• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Editorial
 News
 1987 FA/AIA awards for excellence...
 "Test of time" award
 Office practice aids
 Award of honor for design
 The Mediterranean legacy
 Advertising
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00266
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September-October 1987
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00266
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Editorial
        Page 11
    News
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    1987 FA/AIA awards for excellence in architecture
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    "Test of time" award
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Office practice aids
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Award of honor for design
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The Mediterranean legacy
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Advertising
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Back Cover
        Page 57
        Page 58
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CONTENTS

















Features


1987 FA/AIA Awards for
Architecture


Excellence in


1987 "Test of Time" Award

Award of Honor for Design

The Mediterranean Legacy
Jose Gelabert/Navia, AIA

Departments

Editorial
News
Office Practice Aids
The Slip and Fall Primer, Part II
Dr. Randall I. Atlas, AIA


Florida Architect, Official Journal of the
Florida Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects, is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Florida Cor-
poration not for profit. ISSN-0015-3907.
It is published six times a year at the
Executive Office of the Association, 104
EastJefferson St., Tallahassee, Florida
32302. Telephone (904) 222-7590.
Opinions expressed by contributors are
not necessarily those of the FA/AIA.
Editorial material may be reprinted only
with the express permission of Florida
Architect.
Single copies, $2.00; Annual subscrip-
tion, $12.00. Third class postage.


The cover photograph of the Stan Jordan Residence in Lake Wales is by Steven Brooke. The project was
designed by Mark Hampton, FAIA.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987


September/October 1987
Vol. 34, No. 5





































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Fl)RIDA ARCHITE EDITORIAL


Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
Publisher/Executive Vice President
George A. Allen, CAE
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertising
Carolyn Maryland
Design and Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Editorial Board
Ivan Johnson, AIA, Chairman
Carl Abbott, AIA
Bill Hegert, AIA
John Totty, AIA
Larry Wilder, AIA
President
John Barley, AIA
P. O. Box 4850
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
Vice President/President-elect
,T.,h i,r';_ AIA
1 i-: F:., Drive
Suite 221
Clearwater, Florida 33546
Secretary/Treasurer
Larry Schneider, AIA
25 Seabreeze
Delray Beach, Florida 33444
Past President
James J. Jennewein, AIA
780 Ashley Tower
100 S. Ashley Drive
Tampa, Florida 33602
Regional Directors
Glenn A. Buff, FAIA
1821 SW 98th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33157
Mark Jaroszewicz, FAIA
University of Florida
College of Architecture
331 Architecture Building
Gainesville, Florida 32611
Vice President for
Professional Society
Jerome Filer, AIA
250 Catalonia Avenue
Suite 805
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Vice President for
Governmental Relations
Bruce Balk, AIA
290 Coconut Avenue
Sarasota, Florida 33577
Vice President for
Professional Development
Dean Rowe, FAIA
777 S. Harbor Island Blvd.
Suite 300
Tampa, Florida 33602
Vice President for
Public Relations/Communications
Don Sackman, AIA
2869 S.W. 27th Avenue
Coconut Grove, Florida 33133
General Counsel
J. Michael Huey, Esquire
Suite 510, Lewis State Bank
Post Office Box 1794
Tallahassee, Florida 32302


his year's Design Award jury produced fifteen win-
ning projects and a definite trend in what they like to
see from Florida architects. Almost without exception,
the premeated projects were vernacular buildings which
drew their inspiration from the domestic architecture of
the Caribbean islands and the Spanish Colonial and
Mediterranean Revival styles so popular in Florida in
the 20's. Clearly, this jury, which met in Atlanta, knew
what it was looking for, stylistically speaking, and went
after it.
Vernacular architecture in a state as culturally and
geographically diverse as Florida is many things to
many people. It is consistently, however, the architec-
ture of logic. It is, of necessity, regional, energy-efficient
and it uses indigenous materials and local building tech-
niques and traditions. It is less a style than a sensibility
springing from man's need for shelter.
The following is a composite definition of vernacular
architecture which, I think, applies to much of Florida's
architectural heritage.
"It [vernacular] is not architecture produced by a few
intellectuals. Rather, it is the product of the spontane-
ous activity of a group of people with a common heritage
acting under a commonality of experience. Its humane-
ness causes a response in us. Vernacular architecture
does not go through fashion cycles. It is nearly immut-
able, indeed, unimprovable, since it serves its purpose
to perfection."



^^^ *^/ W


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987







NEWS


New Commissions

Currie Schneider Associates,
AIA, PA, has been selected
to design the renovations for
Redford's Restaurant in Lan-
tana. Completion is scheduled
for fall, 1987. Fugleberg Koch
Architects has designed a new 7-
Eleven Store for one of down-
town Orlando's oldest neighbor-
hoods. Brown-Cleary-Smith &
Associates have completed plans
for Catalina Grove, a New Eng-
gland-style community of at-
tached single family homes in
Vero Beach. The developer is Or-
lando-based Catalina Homes. *
Architects Design Group, Inc. in
association with Clements, Rum-
pel, Goodwin & d'Avi have re-
cently been selected to provide
master planning and design ser-
vices related to a major expan-
sion of the Marion County Judi-
cial System. The proposed com-
plex will include a new 120,000
s.f. judicial center, and renova-
tions to the existing courthouse
and annex buildings.
Architecture and construction
management for South Flori-
da's new attraction Butterfly
World will be provided by Bar-
retta & Associates. Butterflies
have been fighting a losing strug-
gle against pollution and destruc-
tion of natural habitats and the
new park will be home to 4,000
butterflies, the first such facil-
ity in the U.S. Architects De-
sign Group, Inc. and Cornerstone
Architects in Albany, Oregon,
have been selected to design a
new police station for the city
of Albany. The 12,000 s.f. facil-
ity will cost about one million
dollars. The Design Advocates,
Inc. will design Riverbend at In-
dian River Plantation, a ninety-
one unit waterfront condominium
community in Stuart. Radnor
Corporation is the developer. *
Wedding & Associates, Architects,
Inc. is designing and serving as
engineer for a $3-million manu-
facturing complex in Pinellas
Park. The firm is also designing
an $800,000 office building in
Venice for Guaranty Bank of
Southwest Florida, a newly char-
tered bank.


