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AIAFL



Florida architect
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00249
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1984
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00249
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Editorial
        Page 7
    News/letters
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 12a
        Page 12b
    1984 FA/AIA awards for excellence in architecture
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Product news
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Viewpoint
        Page 48
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.














1984












































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Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Street
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
Publisher/Executive Vice
President
George A. Allen, CAE
Editor
Diane Greer
Assistant Publisher
Director of Advertising
Carolyn Maryland
Art Director
Earl Morrogh
Editorial Board
Charles E. King, FAIA
Chairman
William E. Graves, AIA
Ivan Johnson, AIA
Peter Rumpel, FAIA
John Totty, AIA
Michael Bier, AIA
President
James H. Anstis, AIA
333 Southern Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
Vice President/President-elect
Mark Jaroszewicz, FAIA
University of Florida
College of Architecture
331 Architecture Building
Gainesville, Florida 32611
Secretary
James J. Jennewein, AIA
102 West Whiting St.
Suite 500
Tampa, Florida 33602
Treasurer
John Barley, AIA
P.O. Box 4850
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
Past President
Robert G. Graf, AIA
251 East 7th Avenue
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Regional Directors
Ted Pappas, FAIA
Post Office Box 41245
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
Howard B. Bochiardy, FAIA
Post Office box 8006
Orlando, Florida 32806


General Counsel
J. Michael Huey, Esquire
Suite 510, Lewis State Bank
Post Office Box 1794
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal
4 of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, is owned
and published by the Association, a
S Florida Corporation not for profit. ISSN:
0015-3907. It is published six times a
year at the Executive Office of the
Association, 104 East Jefferson St.,
S Tallahassee, Florida 32302. Telephone
(904) 222-7590 Opinions expressed by
contributors are not necessarily those of
Sthe FA/AIA. Editorial material may be
reprinted provided full credit is given to
the author and to FLORIDA AR-
CHITECT, and a copy sent to the
publisher's office
Single copies, $2.00; Annual subscrp- Cover phc
tion. $12.00 Third class postage. Architect:

FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984


FLORID/ AI CHITECT
8 JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


Is. m ..2.


November/December, 1984
Volume 31, Number 6



Features

13 1984 FA/AIA Awards For
Excellence In Architecture



Departments

7 Editorial
8 News/Letters
43 Product News
48 Viewpoint


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EDITORIAL


I have been involved with the FA/AIA's various awards programs for
several years now. My involvement began rather modestly, mainly in
conjunction with publicizing the projects in FLORIDA ARCHITECT, but
since that time it has grown to a point of interaction with jury members
and gaining some insight into why certain projects are selected. I'm still
new enough at the whole process, however, to sit back and wonder how
juries can meet in other states, see only photographs and drawings of a
project, and unfailingly select the very finest designs.
It's more than just good insight on the part ofjury members. Criteria
for selection has a lot to do with it.
This year's design awards jury met in Boston and jury members
Norman Fletcher and Earl Flansburgh summed up their design criteria
very eloquently. Fletcher stated that, "Something has to be heightened
for [a project] to receive an award. Something overly simple or overly
exaggerated may be selected, but it has to work."
Flansburgh perceives design criteria somewhat differently. He
thinks that jury members "should be sure to give awards for the design
solution, and not just because the problem is unique."
Interesting. Not only is beauty in the eye of the beholder, but differ-
ent criteria are in the minds of different jurors. More interesting, however,
is that in my limited experience all the criteria I've seen exercised have
led to the same place. Awards for good design.
Since the road to good design is not always a smooth one, we prob-
ably should consider the means to the architectural end. We should
consider the problem as well as the result. Among the Design Award
winners presented in this issue of FA, for example, are a City Hall that
sits suspended over thin air because there was only a sliver of ground
available for a site. Faced with setback restrictions, there is a 21-story
condo on Tampa Bay that could not be built with its broad dimension
facing the water. The architect's solution to the situation still permitted
a large majority of the tenants a view of the Bay. In Jacksonville, an ap-
pealing new design for three of the city's utility buildings turned a ple-
bian kind of structure into something very distinguished.
In each of this year's winning projects, there seems to have been
an overriding goal on the part of the architect to give a humane quality
to the building, either through scale, siting, fabric or color. "Gaiety" and
"spirit" were two of the adjectives the jury used a lot to describe these
fourteen really fine designs.
Diane D. Greer


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984








NEWS


Evans Group Wins "Detached Home of the
Year"
For the second time in three years the
Evans Group has earned a distinguished
Best-In-Show honor at the Aurora Awards
design competition. This year they won the
"Detached Home of the Year" for the de-
sign of the Villa Christina at Villa D'Este in
Deerfield Beach. In addition, the Orlando-
based architects and planners captured
one Grand Award and nine Merit Awards
to finish with a total of 11 awards recog-
nizing achievements in residential and


Sawyer Park by The Evans Group
Survey Shows Design Firms Profits Falling
The 1984 Finanical Statistics Survey,
sponsored by Professional Services Man-
agement Journal (PSMJ) reveals the prof-
its of design firms are still falling. Accord-
ing to Atlanta management consultant Bill
Fanning who conducted the survey, the
survey found the median pre-tax profit for
design firms to be 2.6% of gross revenues,
down from 2.9% in 1982.
The chief factor contributing to this re-
sult is the continued rise in overhead rates.
The median overhead rate has now risen


non-residential design in 11 southeastern
states.
The "Detached Home of the Year", a
three-bedroom, 2/2 bath zero lot line patio
home with 2,102 square feet of living area,
was designed for Trendsetter Homes. The
$245,000 home features an open floor
plan oriented to a pool and several unus-
ual features such as eight-foot carved en-
try doors and a "good morning" room with
greenhouse solarium.
The Evans Group pulled in another
honor in August with the designation by


to 161.1% from 155% in 1982. This rate
has been showing a steady rise since the
inception of the surveys in 1980.
The survey also revealed that firms
with Computer Aided Design and Drafting
(CADD) capabilities are more profitable
than firms without this capability. Reve-
nues per employee are, on the average,
6% higher for CADD firms, and overhead
expenses are reduced due to better labor
utilization. The survey also found that
28% of the surveyed firms now have this
capability.


