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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00231
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: Spring 1981
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00231
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Advertising
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Page 37
        Page 38
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Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
117 West College Avenue
Post Office Box 10388
Tallahassee, Florida 32302


JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCH ITE C T
B JOURNAL OF THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


Editor
Diane D. Greer
Publisher/Executive Vice President
George A. Allen
Art Direction
Mel Hutto Associates, Inc.
Editorial Board
William A. Graves, AIA
Chairman
Rick Fernandez, AIA
William Harvard, Jr., AIA
Perry Reader, AIA
Yahya Koita, AIA
Nelson Spoto, AIA
John Totty, AIA

President
Ted Pappas, AIA
100 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
Vice President/President-Elect
Glenn A. Buff, AIA
9369 Dominican Drive
Miami, Florida 33189
Secretary
James H. Anstis, AIA
333 Southern Blvd.
West Palm Beach, Florida 33405
Treasurer
Robert G. Graf, AIA
Post Office Box 3741
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
Past President
Howard Bochiardv, FAIA
Post Office Box 8006
Orlando, Florida 32806
Regional Directors
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
E.H. McDowell, Jr., FAIA
Post Office Box 3958
St. Thomas, VI 00801
General Counsel
J. Michael Huev, Esquire
Suite 510, Lewis State Bank Building
Post Office Box 1794
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the
Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects, is owned and published bv the Asso-
ciation, a Florida Corporation not for profit.
ISSN: 0015-3907 It is published quarterly at the
Executive Office of the Association, 117 West
College Avenue, Tallahassee, Florida 32302.
Telephone (904) 222-7590. Opinions expressed
by contributors are not necessarily those of the
FA/AIA. Editorial material mav be reprinted
provided full credit is given to the author and to
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, and a copy sent to the
publisher's office.
Single copies. $2.00, subscription, $16.00
per year. Controlled circulation postage
paid at Tallahassee, Florida

Postmaster: Please send address changes
to Florida Association of the American In-
stitute of Architects, Post Office Box
10388, Tallahassee, Florida 32302.

FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


Spring, 1981
Volume 28, Number 2


CONTENTS

7 DESIGNING BUILDINGS THAT
WORK IN A CITY ON THE MOVE
FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER/AIA

11 MI*A*MI/MY*O*MY
A DAZZLING DISPLAY OF SOME OF
MIAMI'S MOST EXCITING NEW
BUILDINGS

32 A PARK FOR PEOPLE
ON THE BAY
A CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL
STATEMENT WHICH RECOGNIZES
ITS TIME AND PLACE


DEPARTMENTS

5 Editorial
9 Legal


Cover Photo b, Steven Brooke






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EDITORIAL


M iami.
"My, oh my . what a razzle-dazzle town!"
What an uptown, downtown, "all-around-the-town" town.
From a 20's boomtown to an 80's explosion . that's Miami.
Miami is an enigmatic, sprawling, complex potpourri of peoples, languages,
cultures and styles. It is hot, humid and hectic.
Miami is a town with an architectural heritage that reads like the table of
contents in a "Guide to Architectural Styles." It is at once, according to the experts,
Mediterranean Eclectic Spanish Colonial Baroque Tuscan Villa Venetian Gothic Deco
Streamlined and so on.
Miami is a sub-tropical, red-tiled, buff-stuccoed, terraced, breeze-wayed, palm
treed, high-rising community. It is unique.
To be a citizen of Miami is to be a citizen of the world.
To be an architect in Miami is to walk a fine line within a delicate balance of
tolerances-climatic, cultural, ecological, political and economic. To go beyond the limits
of these tolerances is to tip the scales in a delicate balance between the built environment
and the natural environment. As often as not, these tolerances are not very tolerant.
The South Florida architect is faced with an already over-developed area with
a climate that cannot be ignored. Incompatible land use, high density population, a
complex infrastructure . all of these factors adding to the already di ficult problem
which the architect faces in helping to define the total environment within which man
moves and lives.
This issue of Florida Architect is taking a look at how the architects of Miami
and the Florida South Chapter of the AIA are working effectively and efficiently within
these tolerances and at how they are succeeding without tipping the scales.--Diane D. Greer


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981




















































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FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER/AIA