Schwab & Twitty Interiors has
been commissioned to design the
Jean Claude Jitrois Boutique in
Palm Beach. This will be the larg-
est store in the world for the in-
ternationally known chain of cus-
tom designed leather clothes.
The design will be a high-tech


contemporary utilizing pearl
gray and black with red accents
highlighted with chrome. Cur-
rie Schneider Associates, AIA, PA
will design a new shopping cen-
ter in Boynton Beach for Pedro
M. Diaz. The center will pro-
vide badly needed retail space


to the residents of West Boynton
Beach. Keith C. Hock, AIA,
has been selected by J.M.B.
Property Management Corpo-
ration of Chicago for architec-
tural design services on the ren-
ovation of Argyle Village Square
Shopping Center in Jackson-


I T
11f 14 ;

4, ht


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987














ville. The Smith Korach Hayet
Haynie Partnership has been com-
missioned to aid in the design
of the interior alterations for
Frenchman's Reef Resort Hotel
in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands.
The interiors of all the public
spaces will be completely refur-


bished. David Perez
Cibran of The Architect
nership, Inc. have comp
design of the West Gab
ping Center.
Robert M. Swedroe,
completed the design fe
story condominium, Bal


LIM*


and Jorge Tower. The half million square
tural Part- foot tower will contain 114 luxury
pleted the units. Keith C. Hock, AIA, will
les Shop- design the new council chambers
addition to the City Hall of New
AIA, has Smyrna Beach. Kenneth Hirsch
or the 24- Associates Architects, Inc. in as-
Harbour sociation with The Ryan Group,
PA, of Middleton, New Jersey,
has been commissioned to design
a new club facility for the Bamm
Hollow Golf and Country Club
in Middleton. Barretta & As-
sociates will provide space plan-
ning for three new facilities for
NCNB National Bank of Florida.
Hatcher, Ziegler & Gunn was
the firm responsible for the de-
sign of the new 33-story, 300,000
s.f. World TYade Center in Mi-
ami. Slattery & Root Architects,
PA, has been selected to provide
16,000 s.f. of space planning and
interiors for Building One of the
Research and Administrative
Complex for Rodime, Inc.
Construction documents have
been completed on the Moog En-
gine Controls Division Facility
by Reefe Yamada & Associates.
The facility includes approxi-
mately 70,000 s.f. of assembly/
test and production space for
aviation control systems. Scott
Bray Design Associates, Inc.
recently designed 17,000 s.f. for
the First Family Federal Bank
in Eustis in conjunction with Or-
lando architect Allen E. Arthur,
Jr., AIA. *Architects Interna-
tional, Inc. has been commis-
sioned for the design of Dade-
land North Metrorail Station
Parking Garage in Miami. Prin-
cipals in charge of the $13 million
project are J.N. Garcia-Hidalgo,
AIA, and Juan Crespi, AIA. *
The Coral Ridge Presbyterian
Church in Fort Lauderdale has
retained Schwab & Twitty Archi-
tectural Interiors to do the space
planning and create the interior
design for their 80,000 s.f. addi-
tion and renovation program. *
Currie Schneider Associates,
AIA, PA, has been selected by
The Linpro Company to design
phase two of The Linpro Distri-
bution Center in North Palm
Beach County. Currie Schneider


is also designing additions to
Pompey Park for the City of Del-
ray Beach and Phase I zero lot
line homes at Newport Bay Club
for the First Building Corpora-
tion of Florida. Mark S. Hart-
ley Architect has recently com-
pleted additions and renovations
for Coleman Junior High School
in Tampa, as well as a 2,800 s.f.
expansion of the Corporate
Headquarters for Marketing
Associates located in the Tampa
International Airport. Wed-
ding & Associates, Architect, Inc.
will design and serve as engineer
for two $4 million church-affili-
ated housing complexes for the
elderly in Pinellas County and
Daytona Beach.
The Architectural Partnership has
been commissioned by P.N.R.
Developers to design a 35,000
s.f. shopping center. Project de-
signers are David Perez, AIA,
and Jorge Cibran, AIA.
Beilinson Architect, PA, has
been retained to restore the 1925
Freedom Tower in Miami for $7
million. The building was origi-
nally designed by Shultz and
Weaver as a replica of the Giralda
Bell Tower and it was one of the
first skyscrapers in downtown
Miami. Dow Howell Gilmore
Associates, Inc. has designed an
addition to the Palm Springs
Public Library. The expansion
will double the facility's book
storage capacity and will pro-
vide a new auditorium/gallery
space that will accommodate 100
people.