Builder magazine of its Sawyer Park town-
house development as "Project of the
Month." Builder is the official magazine of
the National Association of Home Builders
(NAHB). The 12-unit contemporary Victo-
rian townhouse project is situated in what
used to be the backyard of a 66-year-old
private residence in Vero Beach. It is the
first in-town luxury townhouse project for
Vero Beach and it offers a single floor plan
with 2,046 square feet of living space with
rooms on three levels.


Even with the overall downward trend,
some firms performed better than the av-
erage results. The firms that exceeded the
overall averages include architectural
firms, firms practicing in the southwestern
region of the country, and the firms whose
staff ranged in size from 21 to 100. Worse
than average results were reported by
firms from 201 to 500 total staff and firms
located in the midwest.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984









r MEMBER NEWS

Burt Reynolds is a man that they are
proud to call their own, and Palm Beach
Junior College will name its new student
services center at the north campus after
its most illustrious alumnus. The 27,000
S square foot Burt Reynolds Student Ser-
vices Center was designed by Peacock &
Lewis Architect & Planners of West Palm
Beach and its features will include a gras-
S sy sloped amphitheatre, according to Ed
Sheahan, AIA, project architect.
Architects Daniel Davis Tinney and
S Carlos Ruiz de Quevedo recently an-
nounced the formation of their partner-
ship, Tinney-Ruiz & Partners, P.A. with of-
fices in Coral Gables.
S De Quevedo, AIA, Vice President of
the firm, has just been elected Chairman of
{ the Planning and Zoning Board of the City
of West Miami. He has been a member of
the board for the last three years. Harper &
S Buzinec's 1,000-bed Pre-Trial Detention
Facility in Dade County has been awarded
S a Citation of Design Excellence by the
American Correctional Association. Oliver
S & Gidden Architects, Inc. has won two Au-
rora Awards for the design of the Reflec-
tions Office Centre in West Palm Beach
and the Town Executive Center in Boca
Raton. The newest member to join the de-
sign team at Robison + Associates Inc.,
Interior Architecture is Russell G. Bogue.
Bogue recently earned his master's de-
gree in Environmental Design from Pratt
r Institute in New York.
The Haskell Company began con-
struction in August on Jacksonville's first
auto dealership park. The design/build
project will house three of the city's largest
auto dealerships who will be housed in
three separate buildings. Dr.Randy Atlas,
AIA, who recently formed the consulting
firm of Atlas & Associates in Miami, was a
S speaker for two major sessions at the
American Correctional Association's Con-
ference in San Antonio last August.
In January, 1984, Governor Graham
appointed the Miami River Management
Committee to study possible solutions
to the problem of urban decay along that
river. The Committee then commissioned
a University of Miami architecture class to
redesign declining neighborhoods sur-
rounding the bridges near downtown
a Miami. The team of winning designers
was from Cuba, Ecuador, Puerto Rico,
S Spain and Saudi Arabia. The winning de-
sign included open-air fish and produce
markets, restaurants and a luxury hotel
along the river.
Alison J. Smith has been appointed
S Marketing Director for Schwab & Twitty
SArchitects, Inc. Ms. Smith will plan new
business development and coordinate all
marketing efforts. The Stewart Corpora-


tion-Engineers, a consulting engineering
firm jointly owned by The Stewart Corpora-
tion-Architects and the Wade-Trim Group
of Michigan, has opened its doors for busi-
ness in the Plaza on the Mall in downtown
Tampa. Robert St. Claire, P.E. is the Gen-
eral Manager for the new firm. Donna
Dejongh, AIA, in the Virgin Islands firm of
Dejongh Associates was mentioned in the
June, 1984 issue of Ebony Magazine in the
article, "Black Women Architects: A Blue-
print for Success." The Institute of Busi-
ness Designers and Interior Design Mag-
azine have named the American Way
Cafe, designed by the Miami architectural
and interiors firm of Zyscovich & Grafton,
as Best-of-Competition in their annual in-
ternational design competition. This made
Bernard Zyscovich, AIA and Thorn Graf-
ton, AIA, the first Florida architects to win
the honor in the competition's eleven year
history.


American Way Cafe, Zyscovich & Grafton Architects,
Miami. Photo by Steven Brooke.

Cindy E. Cleary has been named
Senior Landscape Architect and Daniel F.
Delong has been named Graphic and
Design Coordinator at Studio One Archi-
tecture, Planning and Landscape Architec-
ture of Winter Park. According to firm prin-
cipals, Larry Brown, AIA and Bill Hegert,
AIA, the firm has recently more than dou-
bled their operational space.
Rowe Holmes Bamett Architects, Inc.

announced the promotion of Robert J. Bit-
terli, AIA, to principal in the firm. Bitterli
joined theTallahassee staff in 1980 after
a three year association with the Tampa
office as a Project Architect. He received
his Master of Architecture degree from
the University of Florida.
Pittsburgh's Mellon Stuart Company,
has commissioned The Evans Group to
plan and design Perdido Sun, a 186-unit
condominium overlooking the Gulf of Mex-


ico on Perdido Key. The master site plan
for the Villages of San Jose won a merit
award at the Fifth Annual Aurora Awards
competition at the 1984 Southeast Build-
ers Conference. A Bos Group develop-
ment, Villages of San Jose award-winning
plan was designed by The Evans Group.
Also by Evans, the Bent Tree Mission Villas
overlooking Lake Sarasota. This Mediter-
ranean-style duplex community will be


Bent Tree Mission Village by The Evans Group

situated in the planned golf course com-
munity of Bent Tree.
Schwab & Twitty also captured two
Aurora Awards for their design of Park
Plaza, a 19-story luxury condominium
tower in Naples. Honors were extended
in the categories of "Best Condominium or
Attached Development, 3-stories or more"
and the "Best Unit of More Than 2,000
Square Feet." Promoted to Associates
within the Schwab & Twitty firm were Mi-
chael Corbett, Michael Gotwalt Raimund
Heger and Peter Paulson. The new Boca
Grove Country Club now under construc-


Boca Grove Country Club by Peacock & Lewis

tion was designed by Peacock & Lewis Ar-
chitects & Planners. Walker's Ridge, a new
Sawgrass community of 56, zero-lot-line,
single family detached homes, is being
developed by Cantrell Weaver Communi-
ties, Inc. with architecture and land plan-
ning by Charlan Brock Young & Associ-
ates. This is one of five projects in the
Jacksonville Beach area that has been
designed by CBY.
Florida Atlantic University, Division of
Continuing Education, will implement a
new program entitled "Architectural Tech-
nology" at the Boca Raton campus in Jan-

Continued on page 44


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984









































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Banyan Manor Coconut Grove, Florida




Good Urban Architecture
On A Restricted Site and
A Modest Budget

This three-unit housing development
contains the maximum number of units
S and square footage allowed by code
within strict height and open space re-
strictions. The lot is very sensitive and
narrow and is tightly wedged between
two modest single family homes to the
north and south and lightly traveled
streets to the east and west. The need
for uniqueness and creativity in the
design and massing of the units was
imperative.
The resulting design called for three
typical units, two of which are attached
and the other connected only by an open
trellis. The units were designed to give
a feeling of spaciousness and to open
the interior spaces to the outside. The
interior spaces are stacked vertically with
the semi-private spaces on the second
and third floors. The use of low mainte-
nance materials and the simplicity of
construction were the owner's special
requirements.