DESIGNING BUILDINGS THAT

WORK IN A CITY ON THE MOVE


The Florida South Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects is a
group of men and women who are
intimately involved with the shaping of
their environment. The scope and
magnitude of the chapter's activities
during the year present an accurate
statement of the intensity of their
commitment not only to their
profession but to the community, as
well.
FSC has approximately 385
members and its geography includes
high-density, heavily populated
downtown Miami, the Beaches, rural
Dade County and the Keys. It is an
area that is diverse at best.
FSC officers are installed annually
and this is a chapter that does it right!
The 1981 officers were installed during
an "Evening of Elegance" within the
lavish surroundings of the beautifully
restored Biltmore Hotel (See Florida
Architect, Fall, 1980). The Galleries of the
Metropolitan Museum and Art Center
were opened for the occasion and a


SAWED CORAL CAP


sumptuous dinner was served in the Bilt-
more Restaurant. In addition to install-
ing the new officers, FSC took advantage
of the occasion to award the Silver Med-
al, its highest honor given to an in-
dividual member for outstanding service
to the profession.
The FSC/AIA calendar is marked
by a number of annual events includ-
ing programs, workshops, exhibits and
one big fund raiser . the Cultured
Flea Market. The Flea Market, which
grew out of a garage sale concept and
became cultured via its liaison with the
Metropolitan Museum and Art Center,
produced net proceeds last year of
18,000. Donations to the sale are
made primarily by manufacturers, sup-
pliers and building specialty represen-
tatives, as well as from FSC/AIA mem-
bers and people from the community.
The proceeds are used to benefit
educational funds of both the Chapter
and the Metropolitan Museum and Art
Center. Last year, FSC awarded three
scholarships of $500 each to students


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wishing to further their architectural
education.
Other annual events which the
Chapter sponsors are the Design
Awards Program and the Urban Work-
shop.
"Reflection-On-The Bay" was the
theme of last year's Awards Program
and it was held in the completely reno-
vated Miamarina Restaurant. In this
setting overlooking the magnificent
Miami skyline, Jury Chairman Stanley
Tigerman of Chicago presented the
awards as fellow jurors Helmut Jahn
and Thomas Beeby looked on.
FSC/AIA was a winner itself last
year, returning from the FA/AIA Fall
Conference with the coveted Anthony
J. Pullara Award for Chapter contri-
butions to the advancement of the pro-
fession.
The Urban Workshop has been an
annual project of FSC for the past
eleven years. It is nationally recognized
as a one-day program which brings
together internationally recognized ar-
chitects and urban planners in a pre-
sentation and panel discussion with
community leaders. Topics discussed
are of concern to the profession and
community alike. The 1980 Workshop
brought together Charles Moore,
FAIA, California, Jacquelin Taylor
Robertson, FAIA, New York and Bar-
ton Myers, Canada, to participate in a
program entitled, "URBAN FORUM
- DOWNTOWN MIAMI." The pro-
gram received national coverage and
was reported on in the Architectural
Record.
FSC/AIA has demonstrated its
concern for the future development of
downtown Miami by funding special
studies in the University of Miami's De-
partment of Architecture and Florida
International University's Department
of Architectural Technology. These
special studies enable students of archi-
tecture to engage in researching and
building a physical model of downtown
Miami allowing a view of the city's
future development.
One of the most important proj-
ects which FSC/AIA has undertaken re-
cently is known as "A Park For People
On The Bay." Because of its tremen-
dous significance, the project is dealt
with in detail on page 32 in this issue of
Florida Architect.
It hardly seems sufficient to de-
scribe the Florida South Chapter as a
"chapter on the move." But on the
move they are .. constantly, tirelessly
and, most important, creatively. n


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981






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LEGAL


No Panacea but Significant

FLORIDA'S STATUTE

OF LIMITATIONS

FOR ARCHITECTS byJ. Michael Huey
FOR RCHIECTFA/AIA General Counsel


Florida has had a special statute
of limitations for architects, engineers
and contractors since the late 1960's. In
the early 70's, the Legislature included
contractors within the statute. The
underlying purpose of this statute is to
place certain time limits on the right of
owners and third parties to sue
architects, engineers and contractors
for design and construction defects.
Florida design professionals re-
ceived a jolt in 1979 when the Florida
Supreme Court ruled that a portion of
the special statute of limitations was un-
constitutional. In the case of Overland
Construction Company, Inc. v. Jerry I. Sir-
mans, et ux, et al, the court reviewed that
portion of the special statute which
established a twelve-year maximum
time period after completion of con-
struction for the initiation of any legal
action against one of these parties,
regardless of whether the alleged de-
fect was discovered within the twelve-
year period. The court held that Flor-
ida citizens had a constitutional right of
access to the courts for redress of in-
juries. The court found that the statute
arbitrarily abolished this right by
adopting a twelve-year cap on one's
right to sue an architect, engineer or
contractor. The court found that the
Legislature was without power to abol-
ish this right of access to the courts,
absent a legislative finding of over-
powering public necessity for the
abolishment of such a right. After ex-
amining the prior statute, the court de-
termined that the Legislature had not
expressed any perceived public necessi-
ty for abolishing this right of access to
the courts and ruled that this portion
of the prior statute was invalid.
In 1980, the Florida Legislature
was convinced, by the united effort of
the architects, engineers and contrac-
tors in this state, to reenact a special
statute of limitations. However, the
Legislature determined that a fifteen-
year cap was more reasonable than the
twelve-year cap in the prior statute. In
adopting the new version of the statute
of limitations, the Legislature did
express certain findings regarding the
public necessity for the passage of this
FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


