra Stoller. Below. left:
Hond Centre, Hong Kong and right. Colonnade Conldominiums. Singapore. Photos hb Peter Aaron, Esto Photographics.








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1989 FA/AIA Unbuilt Design Awards



A Song For the Unsung




B ringing attention to the design
process i.s the oal of the
annual FA/AIA Unhuilt Design- --
Awards Program. The program is
open to projects of all si/es and
classifications that have been
designed by members of the
Florida Association of the AIA.
but have not yet been built. All
entries. however. must have been
commissioned for compensation
on behalf of a client.
This year. 106 projects were
submitted and reviewed bh a
distinguished jury meeting in New
York City. Paul Rudolph. FAIA.
served as Chairman of the Jur\. He
received his Bachelor of Architec-
ture from the Alabama Polytechnic
Institute and his Master of
Architecture from Har\ard
University in '1947. Within two
years. he received his first Asward
of Merit for Design from the
American Institute of Architects.
Today. Rudolph is at the height of -
his career, w ith projects underway
around the w orld.
Bert Brosmith. AIA. practiced
architecture in Sarasota from 1955
to 1965. In 1961. he was named
one of 14 "New Architectural
Talents in America" by A.rchiilt- In this sketch by Don S
lturl Forum, magazine. From and Paul Rudolph.
1961 to 1975. he served as a prin-
cipal in the firn of Juster/
Brosmith/Levine in New York
City. Since 1975. he has practiced
in relative obscurity in Northern
Westchester County. New, York in
the fond belief that "in lime I will
get it right."
Gene Leedy. AIA. is a favorite
son of Florida architecture. He has
been designing all types of
buildings with his signature use of
T-beams and screen walls for the
past thirty years. In 1965. Leedy
gained national recognition as one
of, iAr hiitecturatRecord'.\ "Sue- i
cessful Young Architects." More
recently. Leedy \was the recipient
of the FA/AIA's 1988 Award of
Honor for Design. the highest
award the Association can confer
upon an architect for continuous
excellence in design.


intgeAr. FAIA. the jury evaluate thei ubmiettd Iprojecits: I.,ft to right are. Gene Leedy. Bert Broosmith


Bert Brosmith. AIA


FLtORtt)A ARCtIITtEr July/August t989


Paul Rudolph. FAIA


(Gene' Lee,., AIA


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EIB It


The Acropolis at Brickell



Hervin Romney Architect,
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Miami, Florida

Built with reinforced concrete
slabs and columns, this concrete
block building will have its
exterior stucco painted bright
primary colors.
The small site incorporates
twenty units into live levels of a
rental apartment building with
lobby and parking at grade. The
second level of the building is
being utilized for recreation, while
the third and fourth floors contain
flats and two-story townhouse/
penthouses. The structure meets
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across the street.
The jury found the variety of
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maintains the identity of each
individual unit.


Miami, Florida


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IXI)RIDA ARCH(ITECI( July/August 1989






EiL0 I


U.S. Embassy Office Building


Khartoum, Sudan


William Morgan, FAIA
William Morgan Architects,
P.A.
Jacksonville, Florida

Currently targeted for
completion in 1993. this low
silhouette office building contains
an area of about 70.0(X) square
feet. Sudan is located in sub-
Sahara East Africa and the design
of this government building
recalls the character of anony-
mous desert forts and oases in the
vicinity of the Sahara Desert.
References to architecture that
was seen in Sudan between 5(X)
BC and AD 3(X) appear on the
circular reservoir at the main
entry, in exterior walls suggesting
megalithic masonry construction.
in the garden arrangements
recalling objects within objects, in
the contrast of highly developed
interiors with anonymous
exteriors, in the stepped pyramid
configuration of skylights and in


the framing of the entry portal by
multiple bands of masonry.
The building construction will
be cast-in-place reinforced
concrete. Flat-plate floors and
roofs will be supported by
perimeter bearing walls and
square interior columns arranged
in square bays. Light is intro-
duced into the building by 8-inch
wide vertical slots in exterior
walls and by two 50-foot square
skylighted gardens located on the
centerline of the building's
rectangular plan. Security
considerations indicated two
atriums rather than a large single
one.
The jury admired the simple
formality of this project with its
obvious emphasis on security.


Opposite page. top: South elevation and main facade, west elevation. Bottom, site plan. This page. above: South Atrium perspective.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


II.




























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Winter Park Memorial Hospital Cancer Care Facility Winter Park, Florida



Helman Hurley Charvat
Peacock/Architects, Inc.
Alexander W. Stone, AIA -

Maitland, Florida

In order to alleviate some of'
the mental discomfort of the
patients who must use this facility.
the intent of the design solution
was to deal with components that
embody the antithesis of death.
such as sunlight, water and large
existing on-site trees.
As one enters the radiation fa-
cility, he is greeted by a ten-foot
square pool of water. Reflections
of passing clouds may be seen in
the water and during the cold
winter months, a shaft of sunlight
moves across the pool as the day
progresses. The water gently
flows over the sides of the
fountain producing a sound which o S
many people find soothing.
The opposite end of the waiting
area is defined by a stand of four *l *
large oak trees which are visible
through Iloor to ceiling glass.
Here. the canopy which these trees
form, in conjunction with the west
wall of the satellite building.
creates a garden space which will
be landscaped with flowering
plants.
Although the direct effect of
architecture on one's physical ,
health is probably limited to some
extent, it was the general consen-
sus of the doctors and hospital.
that a peaceful environment would
be most conducive to the patient's
well-being. The jury Ielt that this
was a very quiet. straightforward
solution to a particularly complex .
problem ll I| I I,]


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


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Tp., north elevation and below. west elevation. Left, section perspective. Above,
site plan courtesy of HHCP.