One of the things that is rather nice
about this project is that it is a very simple
small scale series of buildings in which
the same design ideas are repeated in
different ways. Given the obviously mod-
est budget, a very handsome piece of
urban architecture was created. The cut-
outs on the exterior and the use of color
are very handsome." Earl Flansburgh




Architect
Architeknics, Architects and Planners
Edward C. Berounsky, AIA
Ramon G. Perez-Alonso, AIA
Owner
Guenter Goertz
General Contractor
Berkek, Inc.










FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984 15






City Hall and Municipal Theatre Bayamon, Puerto Rico




An Ingenious Design For
An Airborne Building
The unusual site available for the con-
struction of a new City Hall called for an
innovative structural-architectural de-
sign. Various alternatives were tested for
feasibility and architectural expression,
and one exposing the steel trusses was
chosen for economical and dramatic rea-
sons. It was found that the deeper the
truss, the more efficient it would be, there-
fore, a frame was designed which was in-
tegrated with the building module. The
steel was exposed outside the window
wall to avoid fireproofing, although a row
of sprinklers was provided inside the
building next to the windows. The whole
building is carried by two exterior trusses
with steel girders spanning the 55 feet in
between the office space which is totally
free of columns. Steel was chosen for
economy and ease of fabrication and
erection.


"This is a project where a municipal
government has taken adversity and
turned it into an asset. The project had a
minimal amount of square footage to use
in terms of land, so air rights were used
to provide space. The building is a strong
powerful statement which links two sec-
tions of the community and in its expres-
sion it has a positive quality that one -a
hopes to find in a municipal building. The
building is reinforcing, strong, interesting
and clear in expression. The auditorium
is the detail that gives the entire build-
ing substantial human quality." Earl
Flansburgh




Architect .. .
Thomas S. Marvel, FAIA !4l4-A 4' -=
Torres.Beauchamp.Marvel y Asociados -L -,='zlDIt=:-:dt _
Consulting Engineer..... ., -_.d. I I r-- -.'
Structural Hernandez & Hernandez 4
Electrical, Mechanical -- I i
Enrique Garcia & Associates -
Owner
Municipality of Bayamon
General Contractor
Pavarini Construction Company
Mediavilla Inc., Steel Erection


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984






Hicks Residence Boca Grande, Florida




Layered Terraces Create
A Setting for Art

This bayfront residence was designed 4.
for an artist who moved from the West
Indies to a remote island off the West -'
Coast of Florida. The client wanted to re-
tain a sense of openness and out-of-door
living in her new home. The client insisted
that the house and grounds were to func- -
tion well for frequent entertaining and also
as a setting for a growing collection of
painting and sculpture. ,e".
The building form is derived from the
view lines, sun angles, privacy control,
winter wind control and from the shape of
the site itself. With its pool acting as a
dominant linear element, the house is fo-
cused on the inlet connecting the bay to
the larger harbor beyond. The building is
basically a series of terraces which step
down and open to the bay. The main liv- Photos (c)Steven Brooke
ing area of the house is an enclosed por-
tion of the upper terrace. The floor directly
below this has the painting studio,
garage, and storage room. The separate 11
guest -,ouse, connected by a roof link,
opens onto a mid-level terrace.
As with an open seashell, the house
has hard protective outer walls contrast-
ing with the total openness of the oppo- iI[
site side. The forms of the layered terraces iI "
reflect the sense of movement on the
water. f
/1 p

"The way this house orients itself to the
view creates a very dynamic geometry. .
This house has some overtones of some .r
of the best house design I've seen, in-
cluding dramatic cantilevers and a very
clean use of glass." Norman Fletcher




Architect
Carl Abbott Architect
Consulting Engineer
A. L. Conyers
Owner
Gail S. Hicks
General Contractor
Boca Grande Builders


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984





























































































S FLORIDA ARCHITECT rOJ JEMBEH DECEMBER, 1984 19






Jacksonville Electric Authority Church, Main and Water Street Substations




An Elegant Enclosure of -
Utilitarian Space

In the early 1980's, the Jacksonville
Electric Authority undertook a major pro-
gram for expanding and modernizing its
electrical distribution network. Three new
substations were required and the major
emphasis was placed on designing facili-
ties that would be environmentally sensi-
tive to their neighborhoods.
Each of the three buildings is one-story
high with walls enclosing transformer
yards, small switchgear buildings and
maneuvering areas for large utility trucks "
requiring access to major equipment.
The Water Street Substation combines
four disparate elements into a unified -
composition. The functional elements are
arranged compactly within a rectangular
enclosing. Wall columns extend upward
to support an open lattice of precast con-
crete beams. At the Church Street Station
a circular enclosing wall thirteen feet high
is placed in the center of the site, permit-
ting the development of small public
parks at the four corners. Textured ma-
sonry walls emphasize light and shadow
and also discourage vandalism. The
Main Street Substation is similar to that on
Water Street. Major determinants were [C '.. '
the turning radii for large vehicles and
minimizing the substation's visual impact
on its immediate environment.