legislation. Whether this language will
meet the test of the Supreme Court as
stated in the Overland case remains
to be seen. The new statute-Section
95.11 (3) (c), Florida Statutes (1980)-
like its predecessor, establishes the time
period within which persons must
bring suit for "patent" defects and
"latent" defects as well as establishing
the overall fifteen-year cap. The statute
actually is three statutes in one.

Patent Defects
The statutory period for
commencing a legal action against an
architect, engineer or contractor
founded upon a patent defect in the
design, planning or construction of an
improvement to real property is four
years, with time running from the date
of actual possession by the owner, the
date of issuance of a certificate of
occupancy, the date of abandonment of
construction, if not completed, or the
date of completion or termination of
the contract between the architect,
engineer or contractor and his
employer, whichever is latest. There is
no statutory definition of a patent de-
fect. In fact, the statute doesn't men-
tion the word patent but does distin-
guish latent defects (thereby creating
the patent defect classification). Of
course, patent is defined as "manifest,
apparent or unobstructed." Some de-
fects may be patent to everyone where-
as other defects may be patent to those
having special or unique design or
construction backgrounds but latent as
to others. This determination must be
made on a case by case basis.


Latent Defects
When an action is commenced
against an architect, engineer or con-
tractor founded upon a latent defect,
the time runs from the discovery of the
defect or the time it should have been
discovered by the party initiating the
action, assuming that party had
exercised reasonable diligence. Thus,
the triggering dates-possession by
the owner, issuance of a certificate of


occupancy, etc.-are not used for latent
defects. The theory behind this distinc-
tion is that a person should have some
notice of the defect or have an
opportunity to discover it prior to any
expiration of the time within which he
must bring suit. What constitutes a la-
tent defect is again a case by case
determination.

Fifteen-Year Cap
The third part of Section 95.11 (3)
(c) contains a clause which has been
referred to as a statute of repose. This
statute of repose was of concern to the
Supreme Court in Overland. The clause
basically provides that regardless of
whether the defect is patent or latent,
the party suing must commence suit
within fifteen years after the date of
actual possession by the owner, the
date of issuance of a certificate of
occupancy, the date of abandonment of
construction, if not completed, or the
date of completion or termination of
the contract between the architect,
engineer or contractor and his
employer, whichever is latest.
Now comes the hooker! It is not
entirely settled in Florida that the four-
year time period for initiation for suits
involving patent/or latent defects
applies to all actions which may be
brought against architects, engineers
and contractors. Section 95.11 (2) (b)
provides a five-year statute of limita-
tions for actions founded upon a con-
tract. There has been at least one trial
court in Florida which has determined
that an action against an architect
founded upon the breach of his con-
tractual obligation is covered by this
section as opposed to Section 95.11 (3)
(c). Likewise, there have been courts in
other states which have ruled that the
special statute of limitations applicaable
to architects and engineers does not
apply to actions based upon contract.
Thus, our special statute of limitations
is no panacea even though it is of
significant benefit. N












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AUTHORIZED


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SYes, Virginia, there is a
paradise." And it's alive and well in
Miami.
Henry Flagler certainly
thought so and so does the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce. The
Miami Dolphins think so. The
Cubans think so. The visitors from
the North think so. And .. Flor-
ida Architect thinks so. Miami is a
city of vision and revision . par-
ticularly in its architecture. In this
article, Florida Architect has
taken a look at some of the oldest
and newest and best of Miami's ar-
chitectural palette. As with any arti-
cle of this kind, there are places and
people and things we have missed.
We regret that. But, for practical
reasons we were limited in the num-
ber of buildings we could present to
our readers. In an effort to be objec-
tive-and always discriminating
-what we offer here is but a small
sampling of what Miami has to
offer.
Accompanying the photographs
we've selected is a text comprised pri-
marily of excerpts from a "rap ses-
sion" which took place in Miami re-
cently. At Florida Architect's re-
quest, nine architects taped an hour
long discussion of their city's archi-
tecture, old and new. The men who
participated in that discussion were
FSC/AIA members Mike Bier,
Jerome Filer, Don Sackman, Bob
Koger, Javier Cruz, Jeff Parns,
Raul Rodriguez, David Perez, and
Walter Martinez.