Cypress Centre, in Fort Lauderdale, is by Barretta and Associates.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987


i

1













Awards and Honors

Key West Architect Jose An-
dres Gonzales, AIA, was ap-
pointed to serve as the new
Chairman of the Florida Com-
mittee on Housing for the Elder-
ly. The appointment was made
by the Department of Commu-
nity Affairs Secretary, Thomas
Pelham.
John W. Anderson, AIA, Vice
President and Division Manager
for Environments for the Aging
at Helman Hurley Charvat Pea-
cock/Architects, Inc. addressed a
statewide conference on "Aging
in Florida" sponsored by the
Gerontological Society of Flor-
ida. The issues were related to
design of retirement communi-
ties and a case study of the Alz-
heimer's Care Center of Orlando
was presented.
Steve Kuhle, CSI, Chief Speci-
fications Writer for the Orlando
architectural firm of Schweizer
Incorporated, was recently ap-
pointed to the MasterSpec Ar-
chitectural Review Committee
of the AIA. The MARC meets
quarterly to review and comment
on the next proposed issue of
MasterSpec, a guide used by
Construction Specification writ-
ers in the U.S. and Canada.
Mark Reeves, AIA, is an archi-
tect and attorney with the Miami
law firm of Sparber, Shevin,
Shapo & Heilbronner. He was
recently selected by the Editors
of Progressive Architecture for
inclusion in its special June, 1987,
issue on young architects. The
men and women profiled in the
issue were selected through a
competition open to all those who
are ten years or less out of archi-
tectural school. Reeves, who is
32, has a Bachelor and Master
of Architecture and a Juris Doc-
tor from the University of Miami.
He practices law with specialty
in construction, zoning and land-
sue law.
The Market and Heron Walk,
both designed by The Evans
Group, were recognized for their
outstanding architectural design
by the South Florida Builders
Association. Three homes de-


signed by the Jacksonville office
of The Evans Group were recog-
nized as winners in the North-
east Florida Builders Association
Parade of Homes.
Patricia L. Crawford, Execu-
tive Director of Schwab & Twitty
Interiors, has received an award
for her design of the Acura of
the Palm Beaches Building. The
award, for commercial design
with a limited budget, was pre-
sented by IDG and National Home
Fashions League.
Charlan, Brock & Associates
received an Honorable Mention
Award for their entry in the Fla-
mingo Gardens Design Compe-
tition. Stephen M. Joos and R.
Randall Buchanan, planning and
landscape architecture depart-
ment heads at CBA, accepted
the award for their work in the
site redevelopment of the South
Florida tourist, research and edu-
cation facility.
Miami architect Barry Sugar-
man, AIA, has been recognized
for excellence in homebuilding
by the Builder's Association of
South Florida. Selected for hon-
ors were the Tbwnhomes at Doral
Park, a development of attached,
single-family homes in Miami
built by Lennar Homes, Inc. The
Florida Achievement in Market-
ing Excellence Award (FAME)
recognizes excellence in home-
building and encourages out-
standing performance in design,
construction and marketing.
"Marketecture '87" was the
thrust of a seminar conducted
by Donald F. Evans, AIA, at the
1987 Southeast Builder Confer-
ence. Evans is known for his
market driven approach to home
design, which he calls marketec-
ture, and at this meeting he dis-
cussed top-selling detached zero-
lot line patio homes, duplexes,
garden villas, stacked flats, mid-
rise condos, mixed-use projects
and show homes.

The Building Owners and
Managers Association of South
Florida has named architects
Barretta & Associates as recipient
of the association's first annual


i1j1


U.f


The 1925 Miami Freedom Tower will be restored by Beilinsen Architect,
PA.


award for Special Achievement
for Outstanding Design. Two
buildings designed by Barretta
also won top honors from BOMA
in the 4-6 story office building
category Cypress Center in
Fort Lauderdale and Linpro
Sabre Centre I in Boca Raton.


CORREX

Apologies to Orlando photog-
rapher Bob Braun for an editor-
ial oversight in the May-June
issue of FA. The photo of the
Beaches Library which appeared
on page 30 was taken by Braun,
as was the photo of the Eckerd
Building on page 42.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987


:0


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HOT NEW WAYS
Improve your profits year in operating costs. Packaged cogener-
the bright way. action systems are being tailored to meet the
Here's a hot new way to fire up your cash needs of hospitals, nursing homes, hotels,
flow: Run your business on technologically motels, supermarkets and restaurants. This
Electricity advanced natural gas equipment. is one of the brightest technologies avail-
These high-efficiency systems have the BN able for many commercial establishments.
power to reduce your energy costs by up to Gas-fired heat pumps now being tested will
50% over electricity!* That's a bundle you soon make available another great way to
the business. ance. These systems are also
So invest in reliable, designed to be far more
long-lasting natural gas effective and reliable than
equipment. You'll find r conventional electric
they're some of the most equipment. So whether
advanced systems available. And one of your business is large or
the brightest ways to improve your cash flow. small, you'll benefit from
New technologies fire up your profits. natural gas technology.
Just look at advanced water heaters to see stay cool while
new gas technology in action. They're more sales heat up.
efficient and reliable than their electric I-- end on natural gas
counterparts, and they have an exceptionally equipment to put a chill on
long, useful life. New condensing-type water the high cost of your cool-
heaters deliver a 96% efficiency as compared iig needs. Operations
to 70% for most conventional units. That that need high perfor-
could mean substantial savings. mance cooling-from
New natural gas systems are unmatched in meeting supermarkets to high-rises- ian receive -
all )our choking needs. You'll improve your chefs perfor- greater efficiency, flexibility and peak performance
nuniir .ind mlke profits with the high speed, even heat from new gas-regenerated desiccant systems and gas
distnhui i n and precise temperature control provided absorption chillers. So you can relax in cool comfort
h natural gas. In fact, many well-known food knowing your business is operating at first-rate natural
rice companies like Wendy's International, gas efficiency.
Burger King, and Domino's Pizza are Cogeneration Give your business the natural gas edge.
moving to greater use of natural gas
systems. When it comes to smart business, you'll never Capitalize on all these natural gas advantages to keep your business
match the power of natural gas. high-powered Natural gas systems operate more efficiently, saving fuel
Generate all your power naturally. Have the flexibility and performance to meet virtually any need Offer
e all your power naturally solutions to both heating and cooling requirements Improve business
Natural gas can brilliantly generate our energy needs operating efficiency And natural gas costs less than electricity. Gas is
Irom one fuel source. This sizzling technology-called available more places than ever in virtually endless supply.
S c 'generation-allows you to heat and cool your facility, So don't wait to get a jump on the competition. Call your local nat-
S hea your water and produce excess electricity. By using ural gas company today, and get the facts about installing natural gas.
natural gas in such a versatile way, companies with large Or write FNGA, P.O. Box 66432, Orlando, FL 32853. It's likely to be your
energy requirements can save up to $225,00 '" -c.h sL anerici siII toward maintaining a high-powered business.
*Based on average consumption and rates in Florida of $.45 per Therm for I r,~, .. ,,.ual savings rangeof $90,000 to $225,000 for a 450-kWpackagefor a 250-bdhospital.
$.08 per KWH for electricity. -