FIORIDA ARCHIITE(C July/August 1989


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Bay Plaza Waterfront Retail District


St. Petersburg, Florida


Thomas C. Gruber, AIA,
RTKL Associates, Inc. -
Design Architect
William S. Blizzard. Ander-
son Parrish Associates, Inc. -
Architects of Record

The special requirements of
this project are to transform a
mostly vacant and underdeveloped
downtown core area into an
upscale retail district similar in
concept to J.C. Nichols' Country
Club Plaza in Kansas City.
The design goal as to take
advantage of St. Petersburg's
waterfront and park system and
have strong visual and physical
connections to and from the retail
district. Food. entertainment and
public facilities were located
adjacent to the waterfront park so
that they became anchor lor the
district. Parking also had to be
organized so that it was conven-
ient. walking distances were
reasonable and retail relationships
were attractive to perspective
tenants.
The most difficult aspect of a
project of this scale is accommo-
dating the divergent views of local
community groups while still
maintaining a viable plan that
requires multi-block assemblages.
The jury liked the planning
concept and thought it was a very
thoughtful solution to relating the
city to the water.


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This ptge. site plmi wid propni.ed north elevation. Oppifiite lxige'. main entrinice to .Aht ping district.


FLORIDA ARCIIITE(C- July/August 1989






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South County Civic Center Palm Beach County, Florida


Currie Schneider Associates
AIA, PA
Delray Beach, Florida



The objective of this project is is buffered from its surroundings
to provide the residents in by existing vegetation.
southern Palm Beach County with There will be seating for I.(XX)
a place to hold civic meetings and inside the center's usable 20).(W )
to provide administrative offices square feet. Interior requirements
for the County Commissioners include Ilexibility in the main as-
and the Parks and Recreation sembly room which can be subdi-
Department. vided into four smaller spaces. 1-
Situated on an existing lake. Because each room must be able
the building will occupy a to function independently, it was .J I '
fourteen acre site in the immediate necessary for the design to ''t
vicinity of several residential provide for acoustical isolation. O
developments. The external form The jury felt that this simple .
of the new center reflects the building form resolved a complex
internal function and the building variety of spatial requirements. 0
is atypical of others in the area. It 0 0

0 0








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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989

























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Opposite, top: Site plan and southeast elevation. Above, axonometric courtesy of Currie Schneider Associates.




FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989





UiL L AIWADS


Mayaguez Municipal Marina and Proposed
Waterfront Develooment


Mayaguez, Puerto Rico


Humberto Betancourt,
Arquitecto
Gaspare Malek, Asociado
San Juan Antiguo, Puerto Rico

This proposed waterfront de-
velopment will contain marina,
restaurants and shops, sailing
center and yacht club facilities,
boardwalk, drydock, hotel, park-
ing, fishing facilities, middle
income housing, commercial
areas, piers and a park. The
buildings will be constructed of
poured-in-place reinforced con-
crete, wood and steel. Cast iron,
wood and copper urban furniture
will be used on a variety of paving
materials.
The City of Mayaguez
required a phased construction
schedule with the first phase to
include the marina, housing,
fishing, drydock and related
recreational facilities. The second
phase will include the promenade
up to the Yaguez River delta and
the third phase will include the
boardwalk and fishing pier. Later
phases will expand the entire proj-
ect throughout the bay area.
In this major waterfront devel-
opment, the jury felt that the site
features were well integrated by
the device of a continuous prome-
nade at the water's edge.


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Boardwalk promenade and park.


Marina and cruise ship pier.


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


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Yaguez River Delta showing all of the development's amenities and section of Promenade.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989











Bay Park Place Tampa, Florida




John Howey Associates
Tampa, Florida


Located in a large oak ham-
mock, this site borders a city park
and has views to Hillsborough
Bay. The client desired to develop
the site with luxury parkhomes
which would take advantage of'
both the site and the view.
The design solution places the
parking at the lowest site elevation
with three levels of paired midrise
units over the walled-in parking
and separate retention ponds. At
each end are multi-level
townhomes with their own
entrances making a total of eight
units in the complex.
The units range in size from
2,000 to 2,600 square feet. All
have three bedrooms and three
bathrooms, nine foot high ceilings,
fireplaces, large kitchens and patio
balconies opening off of the
master bedroom and living room.
The perimeter walls of the
building have controlled entry
gates. Where tree removal is
necessary, oaks and palms are
being relocated with the help of
the Tampa Parks Department.
The jury was impressed with
the human scale of this project, its
form and simplicity and the clever
solution of parking and site drain-
age.





























26 FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989

































































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Photo ofModel, South elevation and living level plan courtesy of John Howey
Associates.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989





JLI~ I


Residence for Mr. and Mrs. Frank Seco de Lucena


Shell Point, Florida


John Howey Associates
Tampa, Florida
The property on which this va-
cation house is located is on the
Gulf of Mexico in the Florida Pan-
handle. The owners, who are
boating enthusiasts, wanted to in-
corporate an existing structural
frame into their new house. To
this end, wood floor framing is
secured to new and existing
concrete pilings which are driven
to a limerock base. There are full
wood trusses at the building ends
for lateral support.
The owners also wanted a
house that could be completely
opened and then made secure for
long periods of time when it was
vacant. In addition to the living
area, there are two bedrooms, a
loft and three baths. Third floor
viewing decks are accessible by
ladder and there are various decks
at different levels that take
advantage of the north-south
orientation, views of the Gulf and
the prevailing breezes.
The directness of a modest
frame structure raised above the
earth for view and breeze was
immediately appealing to the jury.
They also admired the pleasant
variety of spaces within a single
form.