Above: Coral Gables House, Coral Gables;
Architect: Boerema, Bermello, Kurki & Vera, Inc.;
Miami; Bottom: State Regional Service Center,
Miami; Architect: Russell, Martinez & Holt,
Miami; Photo by Dan Forer


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981















OLD MIAMI
"In Miami, if it's fifty years old . it's
old!"-Parns. The Coral Gables House
is old. It's a National Register property
which the City of Coral Gables has
owned since 1976. The house was built
by Solomon Merrick, father of the
founder of Coral Gables. When the
City purchased the property, their goal
was not to turn it into a museum, but to
utilize it as a City House, a place where
the citizens of Coral Gables would feel
at home. It is presently available for
small group meetings, luncheons and
receptions.
Extensive research by the
architectural firm of Boerma, Bermel-
lo, Kurki and Vera, Inc. in cooperation
with the Coral Gables Historical Pre-
servation Board helped to establish a
period in time to which the house
should be restored. The project proved
to be a very significant restoration
which has been a catalyst for similar
preservation projects.


Above: Brickell Bay Club, Miami; Architect: Robert
Canney West & Associates, Inc., Miami; Photo by
Dan Forer; Left: One Biscayne Tower, Miami;
Architects: Fraga & Associates, E. H. Gutierrez, AIA
Associates, Miami. Project Architect: Humberto P.
Alonso, AIA.


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981















DOWNTOWN
"One Biscayne Tower is an example of
a high-rise by Miami standards"-Filer. At
40 stories, the office tower is the tallest
building in what is rapidly becoming a
high-rise city. Many of the blocks
around Biscayne Tower are developing
in the high-rise mode which is chang-
ing the downtown skyline dramatically.
Biscayne Tower, which was
thought to be ahead of its time, was
completed in 1973 at a construction
cost of $30 million. The building pro-
vides 659,000 square feet of rentable
office space and it is a hundred percent
occupied at the present time. Biscayne
Tower has been commercially success-
ful and it is setting a precedent for fu-
ture downtown development. Word
has it that there are "buildings on the
board" right now that will dwarf Bis-
cayne.
The State Regional Service Center
and the City of Miami Police Head-
quarters were designed by different
architects but they were designed to be
compatible with one another. They are
the first of a four-part masterplan
which stresses compatibility of design
between buildings.
"The Police Headquarters is a good ex-
ample of a building which strived to relate
itself to another structure."-Bier
























Above: Ciz~ of Mami Police Headquarters, Miami;
Architect: Pancoast Architects and Bouterse Borrel-
li Albaisa, Miami; Below: Douglas Centre Office
Building, Coral Gables; Architect: Nichols/Fuller-
ton & Associates, Coral Gables; Photo bI Steven
Brooke

































11



S ,


~.


CORAL GABLES

Douglas Centre is a 210,000 square
foot office building which serves as a
business center for international cor-
porations and banking. Douglas Cen-
tre, and other buildings such as the
Vanidades Continental Building, typify
the city's response to the demands of
international business and commerce.
The Continental Building, located near
the airport, not only responds to the
Spanish community which surrounds
it, but reflects the changing texture of
the community as it becomes multi-
national.
FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


One of the most recent mid-rise
condominium apartment buildings in
downtown Coral Gables is "Biltmore
II." It is named as the younger sister to
the historical Biltmore Hotel.
The terraced levels of Biltmore II
are softened by rounded corners and
curved concrete block walls of cream-
colored textured stucco. Blending with
these basic building materials are the
bronze ceramic tile and bronze tinted
glass. This same exterior design is re-
called as the interior theme for the
thirteen-story atrium in the central
core of the building. The skylight glass
roof allows the interior landscaped lob-
by of the structure to be bathed with


sunshine.
The American Savings and Loan
Association, Coral Gables Branch, is a
building which underwent extensive re-
modling to allow for its present use. It
is located on Miracle Mile which is the
most important shopping street in Cor-
al Gables. Its style echoes that of
another landmark structure, located
across the street, and includes a con-
temporary version of a shopping
arcade.


