• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Editorial
 News
 Advertising
 Office practice aids
 Les Arts Decoratifs L'Hotel de...
 A pyramidal adaptation of Florida...
 A linear progression of forms
 Classical tradition blends with...
 A park for the people
 Advertising
 Viewpoint
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00265
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July-August 1987
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00265
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
    Advertising
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Editorial
        Page 5
    News
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Advertising
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 10a
        Page 10b
    Office practice aids
        Page 11
    Les Arts Decoratifs L'Hotel de la Mer
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    A pyramidal adaptation of Florida cracker
        Page 16
        Page 17
    A linear progression of forms
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Classical tradition blends with modern technology in USF Sarasota library
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    A park for the people
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Advertising
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Viewpoint
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Advertising
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Back Cover
        Page 42
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.






J)RIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987



















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July/August 1987
Volume 34, Number 4


CONTENTS





Features



Les Arts Decoratifs L'Hotel de la Mer 12
The "Tropical Deco" Edison Hotel on Miami Beach
has been restored by Beilinson Architects.
Esther L. Perez

A Pyramidal Adaptation of "Florida Cracker" 16
Reefe, Yamada & Associates designed a Tampa
residence that takes its cue from vernacular house
forms.

A Linear Progression of Forms 18
On Lake Keystone, Abell Garcia Architects
stretched one house into a series of beautifully
evolved "cottages."

Classical Tradition Blends With Modern
Technology in USF Sarasota Library 21
Harvard, Jolly, Marcet's new library unites two
parts of the USF campus in an updated
"Ringling-style" building.
Diane D. Greer

A Park for the People 26
At the D.C.A. Active Park in Sunrise,
Michael A. Shiff& Associates provided recreational
space on a challenging site.

Departments

Editorial 5
News 6
Office Practice Aids 11
The Slip and Fall Primer
Dr. Randall I. Atlas, AIA
Viewpoint 33
Drawings from the Sketchbook of
Lowell Lotspeich, AIA, document his
extensive travels







The cover photograph of the D.C.A. Active Park in Sunrise is by George Miller, Miller Photography.
The park was designed by Michael A. Shiff & Associates.









F)RIDA ARCHITECT EDITORIAL


Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
Publisher/Executive Vice President
George A. Allen, CAE
Editor
Diane D. Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertising
Carolyn Maryland
Design and Production
Peter Mitchell Associates, Inc.
Editorial Board
Ivan Johnson. AIA, Chairman
Carl Abbott, AIA
Bill Hegert, AIA
.John Totty, AIA
Larry Wilder, AIA
President
John Barley, AIA
P. O. Box 4850
Jacksonville. Florida 32201
Vice President/President-elect
John Ehrig, AIA
2333 E. Bay Drive
Suite 221
Clearwater. Florida 33546
Secretary/Treasurer
Larry Schneider. AIA
115 Woodland Road
Palm Springs, Florida 33461
Past President
James J. Jennewein. AIA
7O) Ashley Tower
100 S. Ashlev Drive
Tampa, Florida 33602
Regional Directors
Glenn A. Buff, FAIA
1821 SW 98th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33157
Mark Jaroszewicz, FAIA
University of Florida
College of Architecture
331 Architecture Building
Gainesville, Florida 32611
Vice President for
Professional Society
Jerome Filer, AIA
250 Catalonia Avenue
Suite 805
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Vice President for
Governmental Relations
Bruce Balk, AIA
290 Coconut Avenue
Sarasota, Florida 33577
Vice President for
Professional Development
Dean Rowe, FAIA
777 S. Harbor Island Blvd.
Suite 300
Tampa, Florida 33602
Vice President for
Public Relations/Communications
Don Sackman, AIA
2869 S.W. 27th Avenue
Coconut Grove, Florida 33133
General Counsel
J. Michael Huey, Esquire
Suite 510, Lewis State Bank
Post Office Box 1794
Tallahassee, Florida 32302


f architecture is the best tangible evidence of how man has
lived throughout history, then the discovery of the site of the
de Soto encampment less than a mile from my office, certainly
has the potential to offer the clearest picture of true vernacular
architecture.
Hernando de Soto, on an expedition chartered by the King of
Spain, sailed into Tampa Bay in search of places to settle and
riches for Spain. He traveled north through Florida and, accord-
ing to the written account of Garcilaso de la Vega who inter-
viewed many of the expedition's survivors, de Soto and his men
arrived in what is now Tallahassee in October, 1539. One-
hundred-and-forty-three days later they departed, leaving
behind what is proving to be a remarkably clear picture of their
tenure in North Florida.
The Apalachee Indians who inhabited the area prior to Euro-
pean exploration built round houses approximately 25 feet in
diameter. This is the type of structure the de Soto party would
have encountered. Based on archeological findings, it is assumed
that the Spanish built rectangular structures approximately 35
by 45 feet which were not too different from the missions they
built in Florida 100 years later. There are further archeological
indications that upright posts were lashed together, infilled
with wattle and daub and roofed with palmetto fronds. Some
nails were found, obviously brought from Europe along with
iron tools. The buildings seem to have been an interesting com-
bination of European technology combined with the use of on-
site materials and construction ideas probably gleaned from the
native inhabitants.
The relevance of the de Soto site to archeologists, architects
and historians is clear. But, for the rest of us, the casual ob-
servers, the site should be no less important. The fact that
"de Soto Slept Here" could help insure our place in history
and may do for Florida what George Washington did for all
those New England inns.