"I think the architect has contributed
something to the neighborhood. What
might have been an eyesore has been
turned into something that is fun to walk
by and adds to the overall urban feeling of
the site." Paul Dietrich




Architect
William Morgan Architects
Consulting Engineers
Structural H. W. Keister
Mechanical/Electrical -
Turknett/MPS Engineers
Landscaper Architect
Diversified Environmental Planning
Owner
Jacksonville Electric Authority
General Contractor
M. E. Elkins Company (Church)
Melrose Construction Co. (Main)
D. Coleman, Inc. (Water)







The Townhomes of Blue Heron, Aquarina


Melbourne, Florida


A Geometry of Sloping
Roofs and Curved Forms

This project consists of 20 town-
homes, four per building in five buildings,
arranged in a U-shaped configuration on
a two-acre site within a 200-acre seaside
community. Much of the land is preserved
in its natural state. Nature walks meander
throughout the site. The townhomes fea-
ture cedar siding over solid block con-
struction. High pitched roofs have cedar
S shingles over cedar planking. All rooms
open onto cedar decks. Theexterior of the
S homes has been stained smoke gray to
blend well with the weathering of the shake
roofs.
The requirement in the project was to.
S create a private townhome neighborhood,
on a nicely wooded site compatible with
neighborhoods of garden apartments and
oceanfront mid-rise apartments. The re-
sulting plan called for a semi-circular stair-
case contained within the radius column
which ascends from the foyerto the sec-
ond floor gallery. Decks and balconies
extend from all rooms and square footage
ranges from 1,766 to 2,174 square feet per
home.


"The scale of this project is very ap-
pealing. The color scheme and roof treat-
ment is very sympathetic and the forms
and landscape are simple and hand-
some. The overall scale of house to site
works well." Norman Fletcher


Architect
Schwab & Twitty Architects, Inc.
Consulting Engineers
Mechanical Chane, Inc.
Strucural-- Ritchie & Crocker
Landscape Architect
Taft Bradshaw & Associates
Owner
Aquarina Developments, Inc.
l' General Contractor
SJohn Cooley Company


SECOND
FLOOR PLAN


O GROUND
FLOOR PLAN


On m


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984


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Point Washington, Florida


A Planned Presence
For A Seaside Village

This small mixed use development in
the Florida Panhandle is a new vacation
resort of 350 dwellings of different types,
100-200 units of lodging, a retail center, a
conference facility and recreation com-
plex. The design intent of the program
was to generate an urban environment
similar to that of a small town of the period
prior to 1940. A study of towns throughout
the American South indicated that a com-
munity of genuine variety and authentic
character relies on public spaces (plazas
and streets) of specific size and charac-
ter. The architects have designed a Mas-
ter Plan and Zoning Code for the town
which provides a variety of public spaces
with a coherent character while allowing
buildings to be designed by many differ-
ent people. The Code has been tested
several times in university design studios
and has proven workable. It is now envi-
sioned that the town will be substantially
built in ten to fifteen years, depending on
economic conditions.


"The arrangement of open spaces has
been carefully thought through to give di-
versity to the neighborhoods and maxi-
mum access to the water, even though it
is a very small, informal community. De-
spite its size, this town has a presence."
Norman Fletcher


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Architect
Andres Duany & Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk,
Architects
Consulting Engineer
Barrett, Daffin & Carlin
Landscape Architect
Douglas Duany
Owner/Developer
Robert Davis
General Contractor
Seagrove Development Corporation


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984


Seaside


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:trriiitr fr







Charles Wharton Johnson Pavilion




A Public Facility With
A Sense of Spirit
The City of Clearwater sponsored a de-
sign competition for a bandshell to act as
a spearhead for the revitalization of its
downtown area. In order to link the urban
park site with the civic buildings to the
east and the bay immediately to the west,
the architects wanted to create a visual
point of reference to be viewed from land
or water. The design was also to be un-
obstructive and sensitive to its context.
Coachman Park gently slopes from a
bluff at the eastern side down to the bay
on the west. By locating [he bandshell in
the southwestern corner of the site, the
architects preserved the existing fabric of
the park, maximizing audience areas and
views of the bay. To further bring out the
existing topography and create a natural
"bowl" effect, subtle berming within the
oval path was suggested. An airy, light
performing space was buffered from traf-
fic noises by trees and ancillary spaces
containing storage and restrooms.
The prominent site called for a strong
image. In plan, the form complements the
bandshell function by assuming the
shape of a "speaker." In elevation, the
evocative triangle shape recalls the
shape of old Florida houses to those on
land and a sailboat to people on the
water.


"Certainly the focus of the sparkling
little gem at the end of the bowl-shaped
amphitheatre is a very entertaining and
visually delightful accent. It's a public
facility with a lot of gaiety and spirit."
Norman Fletcher


Clearwater, Florida


Photos (c) Steven Brooke


Architect
Mateu Associates
Design Team
Roney Mateu and
Jose Louis Gonzalez
Landscape Architect
Ted Baker Group
Consulting Engineers
Structural James D. Marks
Mechanica/Electrical
Dalla-Rizza & Associates
Owner
City of Clearwater
Department of Parks and Recreation
Contractor i
Creative Contractors, Inc.
FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984






2600 Maitland Center Building Maitland, Florida




Offices Within A Grid
of Polished Aluminum

The program for this building required '
160,000 square feet of office space to be
constructed on a 10-acre site within a
suburban office park. The solution locates
the three-story building in the center of the PA
site with two entrances accessible to the .'
parking area. A system of pool, swales, V,
berms, walkways and landscaping sur-
round the site. The plan ofthe building is a
square, 250 feet on each side surround-
ing a three-story atrium at the center.
To reinforce the double entry state-
ment, a 3V2-story precast concrete wall
bisects the building beginning at one en-
trance and terminating at the other. A
water feature follows the wall through the
building.
Exterior curves, angles and planes are
formed with silver reflective glass panels Photos (c) Eric Oxendorf
set within a grid of polished aluminum
mullions. This grid is repeated on the sur-
face of the diagonal concrete wall.