Above: The Vanidades Continental Building,
Miami; Architect: Bouterse Borrelli Albaisa,
Miami; Photo by Steven Brooke





















































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Above: Biltmore II Condominium, Coral Gables; Architect:
Filer Hammond & Cruz Associates, Coral Gables; Left: Dobbs
House Bar & Lounge, Eastern Concourse B, Miami Inter
national Airport; Architect: Milton Carlisle Harry & Asso-
ciates; Interior Design by Dennis Jenkins Associates; Photo by
Dan Forer; Top, preceding page: American Savings &
Loan Association, Coral Gables; Architect: Ferendino/Graf-
ton/Spillis/Candela, Coral Gables; Photo by Steven Brooke


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981



































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AIRPORT
"Miami International Airport is one of
the greatest challenges to the architect that
the city has to offer." Rodriguez. New
designs for airport expansion are
architectural responses to a new type of
airport program. The airport is no lon-
ger drab and confusing. A major $25
million expansion of domestic and in-
ternational passenger facilities is
planned for Concourse D and a similar
16 million expansion is simultaneously
being designed for Concourse B.
The Dobbs House Bar and Lounge
in Eastern Concourse B is an interest-
ing triangular space which provides
diners with a view of airfield activities.
It is indicative of the way in which the
total airport facility is being upgraded.



INSTITUTIONAL/
RECREATIONAL
The Sunset Senior High School is
a South Dade County landmark. Pro-
jecting angles and semi-circular stair-
wells break the massing of the structure
and add design interest. The client im-
perative for a vandal-resistant building
resulted in a windowless building light-
ed by skylights over a central two-story
mall.
Homestead Senior High School
was built to provide a complete
academic program for grades 10-12
with a student population of 2,600.
The building is energy efficient and
utilizes natural light in classroom areas
and common spaces.
Both of these schools reflect a new
trend in school design which is both
bold and exciting. The Homestead
school was the winner of the Out-
standing High School Award presented
by the American Association of School
Administrators and the AIA. An article
in the Miami Herald described Sunset
in this way: "You'd have trouble believ-
ing a high school can be this beauti-




Top: Sunset Senior High School, Miami; Archi-
tect: Smith, Korach, Hayet, Haynie Partnership,
Miami; Below: Homestead Senior High School,
Homestead; Edward M. Ghezzi, AIA, Miami;
Photo by DanielJ. Barba; Top of preceding
page: Miami International Airport, Concourse D
Expansion; Architect: Bouterse, Perez & Fabre-
gas, Miami.
FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


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ful-and utilitarian."
The School of Business Adminis-
tration is located in the heart of the
University of Miami campus. Its design
is one that recognizes the need for pro-
viding a focal point for pedestrian traf-
fic and people-oriented spaces while
satisfying the building program. The
precast concrete facade of the building
was designed to provide shade for all
glass areas and thus reduce the air-
conditioning load. In addition, the
building complex is raised off the
ground to emphasize a feeling of open-
ness, while specially defining an out-
door courtyard which will become the
hub of student life at the new school.
Academic One Classroom Building
at Florida International University's
Bay Vista Campus serves as the first
major academic facility at the school
and it sets the architectural theme for
the campus.
The building contains four quad-
rants connected by naturally ventilated
breezeways. The intersecting passages
not only function to catch the prevail-
ing winds, but also provide access in all
directions throughout the facility. The
focal point of the breezeway is a lush,
open, tropically landscaped atrium with
a free-standing stair extending vertical-
ly to a skylight serving the natural ven-
tilation process.
Immanuel Presbyterian Church re-
flects a design intent to project an invit-
ing atmosphere for worship. The
buildings are of human scale and com-
patible with the adjoining residential
neighborhood. Materials and construc-
tion techniques were carefully selected













Above: The School of Business Administration,
University of Miami, Coral Gables; Architects:
Boerema, Bermello, Kurki & Vera Inc., Miami;
Right: Academic One Classroom Building, Florida
International University, Miami; Architect: Green-
leaf-Telesca, Miami; Next page, at left: Immanuel
Presbyterian Church, Miami; Architect: Boerema,
Bermello, Kurki & Vera, Inc., Miami; Next page,
at right: The Interamerican Trade Center & Ex-
L, ... Florida International University,
Miami; Architect: Pancoast Architects and
Bouterse Borrelli Albaisa, Miami


