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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00238
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: Fall 1982
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00238
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text












































































































































































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Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
104 East Jefferson Ave.
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302

Publisher/Executive Vice President
George A. Allen
Editor
Diane D Greer
Director of Advertising and Art
Ann E Allen
Editorial Board
J. Michael Bier, AIA
Chairman
Jaime Borelli, AIA
William E. Graves, AIA
Mark Ramaeker, AIA
Peter Rumpel, FAIA
President
Glenn A Buff, AIA
9369 Dominican Drive
Miami, Florida 33190
Vice President
Robert G Graf, AIA
Post Office Box 3741
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Secretary
James H Anstis, AIA
333 Southern Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
Treasurer
Mark T Jaroszewicz, FAIA
University of Florida
College of Architecture
331 Architectural Building
Gainesville, Florida 32611
Regional Director
Ted Pappas, FAIA
P. O. Box 41245
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
General Counsel
J Michael Huey. Esquire
Suite 510. Lewis State Bank Building
Post Office Box 1794
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of
Architects, is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Flor-
ida Corporation not for profit.
ISSN. 0015-3907 It is published
five times a year at the Executive
Office of the Association 104 E.
Jefferson Ave., Tallahassee, Flor-
ida 32302. Telephone (904) 222-
7590 Opinions expressed by
contributors are not necessarily
those of the FA/AIA Editorial
material may be reprinted pro-
vided full credit is given to the
author, and to FLORIDA
ARCHITECT, and a copy sent to
the publisher's office

Single copies $2.00 subscription,
$20.00 per year Third class
postage


FLORKDA ARCHITECT
i JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


Fall, 1982
Volume 29, Number 5







Contents


1982 FA/AIA Awards

for Excellence in Architecture


Departments


5 Editorial

6 News and Letters

7 Legal Notes

31 Viewpoint















Cover photograph of the Gregg
Beachfront Residence by Carl Abbott.
Photograph is by Steven Brooke.
Brooke is the recipient of this year's
FA/AIA Honor Award for Photog-
raphy.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982






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FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982


EDITORIAL










In all things, it seems, the spirit of competi-
tion is a driving force in bringing true excel-
lence into public view. There is no field of en-
deavor where the spirit of competition is not
keen and the goal is not either to be first, best
or biggest. To deny that competition is one of
this country's motivating forces is to deny the
very essence of our goal-oriented culture. We
are a society that thrives on recognition in
athletics, personal appearance, medicine and
science, arts and letters . and architecture.
Sooner or later, presumably, we will all be
recognized because we are first or best at
something.
While much of this recognition is little more
than entertainment for the masses, the spirit of
competition is important. It stimulates our de-
sire to succeed and become ever better at
what we do. A desire for recognition among
our peers is healthy, even admirable. I would
like nothing better than to win the Pulitzer Prize
for journalism. Is that bad? I say no. It causes
me to constantly strive to produce my best
writing.
Architectural competitions are no different.
Architects enter competitions to win. With win-
ning comes a recognition of excellence and
with that recognition comes an implied obliga-
tion for continued excellence. That's good. It's
good for the people who buy architecture. It's
good for the future of architecture, for the fu-
ture of our cities. It is one of the assurances
that quality will continue to be a goal.
Diane D. Greer












5









LETTERS


Dear Editor
The summer issue of FLORIDA
ARCHITECT is another fine job you've
done. I'll share my copy with the Homes
Editor of the Evening Independent, our
afternoon paper.
Keep up the fine work.
Charles Benbow
Architecture Writer
St. Petersburg Times

Dear Editor
I have enjoyed the look of the maga-
zine (FA) in the last fiew issues. The cov-
er on the summer issue was very soft in
tone and most effective in displaying the
rotunda stair in the Capitol.
Sincerely,
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA

Dear Editor
I want to compliment you on your
very good looking FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT. It's very well done and I hope that
it is profitable for you.
Sincerely,
Helen T. Schneider, Hon. AIA
Executive Director
New Jersey Society of Architects

Dear Editor
The summer issue of FLORIDA
ARCHITECT, with the 1982 Governor's
Design Awards featured, contained an
error. The credits on the Escambia Re-
gional Service Center were incorrect and
should have been listed as follows:
THE GOVERNMENTAL CENTER
ARCHITECTS, (J.V.)
Hugh J. Leitch, Architect, P.A.
The Bullock Associates, Architects
& Planners, Inc.
Look & Morrison, Architects
Marshall & MacNeil, Architect
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., was the Princi-
pal in Charge
Please publish a correction accord-
ingly in your next issue.
Thank you.
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., FAIA
Ed. Note: FLORIDA ARCHITECT incor-
rectly listed Ellis W. Bullock, Jr. as the
architect of the Escambia Regional Ser-
vice Center based on information sup-
plied by the coordinators of the awards
program. The FA/AIA's involvement in
the Governor's Design Awards Program
is limited to co-hosting the announce-
ment of the winning designs. FA apolo-
gizes to those architects who were mis-
takenly deleted from the list of winners.
Turn to page 20


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982








LEGAL NOTES





Architecture or Engineering-Clearing Up A Cloudy Issue.