This page, top: Side elevation. Middle,
front elevation, and bottom, plan of
main living level.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


lfill






-i L TAIWARDS I


"Colonos Del Este" A New Company Town


Marvel.Flores.Cobian Y
Asociados
Santurce, Puerto Rico

This residential community for
4,000 people is to be developed on
a 200-acre mountain site on the
coast of Puerto Rico. The project',
concept integrates the urban de% el-
opment of the Caribbean culture in
its architectural traditions.
The design scheme maximize,
its hilly location. The fan-like ar-
rangement of buildings arises Irom
the central park plaza where the
clubhouse, chapel and banJstand
are located in the tradition olI he
octagonal cities of the past The
octagonal street and block pattemr
conform to the natural grade
The program required a high l
secure environment achieved b\
wall surrounding the residential
community. The retail center u ill
be located outside the walled are.
in an analogous relationship
between the sugar mill building
and its company town. Small
shops will be located at the base of
the "wall building" served by the
main road which anchors the urban
grid to its periphery.
The housing types will range
from estates on one acre sites to
twin houses, row houses and
blockhouses, each designed by
different architects following a
graphic set of rules. These rules
are intended to give unity and a
common vocabulary to the town as
well as allowing for individual
creativity.
The jury felt it was clear that
the project showed exceptionally
sensitive research and form analy-
sis. Although the architectural
development has not yet been
clarified, the jury felt that the
strength of the research would be
carried out in the building forms.


Rio Grande, Puerto Rico


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


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Left: General scheme for town with Citadel Plaza at center. Above, top: the
main town square, middle, company administrator's house and bottom, town
engineer's house. Photos courtesy of Marvel Flores Cobian.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989






UMUII ITAW AR


Hillsborough Community College

Brandon Learning Center


Brandon, Florida


Ranon & Partners, Inc.
Jim McLean, Architect
Tampa, Florida


This building will be the first of
three principal phases of a new
campus. The facility contains
180,000 sf and 1,057 student study
stations and is scheduled for a De-
cember, 1990 occupancy date.
The site is a rural prairie which is
relatively isolated.
The design for the campus
defines the first of a series of
connecting courtyards as outlined
by the campus masterplan. A
concept was developed from both
the givens and the opportun-
ities.., a prairie site, a high tech
program, a series of landscaped
gardens. The structures are
designed to hover slightly above
the lush garden supported by an
elevated platform. Together,
building and garden will combine
to provide an educational setting
unique to the Florida environment.
Construction materials consist
of an aluminum storefront, hollow
metal frames and reflective
glazing. Porcelain ceramic tile
cladding was selected for
durability, low maintenance and
vandal resistance. It also presents
a cool, crisp, modular appearance.
This material of earthen origin is
contrasted against clear anodized
aluminum and jade-colored
reflective glass.
The jury felt that this was a
sensitive arrangement of six
buildings to form an entrance for a
major future expansion. The
individual buildings are well
integrated in both form and
material usage. There is a rich
variety of spaces between
buildings, both axial and subaxial.






Elevation, axonometric and site plan
courtesy of Ranon and Partners.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


7

































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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


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JNBUILARD


Fomon Residence Palm Beach, Florida


Architect Charles Harrison
Pawley
Jerry Beattie- Project Archi-
tect
David Richmond, Victoria
Laguette, Lauren Greenberg,
Gregg Pawley, John Sklanka-
Project Team

This two-and-a-half acre site
on Lake Worth has been undevel-
oped for more than fifty years.
With 560 feet of waterfront, there
is a spectacular view across the
lake to an island bird sanctuary
and the Intracoastal Waterway
beyond. Designed to be the
client's escape from Northern
winters, the house was designed to
match the natural beauty of the
site. Primary consideration was
also given to designing a house
that would function efficiently and
sympathetically within the natural
environment.
The design of the house show-
cases the beauty of the materials
used in its construction including
various woods and indigenous
stone. There are six-foot deep
covered porches on all exposures.
The client also requested that
the house be a tropical vernacular
type of structure. In keeping with
this theme, a pavilion concept was
used which maximizes both views
and natural cross-ventilation.
There is a separate guest house
and pool pavilion and the main
living areas are elevated well
above ground to better capture the
prevailing breezes. The house has
high exposed beam ceilings, and
French doors were used exten-
sively to permit secure enclosure,
as well as to maximize the house's
potential to be completely opened
up.
The jury liked the organization
of the plan, the massing of the
room areas, the straightforward
detailing and the honest use of
materials.




Opposite, top: First floor plan and below,
wall section. This page, top: South eleva-
tion and below. East elevation.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989



















































FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


~l:T






JL IN Ik &IeA


Brevard County Operations Center Brevard County, Florida

Hunter/RS&H, Inc.
Tom McCrary, Design
Architect
Jacksonville, Florida

This county government opera-
tions center will provide facilities
for planning and development,
social services, utility services and
county commission administration.
Completion is scheduled for 1990.
The development of the operations
facility marks the beginning of a
new Town Center in Brevard
County. The design addresses the
consolidation of public govern-
ment services and responds to the
image and importance of a civic
building.
A campus of public structures
was developed through the use of
separate buildings, covered walks
and a variety of public courts and
spaces. The formal entry with its
fountain, colonnade of palms and' n' '
entry portico is reminiscent of a
classical treatment.
The future Judicial Center will -
complete the civic complex. The
building has a conventional steel
frame with bar joists. There is a
standing seam metal roof with
copper patina. The exterior is
brick veneer with precast columns,
lintels and bases.
The jury liked the simplicity .
and formality which they felt is '.-
appropriate to this type of '' ''
building.