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


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to achieve this design goal. The use of
wood and warm tones on the interior
of the Sanctuary gives this place of
worship a serene and inviting atmo-
sphere.
The South Dade Regional Library
has a two-story entrance lobby with a
custom-built circulation desk and a
circular stair to the second floor. The
interior space is visually exciting and
invites the visitor to spend time in one
of its reading rooms.
The Joseph Caleb Community
Center in Liberty City is a multi-service
governmental and community center
containing approximately 160,000
square feet of building area. The cen-
ter was created for use by federal, state
and local governmental facilities and it
houses a branch library, auditorium/
performing theatre, meeting and ban-
quet rooms, a day-care center, a
cafeteria, county courtrooms and social
service and government agencies. In
the best Miami tradition, the day care
facility, auditorium and meeting rooms
are oriented around an outdoor court-
yard.
"The Community Center and other
buildings like the Opa Locka Neighborhood
Service Center are typical of an exciting new
breed of public projects which are executed
with a level of design and care not usually
identified with public buildings. ."-Mar-
tinez.


Above: Opa Locka Neighbor-
hood Service Center, Opa Locka;
Architect: Bouterse, Perez &
Fabregas, Miami; Photo by
Steven Brooke; Right: The
Joseph Caleb Community Center,
Miami; Architect: Joint venture
of Hatcher, Zeigler & Gunn
Associates, Ronald E. Frazier &
Associates, PA, and Harold L.
Sanders & Associates, Miami












SLeft: South Dade Regwnal Library, Dade County;
Architect: Watson, Deutschman, Kruse, Lyon,
Miami; Lorraine M. Bragg, Designer; Photo by Dan
Forer







ERRATUM
On page 20 of the Fall, 1981 issue of
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Jan Abell,
AIA, was credited as project archi-
tect on the restoration of the
Hutchinson House in Tampa.
FLORIDA ARCHITECT apologizes
to McElvy, Jennewein, Steffany and
Howard, Architects-Planners, Inc.
who were the principal architectural
firm in a joint venture with Jan
Abell on this project.






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FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981 9















OFFICE
BUILDINGS

The design philosophy illustrated
by the Pan American Bank at Merrick
Plaza is one of shrewd analysis of bank-
ing operations, followed by careful zon-
ing of a given space to fulfill the func-
tional needs of the operations and com-
pleted by a concise architectural state-
ment of the resulting interior solution
shown here. That solution uses various
strong, often symbolic design elements.
The client objective for the Pan
American Bank of Emerald Hills was to
achieve a bright contemporary design
which would use emerald green as a
color tie to their location. The result
was an uncomplicated design involving
careful detailing of work areas and the
use of fine materials such as solid oak,
tinted glass, clay tile and bronzed alu-
minum. Vibrant emerald green wool
carpet runs the entire length of the
space and contrasts with the warm pale
oak millwork. The whole atmosphere
of the bank is crisp, modern and effi-
cient.
The Lazurus Office Building is a
multiple-tenant, low-rise office building
which succeeds by keeping its design
within a tropical framework. Color and
landscape were brought into the build-
ing to define circulation areas and
promote tenant interaction. The re-
novation of the Financial Data Plan-
ning Corporation Building in Coconut
Grove was an interesting conversion












Left, top: Pan American Bank at Merrick Plaza,
Coral Gables; Architect: Robison & Associates,
Inc., Coral Gables; Photo by Bo Parker: Left: Pan
American Bank of Emerald Hills, Hollywood; In-
terior Design rby Robison & Associates, Inc., Coral
Gables; Photo by Bo Parker; Next page, top:
Financial Data Planning Corporation 1 '* Re-
modeling & Renovation, Coconut Girove; Architects
Baldwin & Sackman, PA, Coconut Grove; Photo by
Steven Brooke; Second from top: The Lazai u.s
Office Budilding, Miami; Architect: Architeknics,
Inc., Miami; Third from top: Barnett Bank at
Bay Harbour, Bay Hai bour: Architects: Yaros
Associates, Miami; Bottom: Accounting '
Miami; Jorge Arango, Miami
FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981









from a motel to a small office building.
It is indicative of the current wave of
adaptive reuse projects which is taking
Dade County by storm. "Converting to
office space is a wonderful way of revising a
building which has outlived its financial
viability."-Koger.