by J. Michael Huey
FA/AIA General Counsel

The professions of architecture and
engineering have been regulated in Flor-
ida since 1915 and 1918, respectively.
Distinctions between the two have, how-
ever, never been totally clear to the
public, the legislature or the courts. In-
deed, there is an acknowledged overlap
between architecture and some of the
engineering specialties, particularly,
structural and civil engineering. This
overlap has caused regulation of the ar-
chitectural and engineering professions
to be complex and, at times, frustrating.
From 1915 until 1979, there was a
limited definition of architecture con-
tained in the Architects' Practice Act.
Persons engaged in the planning or de-
sign of buildings for others or furnishing
architectural supervision of the construc-
tion of buildings were deemed to be
practicing architecture. From 1918 until
1979, the Engineers' Practice Act con-
tained an extensive definition of the term
"professional engineering." This term in-
cluded any professional service requir-
ing use or knowledge of mathematics
and the principles of engineering ren-
dered or offered to be rendered for pub-
lic or private buildings, dams, machines,
etc., and any consultation, investigation,
plan, design or responsible supervision
of construction of such buildings, dams,
machines, etc.
For years, architects and engineers
were at each other's throats over one
another's encroachment in the practice.
This not only occurred in Florida, but
throughout the United States. In 1970,
the Florida State Board of Architecture
attempted to prosecute an engineer for
the unlawful practice of architecture. The
now famous case Verich v. Florida


State Board of Architecture involved
the design of a shopping mall by an
engineer. The lower court's order en-
joined the engineer from continuing with
the design of the mall. The District Court
of Appeal for the Fourth District of Florida
reversed the lower court holding that,
upon review of the definitions in the
practice acts, a registered architect
could plan, design and supervise con-
struction of a building as the practice of
architecture and a registered profes-
sional engineer could plan, design and
supervise construction of a building as
the practice of engineering.
The district court also noted that the
legislature obviously intended an over-
lap of these two professions due to the
statutory language allowing engineers to
perform architectural services incidental
to an engineering project and vice versa.
The Verich decision did not end the con-
troversy between architects and en-
gineers but it substantially precluded en-
croachment enforcement activities by
the respective professional regulatory
boards.
In 1979, the legislature reviewed the
Architects' Practice Act and the En-
gineers' Practice Act under the sunset
law. Under this law, the two practice acts
were to be automatically repealed ab-
sent the legislature's finding that the
health, safety and welfare of the citizens
of the state required re-enactment. The
legislature made such a finding and re-
enacted both practice acts. In doing so,
the definition of engineering was mod-
ified only slightly. However, the definition
of the practice of architecture was sub-
stantially amended to read:
"'Architecture' means the ren-
dering or offering to render ser-
vices in connection with the
design and construction of a
structure or group of structures
which have as their principal
purpose human habitation or
use, and the utilization of space
within and surrounding such
structures. These services
include planning, providing
preliminary study designs,
drawings and specifications,
architectural supervision, job-
site inspection, and administra-
tion of construction contracts."


The 1979 Legislature further mod-
ified the two practice acts to provide that
only civil and structural engineers could
render architectural services which were
purely incidental to an engineering proj-
ect. Formerly, such incidental architec-
ture was not restricted to these two
engineering specialties. The two modifi-
cations have gone a long way toward
clarifying the respective practices. The
legislature recognized that the disci-
plines of civil and structural engineering
are the only two engineering disciplines
applicable to planning, design and con-
struction supervision of buildings. Fur-
ther, the legislature recognized that ar-
chitecture, alone, involves overall plan-
ning, design and construction supervi-
sion of structures for human habitation or
use.
The legislature, rightfully, did not re-
move the "overlap" language wherein
architects can perform engineering ser-
vices purely incidental to their archi-
tectural practice and vice versa. There
are some who will say that this leaves the
two professions exactly where they were
in 1970, when Verich was handed down.
However, this is not the case. The De-
partment of Professional Regulation,
through the State Board of Architecture
and the Florida Board of Professional En-
gineers, has formed a Joint Architec-
tural/Engineering Committee whose
purpose is to review alleged practice en-
croachments. This committee has con-
sistently applied the "human habitation
or use" principle in distinguishing the
two practices. The committee, in eval-
uating complaints received by DPR, has
determined that the following building
types can only be designed by archi-
tects: condominiums, apartment build-
ings, office complexes, church build-
ings, public recreational buildings,
shopping centers, hotels and detention
facilities.
Despite the progress being made
by the Joint Committee, many architects
continue to be frustrated by the failure of
their local building code officials to prop-
erly interpret and enforce the law by
issuing building permits for architectural
buildings when the plans have been
sealed by engineers. Building officials
have a duty to examine the plans submit-
Turn to page 32


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982









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1982 FA/AIA Awards For Excellence in

Architecture
This year's eight winners of the Award for Excellence in Architecture were selected
from 150 submitted projects. The jury which convened at the headquarters of the New
York Society of Architects in Manhattan, included Charles Gwathmey, FAIA, John M.
Johansen, FAIA and Paul Rudolph. While philosophical differences existed among the
jury, as they will in any jury, this year's winners collectively represented this jury's different
perceptions of excellence in architecture.