Center, Building C Model and above,
north elevation of Buildings A and B.
Opposite page, site plan.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989









































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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


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ROLL MODEL.
j


New Vanguard" Roll FasTrack" Roof "'
Tile from Gory is the perfect example of'
what's meant by less is more.
Because of its larger double-roll sym-
metrical design Vanguard Roll requires i.
less pieces per square, only 90. So the
structure has to support about 10% less
weight. And it takes less time to install.
Yet you have more ways to install it.
Either nail-on, batten or mortar-set.
And we have many colors in inventory.
All Vanguard Roll roof tile is color-thru,
which eliminates repainting. With double weather barriers. And
concealed interlocks.
Find out what role Vanguard Roll can play in your next new or
remodel project. Write to Gory Roof Tile, 1100 Park Central
Blvd. So., Suite 1800, Pompano Beach, FL 33064.
Or call toll free 1-800-223-8453.
(305) 975-7605 locally. G O FR
ROOF TILE

CIc atn Radr Iy CaSrd
Cikleo 60 n Reader inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT JulyAugput 1989







Chapel Dedicated To Nils Schweizer, FAIA


The late Nils Schweizer, a past
president of the FA/AIA and student
of Frank Lloyd Wright, will be hon-
ored in a very significant way by
the Episcopal Diocese of Central
Florida. The project, a memorial
chapel, has been named the St. Au-
gustine Chapel and it will be built
on the grounds of the Canterbury
Retreat and Conference Center near
Orlando.
Canterbury Center meant a great
deal to Nils as a special place of spir-
itual renewal. His vision for it be-
came its master plan. The Schweizer
family believes there is no better
place to create a memorial to Nils
through which others will come into
an intimate relationship with nature,
the self and the spirit of man and
God.
It is appropriate that the design
team for the chapel consists of Nils'
children Kevin Schweizer, Archi-
tect; Tamara Schweizer Sims, Inter-
ior Designer; and Garth Schweizer,
Landscape Architect. They incor-
porated in its creation the elements
of organic architecture with which
their father was so long associated.
Plans are being made to give
members of the architectural com-
munity an opportunity to express
their love and respect for Nils by
participating in the funding for this
memorial project. Further informa-
tion can be received by contacting
the Canterbury Retreat and Confer-
ence Center at 1601 Alafaya Trail
in Oviedo, Florida 32765. (407)
365-5571.


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NEW PRODUCTS


Air Terminal
Lightning Rod
Available

Many times it is an architect who
specifies the lightning protection
system. Information is presently
available from Lightning Master
about their new air terminal light-
ning rod with static dissipating char-
acteristics. The rod, PP-35T, has
recently been approved by the Un-
derwriters Laboratories.
Static dissipation has been a buzz
word for several years now. Simply,
it is the reduction of a ground charge
associated with an electrical storm
at a rate sufficient to maintain the
value of that charge on a protected
structure below that at which a light-
ning strike will occur, thus render-
ing the site "lightning invisible."
The static dissipating air terminal
replaces the traditional air terminal,
and enhances dissipation of light-
ning-causing static ground charge
to the atmosphere, thereby reducing
the likelihood of a direct strike.
The new rod weighs approxi-
mately 12.5 ounces and is mounted
on a standard 1/2 inch thread base.
The PP-35T must be electrically
bonded to ground and to the object
or structure upon which it is mounted.
For information, contact Light-
ning Master in Brooksville, Florida
at (904) 799-6800.


New Fireproofing
Material Available

Firebrake Perlite Type KG100 is
a patented, quick-setting, inorganic
fireproofing material. It is a two-
part formulation consisting of a dry
blended perlite, and a liquid activa-
tor solution.
When spray is applied, the com-
ponents are mixed with the liquid
at the nozzle of the spray unit to ini-
tiate a rapid chemical reaction,
exochemically producing heat and
quickly recrystallizing the com-
ponent to form a fast-setting light-
weight material which tenaciously
bonds to most building materials.
In addition, the quick setting action
permits a continuous buildup to the
thickness required for a one to four
fire rating.
Firebrake Perlite Type KG100
contains no asbestos, no fibers, no
vermiculite, and no chloride, and
produces a fireproofing that is hard,
moisture-resistant and non-friable.
The phosphate in the mix inhibits
corrosion of substrate materials. It
is classified by Underwriters Lab-
oratories, Inc. for up to four fire
ratings on structural materials.
Firebrake Perlite is a product
of Chemco-Kaltec, Inc. Florida
office: 813-942-4234. The com-
pany will have an exhibit at the
Sarasota Design Conference in
July.


TASSO Introduces
Paintable Diagonals

TASSO Wallcoverings, manu-
factured by U.S. TASSO, is a paint-
able glass fiber wallcovering that
is highly permeable when painted
with latex (9.5 times more perme-
able than vinyl wallcoverings ac-
cording to tests conducted at Georgia


Tech). An oil-based or epoxy paint,
however, will seal the finish.
In addition to exceeding the fire
standards for flame spread, fuel con-
tribution and smoke generation,
woven glass fiber is low in toxicity.
When burned and tested in accor-
dance with Airbus standards,TASSO
demonstrated toxic gas values far
below those set by the airline indus-
try. These qualities make the product


a particularly desirable wallcovering
for schools, hospitals and hotels.
Woven glass fiber also has the
quality of rehabilitating walls by
bridging joints and cracks and smooth-
ing rough surfaces. it can be in-
stalled over wood paneling, brick,
stucco, tile and drywall.
Now, the company has added a
ninth texture to its American line.
"Diagonals" is a new texture suited


to a variety of applications. Like its
predecessors, it is easy to install
and clean and it won't shrink or
stretch.
TASSO is delivered pre-trimmed
and ready to hang in 39 by 54'/2 inch
rolls.
For complete information, contact
U.S. TASSO at 1-800-888-2776.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989