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FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987







NEWS


McRae New Dean of
Mississippi State

Professor John McRae, AIA,
Chairman of the Department
of Architecture at the Univer-
sity of Florida, has accepted a
position as Dean of the School
of Architecture, Mississippi
State University, Starkville.
McRae has been on the faculty
at UF since 1967 and Chairman
since 1982. His research and con-
sulting interests have focused
on gerontology and he recently
served as Chairman of the Flor-
ida Legislative Committee on
Housing for the Elderly.
McRae, a native of Missis-
sippi, assumed his duties July 1.


New Commissions

Miller Associates has just com-
pleted the renovation of Uni-
versity Shoppes, a 15,000 s.f.
shopping center in Winter Park.
The firm has also been selected
to design the Shoppes at Mait-
land, a 20,000 s.f. retail facility
and they will provide architec-
tural services for Walmart Plaza
in Maitland. JMB Property
Management Corporation of
Chicago and recent purchaser of
Arvida from Disney has selected
Keith C. Hock, AIA Architects to
perform inspection services re-
garding their purchase of apart-
ments in Pompano Beach. Hol-
lywood's Military Circle, an is-
land on Hollywood Blvd. which
once housed a military academy,
may soon be known as Presiden-
tial Circle and contain a landmark
office structure with 7-story,
lighted, see-through atrium.
The project will be designed by
Barretta & Associates and asso-
ciate architect Arthur Frimet. *
Benjamin P. Butera, AIA, has
been selected to design the new
Remax Headquarters building
in Altamonte. The firm has just
completed the Dayas Auto Body
building in Longwood. Dayas


services such autos as Rolls
Royce, Porsche and Mercedes.
The Stewart Corporation Archi-
tects, in association with Diedrich
& Associates Architects of At-
lanta, recently completed de-
signs for Markborough of Flor-
ida's clubhouse, information cen-
ter and tennis/fitness center at
Hunter's Green in Tampa. The
Interior Design Department of
Oliver-Glidden & Partners re-
cently completed installation on
the 1,700 s.f. office of Dr. Richard
Margolies at the Gardens Medi-
cal Plaza in Palm Beach Gar-
dens. Schenkel & Shultz, Inc.
Architects will do the master
planning of a new 65-acre office
park in Orlando. In addition, the
firm has been awarded an open
end contract to provide architec-
tural and engineering services
for the U.S. Navy at the Naval
Training Center in Orlando.
Schenkel & Shultz has also been
selected by the Greater Orlando


Ground has been broken for the new corporate headquarters for Gee &
Jenson, Engineers-Architects-Planners, in Palm Beach Lakes.


Artist's rendering of ParkCentre, a 26-acre suburban office park in South Florida designed by Baldwin +
Sackman & Associates.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


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Aviation Authority for an indef-
inite term open end contract as
part of their $400,000 expansion
program. The Architectural
Partnership Inc. has completed
contract documents for the
new Pembroke Pines City Hall,
a 70,000 s.f. complex of three
buildings.
Ground has been broken for
the second phase of ParkCentre,
a one story, 133,000 s.f. office/
showroom/warehouse facility
created by Baldwin + Sackman
& Associates. The $50 million,
26-acre office park, being devel-
oped by Loys Charbonnet and
Donald Gache, is strategically
located at the Golden Glades
Interchange in Northern Dade
County. The Design Advocates,
Inc. has been selected by The
Radnor Corporation to design a
clubhouse complex for the $30
million waterfront community,
Edgewater Landing. Mudano
Associates has been commis-
sioned to design the 121,000 s.f.
Tower Oaks Terrace Shopping
Plaza planned for Pasco County.
The project is being developed
by Rosewood Properties of Dal-
las. The Hillsborough County
School Board has selected Hanmm
Woodroffe Corporation Architects
for the renovations and additions
to the Egypt Lake Elementary
School in Tampa.
Oliver-Glidden & Partners De-
sign Department will coordinate
the remodeling and renovation
of J. B. Hanauer & Company's
North Miami Branch Office. *
Ground has been broken for the
new corporate headquarters of
Gee & Jenson, Engineers-Archi-
tects-Planners, Inc. in Palm Beach
Lakes. Interiors will feature pre-
dominantly open floor space ap-
propriate for professional design
functions. Construction began
in early April on Island Club,
Melbourne's only new beachside
community designed by Fugle-
berg Koch Architects. The 10.7
acre site plan focuses on the proj-
ect's two lakes. Construction
began in April on the 65,000 s.f.
specialty retail center, Esplan-
ade at Coral Square, designed
by Currie Schneider Associates


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The renovation of Palm Beach Junior College Performing Arts Center by Schwab & Twitty Architects received a
first place FAME award.


AIA, PA. The firm has also been
chosen to design the second phase
of the Catalina Center resort and
hotel in Boynton Beach and they
designed the interior spaces for
the new office of Paramount En-
gineering in Delray Beach. A
108-unit apartment project,
dubbed The Fountainhouse, is
being designed by Baldwin +
Sackman & Associates. The new
project will be in the block ad-
joining the Miami Lakes shop-
ping center and is being devel-
oped by The Graham Companies
of Miami Lakes. Schwab &Twitty
Interiors have been commissioned
to do the space planning and pre-
pare the construction documents
for Esperante, a 295,000 s.f.
mixed-use project in West Palm
Beach. The same firm will be
doing the interior architectural
plans for the offices of First Wis-
consin Trust Company, the larg-
est financial service organiza-
tion in Wisconsin. The Florida of-
fice will be located in West Palm
Beach. The Design Advocates,
Inc. has been selected by Algon-
quin Development, Inc. to design
a waterfront condominium in
Naples. The project will have


three buildings totaling thirty-
three units. Fugleberg Koch Ar-
chitects is working on three apart-
ment developments in South
Florida for Picerne Development
Corporation. The three commu-
nities are in Sunrise, Davie and
Deerfield and feature similar de-
sign themes with each apartment
containing a solarium.
Alyo International Architects
has been selected to design a
14,000 s.f. shopping center, fast
food restaurant and 86-unit motel
on U.S. 41, north of Port Char-
lotte. Alyo is also currently de-
signing a 72-unit motel on 1-75
in Ellenton. Fugleberg Koch Ar-
chitects is designing three Muf-
fler Man facilities in the Orlando
area that will feature unusual de-
sign details and colorful graphics.
Developer/owner for the proj-
ects is LaKenDon, Inc. and the
construction cost per shop is
$150,000.