I?
/


1


John Johansen, FAIA
John M. Johansen, FAIA, is one of
the most widely acclaimed Architects
practicing today. Since he ei, hi.i.ried
his practice in 1950, his work has re-
ceived both national and international
attention for its boldness, imagination
and freshness of approach. Over the
years Mr. Johansen has received re-
peated honors and awards from the Na-
tional Chapter of the A.I.A., several re-
gional chapters of the A.I.A., the Brunner
Award from the National Institute of Arts
and Letters, and the U.S. Department of
H.E.W., and the Royal Institute of Archi-
tects of Ireland.


Charles Gwathmey, FAIA
Charles Gwathmey, FAIA, of the
New York firm of Gwathmey Siegel &
Associates, received his Master of Archi-
tecture from Yale University where he
was awarded the Winchester Traveling
Fellowship and a Fulbright Grant.
Gwathmey has maintained faculty posi-
tions at a number of universities includ-
ing Harvard, Yale, Princeton and Colum-
bia. He is the youngest architect ever to
receive the American Academy and In-
stitute of Arts and Letters' Brunner Prize.


Paul Rudolph
Paul Rudolph practices in New York
City. He is a former Chairman of the De-
partment of Architecture at Yale Uni-
versity and holds numerous honorary
doctoral degrees from such schools as
Auburn, Emory and Florida State Uni-
versity. He has a Master of Architecture
degree from Harvard University. Ru-
dolph has been the recipient of numer-
ous awards and honors, both nationally
and internationally. He is a prolific author
and his work has been the subject of a
number of books including The
Architecture of Paul Rudolph by Sibyl
Moholy-Nagy and Gerhard Schwab.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982






"This house is an interesting mixture of nature and human design ..."
John Johansen


The Aguilera Residence
Dade County, Florida
Architect
George F. Reed, FAIA
Coconut Grove
Landscape Architect
George F. Reed, FAIA
Owner
Mr. and Mrs. Enrique Aguilera
General Contractor
Meares Contracting Company
This residence was designed for a family
with four children who wished to have com-
plete privacy and save all existing oak trees.
In addition, they wanted a home which related
to the tropical outdoors and enhanced their
energy conservation Privacy for individual
family members was also important, but the
spirit of the family and a feeling of security
within the house was imperative.
The solution to these criteria was a com-
plex of four sheltering roofs, set among the
trees, describing a compound that is en-
closed by a continuous meandering masonry
wall that provides security and privacy. Alto-
gether, this tropical house was designed to
be in harmony with its family and its site.
Jury Comments
"This is the most indigenous and most
livable building we saw." . Paul Rudulph
"This house is a haven in the tropics. It is
an interesting play between formal and infor-
mal The delight here is in the mixture be-
tween plant life and man's construction. It's
really a marvelous mix." . John Johansen


rnoiograpny oy seven brooKe


-----------4






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FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982









































Photography by Hursley/Lark/Hursley


"A most extravagant core of glass wall. ." Charles Gwathmey


The Overseas Tower
Miami, Florida
Architect
Arquitectonica International Corporation
Coral Gables
Consulting Engineer
John Ross Associates, Inc.
Owner/Developer
The Overseas Tower Corporation, N.V.
Jorge Boza, Jr., Developer
General Contractor
Edward J. Gerrits
This medium rise suburban office build-
ing is sited at the entrance to an industrial
park on a peninsula. There are expansive
views of a large lake from the seven-story
building which has 37,000 square feet of
gross area. Building construction is rein-
forced concrete columns and post tensioned
slab on pile footings. Building materials in-
clude painted stucco on block, gray reflective
glass and aluminum framing which was elec-
trostatically painted blue. There is on-grade
parking and the mechanical system employs
one air handling unit per floor.


Jury Comments
"As a total surreal building, as a graphic
idea, both in terms of color and material and
articulation .. as a speculative object, it is
very successful.
"The building addresses itself to high-
way architecture which is unique because it is
done all too seldom. It holds its own in the
highway by using the most extravagant core
of glass wall that one can imagine. The han-
dling of the core, from a purely architectural
viewpoint is, I think, brilliant. It is a study in
scale. It is simultaneously scale-less at first
glance with the continuous glass walls of the
office tower, but if you examine the detail
more closely, you see that it has great delica-
cy of scale. The whole building is a study in
abstraction.' . Charles Gwathmey


0 0


Pi k.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982


S 0







"There is a great inventiveness of gestures here ." John Johansen


Alexander Residence
Coconut Grove, Florida ,
Architect,.
Henry C. Alexander, Jr.
Miami
Consulting Engineer
Brill-Heyer Associates .
Owner .
Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Alexander, Jr.
General Contractor
Henry C. Alexander, Jr., Architect

This single family residence occupies a
lot which is 50 by 90 feet with a flood criteria
of + 12.0' MSL for all habitable spaces. Foun-
dations are isolated footings for each column
and concrete slab on grade. The exterior is
stained cypress on plywood sheathing and
flooring is oak strip. There are two 37,000 BTU
split system air conditioners with heat ex-
changer for hot water.