"The contrast of materials is interesting
here and so is the contrast of form. The
overallscale of the wallis broken down by
the diagonal wall in the atrium. The use of FLOOR PLAN
the diagonal also defines both entrances -
and provides the element that linnks the
inside with the outside." Earl Flansburgh A*




Architect
Hunton, Shibers, Brady, Associates,
Architects, P.A.
Consulting Engineer.
Tilden, Lobnitz and Cooper,Inc.
Landscape Architect .i '
Foster, Conant and Associates
Owner .- ...
Morley Properties, Inc.
General Contractor
Holder Construction Company












26 FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984







A T & T Operations Center Jacksonville, Florida




A Human Scale On The
Grand Scale

The required construction schedule
was a dominant factor in this project.
AT&T could allow only 11 months for the
entire design/build schedule.
The building complex is organized .
around a sloped glass pedestrian circu-
lation spine which links all separate build-
ings with a continuous environmentally
conditioned walkway at the ground level.
This walkway connects all vertical trans-
portation points. In addition, all buildings
are interconnected at the second and
third floors. The sloped glass system
steps up the facade of the computer sup-
port office building to note its special
usage.
The office space is designed as a con-
tinuous ribbon of floor area, approxi- Photos (c) Richard Payne
mately 72 feet in width with vistas
provided to either the outside or the
atrium. Four major atriums were created
for use as offices, cafeteria, reception
space and for visual upper level offices.
Fabric covered open office work stations
are provided for 1600 employees, with
built-in expansion in all areas.


"The architect has taken great pains to
achieve a human scale and character
within this very large building. The offices
are essentially low clusters of space con-
nected by a single corridor. Each one of
the office spaces has its own special
view. The interior, although spartan in
character, is very handsome." Earl
Flansburgh .




Architect
The Haskell Company -
Engineer, Landscape, j<
General Contractor
The Haskell Company
Owner
195 Broadway Corporation ..


FLORIDA ARCHITECTINOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984


i





Avero House Restoration
St. Photios National Greek Shrine St. Augustine, Florida




A Shrine To Symbolize .
the Byzantine Heritage
The Avero House, built in St. Augustine
around 1749, is recognized as the site of
the earliest recorded regular worship ser-
vices of Greeks on the North American t .
continent, held in the year 1777. The A
existing structure was restored to its 1777
characteristics and detail and the one-
story section to the rear of the site was uti-
lized to create a shrine to symbolize the
Byzantine heritage of the Orthodox faith.
This building is the only Greek Orthodox
Shrine in the Western Hemisphere and it s
is on the National Register of Historic
Places.


'The detailing of the interiors is note-
worthy as is the strong Greek character of
the interior. The huge wooden beams
against the white walls are very hand-
some." Paul Dietrich




Architect
Pappas Associates, Architects, Inc.
Owner
Greek Orthodox Archdiocese
General Contractor
Fred M. Cox, Inc.





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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984






















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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984 31


'----






The Miller House Siesta Key Sarasota, Florida




A Simple House That
Embraces a Lake

This lakefront house is built on an ex-
tremely small triangular site which fronts
on a water-fowl sanctuary. The clients
wanted a house that would work closely
with the site and would be open, light and
low in maintenance. Architecturally, the
building is a strong, simple, sculptural
form whose triangular plan is generated
from the shape of the site and the view
lines. With the small confining site, the
building extends to the setback lines on
all sides. For privacy, two sides of the
house are walled while the view side is
totally open to the lake with its mangrove ___
rookeries. The main space, the living
room, dining room and kitchen, is a large
double volume. A den and guest room
adjoin these rooms and above is the mas-
ter suite with its private deck. Penetrating
the form of the building is the wooden
deck which begins at the entry and ex-
tends out from the opposite side of the
house to form a dock in the lake. Visually,
the building seems to reach out and em-
brace the lake, completing its own form
with the wall of mangroves on the oppo-
site side of the inlet.


"I think of all the houses we looked at,
this one has the greatest amount of clarity
and simplicity, but with an inherent rich-
ness that is built into the design by com-
bining the outside deck with the interior
spaces. This is a very sophisticated and
handsome house." Earl Flansburgh




Architect
Carl Abbott Architect
Consulting Engineer
A. L.Conyers
Owner
Brian and Renata Miller
General Contractor
Dale Pierce








Photo (c) Steven Brooke

32 FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984






Luminaire Showroom and Offices Coral Gables, Florida




A Showcase of
Good Design

The owner of this furniture showroom
wanted a building created which would
showcase a philosophy of good design as
a way of life. The client asked that the
building be as transparent as possible,
so that the furnishings could provide
color and excitement.
A mutual belief, between architect and
client, in modular systems led to the
choice of a 50-inch module which is ex-
pressed on the facade and regulates all
proportions within the building. The lower
ceiling height (100") allows furniture to be
viewed at a residential scale. Washing
the interiors with soft, reflected light, a
central atrium and skylight create a light-
filled moment through which customers
move upstairs. For fashion shows, the 1
white steel stairway serves as a stage in
the center of the space. The south facade
setback underlines the visual and physi-
cal separation of the adjoining women's
boutique.


"The clarity of the exterior that says,
'come in and visit,' is what really gives this
building its strength. In addition, the
simple interior does not at all take away
from the objects on display which is the
rationale for doing a building of this kind."
Paul Dietrich




Architect Photo(c) Steven Brooke
Mateu Associates
Design TeamV
Roney Mateu and Armando Rizo
Consulting Engineers
Structural M. A. Suarez
Associates, P.E.
Electrical, Mechanical, Plumbing I
Dalla-Rizza & Associates, P.E.
Owner
Mr. Nasir Kassamali ...
General Contractor
Greenberg Construction Corp.









34 FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984
r







Gilldorn Savings Association


A Distinguished Approach
To A Commercial Problem

Gilldorn Savings Association required
the construction of two modest facilities in
central Illinois. Each of these branches
contains a drive-in teller area, a com-
munity room accessible to the public
when the offices are closed, and future
expansion capabilities. The owner re-
quested that the buildings be highly
energy efficient and that their designs
respect the architectural traditions of
prehistoric earthwork constructed in the
central Illinois area.
Both facilities are constructed on
8 foot 8 inch by 40 foot modules with
carefully controlled daylighting. Paired
laminated timber beams clearspan the
interiors and bear on sandblasted, cast-
in-place concrete walls.
Daylighting was a major design deter-
minant for both facilities. High sidewall
windows and continuous clerestories dis-
tribute glare-free daylighting to interior
spaces. Natural wood ceilings and
beams are treated with a bleaching stain
to increase light reflectivity. Clerestory
overhangs block out direct sunlight dur-
ing the summer and permit penetration in
the winter. Earth berms protect the inter-
ior spaces from temperature extremes.