Awards

The Hillsborough County City-
County Planning Commission
recently recognized The Design
Advocates, Inc. for three of their


local projects, including Lake
Ellen Landings, a single family
attached dwelling development,
Reeves Import Motorcars Show-
room, a commercial development
and Pinebrook Business Park,
an industrial complex. Projects
are judged on the impact they
have on the quality of life in Thm-
pa and future impact on the Flor-
ida environment.
Slattery & Root Architects, PA,
and Angles Esteban Associates
were honored recently at the
.1987 FABA GEM (Guild for Ex-
cellence in Marketing) Awards
Banquet. The awards competi-
tion is sponsored by the Florida
Atlantic Builders Association.
Slattery & Root received an award
for the "Best Custom Single
Family Architecture For A Pri-
vate Residence Under $300,000"
and for the "Best Commercial
Remodeling," that being for the
renovation of the Boca Bank
Building in Boca Raton.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


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Angles Esteban received an
award for "Best Overall Devel-
opment/Single Family Custom
Home Design" for Barcelona in
Boca Raton and "Best Overall
Development/Single Family At-
tached from $80,000" for Verona,
a village in Deerfield Beach.
Slattery & Root Architects, PA,
and the Coral Springs Animal
Hospital in Coral Springs were
honored by receiving a national
award in the Veterinary Eco-
nomics' Hospital Design Com-
petition. The award was com-
plemented by the fact that it
was one of only three chosen
from over 100 submittals in the
country.
"FAME" Awards were pre-
sented by the Florida Building
Industry for Achievement in
Marketing Excellence. Recipi-
ents were The Design Advocates
for Old Ponte Vedra Beach, The
Terraces in Naples and Santi-
ago/ Urban Dwelling Units in
Tampa; Angles Esteban Associ-


ates for the Steiner Residence
in Miami, Charlan, Brock & As-
sociates for Heathrow's Devon
Green, Sabal Point's Sabal Park
Apartments and the luxury Win-
ter Park infill, McIntyre Place,
Robert M. Swedroe, AIA, PA, for
the Williams Island Tower, The
Evans Group for the Market at
Sandestin, Park Plaza in Naples,
Bonita Bay near Naples, Cross
Creek in Plantation and a num-
ber of other sites around the
state and Schwab & Twitty Archi-
tects, Inc. for Trump Plaza in
West Palm Beach, the renova-
tion of the Palm Beach Junior
College Auditorium and Aqua-
rina Beach Club in Melbourne.
The Florida Central Chapter,
AIA, presented its 1987 Awards
for Design Excellence to the H.
Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and
Research Institute by Bentler/
Heery Architects, Rivergate Of-
fice Park by Rowe-Holmes Asso-
ciates Architects, Inc., Ocean
Center by Ellerbe Architects and


Engineers, Inc., the Library for
the University of South Florida
in Sarasota by Harvard, Jolly,
Marcet and Associates, Architects,
PA, AIA, and the John D. Floyd
Elementary School by Ranon and
Partners, Inc.


BOOKS

Shaping the City
By Roger K. Lewis, FAIA (AIA
Press, $14.95, or $10.50for AIA
members)

Quality of life and quality of
design issues are addressed
by architect Roger K. Lewis,
FAIA, in his new book, Shaping
the City, which was published in
May by the AIA Press. The book
is a series of essays which were
originally published in Lewis'
weekly columns in the Washing-
ton Post. The Post columns,
which dealt with architectural
design and urban planning, are


principally drawn from sources
in the Washington area, yet the
overall themes expressed in the
book apply to cities across Amer-
ica. Lewis also joins in current
architectural design and urban
planning debates, discussing,
for example, the controversial
designs for the Guggenheim and
the Whitney Museum of Ameri-
can Art in New York City.
Geared for the general reader
as well as the architect, Shaping
the City informs and entertains
with 72 pen-and-ink cartoons.
The 324-page collection of essays
and drawings includes: creating
America's Capitol, streetscapes,
celebrating commerce, "home-
sweet-home," the city's archi-
tecture, historic preservation,
the architect's task and the de-
velopment process.
Shaping the City is available
through the AIA Bookstore, 1735
New York Avenue, NW, Wash-
ington, DC 20006. There is a $3.00
shipping charge.


--------- -

4Y


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


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THE BOLD LOOK
OFKOHLER

European styling and Kohler quality join hands. The ChardonnayM' pedestal lavatory in Raspberry Puree,M
available in fourteen other decorator colors. Other custom faucets also available. For more details see the Yellow
Pages for a Kohler showroom, orsend $2 for a color catalog to Kohler Co., Dept. BD5, Kohler, Wisconsin 53044.
C 501 Copy ghl 1985 KoNer Co












Before you
sign
your next
contract ...


Significant changes have been made
to many AIA Documents to further
clarify roles and responsibilities, to
provide remedies for nonpayment,
and to require proper credit and
recognition of the architect's
contribution.
Before you sign your next contract,
you need to know what revisions
have been made and what they
mean to your relationships with
owners and contractors.
Call your local chapter for more
information on how you can best
use AIA Documents.