SSCULPTURA
DING GLASS DOORS




HCIE


Now that's tough ... even by
South Florida standards.
Sculptura is the boldest,
strongest door ... tested and
approved for your most stringent
applications.
A 4' x 9' panel will withstand
120 MPH winds at a 350 ft. ele-
vation in South Florida.
And, Sculptura is an extra-safe
door because it features:
* Large profile extrusions for
exceptional strength.
* Double screws at all panel
corners.


*Tamper-proof, surface-mounted
cam latch.
* Burglar bolt at interlocking stiles
for added secondary security.
* 15.0 PS.F water test pressure
satisfies the most stringent code
and architectural specifications.
Sculptura can safely fill your
door requirements up to a
5-ft.-wide x 9-ft.-high panel.
Send for our Sculptura
Spec Kit. When you check
all the facts ... you'll move
up to Sculptura ... with
confidence.


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I\SCULPTURA. ---z-J


DON'T GET STUCK WITH INFERIOR STUCCO.


Perma Crete'" Stucco is a quality-
controlled, pre-blended portland cement
and selected aggregate composition
which includes a waterproofing agent,
fade-resistant pigments, and other chemi-
cal combinations to provide a long-
lasting finish.
Perma Crete's finish coat is color
through so there is never a need to paint.
Available in white and many beautiful
colors, it can be trowel applied or sprayed
for either a textured or smooth finish.
The butteryconsistency makes it easier
to apply and its greater spread gives extra
coverage making it more economical.
All components meet the standards
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for stucco.
Coverage is
6-9 yards per PERMA
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For further information write or call C.L. INDUSTRIES, INC.
PO. Box 13704, 8188 South Orange Avenue, Orlando, Florida 32859-3704
(407) 851-2660; 1-800-333-2660; FAX: (407) 240-2743 CircleonReadernquiryCard


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


15


I













Books


Prehistoric Architecture in
Micronesia
by William N. Morgan
University of Texas Press, $49.50

This is William Morgan's second
book, the first being Prehistoric
Architecture in the Eastern United
States, which was published in 1980.
Clearly Architect Morgan's interest
lies in what can be learned from the
architecture of our ancestors. His
research is thorough, his drawings,
diagrams and maps are clear and
explicit and his writing style is con-
sistently readable and interesting.
Added to all of this is breathtaking
color photography of perhaps the
most beautiful islands in the world.
This is the first modern study of
the richly diverse and innovative
architectural tradition in the West-
ern Pacific in the centuries preced-
ing Western contact. PrehistoricAr-
chitecture in Micronesia presents
five distinctly different examples of
Micronesia's ancient architecture,
comparing the architectural charac-


teristics of the island groups with
each other and with monuments
outside Micronesia.
The sites include the extraordi-
nary stone cities of Leluh and Nan
Madol on the islands of Kosrae and
Pohnpei, respectively. Other struc-
tures include the meeting houses
and residences built on hexagonal
stone platforms in the Yap Islands,
the earth terraces and ornately deco-
rated meeting houses of Palau, and
the megalithic columns and cap-
stones of prehistoric houses in the
Mariana Islands.
Morgan's first encounter with the
architecture of Micronesia came
in 1954 while he was serving in
the United States Navy and sta-
tioned on Guam. During the nine-
teen months he was there he saw
numerous capstones and stone col-
umns, but could find no reliable
source of information about the un-
usual structures. In Morgan's own
words, he describes what followed:
"During a chance visit to the neigh-
boring island of Tinian, an elderly
Micronesian told me of an immense


latte in the jungle. Following his
directions, I found the ruins of the
extraordinary House of Taga with
two of its original twelve columns
still standing." From that point, I
believe Morgan was "hooked" and
his own interest and curiosity about
this remote and impressive architec-
ture grew steadily. Although many
years would pass before Morgan
began his research in earnest, he
did visit the islands of Micronesia
in 1984 and begin to review avail-
able information. It was then that
he decided to prepare a study of pre-
historic architecture based on five
distinct island groups. In this book,
the architectural ideas of each group
are presented in their respective cul-
tural and geographical contexts.
In the introduction to the chapter
on Methodology, Morgan uses a
quote from fellow Florida architect
Paul Rudolph which sums up the
importance of a study such as this
one. Rudolph says,"...pay close at-
tention to what we regard as untu-
tored people and how they approach
their problems, how they approached


them in the past, and how they still
approach them.., quite often people
naturally do things when left to their
devices, do things very well, and
solve an awful lot of problems that
architects tend to forget."
Copies of Prehistoric Architec-
ture in Micronesia are on sale in
the FA/AIA Headquarters Book-
store inTallahassee. (904) 222-7590.

Interior Signage Catalog of
Desk & Door Nameplate
Company
Catalog free on request

Desk & Door Nameplate Com-
pany developed this manual as an
educational guide to interior sign-
age. It was designed to help design
professionals better understand the
mechanics of and the opportunities
for designing fine signage. The
manual was designed for easy, ef-
ficient and repeated use by archi-
tects and their space-planning or in-
terior staffs. It covers everything
from brand names and graphic pro-
cesses to technical specifications


Partial Client List:


Rockefeller Center, Inc.