"I think the design of branch drive-in
banks can be pretty ordinary and uninter-
esting. Here, the total integration of the
building with the landscaping and the
sloped berms has done a very nice job of
solving a commercial kind of problem."
Norman Fletcher




Architect
William Morgan Architects, P.A.
Consulting Engineers
Structural M. Dean Wurth, Decatur, IL
Civil Phillip W. Cochran, Decatur, IL
Mechanical/Electrical Hall-Schwartz
& Asso., Decatur, IL
Owner
Gilldorn Savings Association
General Contractor
Fisher-Stoune, Inc., Decatur, IL
Harold O'Shea Builders, Springfield, IL
Interiors
Omniplan Architects, Dallas, Texas
Graphics
Lippincott & Margulies, Inc., New York
FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984 35


Mt. Zion and Pawnee, Illinois






The Atrium on the Bayshore Tampa, Florida




A High Rise Atrium Soars
21 Stories

The Atrium is a highrise luxury condo-
minium on Tampa Bay. A2.5 acre heavily
wooded site on Bayshore Boulevard was
to be used to its maximum allowable
density of 50 units per acre to create a
highrise apartment. Stringent setback
constraints plus the desire to save trees
and take advantage of the water views
produced a very efficient sawtoothed
building footprint of six units per floor cre-
ating in the process a naturally ventilated
atrium space. The resulting 126 apart-
ments are situated on 21 floors.
The naturally ventilated atrium has a
positive airflow caused by the stack effect
of the skylight heated by the sun and the
large louver vents have created fantastic
cross-ventilation of the units allowing
apartment owners to virtually eliminate air
conditioning of their units much of the
year.


"This is, I think, a genius of a response -
to what can be a very standard highrise
problem concerning a narrow piece of
property and how to give many tenants a
water view. The architect has succeeded
in giving the maximum number of tenants
a view and instead of having a very
clumsy building rear, he has developed a
wonderful atrium." Norman Fletcher




Architect
Rowe Holmes Barnett Architects, Inc.
Consulting Engineer
Civil Rast Associates, Inc.
Structural The Paul J. Ford Company I
Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing -
Best, Hickman & Thomas, Inc.
Landscape Architect
The Balsley/Davis Group I
Owner
Swire Properties, Ltd.
General Contractor
Great Southwest Corporation









36 FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984




























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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984


t/







DISCOVER te GYP-CRETE
The Standard
in Floor Underlayment, I Or c ^
for Residential-.


T Pwrn nct ri'oni


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Gypsum Floors, Inc. of "5 ing
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3750 Consumer Street8 -"
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Future Floors, Inc.
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, [ PREMIX-MARBLETITE

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STUCCO, PLASTER, DRYWALL AND
POOL PRODUCTS
SOLD BY LEADING
BUILDING MATERIALS DEALERS
For specifications and color chart
refer to SWEET'S CATALOG 9.10/Pr
3009 N.W. 75th Ave. Miami, FL 33122
Oviedo & Sanford Rd. Orlando, FL 32707
Miami Orlando
(305) 592-5000 (305) 327-0830
(800) 432-5097 -Fla. Watts- (800) 432-5539

MANUFACTURERS OF:


* MARBLETITE
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* POOLCOTE
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* FLO SPRAY
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* CEMCOTE
Cement Paint
* FLOTEX
Wall Spray


* ACOUSTICOTE
Acoustical Plaster
* WONCOTE
Veneer Plaster
* P.V.L
Vinyl Ceiling Spray
* ACOUSTEX
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* BEDDINGCOTE
For Rock Dash
* SNOWFLAKE
Ceiling Spray


AND OTHER BUILDING PRODUCTS
An Imperial Industries Company


A Florida Native















Florida Keys Coral, unique to South Florida, gives a distinct character to
any building or garden. We can cut Coral to your specifications, for
architectural mouldings, arches, columns & furnishings. Our Florida Keys
Coral. A Native.
CM I a Craftsman Masonry Incorporated
SNatural Stone Supply
1995 N.W. 16 Street, Pompano Beach

(305) 974-1736
Celebrating Our 20th Year!
Coral Keys Stone Cutting O Natural Stone
Sales & Installation l Majestic Fireplace Distributor


A MAN'S HOME
IS HIS CASTLE




To make your business or
residence secure
contact


Dr. Randy Atlas, AIA
Architectural Security Design Consultant


Specializing in criminal justice
facility design, building security and
expert witness testimony.



ATLAS & ASSOCIATES
- 600 NE 36th, Suite 711
Miami, Florida 33137
305-573-6211







FLORIDA BLUEPRINT ANNOUNCES
ITS COMMITMENT TO
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FOR ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS
& DESIGN PROFESSIONALS


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* Experience, knowhow and dedication.
* Innovation with state-of-the-technology
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To best serve the needs and demands
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Blueprints FREE SEMINARS offered
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The strength of Florida Blueprint is our
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PRODUCT NEWS

New Plant Care System is Energy
Efficient
Aqua/Trends, of Boca Raton, has a
new line of automatic, foliage plant water-
ing systems for interiorscape, building
management and construction industry
use. These "Plant-Minders" are fully-auto-
mated, multi-plant central systems spe-
cially designed for watering interior and
patio potted plants. Although not intended
to replace human plant care, their purpose
is to reduce the time, effort and cost that
goes into the maintenance of decorative,
interior plantings in residential and com-
mercial applications.
The new line is the MIRAGE III Sys-
tem which waters all interior foliage auto-
matically through a central network incor-
porated into the framework of a building
during construction or renovation. Incon-
spicuous plastic tubing simply plugs into
receptacles provided at convenient loca-
tions along the walls of rooms and run to
nearby potted greenery... also outdoors
on terraces and patios. An adjustable
mini-valve at each plant provides pre-
cise, individual watering control. This
equipment is also capable of being tied
into a building's computerized energy
management or security systems.
Brochures and information can be
obtained from Aqua/Trends, Blair Build-
ing, 215 North Federal Highway, Boca
Raton, Florida 33432.

Low Maintenance Bathroom
Partitions Good for Schools
Santana's POLY-MAR HD partitions
are a possible solution to the architect's
toilet and shower partition needs. All pan-
els, doors and pilasters are fabricated
from solid polymer resins forming a solid
one-piece component. POLY-MAR does
not rust like metal, delaminate like plastic
partitions or absorb odors like marble.
There are no seams to come apart.
For the architect, Santana offers com-
plete design consultation with special em-
phasis on handicapped accessibility. Our
system can be easily adapted to meet the
specific layout requirements of building
codes in your area.
The special "Plasti-Glaze 280" self-
lubricating surface resists marking with
pens, pencils, cosmetics and ink markers
to discourage writers of graffiti. The parti-
tions never require paint and are virtually
maintenance free.
Contact local sales representatives
for more information.