You'll never match er of Natural Gas
FLORIDA I IATION Circle 10 on Reader inquiry Card










ARCHITECTURAL
PHOTOGRAPHY


ERIC OXENDORF

represented by
JIM CUNEO
813-848-8931


Circle 44 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987













1987 FA/AIA Awards
for Excellence in Architecture

This year, 157 entries in the
FA/AIA Awards for Excellence in Architecture
program resulted in fifteen winning projects
ranging from a Catholic church to
a cruise line terminal. The jury felt
that the quality of most of the submissions
was very high and that the projects showed
an awareness of the complexity in today's
design process. The jury consistently
selected projects with a vernacular feeling
and addressed their comments to the
relationship between building and site.
This year's jury members were
Merrill Elam, AIA,
ofScoggin Elam and Bray Architects, Inc.
in Atlanta, Chairman;
Faye Jones, FAIA,
ofFaye Jones Architect,
Fayetteville, Arkansas,
and Peter Blake, FAIA,
ofMetcalf and Associates,
Washington, D.C.











Russell Residence


Tampa, Florida


Architect
Rowe Holmes Hammer
Russell Architects. Inc.
Michael L. Russell. AIA
Project Architect

Owner
Michael and Jan Russell

- General Contractor
Michael and Jan Russell


Jur': "This deligli tfl resi-
deuce is a classic 1930's re-
cival reminiscent o'f /L c.:r
eitl. An invigorct i'g coIhi-
,ation of solid to coild noil
heavy o delicate."


[1
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FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Interim Cruise Ship Terminal Tampa, Florida


I I
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0409 -j


Architect
Fleischman-Garcia
Architects

Consulting Engineers
David Volkert and Associates
civil and structural
Emtee Coirporation
electrical. mechanical.
plumbing

Graphic Designer
Design Smith

Landscape Architect
Eugene Bales and
Associates
Central Florida Landscape

Owner
amlpa Port Authorit.y

General Contractor
Angle and Schmid. Inc.


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Museum Tower Mia


Architect
Spillis Candela
& Partners. Inc.


Consulting Engineer
Spillis Candela & Partners
electrical, mechanical, civil
The Office of Irwin G Cantor,
structural

Owner
I nt rAmerica Investments,
Inc..& Prudential
Insurance Co. of America

General Contractor
Witters Construction Co.

Jury: "This w!ell-disciplined
building i.s packaged in a
most elegant skin."i.


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Fb'.RIDA ARCHITECT Spt*
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Photo by George Cott


FLORIDA ARCHITECT SeptemtwruOciber 1987











Private Residence


Fort Lauderdale,


Architect .A ,,-
Donald Singer, FAIA -

Consulting Engineer
Gaston de Zarraga, PE .:

Landscape Architect : ''
Ted Baker Group '':

General Contractor -
John R. Elwell .
Construction Company ~


Jury: Th;s bold house h.Ai
strong, w'(l-handled plan. '1-
Although it ;d Biollo-'que.
it sits well in the Flo,'ida
landscape. One can imagine.
the cool i,,lteiior qalityl
a coin terupoint to the
Florida heat and light. ".'"












i Photo by Steven Brooke


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Photo by Steven Brooke


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Bet Breira Synagogue


Miami, Flori


Architect
Charles M. .SIeeer

Consulting Engineer
Davis Engineers

Landscape Architect
William Rosenberg


Owner
Congregation Bet Breira

General Contractor
Altrmani Meyers



July: "This bui.lidrg is sic-

ma1 nt tleC '. A r(it ct i r-
ill l, p ilu.:Shit.ica/er l l. te'l-
l i-cl lle, i ii 't Iboli rlly. Y o
t ji' ofi ~ .l I'Citi e "i gt.'i(( ii iq,
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bu ilding.


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Photo --Mark S
Photo by Mark Su


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Architect
Donald Singer. FAIA

Consulting Engineer. -
Gaston de ZaiTaga. PE


City of Fort Lag'







ti shout l u bes
ipphlauded for conu mission-
ing this wonderful piece of'
a : hitectiiral sculptu re
w,. which was derived from a
S t. and bolts concern for
S-light con rol."




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Photo Ed Zeal. .





















24 FLORIDA ARCHITECT *













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Sanbome Square Park

Architect
William Cox Architect

Landscape Architect
Thornbrough and Sabold
Lauldscape Architects

Owner
Boca Raton Community
Redevelopment Agency

General Contractor
McColueU Construction
Strelitz Construction


Jury: "The architect is to be
commended for attention to
small scale items in the
urban fabric. The delightful
use of color and texture made
this park very humane."


rL. I lA ARCHIrTECT SeplembetmOctoler- IP
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Miller Reside nce


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Owner
Willamwi ad Sanly f 4ii .