Atlas
& Associates

Security Design for
Architecture

(305) 325-0076


Randall Atlas, Ph.D., AIA,
Consultant
600 N.E. 36 St.
Suite 1522
Miami, FL 33137
Circle 19 on Reader Inquiry Card


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Jeff Falkanger & Assoc, AIA
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Smith Obst Assoc. AIA
W. Palm Beach


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* Writing succinctly


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has conducted workshops for SMPS, NSPE, and AIA. regionally and nationally
Registration deadline
June 26, 1987
Call Jane Grosslight (904) 644-3801
SFlorida State
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Don't mix
old and new
AIA Documents


AIA
Documents


---







OFFICE PRACTICE AIDS





A Slip and Fall Primer

by Dr. Randall I. Atlas, AIA


This is the first in a three part
series on stair design and stair
system safety.

Falls are the second leading
cause of accidental death in
both the home and public places
in the United States. Only motor
vehicle accidents kill more peo-
ple. In 1985, 11,300 people were
killed in falls. This represents
about twelve percent of the acci-
dental death toll. Of these, 6,100
people were killed in falls in and
around the home and 3,800 were
killed in falls in public places.
There are 200,000 to 300,000 dis-
abling injuries in work-related
falls each year according to Na-
tional Safety Council estimates
and the Bureau of Labor Statis-
tics has named slipping, or loss
of footing, as the primary event
involved in a fall. An additional
25% named loss of balance or los-
ing grip on the object they were
holding as the reason for a fall.
More than four out of five acci-
dents occurred while going down
stairs. Slippery surfaces were
by far the most common hazard
cited in the falls.
When attorneys refer to slip
and fall accidents, they can in-
clude: 1) slippery surface falls,
2) stairway falls, 3) balcony or
landing falls, 4) ramp falls, 5) for-
eign object-caused falls, 6) park-
ing lot falls, 7) sidewalk falls, and
8) bathtub-shower falls.
The most important points at-
torneys look for in liability and
negligence cases are: 1) presence
or absence of handrails and guard-
rails, 2) adequate lighting and
barriers, 3) presence of a non-
slip surface, 4) adequacy of land-
ing areas, 5) field of vision, health
status and behavior of the vic-
tim, 6) biomechanics of the fall,
weather conditions and main-
tenance.
There are a number of items
which are recognized as design
and construction failures acting
as contributors in stair fall acci-
dents. Some of these are winders,


w 7

r *-? *et- $1
9 I


open risers, single steps, doors
opening onto stairways, low
headroom, high thresholds, low
riser heights, poor lighting, hand-
rails that are not continuous, un-
marked brick, terrazzo, waxed
treads or marble, loose carpet
and walls or posts intruding into
stairwells.
While it may not seem that
many of these issues are the re-


sult of design, there have been a
lot of judgements awarded that
cost the architect money. Most
experts agree that proper stair
design lessens the probability of
accidents. However, since there
is no consensus on exactly what
a safe stair entails, standard set-
ting organizations are focusing
their attention on proper sizing
of risers and treads, shapes of


nosings, size and placement of
landings, dimensions of hand-
rails, etc.
There is a need for warning
people so that they are not sur-
prised by stairs. Changes in floor
surfaces, an extension of a wall
decoration or an inclination of a
handrail are ways in which peo-
ple can be cued. Visual confusion,
misleading information and dis-
tractions must be avoided. For
example, people are particularly
prone to falling if any of the fol-
lowing factors exist:
* They fail to observe a stairway
when the change in levels con-
nected by the stairway is small.
* A stairway is in an unexpected
position behind a doorway.
* The person is distracted by
light from outdoors, or street
scenes.
* The person doesn't realize the
danger of one or two isolated
steps.
* The person is impaired by
glare caused by windows, or sky-
lights, or stairs just inside a
doorway.
Riser height, which is the ver-
tical distance from one tread
surface to the adjacent tread
surface, has considerable effect
on the way the pedestrian's foot
will land on a stair tread. If the
riser is too high, it will cause the
foot coming off of it to land fur-
ther out on the tread below. If
the riser is too low, it will cause
the foot coming off of it to land
further back on the tread. Thus,
a high riser will result in the ball
of the foot landing where there
is little or no tread surface to sup-
port it and a lower riser will re-
sult in the back of the foot being
caught on the tread surface. The
result is a mis-step and usually,
a fall.
It is imperative that in the fu-
ture there be little or no varia-
tion between riser systems (most
codes require uniformity in risers
within a /16 inch). Studies of stair
accidents have indicated that the
majority of stairs on which acci-
Continued on page 29


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987












Les Arts Decoratifs L'Hotel de la Mer


The Edison Hotel
Miami Beach, Florida

Architect: Beilinson Architect,
P.A.
Engineer: Bhamani, Ford &
Associates
Historical Consultants: Sarah
Eaton, City of Miami Planning
Dept.
Owner: Breakwater/Edison,
Ltd.