Jury Comments
"There is great unity in this building and
it is a marvelous abstraction. There is great
inventiveness of gestures here as to the way
forms break one into the other. Sometimes it is
the flow of a curve, sometimes it is something
else. First you're in one geometry, then
another. You literally move from one form to
another.
"It is a very sophisticated piece of work
and a very able design." . John Johansen



Photography by Martin Fine



























GROUND FIRST
GROUND FIS


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982







"This use of sloping planes is very successful . ." Charles Gwathmey


Photography by Steven Brooke


V
~w~inuuuuuinu~


Photography by Bunny Morgan


Oceanfront Townhouses
Atlantic Beach, Florida
Architect
William Morgan Architects, P.A.
Jacksonville
Consulting Engineer
Roy Turknett Engineers, P.A., Mechanical,
Electrical
H. W. Keister Associates, Inc., Structural
Owner
Morgan-Goodloe, Incorporated
General Contractor
E. Vaughan Rivers, Inc.
Taking advantage of the 100' by 150'
sloping site, the townhouses are nestled into
the sand dune with the center residence's
entry at the second floor approached by a
landscaped wood deck. The north and south
townhouses, mirror images of each other, are
entered through a sunken skylit atrium to a
landing above the first floor. The sloped roof-
line is extended by fin walls on the west to
subdivide a six-car carport, by sodded berms
on the north and south, and by a screen en-
closure on the east facing the Atlantic Ocean.
Each unit has a balcony leading to the bed-
rooms which overlook a two-story living area
below.
Jury Comments
"The formal concept of this building ap-
pears to be one when it is really three living
spaces. The house is most convincing in sec-
tion and I like the feeling that the house is
always recoiling away from you. In.-that re-
gard, its use of sloping planes is most suc-
cessful." . Charles Gwathmey


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982


law- -







"The outside is the other side of the inside . a very honest approach to
architecture." . John Johansen

































Neighborhood Senior Citizens Center Photography by Bob Braun
Jacksonville, Florida
Architect HuBBARD STnREE
Pappas Associates, Architects, Inc.
Jacksonville
Consulting Engineers
H. W. Kiester Associates, Inc., Structural --.- -
Van Wagenen & Searcy, Inc HVAC and
Electrical
Landscape Architect
Jacksonville Landscaping Company
Owner
City of Jacksonville
General Contractor
Wesley of Florida, Inc.
This center was designed to provide re-
creation for the elderly. Utilizing the asset of a
moderate year round climate, the structure
combines not only indoor activities, but invites
the individual to participate in outdoor recrea-
tion, including dining.
Jury Comments
"This building creates its own environ-
ment within its own confines. Because of the
concrete construction, it's easy to see how it
might appear fortress-like to the casual
observer, but actually the idea of the elderly
coming to a protective place which is clearly
defined and where they feel secure is good.
"The plan is admirable. It is essentially
simple laid out around a corridor leading to
lounge and library. As far as the auditorium is
concerned, what better way to keep out dis-
tracting outside noises than to surround the
auditorium with storage facilities. -
"The geometry of the scheme is consis-
tent throughout. It is a good indication that A
Wrightian architecture is not dead."
Charles Gwathmey

14 FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982







"This is one of the few airports in the world that seems to belong to a given
space..." Paul Rudolph


..... Passenger Terminal Complex
Orlando International Airport
Orlando, Florida
,"Architect
Kemp, Bunch and Jackson, Architects, Inc.
*and Schweizer Associates, Inc. Associated
'' Architects serving as project architect to the
Greiner Team, a project led by Greiner
lw Engineering Sciences as project manager.
S Consulting Enginners
Tilden, Denson and Lobnitz, Inc., Electrical,
-.. Plumbing, Acoustic
-- ..- Van Wagenen & Searcy, Inc., Mechanical
..Greiner Engineering Sciences, Structural,
Passenger Transfer system, aprons
Landscape Architects
Wallis-Baker and Associates, P.A.
Foster-Conant and Associates, Inc.
-- Owner
Greater Orlando Aviation Authority
General Contractors
Gilbane/Mills and Jones Construction
Manager
Great Southwest Corporation Landside
Contractor
Metric Constructors Airside Contractor

,1Jury Comments
-"This is an interesting idea for an airport
with terminal building for people, cars and
-parking separate from the terminii for air-
planes. The airport is designed so that you
establish passenger transfer at the main ter-
minal and then take a tube to the various
airline pods. The whole trip from terminal to
airplane building is a part of the sequence of
the building. There is very strong site partici-
pation with passengers moving over a series
of lakes and never losing sight of the land.
"The quality of this building is less auto-
matic than one might expect in this type of
public facility, rather the detailing is clear and
the overall use of space is much less regular
and unexpected than one finds in a typical
airport" . Charles Gwathmey

Photography by Bob Braun




U k


" F


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982






"A logical, intimate building for students who are tired of pretentious
architecture..." Paul Rudolph







1-d!




