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Beach House


Boca (


Architect
Gene Leedy. Architect


' Oner
S Mr. and Mrs. Albert Carlton

General Contractor
Scheveling Construction Co.




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The Astronauts Memorial Foundation announces a competition for
a memorial to the astronauts who have lost their lives in the pursuit
of space exploration. The memorial must be a lasting, inspirational
tribute to these astronauts and, above all, it must stand for their
achievements. It will be built subject to NASA's approval, at the
Kennedy Space Center where it will be accessible to an estimated
2.5 million visitors annually.
An architectural commission plus $50,000 in prizes will be
awarded by a nationally renowned jury. The competition is open to
all U.S. citizens.
Submissions, limited to two 20" x 30" boards, will be due
December 11, 1987. To receive your program as soon as possible,
register by sending $50 (payable to Competition, Astronauts
Memorial Foundation) to:
Astronuts Memoril Foundaion
2121 Camden Road
Orlando. FL 32803
Programs will be available in Septem-
ber. No registrations will be accepted
after October 1,1987. For more informa-
tion, write to the above address or call
(305) 898-3737. The competition advi- The Astronauts
sors are Lawrence P Witzling and Memorial
Jeffrey E. Ollswang. Foundation

The Astronauts Memorial Design Competiton is sponsored by Southern Bell
and a grant from Allied-Signal Inc.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987



















IHIIEEN MIKENZIE PHOKDWRKS


(904) 731-4771


Circle 21 on Reader Inquiry Card


WE


LET THE GOOD IN


AND KEEP

THE BAD OUT
SSAVES ENERGY
0 PROTECTS AGAINST NOISE
ADMITS LIGHT
O DISCOURAGES BURGLARIES


Complete
and


GLASS I
P.O. BOX 832


Line of Glass Block
Accessories


MASONRY, INC.
5, PEMBROKE PINES, FLORIDA 33024 (305) 962-6884


Circle 37 on Reader Inquiry Ca


ard


See us at Booth #105 at the FA/AIA Convention in Clearwater


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987






"TEST OF TIME" AWARD




The Stan Jordan Residence Lake Wales, Florida

T he Stan Jordan Residence
in Lake Wales, Florida was
designed by Mark Hampton
and built in 1955. For thirty-
two years the house has been
occupied and beautifully main-
tained by its original owner.
This year's "Test of Time" jury,
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA,
Dean Rowe, FAIA, and Clyde
Brady, AIA, selected the house
to receive this prestigious
award. The "Test of Time" pro-
gram, now in its second year,
recognizes distinguished archi-
tectural design after a period of
time has elapsed in which the
function, aesthetic statement
and execution can be reassessed.
There is no question that the
house is one of the architectural '
jewels of the 1950's, a time
when Florida was truly the
"mecca for contemporary archi-
tecture" in America. Although
it is clearly a product of the
Meisian era, it also represents
the beginning of a break with
the International style. The
house is a romantic glass build- Photo by Steven Brooke
ing that is clearly in touch with
nature. It is further significant
because it was built at a time
when it was difficult for an ar-
chitect to get a commission for
a "modern" house. Rarer still
was the builder to build such a
house or the bank to finance it.
The fact that this house looks as
good or better today that it did
when it was built is a tribute to
its simplicity, order and atten-
tion to detail. The house has a
timeless quality.


even Droone
35


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987














A IMS WOT OF,
~DIFFERENCE






FOR HE LFE O


F


or only ten cents a square foot you can
increase the life of shingled roof systems
by up to 50%.


When you use PANOFLO as insulation and roof
deck nail base its unique bilateral air flow system
keeps shingled roof systems cool and helps
eliminate moisture between the shingle and deck.
And a cool, dry roof will last longer!
PANOFLO adds only ten cents per square foot to
the cost of a roofing system over and above what
normal decking and insulation costs. Yet it could
save you from replacing shingles early in the life
of your roof.
When you use PANOFLO vented nail base
insulation in your roofing system it will help you
build a roof that you can live with...
for a long time. ///,,


*The Koppers 20 year limited warranty states specific limits of liability
and should be referred to in its entirety for complete details.


The phenolic foam insulation in PANOFLO
carries the famous...
KOPPERS 20 YEAR GUARANTEE*


S PANOFLO: Vented Nail Base Insulation exclusively
manufactured by Universal Building Specialties
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Circle 58 on Reader Inquiry Card







OFFICE PRACTICE AIDS





Steps, Stairs & Slipping

by Dr. Randall I. Atlas, AIA


Outside ramp level-change with
warning stripe. Photo by R. Atlas.


Outside patio deck with level-
change warning stripe. Photo by
R. Atlas.


This is the second in a three part
series on stair design and stair
system safety.

Accidents caused by slipping
on a floor usually occur on a
forward step as the rear edge of
the heel meets the floor surface.
At this stage of walking the other
foot remains in contact with the
floor, until the heel rocks forward
and the leading foot is fully plant-
ed. For slipping to be avoided,
the friction between the sole-heel
of the footwear and the floor sur-
face must be sufficient to resist
the maximum horizontal forces.
External stair treads should
have a perforated, or a well-
drained surface. Polished wood,
polished stone, and smooth ce-
ramic tile should not be used for
stair treads. Mat wells should
be provided to remove moisture
from people's feet. Non-slip
strips parallel with the edge of
the tread should not be used as
they are likely to be confusing
to users with bad eyesight. This
position is consistent with the
AIA's Design for Aging; a guide
that recommends that different
colors and surfaces be used to
differentiate tread edges in fa-
cilities used by the elderly. This
guide further states that risers
and treads of contrasting colors
are particularly helpful to people
with visual impairments. Fric-
tion must not be too great or
the foot may lock on the tread
surfaces. The user must be able
to slide and pivot his foot slightly
while ascending or descending
a stair. Thus, rubber matting is
not recommended as an accept-
able covering for the treads.