T he term "Art Deco" origi-
nated in 1925 during an In-
ternational Exhibition for
Applied Arts which was held in
Paris that year. The displays of
artistic work including glass,
bookbindery, ceramics, textiles,
wrought iron and other decora-
tive arts was called the "Expo-
sition Internationale des Arts
Decoratifs et Industriels Mod-
ernes," and its abbreviated title
"Art Deco" gave the style its of-
ficial name. The 1925 Arts Ex-
position brought to the front, as
never before, American in-
genuity and cultural expression
that reflected a new modernism
with a phenomenal range of de-
rivative influences.
In her book, Tropical Deco:
The Architecture and Design of
Old Miami Beach, Laura Cer-
winske describes some of these
influences: "Within this range
of new expression were merged
the patterning, color and
geometry of Egyptian and
Aztec cultures; the dynamism
and syncopated rhythms of
jazz; the romance associated
with ocean liners like the Nor-
mandie and Ile de France; the
glamour of the automobile and
the speed of the locomotive;
daring and streamlined visions
of aerodynamics; the new realms
of fantasy opened up by the
movies and later by animation;
the intellectual and fictional
stimuli of science inspired by
H.G. Wells and Buck Rogers
movies; the use of new indus-


trialized materials such as
chrome, glass, polished bronze
and stainless steel in high
design."
The Mediterranean Revival-
style seen in the facade of the
Edison Hotel, c. 1935, repre-
sents both the fantasy and mod-
ernism of the Art Deco style
and the influence of an earlier
Mediterranean style that had
existed in Florida since the
early 1920's.
The four-story Edison Hotel
is the product of a synthesis of
several cultural forces. It
echoes an American obsession
with decorative ornamentation,
interest in the exotic cultures of
the Mayans, Aztecs and Egyp-
tians, the assimilation of Euro-
pean style and fascination with
speed and geometric patterns.
Examples of this synthesis
exist in the Aztec-inspired
crisscross pattern below the
first and second story windows.
The Mediterranean-inspired ar-
cade and Venetian spiraled col-
umns add a touch of fantasy.
The restoration of the Edison
involved returning the building
to full functioning capacity as a
69-room hotel with two pent-
house suites, an 80-seat restau-
rant and poolside beverage
service. Located on Ocean
Drive in Miami Beach's Art
Deco District which is listed on
the National Register of His-
toric Places, the hotel's design
is characteristic of a tropical
Art Deco style that flourished
in South Florida during the real
estate boom of the 1920's and
30's.
The architectural restoration
sought to completely update
the CBS-constructed building
without modifying any of the
original architectural features.
Beilinson Architects paid
careful attention to the interior
and exterior masonry, particu-
larly in the arches where layers
of multi-colored paint were


~Ho


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II


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987




























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I!- L





LI 1


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


stripped from the masonry
down to the original stucco. A
sealer-primer was applied to
the cleaned surface that reacts
chemically and physically with
the original stucco surface to
provide an integrated weather-
resistant surface without re-
moving any of the original tex-
ture. The surface is then
finished with a pigmented
cementitious coating that pene-
trates into the primer and pro-
vides a permanent finish.
The interior of the Edison did
not require gutting. However,
walls were opened to replace
galvanized waterlines with new
copper lines. New PVC waste-
lines were installed in place of
old cast iron lines. Hallway ceil-
ings were dropped six inches to
accommodate sprinkler and
alarm systems. A ductless air-
conditioning system was instal-
led thereby negating the need
for lowering bedroom ceilings
and changing the original scale
of the guest rooms.
Original hotel furniture was
reupholstered and restored in-
cluding the original wooden
Venetian window blinds and the
Otis elevator with its brass con-
trol panel and accordian gate.
Esther L. Perez

The author is a writer living in
Miami. She is associated with
Beilinson Architects and the
Dade Heritage Trust.





Tbp photo; The block containing the
Edison and Breakwater Hotels,
c. 1938. Drawing, opposite: Pent-
house plan for Edison. Left, site
plan showing juxtaposition of
hotels with common pool area.
Drawings courtesy of Beilinson
Architects.







13

















Opposite, Edison Hotelfrom southwest, fully restored. This page, top: Pool/patio area which is common to the
Edison and Breakwater Hotels. Bottom: Dining room. Note the Art Deco details on pilasters. Photos by Seth
Benson.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987





































































































FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987











A pyramidal adaptation

of "Florida Cracker"


The Reefe Residence
Tampa, Florida


Architects: Reefe, Yamada &
Associates
Project Designer: Edward M.
Reefe, AIA
Consulting Engineers: H.M.
Long & Associates, structural;
Burton & Rolley, mechanical
and electrical
Landscape Architect: Wayne
Pitts
Interior Designer:Edward M.
Reefe, AIA


n response to a conventional
suburban lot with limited
ground level views and minimal
existing foliage, architect Ed
Reefe designed an introverted
scheme occupying the bulk of
the site and focusing the house
around a screened pool. The
form of the house, which Reefe
designed in both scale and ma-
terials to blend with others in
the neighborhood, resembles a
4-sided pyramid. It contains
3,800 s.f. and consists of a
single-story perimeter massing
which harmonizes with the pre-
vailing neighborhood scale. The
roof culminates in a three-story
tall pyramid form capped with
a pinwheel light/ventilation
monitor cluster at the apex.
The modular 70' by 70' first
floor plan is zoned spatially into
the formal dining, living room,
guest area on the east and the
informal family room and
kitchen on the west. Sliding
doors access the entire level to
a common lanai/pool area.
Taking its cue from the his-
toric "cracker box" houses of
early Florida, the plan is de-
signed with a steep pitched
roof, deep overhangs at the
windows and generous ventila-
tion of the major spaces
through the lanai. Vertically,
the structure is designed to pro-
vide a natural chimney effect
exhausting all spaces via opera-


Photo right: The first floor gallery
is one of the house's public spaces.
Below: Southeast corner of house
and, opposite, the pool were photo-
graphed by George Cott.



ble light/ventilation roof
monitors. Paddle fans supple-
ment natural ventilation.
Interior spatial composition
is designed to counterpoint the
regulated, pyramidal-shaped
exterior. A variety of public
and private spaces permit the
residence to be used for enter-
taining large groups while not
interfering with secluded indi-
vidual spaces. All rooms are
spatially interactive which per-
mits a continuous sense of
orientation.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987