New Bay Window Available from
Marvin Windows
Marvin Windows' new Sun Bay Win-
dow claims to collect more light than tra-
ditional bay and bow windows. Designed


The Sun Bay by Marvin Windows
with 90 degree angle flankers (side units)
and sloped glazing, the Sun Bay is ideal
for replacement, remodeling and new
construction projects where additional
sunlight is desired.
Energy-saving features of the Sun
Bay include insulating or optional tripane
insulating glass (three panes of glass with
two dead airspaces) on flankers and view
unit; the slope is available with one inch in-
sulated glass. Weatherstripping on the side
units virtually eliminates air infiltrations.
The sash, frame and seat board of the
Marvin Sun Bay are constructed of fine-
grained Ponderosa pine, chosen for its in-
sulating properties and the way it accepts
a stain or paint finish. The wood is treated
to protect it from rot and decay and an
additional low-maintenance exterior is an
available option.
For more information, write Marvin
Windows, Warroad, MN 56763.

New Roof Deck System from
Loadmaster
Vigorous activity in the construction
of outlet malls, the latest and fastest grow-
ing concept in discount merchandising,
has hit on an able ally in a roof deck system
employing expanded polystyrene (EPS)
insulation.


The Loadmaster Roof Deck system, a
dry installed system using modular com-
ponents, has been specified for several re-
cently erected outlet malls in Florida be-
cause of its ability to meet requirements for
fast, dependable, economical construc-
tion with long-term energy savings.
In Tampa, Architects McElvy, Jenne-
wein, Steffany, Howard, Inc. recently spe-
cified this roof deck system for the new
Bay Area Outlet Mall, a one-story, 330,000
square foot, "Y" shaped structure. The roof
deck was installed by American-Southern
Roof Deck Company of Tampa. Following
Loadmaster's recommended practices,
the builder first installed high tensile steel
sections as a structural base for the roof
deck assembly. Next, EPS board in two
layers of two inch thickness, a total of 1.3
million board feet, was placed overthe cor-
rugated steel. High density mineral board
was then installed and a four-ply fiberglass
BUR membrane roofing system was ap-
plied on top for weatherproofing.


Kohler Adds Two Spouts To
Faucet Line
Two new spouts, the Crescent and the
High Country, are now available for both
baths and lavatories from Kohler.
The Crescent Spout was designed to
expand the decorator's options. Its curved
shape is very elegant and fashionable, and
it is offered in five finishes, including pol-
ished chrome and gold, brushed chrome
and gold or polished brass with a baked
epoxy-coated finish.
For information, write Kohler, Co.,
Kohler, Wisconsin 53044.


I ne recent -aucet oy sonier.


A total of 1.3 million board feet of EPS provided an
insulation value of R-20 at Bay Area Outlet Mall,
Tampa.


The High Country Faucet by Kohler.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984









News Continued from page 9
r


Walkers Ridge by CBY.


uary, 1985. As the Program Coordinator
and a Lecturer, Dr. George Lancacellera
is currently planning and designing the
program which will be geared generally to
candidates for the Production Phase of the
project in an Architect, Engineer, General
Contractor's and Developer's offices.
Bose Plaza, Winter Park's 21st century
landmark, was designed and developed
by Oru Bose, AIA. The building marks a
bold departure from the area's current ar-
chitecural character. Its five stories reach


McDonald, AIA, announced recently that
construction has begun to insure Febru-
ary completion of Sunrise Towers, a ten-
story prismatic glass structure. The archi-
tect designed this complex to contain
210,000 square feet of leasable office


Larry Ziebarth, Director of Business Development,
Helman Hurley Charvat Peacock/Architects, Inc.

space. In addition, there will be a world-
wide communication system, helicopter
pad, computer center and other prestige
shops and sports and fitness facilities.
Don Sackman, AIA, has been ap-
pointed to the 1984 Design Committee of


Bose Plaza by Oru Bose


the maximum height limitation for the City
of Winter Park, another controversial factor
of the design. In Orlando, Larry Ziebarth
has been promoted to Director of Business
Development at Helman Hurley Charvat
Peacock. Ziebarth has been with the firm
for four years as project manager and
new business manager. John Randal


Don Sackman, AIA


the American Institute of Architects. His
appointment was announced by the Board
of Directors and AIA President George Not-
ter, Jr., FAIA. Fugleberg Koch Associates
Architects and Planners broke ground in
Winter Park for a 14,000 square foot office
building which will serve as its new head-
quarters. The two story structure will house
the firm's Orlando staff of 35.


LETTERS
Dear Editor:

In a 1971 issue of Florida Architect, a
profile was published on my office. As a
part of this profile, I wrote some aphorisms.
Perhaps some additions might interest
your readers.
MORE APHORISMS for ARCHITECTS
Quality is expensive .. and priceless.
When a desired commission is lost, the
ego of a true architect requires that he
mourn the lost client's misfortune.
Restraint is the greater part of beauty.
If we didn't want it pronounced ARCH-I-
TECH, why didn't we spell it ARK-I-TECT?
The question is often asked, "Are you
an architect?", the honest answer, "Some-
times."
We architects contending with roof leaks
are usually humbled to realize that water
runs downhill.

ABOUT LANDSCAPING
I saw a man clipping his hedge and wished
he had waited until the flowers had gone.
A geneticist spent his life trying to pro-
duce a watermelon without seeds. He fi-
nally succeeded only to learn there was
no way to reproduce the fruit.

OBSERVATIONS (UNSOLICITED) After
visiting the recently completed Center
For The Fine Arts in Miami designed by
Phillip Johnson.
Mr. Johnson and many of us who profess
to be architects have yet to learn that ar-
chitecture is not an art of regurgitation.
Mr. Johnson now remembers that smoke
rises. Incidentally, he should view the roof-
top air conditioning units from the adjacent
expressway.
Mr. Johnson would be an ideal client. He
is knowledgeable, appreciative, articulate
and able to afford any building he desires.

The Journal has excellent content,
layout, photographs, reproduction, etc.
Congratulations to you and your staff.