Building codes in this country
are silent with regard to stan-
dards for the slip resistance of
walkway surfaces, other than
those for stairs and ramps which
must have a "non-slip" surface.
However, few codes define what
a "non-slip" surface is.
The most appropriate mea-
sure of the slip resistant qual-
ity of various walkway surfaces
is the static anti-slip coefficient
of friction (COF). The accepted
industry standard as adopted by
Underwriter's Laboratories and
the American Society of Testing
Materials is that a static anti-slip
coefficient of friction of .50 or
above is safe on a dry walkway
surface. A reading below .50
indicates an unsafe walkway
surface.
Architects are responsible for
specifying the materials used for
floor surfaces, and they can be
called as defendants in major
slip and fall cases. For that rea-
son, materials with a history
of being dangerous should be
avoided. Terrazzo has a very low
anti-slip coefficient of function,
i.e., it is very slippery. Terrazzo
is composed of granite and mar-
ble chips bonded with cement,
and chemically sealed. Terrazzo
is extremely slippery under wet
conditions and is so dangerous
that the National Bureau of Stan-
dards has listed it as a high-risk
material for stairway treads.
The safety of marble as a walk-
way surface depends on whether
it has worn to a higher safer COF
value or sealed and polished to
a low unsafe COF value. Mar-
ble steps generally have a low
COF. One way to make an unsafe


marble or terrazzo area safe is
through the use of non-slip mats.
Tile comes in so many different
surface conditions that it is dif-
ficult to generalize. Its COF de-
pends on whether it is glazed,
has non-slip additives or is in a
virgin fired condition. The archi-
tect should review the product
literature and specifications with
regard to the coefficient of fric-
tion. Brick often has a good COF
if it is dry and grease free, but
it is sometimes difficult to per-
ceive brick step edges. It is cru-
cial that brick tread edges be
painted white or treated with a
bright or contrasting color.
Standards for coefficient of
friction do not exist in the South-
ern Building Code, South Flor-
ida Building Code, the Uniform
Building Code and the BOCA
Basic Building Code. Thus, an
architect must utilize standards
from the National Bureau of
Standards, American National
Standards Institute and Ameri-
can Society of Testing Materials.

The author is a registered ar-
chitect in South Florida. He is
frequently called as an expert
witness on stairway and ramp
design with regard to slip and
fall accidents.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987





FA/AIA 1987 Fall Convention

THE CHANGING FACE OF FLORIDA ARCHITECTURE
October 8-11, 1987

Convention Highlights


Thursday, October 8
5:30-7:30 p.m.
7:00-10:00 p.m.
7:00-9:30 p.m.

Friday, October 9
8:00-8:30 a.m.
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
8:30-9:45 a.m.
9:30-10:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
9:00-10:15 a.m.
10:00-11:15 a.m.
10:30-11:45 a.m.
1:30-2:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m. until


Saturday, October 10
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
12:00-5:00 p.m.
8:00-10:00 p.m.

Sunday, October 11
10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.


Exhibit Hall Opening Ceremony and Reception
IDP Seminar #1 "Design Exam Review"
Architects At Home Dinners


Delegate Accreditation, Main Lobby
Exhibit Hall Open
Seminar A: "Living With the Sales Tax"
Delegate Accreditation, Main Lobby
IDP Seminar #2 "Programming and Client Contact"
Seminar B "Dollars from Deeds The Architect As Developer"
Seminar C "Computers Can't Live With 'Em ... Can't Live Without 'Em"
Seminar D "What's New With AIA Documents"
Tour of the Biltmore Presented by Connie Mudano
Host Chapter Party
"Tacky Tourists at the Kapok Tree Restaurant"


FA/AIA Annual Meeting and Caribbean Region Annual Meeting
1987 FA/AIA Awards of Excellence in Design
Awards Banquet Starlight Room


Farewell Brunch A chance to reflect on the weekend and rekindle our
inspiration for another year.


*These and many more events await you at this year's convention.


Cleal
rO31sz S1so



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rte ot hiwtcs




Bring this ad with you for FREE admission.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987













Architects position available
at small design firm on Amelia
Island, Florida.
Responsibilities include design
through supervision of custom
residential and light commercial
projects.
5 year minimum office experi-
ence required.
Contact: David Beer, (904)
261-4586.




Do you have an opening in your
firm? Do you have office equip-
ment for sale? A service to sell to
architects? Use Florida Archi-
tect classified.
Send material to be typeset
to: Florida Architect, P.O. Box
10388, Tallahassee, FL 32302,
Attn: Carolyn Maryland.
Material must be received 45
days prior to publication dates.
Publication dates are the first
day of January March, May, July,
September, and November.
Classified listings are charged
at the rate of $3.00 per typeset
line.


Classified


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The companies who underwrote the special events at the 1987 National A. I.A. Convention
held in Orlando June 18-22, 1987
A. A. & C. CONSTRUCTION, INC.
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The Convention was a Great Success!
We owe much to these allied businesses. Without their support the events, activities and benefits
we all derived would have been lessened.
Remember these kind folks and please return the favor by supporting their efforts.