Photography by Peter Rumpel
University of North Florida
Student Activity Center
Jacksonville, Florida
Architect
Clements/Rumpel/Associates
Jacksonville
Consulting Engineer
H. W. Keister Associates, Structural
Wilder Associates, Mechanical, Electrical
David Locklin, Theatre Consultant
Larry Brock, Kitchen
Landscape Architect
Bill Munson
Owner
State of Florida Board of Regents
General Contractor
Greenhut Construction Company
This 700-seat theatre and student activ-
ity center has a poured-in-place concrete .
frame and is built of brick to match existing
campus buildings. There is stained exposed
concrete, steel and reflective glass over the --
exterior circulation, the theatre lobby and the
greenhouse dining area.
Jury Comments
"There is a sense of intimacy in this m a
building even though it is fairly large. There is .
a certain logic about the whole which is ,
heightened by that sense of intimacy. I like ba.
the spirit of the building. It employs very direct
building methods which, I think, young peo-
ple particularly appreciate. It is really like an
informal community, a village if you will, where
students go shopping for knowledge. The
lineal organization of the building draws on
nature it is very organic." . Paul
Rudolph


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982





"The relationship of solids to voids is handled in a remarkable architectural
way..." Paul Rudolph

Gregg Beachfront Residence
Island near Sarasota, Florida
Architect
Carl Abbott, Architect
Sarasota
Consulting Engineer
A. L. Conyers
Project Job Captain
S.T Michael O'Donnell
SOwner
Mrs. Harry Gregg
General Contractor
Dale Pierce, Inc.
In the canopy of trees, this beach house
reads as a series of light, floating terraces
supported on tall concrete columns. The tall
vertical cylinder of space which runs the full
height of the building visually anchors the
structure to the site.
Jury Comments
"This house's three horizontal planes,
which do not in plan follow each other, but
interpenetrate one with the other, is a valid
idea, especially when these floors are raised
S. above ground in a tropical climate. The rela-
.tionships of these three planes and their
S solids and voids is handled in a remarkable
architectural way. The void in one plane is the
solid in another. All of that is very formalistic,
of course. The thrusting and counter-thrusting
and the balancing of solids and voids and the
flow of space horizontally and vertically is well
thought out." . Paul Rudolph









Photography by Steven Brooke













Fr I 1
''


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982









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NEWS and LETTERS
Dear Mr. Lawrence
Please express my appreciation to
the Institute's Board of Directors for the
resolution presented to me May 3, 1982
by Ellis Bullock. This was quite an honor
of which I am proud.
The Institute's Florida Association
has played a key role in the initiation and
continuation of our Design Awards Pro-
gram. We look forward to continuing this
cooperative effort in the coming years.
Thank you again for this most mean-
ingful resolution.
Sincerely,
Bob Graham
Governor


Florida Firm Selected for AIA/ACA
Exhibit
Harper and Buzinec Architects/
Engineers of Coral Gables and Tallahas-
see was one of six firms cited for special
recognition by the AIA Committee on Ar-
chitecture for Justice. The project which
was cited was the 100-Man Community
Correctional Center in Miami.
Although six projects were cited by
the AIA for special design features, a
total of forty-three U.S. and Canadian
projects illustrating "the continuing in-
crease in the quantity and overall quality
of architecture for justice facilities" were
selected for the 1982 Exhibition of Archi-
tecture for Justice Facilities.
The exhibit, sponsored annually by
the AIA and the American Correctional
Association, was displayed at the AIA
Committee on Architecture for Justice
meeting and conference held in Houston
September 30 through October 3, 1982.
The projects selected included
maximum and minimum security facili-
ties, correctional centers, jails and court-
houses. The 43 winning projects will be
illustrated in a publication which can be
obtained through the AIA's publications
marketing division.

AIA Defends Design for Vietnam
Veterans Memorial
In response to proposed changes to
the design for the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial in Washington, D.C., the AIA
has urged the federal Commission of
Fine Arts to adhere to Maya Ying Lin's
original design which was selected
through a national design competition.
In a letter from AIA President Robert
M. Lawrence to Commission Chairman
J. Carter Brown, Lawrence stated that
such changes to the winning design
were "a breach of faith: the effort of
those to compromise the design breaks


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982







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faith with the designer who won the com-
petition and all those who participated

In his strongly worded response to
the proposed changes, Lawrence went
on to say that, "to break faith in this man-
ner says to those who would participate
in future competitions that their best
efforts can be overturned by a small,
vocal minority."
The Commission of Fine Arts, which
advises on public parks and buildings in
Washington, D.C. is scheduled to review
the proposed modifications to Lin's de-
sign and arrive at a decision in the early
Fall.
Chapters Prepare for Design
Awards Programs
On the evening of November 9,
1982, the Mid-Florida Chapter of the AIA
will present its annual design awards
during a special performance by the
Florida Symphony Orchestra in the Bob
Carr Auditorium in Orlando.
The Mid-Florida Chapter seeks to
honor architects, engineers, interior de-
signers and landscape architects with
offices in the five-county area of Orange,
Osceola, Seminole, Lake and Brevard.
The Florida Central Chapter, AIA, in
conjunction with the Associated General
Contractors and the Construction Pro-
jects Manufacturing Council have an-
nounced the biannual Architects and
Builders Awards Program This program,
designed to recognize architects and
contractors in a five-county area, is held
every two years and provides a show-
case for significant achievements in the
building industry.
This year's program has been ex-
panded to address achievements in in-
terior design and recognize material
suppliers where their efforts warrant it.
The date for this event is November
13, 1982 at the Host International Hotel
in Tampa.