A linear progression of forms


The Odessa House
Odessa, Florida

Architect: The Jan Abell*Ken-
neth Garcia Partnership
Engineer: Courtney Wright,
structural; Ray Jones, mechani-
cal and electrical .
Contractor:Royalwood Enter-
prises
Owner: Drs. Thomas &
Elizabeth Okulski '
Tampa architects Jan Abell
and Kenneth Garcia designed
this house for husband and
wife, both physicians, in
Odessa, Florida, on Lake Key-
stone. The house, which ap-
pears almost as a series of
attached "cottages" that are
classically treated, spreads
luxuriously over the two-and-a-
half acre lakefront site. A dou-
ble row of mature palm trees
planted parallel to the house
provides a middle ground
screen between the house and
the lake. The house stretches
between property lines in a
linear progression of forms that
establishes programmetric Drawings this page by Abell-Garcia
hierarchies. Entry is between Architects. Photo, opposite page
the two dominating elements by Walter Smalling, Jr.






f ?~ 1~


r


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987















the dual gabled "cottages"
which acknowledge two distinct
personalities within. Slightly
recessed beyond these forms on
both front and rear, the re-
sidual house unifies and recon-
ciles the many disparate ele-
ments to the whole.
Public reception spaces occur
at the first floor level, lakeside.
Service areas are streetside
and private family spaces are
on the second level. Flanking
the entry area at the second
level are spaces for the hus-
band's train collection on the
north and the wife's photo-
graphic studio and lab on the
south. Children's bedrooms are
identified by matching hips.






Photo of lakefront view by Walter
Smalling, Jr. Plan courtesy of
Abell-Garcia Architects.










..
4 17


7 [I 4
















I VESTIBULE
2 GALLERY
3 LIVING ROOM
4 DINING ROOM
5 GREENHOUSE
6 BREAKFAST
7 PORCH
8 POOL
9 GARAGE
10 SAUNA
II BATHROOM
12 KITCHEN
13 LAUNDRY
14 STORAGE
15 GUEST BEDROOM
16 SHOP
17 LIBRARY


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987













Classical tradition blends with modern technology in USF Sarasota Library

USF New College
Library
Sarasota, Florida

Owner: State of Florida Board
of Regents
Architect: Harvard, Jolly,
Marcet & Associates, P.A.,
AIA, St. Petersburg
Principal-in-Charge: Blanchard
Jolly, AIA, President
Project Manager: Jonathan
ITppe, AIA, Vice President
Project Architect: Steve Heiser,
AIA, Associate
Interior Design: Harvard, Jolly,
Marcet & Associates, PA, AIA
Consulting Architect: The
Architects Collaborative, Inc.,
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Landscape Architect: Phil
Graham & Company, P.A.,
St. Petersburg
Contractor: PorCon/KUPCO
Construction, Tampa
Mechanical/Electrical Engineer:
Best & Associates Engineers,
Inc., St. Petersburg
Structural Engineer: Charles Lbp photo: North side of the library shows an arcade opening inside onto the main courtyard and library entrance.
Brink/Brink Associates, Inc., Below: Courtyard on southeast side looking toward the building's main entrance. Next page: Interior showing
Lutz, FL first and second floor reading room and stack areas. Photos by George Cott.

The USF at Sarasota/New
College campus represented
a unique challenge to the ar-
chitects, Harvard, Jolly, Mar-
cet & Associates, along with
the Architects Collaborative.
The campus was divided into a
historic bayfront campus and a
modern complex adjacent to
the airport. A busy highway
and a parcel of Ringling
Museum property separated
the historic bayfront and
Hamilton Center campuses.
The hope was to unite the two
parts of the campus by building
a new library and pedestrian
bridge over the busy highway,
but the plan could not go for-
ward without the support of the
Ringling Museum's administra-
tion and trustees. The land on
which the Library complex
stands was transferred to the
University by the Ringling
Trustees and the two institu-
tions adopted a cooperative


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987














Master Plan concept to enhance
the entire educational, cultural,
and historic district. Simultane-
ously, New College Trustee and
philanthropist, Dr. Harry Suda-
koff, donated funds to the New
College Foundation to build a
conference and lecture center
and to challenge the State to
fund the Library and pedes-
trian bridge. The Sudakoff
Center was built as the eastern
anchor of the architectural com-
plex which forms a Gateway
to Manatee and Sarasota
Counties.
The University and the Ring-
ling Museum agreed that the
new Library's design should be
modern, but in harmony with
the overall Mediterranean style
of the Ringling estates. The li-
brary and pedestrian overpass
were to become the unifying
elements for the campus stylis-
tically and physically. The ar-
chitects were also challenged
by the need to protect the li-
brary against highway and air-
port noise while working to en-
hance the district's landscape.
Architects were encouraged to
adapt elements from the tradi-
tional "Ringling" style, such as
subtly colored stucco facades,
arched window openings and
arcades, barrel tile roofs, and
patio garden areas. Landscape
designers were instructed to
emphasize trees and shrubs
which would eventually shelter
the complex under a canopy of
live oaks and native varieties
of pine. With 70,000 s.f. and
housing for 325,000 volumes,
the new two-story Library is
six times larger than its
predecessor.
The library is a teaching and
research center with ample
book stacks, periodicals, refer-
ence collections, open work-
spaces, and study carrels
throughout. A language labora-
tory, media center, telecon-
ferencing room, five class-
rooms, and extensive office and
processing space satisfy a va-
riety of academic needs. Class-
room wings are designed for


eventual conversion into li-
brary space when the collec-
tions grow beyond the planned
capacity of 400,000 volumes.
The building was also engi-
neered with future additions in
mind for the 21st century.
The first step in design was
to locate the bridge over Route
41 to conform to and reinforce
the existing pedestrian circula-
tion on campus. A garden/
gathering space was placed ad-


jacent to this walkway and
bridge, and this courtyard is
the main entrance to the li-
brary. The two wings of the
library which flank the court-
yard have an arcade at ground
level for protection from the
weather. Stylistically, they
complement the Mediterranean
theme of the historic part of the
campus. This theme was also a
motivating force in the design
of the building facades which


feature arched openings, stucco
walls, and barrel tiles on the
sloped portions of the roof.
These roof elements are light
monitors which face north and
considerably enhance the in-
terior spaces as well as reduce
the electrical loads. The main
lobby of the library is a two-
story space which, through the
main arch, opens immediately
to the garden outdoors.
Diane D. Greer