Skidmore Owings & Merrill

Taylor Woodrow

Pace Construction Corp.

Ranon & Partners


U.S. Home


ADP Associates


Michael Saunders & Co.


Arvida


One

Scale Model

Is Worth

A Thousand

Pictures


EPR/CRS Sirrine


Cooper Eckstut Associates

Donovan & Green

Douglas Leigh Organization

The Plantation

Neal & Neal


Palm Aire


Bruce Balk AIA


Paragon Group

Henson Associates (The Muppets)


Johnson Peterson Holliday

Murtha DeSola Finsilver Fiore


The Landings

Freedom Group

Frank Folsom Smith

Tiffany & Co. Jewelers

Francis Thompson

Hack Swain Productions


Ramar Group

The Oaks


ARCHITECT MINIATURE


Architectural Scale Models
Structural Models
Interior Scale Models


Special Effects
Topographical Site Models
Computerized 3-D Presentations


Forsythe Architects

First Baptist Church

Tichenor & Lindner

Edwin Schlossberg


Sarasota, FL 34230-1783
Circle 28 on Reader Inquiry Card


813 955-5555


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


Kendon Films

H. Aoki Studio


P.O. Box 1783


Western Inns

And More.













and maintenance instructions.
The catalog depicts four com-
plete interior signage systems. All
drawings are approximate and pre-
sented to show placement and fin-
ished appearance of signs. The cata-
log also depicts the options available
with regard to ANSI regulations for
visually impaired, regulations for
handicapped access and customiz-
ing for distinctive appearance.
To receive a copy of the manual,
call the Desk & Door Nameplate Co.
in St. Petersburg at (813) 327-1472.




Letters

Editor:
It was with great interest that I
read and viewed the articles on "Nine
Residences By Florida Architects"
in the May/June 1989 issue.
The last article, 'An Engineer in
Time Saves a Lot," also caught my
attention. An article about the bene-
fits of structural engineers to the ar-
chitectural project is something that
I as a structural engineer have often
emphasized.
Unfortunately, I had just previ-
ously read "Learn and Don't Burn,"
an article on wood framed multi-
family structures and their inherent
fire danger potential.
The first example in your article
was a nursing home that was con-
verted from precast concrete roofs
and interior noncombustible bear-
ing walls to clear span wood trusses
and elimination of the noncombus-
tible interior walls. HVAC changes
were also made and the project's
budget was reduced from $3 mil-
lion to $2.5 million.
It would be interesting to know
if the owner, architect or structural
engineer had evaluated life cycle
costs for the reduced structural costs
and higher insurance costs for a
nursing home a facility that re-
quires extra care for safety.
The other examples shown were
good ones and indeed show the bene-
fits of early structural engineering
participation.

Lane. R. Smith, PE.
Vice President
GAI Consultants Southeast, Inc.

FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


Order Your
Guide to Florida's Historic Architecture
Today
Call the FA/AIA Bookstore in Tallahassee at 904/222-7590 to order.


BENEFITS AND SERVICE
THAT ARE
RIGHT ON TARGET!


Group Health Insurance is a wonderful employee benefit...if it offers the
coverage employees want and need at a price employers can afford.
The FA/AIA Insurance Program combines extensive medical coverage, cost
containment features, a "Take Care of Yourself/Wellness Campaign", and an
unbeatable service package to offer a health insurance program designed
exclusively for the design professional.
For information on the FA/AIA Group Insurance Program, please call Ken
Hobbs or Kathleen McDonnell at:


Association Administrators
& Consultants, Inc.
The FA/AIA Insurance
Service Organization
19000 MacArthur Boulevard, Suite 500
Irvine, California 92715


1-800-854-0491 Toll Free


Circle 27 on Reader Inquiry Card









Software Solutions
to Steel Beam Design
Menu operated easy to use
For IBM compatible computers
Variety of video graphics
Any load, span or framing layout
Minimum top flange width option
Select beam from economy list on screen
Designs end connections
This program designs simple steel beams with or without
overhangs. It was written by a structural engineer
specifically for architects. A complete printed analysis is
provided. Please request a free demonstration disk -
specify size.
Applications include:
Lintels Roof Beams Floor Beams Hip & Valley Beams


,/-T---- s s ;- ---- -

SOFTWARE
2729 Bedford Way
Tallahassee, FL 32308
iE 904-386-2736
Stuctural Design Solutions
Tailored to Your Needs
Circle 23 on Reader Inquiry Card


Watch your mail for further information or call
FA/AIA Headquarters at (904) 222-7590


ALlEN MORRIS
CONSTRUCTION COMPANY


QUALITY CORPORATE CONSTRUCTION

EI~i l "llU lllk I li ='I0IIImmllmlmIlII_.


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DEERFIELD BEACH
305 429-3337


WEST PALM BEACH
407 684-1000


TALLAHASSEE
904 224-8531


Circle 18 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


Once Upon a Time...

Architects were Master Builders

Join your Florida colleagues as the profession
relives the Mizner dream in old Boca Raton and
looks to the future of Design Build.




FA/AIA
Fall Convention & Products Show
September 22-24, 1989
Boca Raton Hotel and Club
Boca Raton, Florida


MIAMI
305 358-1000










Broward County


Broward County's 1988 Awards for Excellence in Architecture was juried by Kenneth Treister, AIA, Miami; Roney J. Mateu, AIA, Miami, and John
Thomas Regan, Dean of the School of Architecture, University of Miami. The jury selected a total of four winning projects from two categories, built
and unbuilt.