Sincerely,
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984


































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i








VIEWPOINT

KIDS CREATING A WORLD -

AND THEMSELVES WITH BLOCKS
Victoria Stuart


First they cheer a unison shout that
lights up their faces with the ligntning-flash
joy that only children know.
Then they rush to the block box and
dive in with abandon, P's and Q's flying
out over their shoulders to become castles
and towers and cities and houses and
roads to imagination.
Blocks, the kids call them. The profes-
sor, who studies the kids and the blocks,
calls them "3-dimensional manipulables,"
which doesn't make them any less fun for
the kids. Every day during recess here at
Miami's West Laboratory Kindergarten
and Elementary School, kingdoms rise
and fall, all made of blocks.
"Blocks are among the most impor-
tant toys of an inventive nature available to
children," says the professor, Dr. Eugene
Provenzo, Jr., who teaches educational
psychology at the University of Miami.
"They allow children to create, rather
than use."
Provenzo is co-author of The Com-
plete Block Book, the first book on the
history and educational significance of
blocks. The Complete Block Book is pub-
lished by Syracuse University Press.
"Blocks, more than any other toy, rep-
resent what's in a child's mind, whether
it's a "Star Wars" fantasy or a medieval
castle," Provenzo said.
"Literally, they allow the child to play
God, to create, experiment, add and sub-
tract, and try again. They learn indepen-
dence, and since most children react in
response to the things an adult world im-
poses on them, this can be critically
important."
Linda likes to skate on them. "D"
blocks are the best for this, she says, be-
cause they slide over the carpet better.
Paul has "hunerds and hunerds of
blocks at home."
Kim likes to build "whatever-a build-
ing office or a kingdom, it doesn't matter,
it's just fun."
Lance just wants to know if he can
help the others build with blocks.
They work by sixes, by twos or by
themselves, and they are very serious
about what they do. For Joey, choosing
the best block to represent a smokestack
on "the most biggest ship I ever builded"
can take long minutes of intense concen-
tration, and the testing of possible candi-
dates by size, weight, shape and esthetic
value.
When the masterwork is complete,
Joey stands back, arms folded, consider-
ing the final structure. His expression
is as serious as any masterbuilder sur-


veying the framework for a 70-story sky-
scraper, but slowly, a smile of pride and
satisfaction spreads over his face and he
nods imperceptibly, as God might have
on the Seventh Day.
Sometimes, the children won't even
know what they're building until it's fin-
ished, and sometimes even then they can
only guess. Whether it's a cathedral, a
ship, a moat, a jungle, a launching plat-
form, an elevated mass transit system, a
city, or an entire kingdom, it doesn't matter.
What they like about it so much is just doing
it. The structure doesn't have to be any-
thing in particular, or be useful and justify
itself. Those are adult notions. These are
kids.
Yet what parents and teachers like is
that the children are not only playing; they
are learning.
Block-play can help improve a child's
sensory, motor and intellectual develop-
ment, the authors say.
"Children play with blocks because it
is fun; they don't realize that they are learn-
ing. The learning comes from spontaneous
activities," said Arlene Brett, University of
Miami professor of early childhood edu-
cation and co-author of the book.
Playing with blocks, Brett says, teaches
children pre-reading skills through the rec-
ognition of the letters painted on the blocks,
mathematics through counting and shape-
building, and even the laws of physics as
children learn that a triangle can't stand
up on its pointed end.
But the only way to initially stimulate a
child's interest in blocks is to personally
introduce him or her to a set of them.
"They don't advertise very well on tele-
vision," Provenzo explains. "Small, plain,
wooden squares and triangles just can't
compete visually with a G. I. Joe action ad-
venture series or 'Star Wars' spaceships.
But blocks have a timeless quality that chil-
dren instinctively recognize, and the make-
believe element is very strong. For ex-
ample, G. I. Joe can only be G. I. Joe, and
R2D2 can only be R2D2, but a block can
be anything and that, to children, is very
exciting."
It was Frederick Froebel, the founder
of the kindergarten movement in the 19th
century, who initiated the use of blocks as
a standard part of school curriculum, In
the early 1920's Maria Montessori followed
suit in her unique nursery and elementary
schools. Today, a set of blocks whether
they are traditional alphabet type, bristle
blocks, sophisticated Legos or giant Su-
perblocks can be found in almost every
elementary and pre-school classroom.


"Playing with blocks can also teach
children verbal interaction, sharing, organi-
zation a lot more skills than even a video
game," Provenzo said, "because they
learn how to concentrate, create, and they
receive recognition of an accomplishment."
Video-game enthusiasts maintain that
these games develop similar skills in chil-
dren. "But blocks are three-dimensional in-
stead of two-dimensional," Povenzo points
out, "and the range of activities possible
with blocks is much more diverse and com-
plex. We live in a three-dimensional world,
and the opportunity to learn, manipulate
and master that reality is critical."
The architect Frank Lloyd Wright, in
nis autobiography, says building blocks
were so important in his childhood that
most of his designs, including the Imperial
Palace Hotel in Tokyo and Chicago's Mid-
way Gardens, can be reconstructed in de-
tail with children's building blocks.
Plaio regarded play as "the means to
test the limits of the universe," and an es-
sential part of the entire human experi-
ence, not only childhood.
Recently, however, blocks have either
been ignored or demoted to a minor role in
early childhood education, according to
Brett. "Lately ... teachers are concerned
with improving students' mathematic and
science skills at an early age," she says.
"Play has been de-emphasized, but it is
an important factor in children's develop-
ment, and blocks have a lot of potential in
this area."
Provenzo says, "The almost total ex-
clusion of block-building activities from the
world of adolescents, young adults and
adults mean that we are ignoring a very
important area of development."
A set of blocks on an executive's desk
could be "therapeutic, even soothing as a
sort of 'fidget bead,' and architects and
designers could use blocks to lay out their
designs in three dimensions."
Almost everyone has experienced
building with blocks, but strangely, almost
no one admits it after age seven. "Aw, it's
baby stuff," said one block-jaded eight-
year-old, although he shyly admitted to still
owning a well-used set of Legos "in a se-
cret place" in his closet at home.
But ask young children what their fa-
vorite toy is, and the answer-sometimes
shouted for sheer joy is unanimous:
Blocks.
Eager to start all over again, the chil-
dren gather into a circle and rush head-
long into their creations, yelling and laugh-
ingand kicking the pieces to the four
corners of the room.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1984



















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