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


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A park for the people


D.C.A. Active Park
Sunrise, Florida

Architect: Michael A. Shiff &
Associates, Inc.
Principal-in-Charge: Michael
Shiff
Designer: Laszlo T'th
Job Captain: IrvingI Ttinick
Engineer: Steven Feller
Landscape Architect: Michael
Pirich
General Contractor: Cox &
Palmer Construction
Owner: City of Sunrise


The 50,000 residents of Sun-
rise, Florida are young cou-
ples with growing families and
a lot of retirees. Though di-
verse in age, the population
shared a common need for re-
creational facilities. Until the
mid-1980's, that need was being
inadequately met by Sunrise's
minimal, scattered park
facilities. Finally recognizing
the problem, the City engaged
Michael A. Shiff & Associates,
Inc. to prepare a study of the
city's recreational needs as well
as a Master Plan for growth
and construction of new
facilities.
Shiffs study showed a need
to consolidate many of the city's
active recreational programs
into one active park which
could be built on a 26-acre site
which had been donated to the
city. By consolidating these pro-
grams, the City of Sunrise
would be able to provide a wide
range of activities in a central
location and minimize the staff
needed to supervise the ac-
tivities. The study also indi-
cated the need for a passive
park and an outdoor am-
phitheatre, both of which were
subsequently incorporated into
a 22-acre facility on a major
waterway in Sunrise.
After approving and adopt-
ing Shiff's Master Plan, the
City used a voter referendum
to determine if the citizens
were willing to pay for new
park facilities. The referendum
passed by an overwhelming
majority and Shiff and his as-
sociates began the design for
D.C.A. Active Park (D.C.A.
stands for Development Corpo-
ration of America, the company
which donated the land to the
city.)

Photos, top: Front view of recre-
ation center with offices, restrooms
and meeting rooms. Right: View of
recreation building from pedes-
trian bridge over lake. Photos by
George Miller, Miller Photography.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987














D.C.A. Park is a 26-acre site
in the shape of a triangle. The
program called for designing an
active park with the utmost
utilization of available land.
The challenge to the designer
was to provide a concept using
the rigid shape requirements of
specific sports and recreational
activities and incorporate them
into a site plan that would ulti-
mately take the shape of a right
triangle.
A second challenge was to
allow for varied recreational
programs to take place simul-
taneously without compromis-
ing the safety of the individual
activity. Early in the design
program the architects decided
to limit parking to the perime-
ter of the site, thus eliminating
the conflict between automobile
and pedestrian traffic. The
major activity areas on the site
are connected by a pedestrian
spine. Baseball fields were
placed in the park's triangular
corners and in the center of the
park is a two-story recreation
building containing the park
control booth on the second
floor. From this booth, all park
activities are visible. Park
drainage is handled by a lake
which also provides areas for
picnicking and other passive
activities. The lake was utilized
as a major asset and is spanned
by two wooden bridges. A
measure of the project's suc-
cess is evidenced by the fact
that the City is presently look-
ing for additional parking to
handle the large numbers of re-
sidents who use the park's five
baseball fields, three soccer
fields, football field, three ten-
nis courts, two basketball
courts and two handball courts,
all of which are accessible day
and night.





Tbp: Site plan of D.C.A. courtesy
ofMichael ShiffArchitects. Right:
End view of large picnic shelter
with restrooms. Photo by George
Miller, Miller Photography.

FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


N 0 100 200














































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Circle 70 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


SYSTEM GROUPING













Continued from page 11
dents occurred had riser height
variations. The AIA Design for
Aging guide claims that a high
percentage of the falls that occur
in housing for the elderly can be
traced to a simple riser whose
height is different from the other
uniform risers in the system.
Tread depth is the distance
from the front edge of the step
to the riser wall at the back, ex-
clusive of the nosing and over-
hang. Tread depth is critical for
the human gait when descend-
ing stairs since the ball of the
foot must have a firm surface on
which to step. If there is too little
tread, the ball will slide off the
edge of the tread. obo much tread
will cause the heel of the oppo-
site foot to get caught on the
front portion of the tread as it
attempts to clear the surface.
Most building codes require uni- Mtured In Lolrid, Florid
formity in tread depth within a
/16 inch variation. (South Flor- 4&h r Dlvery
ida Building Code, 1984: 31-11).
The brain must properly per- F ,S S Imple Ihm altlon by One Sub-Con rtor
ceive the change in elevation if
it is to successfully negotiate a N Reduced Construction Time
stairway or ramp. Anyvariations
from what the brain has been U Al Neceary Building Code Approvals
taught to expect will result in
improper placement of the foot LORn Uninterrupted Spans
and could result in a slip and fall
accident. Unbeatabe re Re in
While there are slight varia-
tions in the minimum dimensions N Excellent Sound Attenuation
for stairs as specified in the na-
tional building codes used in the MonO hlc Constructon
U.S. (BOCA, SBC, UBC, SFBC),
the standards established have D b r/Ist oughout
provided the necessary critical
dimensions that are required for Contact in Lakeland
safe use of stairs. 813-688-7686

The author is a registered ar- E-(R
chitect in South Florida. He isM E
frequently called as an expert METALS CORPORATION
witness on stairway and ramp
design with regard to slip and Eleven Talbot Avenue. Ronkin PA 15104
fall accidents. PHONE: 4121351-3913
TWX: 710-664-4424
EPICMETAL BRDK
Cirie 22 on Reader Inquiry Card






FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987 29

























































S- -, -




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V .