Built Category: Award of Excellence

Private Residence
Palm Beach County, Florida

Architect: Donald Singer, FAIA
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This design for an oceanfront residence evolved from an effort to
capture the beauty of the sea and sky, while offering shelter and protec-
tion. The concrete and masonry structure is sheathed in natural coral
stone.


Built Category: Award of Merit


Port Everglades Passenger Terminal
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Architect: Michael A. Shiff & Associates, Inc.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This cruise ship terminal, the first phase of a planned expansion of
port facilities, announces itself with technological and sculptural expres-
siveness.


Unbuilt Category: Award of Excellence

Bay Plaza Waterfront Retail District
St. Petersburg, Florida

Architect: RTKL Associates, Inc.
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This masterplan for a nine block downtown urban retail district was
designed to transform an underdeveloped city core into an attractive
waterfront shopping park.


Unbuilt Category: Award of Merit

Twin Palms Apartment Project
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Architect: Terence O'Connor, AIA
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This private residence with two accompanying apartments was
designed with a private roof garden. This strong, simple building
shields occupants from the sun, funnels the wind and is well-suited
to a hot climate.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989






MAKE A DATE!


SARASOTA DESIGN CONFERENCE
JULY 14-16
COLONY BEACH RESORT
SARASOTA, FLORIDA

SPEAKERS: PAUL RUDOLPH, FAIA; BERT BROSMITH, AIA; JIM MURPHY, FAIA



What wallcovering
affords an unlimited
color palette, won't
shrink, stretch or burn,
does not contribute to
mildew growth, rein-
forces the substrate,
can be applied directly
over wood paneling,
stucco, tile and ot*er

problem surfaces, is
available in a variety of
subtle textures, and...
is paintable?


For more information about
Kohler Plumbing Products
see these Kohler distributors:
Lawrence Plumbing
Supply Company
Showroom:
5700 W. Flagler St.
Miami, Florida 33144
(305) 266-3338
31 S.W. 57th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33144
(305) 266-1571
405 N. Flagler Avenue
Homestead, Florida 33030
(305) 248-7020
8712 S.W. 129th St.
Miami, Florida 33176
(305) 251-7022
Wool Plumbing
Supply
Distrbutors of Plumbing
and Decoraive Hardware
Showroom:
5910 Shirley St.
(off Pine Ridge Rd.)
Naples, Florida 33942
(813) 597-8155
Showroom:
1321 NE 12th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33304
(305) 763-3632
Showroom:
4340 SW 74th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33155
(305) 266-7111
Showroom:
6778 N. Military Trail
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
(305) 863-7788


For local dealer information
and to request our publication
Ten Good Reasons To Install
Glass Fiber Wallcovering, call
1-800-88-TASSO (888-2776).

See us in SWEET'S Section 09950.


SPTASSO
The Professionals' Choice


Circle 45 on Reader Inquiry Card


Circle 6 on Reader Inquiry Card

FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989







Choosing Sides
Hexsign'"Lavatory and TaboretFaucet. Side with better design and color
on your next project. Kohler's distinctive shapes and exciting color range are
not just for residential use. Enameled cast iron fixtures and cast brass faucets
stand up to heavy usage in commercial applications. The cost stays within
budget. And everyone knows Kohler's reputation for quality.
When you can have so many designs in so many colors, why go white?
Make your project look as good as it functions, by simply choosing Kohler.
THE BOLD LOOK
SKOHLER.















RANDALL ATLAS
ARCHITECTURAL SECURITY
CONSULTANTS

Offering:

SECURITY SYSTEMS DESIGN

SECURITY PROGRAMMING

SECURITY AUDITS

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS

CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN

ARCHITECTS FOR SECURITY
Randall I. Atlas, Ph.D., AIA, CPP
600 NE 36th St., Suite 1522
Miami, Florida 33137

(305) 576-6029
FAX (305) 576-1390

CALL NOW FOR CONSULTATION
Circle 19 on Reader Inquiry Card


CLASSIFIED

NEW S. FL EDUCATIONAL
FACILITIES OFFICE
Anticipate 20 jobs in Ft. Lauder-
dale, 7/1/89, pending legisla-
tion. Plan reviews & final in-
spections. Florida Registered
Architects (8); Florida Regis-
tered Engineers (5); 1 Pro-
gram Specialist III; 1 Off. Au-
tomation Spec.; 1 Staff Asst.;
1 Admin. Sec.; 1 Sr. Clerk; 2
Sec. Ed. Fac., Dept. of Educa-
tion, 126 Collins Bldg., Talla-
hassee, FL 32399-0400.
EEO/AA.

FOR SALE Black Tizio lamp
in original box. Also, one George
Kovacs "Big Mac." Boxed and
never used. Call (813) 286-2652.

SCALE MODELS
Highly detailed and realistic
scale models for presentation.
Speed the approval process, en-
hance your sales or leasing ef-
fort. Call for our brochure. Scale
Model & Design Studios, 100
S. Harrington St., Raleigh, NC
27603. 919/832-4304