Daytona Beach Chapter Applies for
RUDAT
The Daytona Beach Chapter of the
AIA has initiated a proposal to have the
city of Daytona Beach Shores evaluated
by RUDAT the AIA's Regional Urban
Design Assistance Team. The Executive
Committee and Directors of the Chapter
agreed to sponsor the RUDAT applica-
tion, the first phase of which was just
completed with a preliminary evaluation
of the City by an AIA Evaluator. Based on
the recommendation of the Evaluator,
who happened to be an Alabama archi-
tect, the AIA should reach its decision by
early Fall.
I RUDAT is a free service of the AIA
which evaluates cities across the coun-
try as to their individual needs and prob-
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Turpin Chambers Bannister, FAIA
A fine architect and a great teacher
and writer was lost to the profession with
the death of Turpin Chambers Bannister
on March 15, 1982. Bannister was for-
mer head of the University of Illinois De-
partment of Architecture and later dean
of the College of Architecture and Fine
Arts at the University of Florida. It was
there, as both dean and teacher, that so
many of the practicing architects in Flor-
ida today came to know and love Turpin
Bannister.
After many years in private practice,
Professor Bannister began an academic
career that was to last until his retire-
ment. In 1957, he was appointed dean of
the College of Architecture and Fine Arts
at the U of F.
Bannister's broad career brought
him many honors and awards. Signifi-
cant among those honors were his Fel-
lowship in the AIA in 1953 and the 1955
Edward C. Kepper Award. one of the
Institute's most coveted.
Turpin Bannister made significant
contributions to the architectural profes-
sion as a writer and editor. He was Editor


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982


Awninw
of dininction


velopment. The only expense to the ap-
plicant relates to transportation, food
and lodging for the Team that does the
survey. That sum, which is estimated at
between $16 and $20 thousand dollars
is raised with City, County and private
pledges. The Daytona Chapter has
agreed to contribute whatever hours of
manpower are necessary to conduct re-
search and be of general assistance to
the Team.
The results of a RUDAT evaluation
and recommendation are of tremendous
benefit to communities which are rapidly
developing. The team focuses its atten-
tion on future business, building types,
road construction and land use plan-
ning.
According to Daytona Beach Chap-
ter President Bill Palmer, the community
as a whole is supportive of the RUDAT
program and long-range benefits can
clearly be anticipated if the Chapter is
successful in getting the Team to Day-
tona Beach Shores.
Florida Loses Two Emminent
Professors of Architecture






of The Architect at Mid-Century and his
publications on the mills of England and
St. Peter's Basillica in Rome are models
of scholarly research. Bannister is one of
the founders and a past president of the
Society of Architectural Historians, and
he served on advisory boards to the Na-
tional Park Service and the Historic
American Buildings Survey.
Professor Bannister will be greatly
missed by his friends and colleagues.


Woodrow W. Wilkins, AIA
Woodrow W. Wilkins, professor of
architecture and planning at the Univer-
sity of Miami, died August 20, 1982, in
Pensacola. He was 67.
Prof. Wilkins was an internationally
known leader in historic preservation. In
May, 1982, during Historic Preservation
Week, the Woodrow Wilkins Archives of
Architectural Records was begun in
Miami. The archives will collect, store
and display architectural memorabilia.
Wilkins research was chiefly in the
field of historic American architecture.
He did a great deal of work with the
Historic American Buildings Survey. At
the time of his death, Wilkins was work-
ing on a book about George Merrick,
founder of Coral Gables.
Wilkins was a member of the Amer-
ican Institute of Architects, the Dade
Heritage Trust and the Florida Trust for
Historic Preservation. In 1978, he was
appointed by the Secretary of State to
the Florida Review Committee for the
National Register of Historic Places. He
has been an acting resident architect for
the National Park Service in the Carib-
bean, furnishing full architectural service
and all new and preservation work. His
work ranged from Spanish forts to Dan-
ish sugar factories.
Wilkins received his Bachelor of Ar-
chitecture degree from the University of
Florida in 1949. He went to teach at the
University of Miami in 1967 and served
as acting department chairman from
1970 to 1972. Professor Wilkins retired in
May, 1981.
Miscellaneous Items of Note
ARNOLD F. BUTT, has stepped aside
as Chairman of the Department of Archi-
tecture, effective June 30, 1982. In the
fall, he will return to teaching duties with-
in the Department. During his 14-year
tenure as Chairman, many major
changes have taken place in the Depart-
ment and the College. Among these was
the establishment of the College of Ar-
FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982


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chitecture as an independent unit,
growth of the College of Architecture into
one of the largest in the country and
construction of the new building for the
College.

Tampa architect, GEORGE McEL-
VY, AIA, has been appointed to a twenty-
member interim study committee estab-
lished by the Florida legislature to review
regulations, construction practices and
building inspection procedures relating
to residential highrise structures. The
Committee was formed in the wake of
the 1981 Harbor Cay Condominium col-
lapse that killed eleven workmen and in-
jured twenty-three.

The FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
OF THE AIA recently highlighted and ex-
plored the growing role women are play-
ing in the field of architecture. Featured
speakers at the FSC/AIA meeting de-
voted to the theme were BEVERLY SAN-
CHEZ who heads a special Task Force
on the subject for national AIA and
LAURINDA SPEAR, a principal in the
award-winning Miami-based firm of AR-
QUITECTONICA INTERNATIONAL. The
two panelists also appeared with Don
Webb, host of Channel 17's "Something
on 17."