RESIDENCES
The location and climate of South
Florida set the pace for the styles that
were to flourish in that area. Early
dwellings in what was to become Miami
responded to the climate in very
straightforward ways. They opened up
walls with large windows and doors and
arranged them in a way that would
provide for cross-ventilation. They
used a bay orientation, built broad
front porches and overhung the eaves
to protect their houses from intense
sun and rain. In the Spanish-Mediter-
ranean mode, thick walls to keep out
the heat and provide a barrier against
tropical storms and central courtyards
to capture the breeze and cross-
ventilate the house became a common


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feature. The pattern was soon set for a
good indigenous building style which
suited the climate and the needs of the
people. Building materials in the form
of sturdy Dade County pine, which is
rot and termite resistant, and oolite
limestone became the main building
materials.
In time, large windows fell victim
to air-conditioners and breezeways,
courtyards and porches became less a
necessity than a luxury. Today, that is
no longer true. Within the contempor-
ary realm of design, there is still room
for the lessons of our past. Energy-effi-
cient devices for cooling us when we're
hot, protecting us from the elements,
ventilating our houses and heating our
water are once again a necessity. The
houses shown and discussed in this sec-
tion incorporate the best principles of
design into contemporary energy effi-
cient sub-tropical dwellings.
The Cocoplum House is, quite
simply, a courtyard house. The scheme
wraps around a central space with a
pool. The massing is totally self-
contained and object-like because the
property all around the site has yet to
be developed.
In the Weiser House, the client's
primary request was that the house be
integrated with the natural landscape.
An abundance of oak trees and shrub-
bery and the need to raise the house six
feet above grade to comply with flood
criteria requirements produced the
opportunity for a series of half-levels.
These half-levels clearly express the
hierarchy of spaces and their relation-
ship to one another.
The centrally located living room
of the Bell Residence with its exposed
wood structure and glass walls shows
an openness of spaces inside the house.
This is in direct contrast to the closed
appearance which the house presents
when viewed from the street.
The home which Miami architect
Raul Rodriguez designed for himself is
a tropical, modular residence arranged
around a central patio to which all





Top: Rodriguez Residence; Miami; Raul L. Rodri-
quez, AIA; Photo by Steven Brooke; Near Right:
Bell Residence, Dade County; H. Carlton Decker,
AIA, Miami; Right, top: Weiser House, Miami;
Architect: Architeknics, Inc., Miami; Right, bot-
tom : ( .. ..'...' . i ...e), Coral
Gables; Architect: Otero/Mateu, South Miami


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981


kL- -




























































































Top: Private Residence, Coconut Grove; Architect: Russell, Martinez & Holt, Miami;
Above: Private Residence, Dade County; Robin Zachary Parker, AIA, Miami; Photo Iny Bo
Parker; Top, right: Fernandez Residence Addition and Remodeling, Dade County; Archi-
tect: Falcon & Bueno, Miami; Right, center: Single Family Residence, Coral Gables;
Juan A. Crespi, AIA, Miami; Right, bottom: Harbour House Residence, Key Biscayne;
John Albert Weller, Jr., AIA, Miami; Photo by Dan Forer

FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981



























Right: Pawley 1. .... I.. ..., Miami; Charles Har-
rison Pawley, AIA, Miami; Far Right: Tai-Pan Residence,
Miami;John Albert Weller, Jr., AIA, Miami; Below: Rifkin
House, Miami; Architect: Architeknics, Inc., Miami; Below:
Olen House, Miami; Robert Athos Koger, AIA, Miami;
Photo by Steven Brooke


FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981














rooms open for maximum ventilation.
The transparency of the design is reg-
ulated through the use of a red clay
grille block privacy screen which dou-
bles as a sunshade.
Oak Grove House is basically a rec-
tangular shape which has been angled
and "woven" between the oaks on the
site without disturbing them. The
house is zoned into living areas and
sleeping areas. A hidden garden is one
of the surprises one sees upon entering
the front door.
"Architecture should interact with the
water if it is nearby."-Sackman. In the


Below, left: Private Residence, Miami; Rone J]. Mateu, under super-
vision of Architects Baldwin & Sackman, PA, Miami; Photo by' Steven
Brooke; Below, right: Waterfront Residence, Coral Gables; Giorgio Balli,
AIA, Miami; Bottom, left: Bouterse Residence, Miami; Architects:
Bouterse Perez & Fabregas, Miami; Photo by Steven Brooke; Bottom,
right: Intercoastal Waterway House, Miami Beach; Barry Sugarman, AIA,
North Miami; Photo by Dan Forer





















Left: Oak Grove House, Miami; Barry Sugarman, AIA,
North Miami; Photo by Alexander Georges; Bottom,
left: Jernigan Residence, Plantation Key; Michael Jason
Bier, AIA, Miami; Photo by John Walther; Bottom,
right: Stiltsville Vacation House, Biscayne Bay; Archi-
tects Baldwin & Sackman, Coconut Grove.