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989


PHDur











A Link To The Profession
by Diane D. Greer


T he second annual AIA
Education Honors program
drew nearly fifty completed sub-
mittals from thirty schools
nationwide. Jury members, all
educators, represented colleges
and universities from California to
Maryland. One of this year's three
recipients of the Education Honors
was a teaching internship program
entitled 'The Bridge That Bonds
Incoming Students With Existing
Students: A Course in Leadership/
Followship Training'' which was
designed, and is directed, by
Maelee Thomson Foster, an
Associate Professor of Architec-
ture at the University of Florida.
In a congratulatory letter to
Professor Foster, AIA President
Benjamin Brewer stated that "The
Bridge That Bonds was considered
among the most exemplary efforts
in the teaching of architecture for
its relevance to the profession, its
contribution to the advancement of
the profession of architectural edu-
cation and its ability to be
transferred to other instructional
settings.
"Brewer's high praise was
justly deserved. The success of
the program can be measured by
the many testimonials from
graduates who have found
themselves "seized" by the experi-
ence of teaching in a program that
helped to clarify their career goals.
Graduate interns who are now
educators, have installed modified
versions of The Bridge program in
their respective institutions and in
that way, the program may already
have had an impact on architec-
tural education and the profession.
Since its inception in 1973 as a
special topics course, the goal of
the program has been to train
qualified graduate teaching
assistants. Since 1984, the course
has played an active role in the UF
curriculum and appears as a 4th
and 5th year elective in the
Undergraduate and Graduate cata-
logue. The course owes its
existence to the continuing coop-
eration of faculty, students, ad-
ministration and staff. In The
Study and Practice ofLeadership
in the Discourse of "Liberal
Education", Frank Pace writes, "In
order for our colleges and
universities to advance and
disseminate knowledge, all stu-
dents must have courses exploring
the nature of leadership and testing


of leadership skills."
Pace's thoughts on this subject
may be influenced by the large
numbers of students who hesi-
tantly make their way into first-
year design studios seeking role
models and leaders to set the stage,
point the way, inspire and share
experiences. The leaders that
these future professionals seek
must symbolize the group's iden-
tity. They must act as leaders to
an insecure band of followers.
Professors represent the image of a
"grade-giving authority" and stu-
dents find it extremely difficult to
talk to a professor in this strange
environment with its harsh
demands to think, act and solve
problems.
The teaching intern, on the
other hand, is quite often available
late at night and on the weekends,
not to solve problems, but to
motivate students to seek answers.
They are there as role models,
eager and encouraging, to create a
bond with the students. In turn, it
is hoped that the student will bond
with the program. The teaching
interns have made a commitment.
They are self-selected and enrolled
in a two-credit elective course for
which they will be evaluated and
receive a grade.
The primary goal of the
Teaching Internship Program, as it
should be in all educational
experiences, is to make students
think, to question and to act. The
program, once established, runs
itself with the congenial coopera-
tion of the participants. It adjusts
easily to fit any degree program,
semester or quarter system. Since
it requires an insignificant
appropriation of time or funds, yet
increases quality performance and
production, it weathers political
shifts in administration. The
program can go anywhere and be a
viable part of any architectural
curriculum.
Since the Teaching Internship
Program is self-selective, it has
allowed for the identification and
involvement of qualified minori-
ties not only in The Bridge
program, but also in the innovative
Minority Tutorial Program. Here,
minority students seeking
leadership positions are identified
and given an opportunity in a
funded program that has an
unusual twist. The funding is
allocated to provide tutors for


minority students and the minority
students become the tutors for all
beginning students. They provide
well-advertised "Help Sessions"
one evening a week during the fall
and spring semesters and the funds
they earn go into the pocket of the
tutor. This interaction has proved
to be extremely beneficial to
faculty and students alike. In-
volvement in the Student Intern-
ship Program has proved to be
extremely valuable to the maturing
students as it allows an holistic
view of the students' architectural
education, a unique opportunity to
evolve as a leader and it also
fosters conceptual development
with verbal and visual communi-
cations skills.


Photos of students, top and above, by Maelee Foster. The Teaching Internship
Program runs itself with the total cooperation of the participants and increases
student performance and production.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1989






Cogeneration and Natural Gas Cooling Systems
Natural gas heating systems are very popular but today new technologies
make gas the perfect energy source for commercial cooling. DESICCANT
COOLING SYSTEMS provide refrigeration and cooling at lower humidity levels
with substantial cost savings over conventional systems. This allows super-
market refrigeration and cooling in which food doesn't sweat or frost over and
shoppers don't freeze.
Another "cool" technology is COGENERATION reliable, pollution free
power for all kinds of energy needs. Cogen Systems use gas to power an on-
site generator that produces electricity and heat. Recaptured heat is used to
provide electrical power space heating, air conditioning, water heating and
steam. The cost savings can be substantial. And you won't have to worry about
power interruptions or surges affecting sensitive operations.
To find out more about these and other cool new technologies call your local
natural gas utility or write:
Florida Natural Gas Association PO. Box 533432 Orlando, Florida 32853


I::. S~T~


FNGA
Florida Natural Gas Association
Circle 10 on Reader Inquiry Card










































PREMIX-MARBLETITE
Manufacturing Co.
Serving the building industry since 1955

STUCCO, PLASTER, DRYWALL AND
POOL PRODUCTS
SOLD BY LEADING
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For Specifications and color chart
refer to SWEETS CATALOG
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Miami Orlando
(305)592-5000 (407) 327-0830
(800)432-5097 -S.E. Watts- (800) 432-5539

MANUFACTURERS OF:
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* FLO SPRAY ACOUSTEX
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* CEMCOTE BEDDINGCOTE
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* FLOTEX SNOWFLAKE
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AND OTHER BUILDING PRODUCTS
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An Imperial Industries Company Reader Inquiry Card


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1








SPEC THE BEST!

Why settle for "equivalent" quality.


When you get roofing plans that read
..."or equivalent quality" you can
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tiles to add quality that's more
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Double weather checks
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* Manufacturing process
allows consistency in
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* Assures more even
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* Lightweight- up to 35% lighter
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* Fungus Retarding top coat
* Color throughout


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Circle 43 on Reader Inquiry Card








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Circle 33 on Reader Inquiry Card




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