In Miami, a family directorship be-
came a reality with the election of QUEN-
TIN DART PARKER to the Board of
Directors of ALFRED BROWNING PARK-
ER, ARCHITECTS, CHARTERED. Mr.
Parker is a son of the founder of the firm.
ROBIN ZACHARY PARKER, Quentin's
brother, has been a director for the past
six years. The third director, ALFRED
BROWNING PARKER, FAIA, has been
active in the profession for almost 50
years.

FA/AIA Executive Vice President
GEORGE ALLEN has been conferred
with the designation "Certified Associa-
tion Executive" by the American Society
of Association Executives. The CAE de-
signation was made during the national
society's annual meeting in August to
Allen for demonstrating a high level of
competence and fitness for association
management by passing examinations
and fulfilling prescribed standards of
performance and conduct.


Due to a misunderstanding, the firm
of Sandu Z. Rapp, AIA, 1865 79th Street
Causeway, North Bay Village, 33141, was
left off the list of architectural firms pub-
lished in the 1982 Florida Architect Refer-
ence Book.


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Florida Salary and Benefits Survey
Completed
One hundred and fifty-three firms, or
28% of those doing business in Florida,
responded to the 1982 Salary and Bene-
fits Survey of Florida Architectural Firms.
The results should make very interesting
reading for Florida architects.
In early summer, the FA/AIA sent a
questionnaire to all Florida architectural
firms inviting them to participate in a sal-
ary and benefits survey. There were re-
sponses from every chapter, but Florida
South and Florida Central with the
largest memberships prompted the
greatest number of responses. This type
of information has not been compiled in
Florida since 1974, and the data which
resulted from the Summary of Major
Findings should be both interesting and
useful to anyone engaged in the practice
of architecture in this State.
The questionnaire explored every
facet of architectural practice from firm
size to average salaries. Some of the
responses were predictable such as the
number of hours in the average work
week while others were more surprising
such as the fact that 62% of the firms
responding do not provide parking for
their employees and only 1% offer group
auto insurance.
By and large, however, the greatest
discrepancies could be accounted for
by geographic location and/or firm size.
For example, the firms employing the
largest numbers of people were in the
Central and Southern parts of the State
where there is a lot of commercial con-
struction. In North Florida and the Pan-
handle, the majority of firms responding
had fewer employees and smaller fee
billings. Noteworthy, however, is that fact
that regardless of location nearly 50% of
the participating firms operated in office
space of 1,000 square feet or less.
Relative to salary, the questionnaire
had nineteen categories representing a
range of positions from executive officer
to clerical support. On this portion of the
survey the statewide tabulation was
accomplished by using median salaries
in the high, average and low categories.
For example, one firm principal in a very
small firm might have an annual income
of $2,000 while another in a much larger
firm would have an income of $84,000.
For that particular category, the median
figure of $42,000 would show as a state-
wide average. This same method was
used for tabulating the total number of
employees in each of the nineteen cate-
gories.
Survey results will be published and
chiri.uid,: free of charge to every firm
participating in the project. Any other
firm wishing to have a copy of the results
may have them upon request, although
there will be a charge.


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VIEWPOINT




Thru A Glass Darkly The Design Awards Jury


by John W. Totty, AIA

Have you ever wondered what hap-
pens when a design awards jury con-
venes?
Paraphrasing a juror, and an old
advertising slogan, "when you care
enough, send your very best. ." This is
how I think most jurors will look at your
entry into a design awards competition.
These are architects who themselves
care deeply for their work and look for
the same dedication in their judgements.
A design awards submission should,
therefore, express the creative effort that
went into the building planning -
through good photographs and well
done graphic materials. The only caution
being that you're still judged on the
building design, not the entry design.
Temper the entry submission with the
same sense of appropriateness applied
to any design model.
"Thru A Glass Darkly" .. This
means that all the juror sees is what you
show him, and it must be interpreted
through his own experiences and sensi-
bilities, without benefit of direct contact
with the finished building. The jury ex-
perience is necessarily a subjective pro-
cess, although each juror is capable of
looking beyond his individual approach
and bias to what is universal about good
design and architecture. Styles may
change and vary but basic tenets remain
the same.
An award for Excellence in Architec-
ture, or whatever title is used, is always a
selection of the best of the best. Thus,
those characteristics which make a proj-
ect such must come through in a quick
viewing. In the final analysis, a closer
scrutiny is given to siting, plan, function,
program all the general ingredients


that any good building project should
possess. But the first impression must
be of such an impact as to establish a
sense that this project transcends com-
petent architecture and that it exhibits a
truly creative effort on the part of the
designer. Further thought would ques-
tion whether the building or the designer
is being recognized. I suspect it is al-
ways a bit of both because the two are
not entirely separate entities.
You all know what goes in the front
end, the submission. The judging pro-
cess itself is necessarily a hurried one. It
usually takes place over a span of six or
so hours on a Saturday when the jurors
can best break away from daily pres-
sures and interruptions. I think most
jurors enjoy this experience, have usual-
ly done it several times and always look
forward to another opportunity.
The judging process is set by the
method of submission. Most competi-
tions use submission of slides with
minimal associated graphic materials.
The obvious procedure in this case is for
the jury to view the slides together. If
submission is by photos in a binder, they
will probably look through each set indi-
vidually and then come together for dis-
cussion on final choices.
Take the case of slides. All entries
are numbered and always remain anon-
ymous throughout discussions, even if a
juror recognizes a building or a style.
Numbers are assigned at random and
multiple submissions by one architect
are spaced apart to avoid recognition
and comparison of his projects one
against the other. For the FA/AIA pro-
gram there are anywhere from 80 to 150
entries, so the pace is apt to be brisk on
the first run through.
There are usually three or four runs
in narrowing down to probable winners.
On the first run, which may eliminate half
the entries, any project that one or more
juror wants to keep in stays. They might
make a judgment on thumbs up or
thumbs down as each entry is viewed in
order. But the best procedure I saw was
the jury which viewed them in groups of
ten in order to get some feeling of con-
tinuity in the quality of submissions. They
went through the ten and then stopped
for brief discussion on which should be
kept. Once a project is set aside it is rare