W whatever the size of
your project, Tarmac
Topblock can add a new
dimension. Design freedom.
That's because our
concrete masonry units give
you more choice. Of
shapes, sizes, colors and
textures.
Yet Tarmac Topblock
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fresh ideas. We also bring
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Our guaranteed on-time
deliveries and a full range
of accessories from wall-
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Topblock is backed by
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ensure that every single
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only the finest Tarmac
aggregates. We subject our
products to extensive
laboratory testing. And our
knowledgeable architect/
engineer advisory staff
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deal with any queries
you may have.
With such freedom
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units and such efficient,
single-source service,
it's not surprising that
Tarmac Topblock is
the name for masonry
units in Florida.
So wherever you're
building, specify
Topblock. And take
a new look at block.


L9 rg


TIOIPIBIL1OIC8K
To order Topblock,
contact Tarmac Topblock Inc.
455 Fairway Drive, Deerfield
Beach, Florida 33441
or call toll-free 1-800/367-8167


A member of
Tarmac Roadstone (USA), Inc.


Circle 47 on Reader Inquiry Card


,,0















Loadmaster is Strong



in Florida


As architects and devel-
opers throughout Florida
are discovering, Loadmaster
is the answer for a strong,
durable roof deck.


The assembly is a strong and
durable roof deck- ideal for
most roofing applications.


Loadmaster Roof Decks are
economical, allow for design
versatility and the R value
retention is guaranteed for
20 years!


Loadmaster Systems, Inc.
produces roof deck systems
for commercial, industrial
and institutional buildings.
mL rn


Loadmaster is no ordinary
roof deck it's extraordinary.
To find out more about the
"extras" you get with
Loadmaster, contact your
nearest licensed Loadmaster
contractor listed below.


The Loadmaster Roof Deck is
composed of high strength
steel, thermal insulation and
high density mineral board
mechanically anchored to
provide composite strength.


SLOADMASTER
JiSYSTEMS,INC.
THE DURABLE ROOF DECK


American Southern Roof
Deck Co.
5905 B Breckenridge Pkwy.
Tampa, Florida 33610
(813) 623-3746


Commercial Roof Decks
Division of Beacon Sales
Corporation
5905 Macy Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
(904) 743-9770


Commercial Roof Decks
of Orlando
700 Wilma Street
Longwood, Florida 32750
(305) 339-0050


Roof Structures, Inc.
6680 N.W. 17th Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33309
(305) 972-4171


Circle 9 on Reader Inquiry Card


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987


SRD, Inc.
P.O. Box 579
Five Acre Road
Pleasant Grove,
Alabama 35127
(205) 744-6110









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THE BOOKS AND
DOCUMENTS YOU NEED
ARE IN TALLAHASSEE.



The Architectural Book and Document Center for Florida is now in Tallahassee. We're as
close as your telephone and can bring documents and books to you quickly through UPS. A
full inventory of ALA Documents in maintained. Members receive a more than 30 percent
discount on most documents; many books also include a discount.

For more information, call 904/222-7590.
For a price list on AIA Documents and
Books, write:
FA/AIA Books & Documents
P.O. Box 10388
Tallahassee, Fl. 32302








































Arhtcua Inero Desig
(35 4987




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Over 50,000 Items in Stock
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Call Florida Toll Free Number
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PREVIOUS PARTICIPANTS HAVE SAID:
"Unlike other programs, I got enough information about
application and equipment to make an informed selec-
tion of what materials to use for which projects. It has
saved my former employer 50% in time spent on pro-
ducing graphics."
Mark Markley
Building Construction Specialist
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services
"Thorough, dynamic, inspiring it has made profound
impact on my teaching methodologies concerning the
issues of reprographics in design."
Paige Conrad
Assistant Professor
Interior Design Department,
Southern Illinois University

WORKSHOP COVERS:


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Photo Reprographics
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Interfacing with CADD
Returning to Hand-Drafting
Cost-Effective Management
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415 N.E. Third StJFt. Lauderdale, FL 33301/(305) 763-421'

AUTHORIZED



DEALER
Circle 25 on Reader Inquiry Ca



GARY M GERLACH
will conduct a 11/2 day hands-on workshop on repro-
graphic techniques: contact, photo, pin-graphics, CADD,
and handdrafting to manage all types of projects for
cost-effective in-house production.


REPRO TO PIN-BAR

TO CADD AND BACK


Noon Thursday, August 20 to
5 p.m. Friday, August 21, 1987
1.2 CEU's Fee: $270
$255 for each additional firm member
James L. Knight Conference Center
Downtown Miami


INSTRUCTOR
Gary M. Gerlach, AIA from Connecticut, is a drafting con-
sultant, technical advisor to International Reprographic
Association, author of columns on pin-bar drafting in Plan
& Print, and trainer for CADD applications.
Registration deadline: July 30, 1987
Call Jane Grosslight (904) 644-3801
NI LN\'I- RSlITY


FLORIDA ARCHITECT July/August 1987







































WHER QULT E IN



BEFOE TLE OESOUT








BEAUTY IN BLOCK
Architectural Masonry Units







.I


4 :.;._.. .




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