THANK YOU
The Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects



























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1987 AWARD OF HONOR FOR DESIGN



Mark Hampton, FAIA



6 is dedication and discipline
I is so thorough that it
makes his work seem simple
and inevitable. There is gr.at
consistency and refinement of
space and detail which has influ- O(I,,,.-iti. page. left, Mclntosh Middle School, Samsota, FL. Opposite
enced the work of many archi- page, right, UW,;,.. Residence, Miami. Photos by Steven Brooke.
tects in Florida."
These w nr I- rld.-n bh the
work of Mark Hampton, this
year's recipient of the 19I .'
FA/AIA Award of Honor for
Design. The jury, all of whom
are previous winners of this
I 'e-tigilu. amnal, Carl Abbott,
FAIA, Peter Rumpel, FAIA,
and Don Singer, FAIA, selected
Hampton in rec.-,, iti',n of his
di--ign work over an extended
period of time. The high quality
and originality of his work has
inspired leadership for his fel-
low practitioners and has ad-
vanced the cause of good archi-
tecture in Florida.
Mark Hampton received his
Bachelor of Architecture de-
gree from Georgia Tech in 1949
after serving in the U.S. Army
as a Captain. He came to Flor-
ida from Atlanta in 1951 and
joined the firm ofTwitchell &
Rudolph in Sarasota. In 1974,
after having worked in Tampa
and Miami, he began his own
firm in Sarasota where he con-
tinues to practice. Hampton is
a Fellow of the American Insti-
tute of Architects and has been
the recipient of many awards at
the local, state and national
level. His design work, which
includes a number ofdistin-
guihetd residences, has been
published many times in Pro-
gressive Arch itecture and the
Architects ral Record. Notable
projects include the Hampton
Residence in Tampa, the Weiss
Residence in Savannah, Geor-
gia and the McIntosh Student
Center Middle School.
According to the Jury,
"Ha iipton's approach to archi-
tecture represents an an conm-
rri'.r i, '' dedication to the
highest standards of design
which raises his work to a re-
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The Mediterranean Legacy
The Florida Chapter of the American Institute of Architects
by Jose A. Gelabert-Navia


"El Jardin," now the Carrolton School, Coconut Grove, designed by
R ,ln rii Ki ,,e/Il. FAIA, in 1917. Photo by Steven Brooke.


Bass Museum, Miami Beach, designed by Russell Pancoast, FAIA, in
1930. Photo by Steven Brooke.


n 1884, two sons of well-to-do
British merchants from Brad-
ford, England, Charles Douglas
and Frederick Delius, set sail on
the ship Gallia for Jacksonville.
They stopped first in New York
City and Fernandina, Florida,
where a man by the name ofJ.R.
Pride met them and proceeded
to exchange the necessary sales
agreements for a property called
Solano Grove on the St. Johns
River.
Douglas and Delius, like so
many others, had become part
of a generation of eager settlers
who saw in Florida the possibil-
ity of a quick fortune and a sed-
entary, idyllic life.
At the end of the 19th century,
Florida remained a seductive,
but dangerous, wilderness in
which Henry Flagler and Henry
Bradley Plant had just begun to


stretch their network of railroads
on both coasts. Delius stayed in
Jacksonville one year; he then
left, going first to Virginia and
finally to Leipzig, Germany, then
the cultural capital of the musical
world. In time, he would go on
to become one of the greatest
composers of the 20th Century.
In Leipzig he wrote his first sig-
nificant work of music, a suite in
four movements which he titled
Florida. It was made up from
nostalgic passages of the tunes
and the spirituals that he remem-
bered from his brief Jacksonville
sojourn.
About the same time that De-
lius was writing about Florida
in Germany, an architect was
born there who would eventu-
ally make the opposite journey.
His name was Richard Kiehnel.
Kiehnel had studied at the Uni-


versity of Breslau, the Fine Arts
Academy in Berlin and the Ecole
Des Beaux Arts. He arrived in
Florida in 1917 and brought not
only the expectations of a promis-
ing future practice in a rapidly
expanding state, but also a seri-
ous and profound education and
a distinguished and proven rec-
ord. In Pittsburgh he established
a reputation from his designs for
the Catholic Cathedral, the Oak-
land Thrverein buildings (1912),
now in the University of Pitts-
burgh, and a series of excellent
private houses like the Stengel
House (1915). This record earned
him the commission for John
Bindley's Florida retreat, El
Jardin, which he designed in 1917.
Keihnel arrived in Florida a
year before Addison Mizner, who,
over the next ten years would
conceive, create and popularize
the myth of Mediterranean Flor-
ida for the winter weary. The
title "boom-time architects" in
Florida has come to signify quick
profit, low skill, eclectic taste
and a reputation to eclipse with
the frenzy that had nurtured
and created it. For years, Addi-
son Mizner was the most classic
and vilified example of the char-
acter. Self-taught and a racon-
teur, Mizner's legend spoke of
adventures in Central America
and the South Seas finding their
way into the architectural fanta-
sies that he would create for his
wealthy Northeastern clients.


The history of architecture
in Florida at the turn of the
.2nll century was like a
series of designer sideshows
coming like a circus troupe
to an unsuspecting state.