that a juror will go back to look again as
later entries come up. And it doesn't
matter where your entry falls in the
series. At this stage they pay as much
attention to the last projects seen as the
first ones.
Each juror takes note of each entry
number that looks most promising. After
the initial run-thru, they then discuss and
compare notes. Indeed, the next elim-
ination run may take place without view-
ing the slides again just through a dis-
cussion.
A lunch break proves a good time
for the jury to relax and talk a bit about
what has been viewed and what they
might look for in the final analysis. Sur-
prisingly, however, there is little phil-
osophical discussion, except on the
occasions of disagreement over one or
two projects. Such disagreement seems
to occur in each jury session. Then
comes the time of horse trading. "I'll let
you have that project if you'll let me have
this one."
There is no preconceived notion of
the number of projects which must be
selected. However, it is understood that
winners will be chosen since the jury is
not judging against an absolute. Each
project, regardless of building type, is
given fair treatment and will rise as high
as its creative input will allow.
If the award categories are broken
up into honor, citation and merit there
does have to be some fine line of judge-
ment. This usually generates quite a bit
of discussion in determining where to
make the break. I think if there is to be
only one category of award the jury will
look harder at individual characteristics.
They realize that each project chosen
must have some common attributes and
that each should approach an equal
level of quality. In multiple categories
each choice, by definition, doesn't nec-
essarily reach the same level of creative
achievement.
No jury is without some element of
humor and irreverent comment to break
the seriousness, or tediousness, of the
task. I remember the time that one ar-
chitect either took his own photos or trav-
eled with the photographer to take pic-
tures of his project. He had a very dis-
tinctive car and by the third time it ap-
peared in the photos the jury was ready


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FAI I 1982






Legal Notes continued
ted to them and to refuse building per-
mits if the plans are not properly sealed.
It would be an understatement to say
that building officials have not uniformly
interpreted the law.
However, progress is being made.
The determinations of the Joint Commit-
tee are being distributed to the local
building code officials for guidance. In
March of this year, the Director of Build-
ing and Zoning for the City of Fort Myers
issued a memorandom to all architects
and engineers doing business with the
City clarifying that City's position with re-


gard to the sealing of plans. The director
acknowledged that it is the obligation of
the building official to determine the
"grey" or overlap areas. He pointed out
that a determination of these grey areas
did not involve the building official's de-
termination of the competency of the
person sealing the plans. He correctly
recognized that the state tests persons
for competency in particular professions
or occupations and, thereafter, only
those who successfully pass the tests
and receive licenses are allowed to
practice in the particular regulated area.
Accordingly, it was declared to be the


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City's policy that any building that is ar-
chitecture will be designed by an archi-
tect and those portions of the building
requiring engineering beyond a minor
nature will be required to be designed
by an engineer with the proper discipline
or specialty for his portion of the work.
Each sheet of the drawings will then
have to be signed, dated and sealed by
the professional that prepared them.
While other cities have not neces-
sarily established such an explicit written
policy, many building code officials are
taking a position consistent with the
position of the City of Fort Myers. We
have come a long way, thanks to the
cooperation of the legislature and the
two professions. The overlap will remain
as it should but, hopefully, we are
beyond the Verich decision and en-
gineers will no longer be allowed to plan,
design and supervise construction of
buildings for human habitation or use as
the practice of engineering.


Viewpoint continued
to give the car an award.
A few other closing comments and
observations. If you have confidence in
your project and don't win one year, try
again. A second jury is a second chance
and they may see your work differently.
Also, it may stand better in competition
with another group of projects. There
usually is one or more projects which
almost make it, and as an observer, one
wants to give these architects an en-
couraging word.
Another reminder, all jurors are not
necessarily familiar with Florida and the
fact that we are not all palm trees and
sandy beaches, or like Miami! They don't
realize the regional differences between
South, Central and North Florida, or the
beaches and the interior. So regional
characteristics and influences should
come out in your presentation.
Finally, believe it or not, there is no
conspiracy which dictates that the same
architects must win awards time and
again. I've never heard a juror, when
recognizing an architect's work, who is a
consistent award winner, give his project
any more attention than any other. In-
deed, looking back over the years, one
wonders why there aren't more repeat
winners. So, you too might join the circle
of winners.

John W. Totty, AIA, is Architectural Design
Services Manager for The Haskell Company,
Architects/Engineers/Contractors of Jack-
sonville. He is former Editor of Florida Archi-
tect Magazine and has observed the judging
of a number of FA/AIA Design Awards.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT / FALL 1982




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