In a 1925 issue of The House
Beautiful Matlock Price wrote:
"7b say that the new Florida
Architecture lacks seriousness is
ii rl tnt1iiyly t, ntp t ripl nl ifit ar-
chitects on the attainment of their
real aim. Tii y do not mean to
be serious. Wl'dr they do not in-
tend it to be frivolous, thei defi-
nitely intend its picturesque in-
Jfriitlitif to express the spirit of
a land dedicated to long, carefree
vacations."
It was in that 1920's heyday of
myth building that the Florida
Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects took shape.
The Florida South Chapter was
perhaps the most important be-
cause of the concentration of
population. It was founded by
Richard Kiehnel in 1929. Antho-
ny Zink, a painter and architect,
was its first president. It is ironic
that it happened in 1929. That
was the year of the Great Depres-
sion, three years after a tragic
hurricane, and the lowest point
in building activity. Tb have
formed an association of archi-
tects in 1929 must have seemed
truly like a union of the unem-
ployed. In the following years,


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987




































S'0i


'


-.4--V c..


The Douglas Entrance, Coral Gables, designed by Walter De Garmo,
Phineas E. Paist, and Denman Fink. Photo by Steven Brooke.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987














well known architects Russell T.
Pancoast (1932), E. L. Robert-
son (1934), Phineas E. Paist
(1936), Vladimir Virrick (1937),
and August Geiger (1939) would
serve as President of the state
association.
And yet those individuals were
not the vanquished or the self-
serving. Phineas E. Paist, who
came to Florida in 1916, had al-
ready established his firm, Hewitt
and Paist, in Philadelphia and
was responsible for the Bellevue-
Stradford Hotel. He became F.
Burrall Hoffmann's Project Ar-
chitect for the Villa Vizcaya, but
his greatest contribution came
after 1925 when he established
the civic architecture of Coral
Gables. August Geiger arrived
in 1905 at the age of 17. He was
responsible for the grand neo-
classical schools of the 1920's and
1930's, as well as the Dade County
Courthouse (with A. Ten Eyeck
Brown, 1925), for years the tall-
est structure in the State. Rus-
sell Pancoast was the grandson
of Miami Beach pioneer John
Collins and was already responsi-
ble for two of the most outstand-
ing examples of architecture in
Miami: The Mediterranean Surf
Club (1929) and the Art Deco
Bass Museum (1930) in Miami
Beach.
Kiehnel was the force behind
the group. The Florida South
Chapter was his idea, as was
Florida Architecture and the Al-
lied Arts, which predated Flor-
ida Architect and was the first
magazine to document architec-
ture in the state.
In the editorial of the 1935 is-
sue, after outlining the on-and-
off history of his magazine, Kieh-
nel felt positive about continuing
the publication. The magazine's
purpose was stated in the last
paragraph:
"This publication is an effort
to bring the work of architects,
contractors and sub-contractors,
craftsmen and artisans to the
attention of all those who may
sooner or later become interested
in building."
The 1936 issue promised to be
impartial and general in its dis-


tribution. The 1940 issue carried
an editorial by the then current
president of the A.I.A., George
Spohn:
"For some time there has been
growing in the United States a
movement toward a better appre-
ciation by all classes of people
for good quality and artistic de-
sign. This is a distinct phase of
American cultural history and
applies to all things used by hu-
man beings.
Good design is apparent today
in the humble label of a tomato
can, in the fountain pen you use,
in your radio and in such things
as automobiles, airplanes and
streamlined trains as well as in
houses and commercial build-
ings. The reason the increased
sales appeal adds real value
and makes good design a neces-
sity in these days of intense
competition.
These things are not designed
by mechanics or salesmen, but
by specialists trained design-
ers. In the industrial field, the
specialist is the industrial de-
signer in the building field,
it is the architect.
A house without a good archi-
tect is as obsolete as a 1910 auto-
mobile. This applies just as
much to the modest bungalow
as to the larger structure. It is
recognized by financial institu-
tions, by experienced specula-
tors and by progressive individ-
uals. Good design is worth many
times the architect's fee."
This plea for quality and pro-
fessionalism, written forty-seven
years ago, underscores the labor
and the virtues of the Florida
Chapter of the A.I.A. Perhaps
as a result of the deeply puritan
upbringing of many of its early
members, the A.I.A. stood pre-
cisely as an organization which
chastised false pretenses in ad-
vertising and shady dealings in
real estate the much publi-
cized mortal sins of boom-time
architecture.
The Florida Association was
born at a time when architects
had little reason to be hopeful,
and more reason like George
Fink, who had designed so many


U. S. Post Office and Courthouse, 1931, designed by Phineas E. Paist and
Harold Steward, Architects. Photo by Steven Brooke.


In Florida, a
transformation was occurring.
Classicism was becoming
Mediterranean Revival, and
Vizcaya was the inspiration.

structures in Coral Gables, to
emigrate. And yet they stayed.
Kiehnel's obituary in 1944 re-
cords that he arrived in the U.S.
in 1892, was naturalized in 1896,
married in 1915 and arrived in
Florida in 1917, never to depart.
Pancoast came from Merchant-
ville, New Jersey, Geiger from
New Haven and many others
from Philadelphia. They were


all buried in Florida. Like Delius
they were trained in the grand-
est of the classical traditions of
the 19th Century. Like Delius,
they forsook that tradition in the
search for a romantic and ver-
nacular tradition which looked
to the themes of anonymous ar-
chitecture for inspiration. That
their work endures and has in
turn become our tradition is a
lasting tribute to their labor
and the organization which they
helped to create.
Jose A. Gelabert-Navia

The author is an assistant profes-
sor at the University of Miami.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987






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53


FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT September/October 1987


What you The new editions of AIA Documents
B 141 and B 151 (Owner-Architect
can do Agreements) contain provisions
when you which clarify your right to suspend
Sor terminate services for nonpay-
don't ment by the Owner. The newly
revised Documents also create an
get paid. automatic extension of services for
AIA additional fees.
Documents For more information on how you
can use AIA Documents to keep
your cash flowing, call your local
chapter.









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