case of the Stiltsville Vacation House,
water is all that is nearby. The house,
which is only accessible by boat, is used
exclusively as a recreational weekend
retreat. It is located a few miles off-
shore and is completely self-sufficient.
Also on the water, but not in it, is the
Ted Brown Beach House on Hutch-
inson Island. Located between the
Atlantic Ocean and Indian River, this
multi-story structure was designed to
accommodate two families as a re-
creational retreat. 0


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A PARK FOR

PEOPLE ON THE BAY


Bayfront Park in downtown
Miami has become a no-man's land
where visitors are rare and casual crime
is common. One of the city's most valu-
able assets is a wasteland after five
o'clock in the afternoon.
"A Park for People on the Bay,"
sponsored and endorsed by the Florida
South Chapter of the American
Institute of Architects, was designed by
Jorge Arango, AIA, William Cox, AIA
and Charles Pawley, AIA with William
Bradford Browne, FAIA, as Chairman
of the Design Committee.
There are four basic principles in-
corporated into the planning and de-
sign of "A Park for the People." In con-
trast to the Isamu Noguchi plan for
Bayfront Park which is currently under
consideration by the City of Miami, the
Browne-Arango-Cox Pawley plan
would cause the Park to become an
event instead of an apology. The
Noguchi plan is, in the opinion of the
Miami architects, a "Band-aid" solution
to a situation which calls for surgery.


The design concept for the park
looks beyond private and political
interests by uniting in a single park all
of the city-owned lands on the Bay.
The plan integrates the city core with
the Park and the Bay by removing the
barrier formed by Biscayne Boulevard.
The Boulevard, which was once a small
road beside the Bay, fails both as a
major artery and as a parkway. Under
the new plan, it is replaced by a scenic
coastal parkway which makes possible
the development of commercial, social
and cultural activities along the Bayside
which will draw people into the Park
during the day and the evening. The
Park will become an event instead of an
apology.
The arterial traffic function will be
accomodated by a re-vitalization of
second avenue and a tunnel under the
Miami River. The Second avenue
artery will bring new blood to the
center city and provide for the neces-
sary expansion of commercial Miami
with an elegant and efficient boulevard.


A barrier free park is created by
stretching the fabric of the park over
roadways and parking. Visitors will
have a panoramic view of the City and
the Bay from the gentle knoll where
three thousand cars can be parked out
of sight, convenient to all activities of
the Park and to the large buildings at
the edge of the Park. A continuum of
pedestrian green space will connect the
City with the Bay.
The Park is allowed to spread into
the City by utilizing the existing route
of the 220 foot wide boulevard as
additional park space. Marginal build-
ings could be removed so that the Park
could penetrate the city core.
A Park for People on the Bay is a
contemporary social statement which
recognizes its time and its place and
anticipates the evolution of Miami from
a seasonal tourist town to a dynamic
international city. N


Above: Revitalized Second Avenue: an artery which
will provide for expansion of the city
Right: The Isamu Noguchi Plan for Bayfront Park
Next page: A Park for People on the Bay
















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18644 Southwest 94th Avenue.Miami, Florida 33157
(305) 233-9537


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WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT


OUR NEW


MODERN FACILITIES












BLUEPRINTS
PHOTOSTATS
PHOTO MURALS
OFFSET PRINTING
SURVEYING EQUIPMENT


MOUNTING & LAMINATING
PRECISION PHOTOGRAPHY
DRAFTING ROOM FURNITURE
ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS SUPPLIES
* DIAZO PRINTING EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

1301 N.W. 27th AVENUE
MIAMI,FLORIDA 33125


Phone (305) 635-6432


ALUMINUM
DOORS
AND FRAMES
T-2 iCline Aluminum
V Doors is devoted
exclusively to the
manufacturing of
quality engineer-
ed and designed
aluminum doors,
for commercial,
residential and
public buildings,
S and offers the
architect the
largest variety of
types and sizes of
aluminum doors.

For FREE CATALOG call or write:


K. aluminum doors inc.
112 32nd Avenue. West Bradenton, Fla 33505
(813) 746-4104

Concrete
Driveways
Are Best!
Cleaner Neater
Attractive
Low Cost
Low Maintenance
Durable
Not Affected By Oil Or
Gasoline
Light Reflective
Cooler
Adds To Value Of Property
Darex Admixtures Make
Better Concrete
For Recommended Specifications
Contact Your Local Ready-Mix Producer
Or:


Construction Products Division
W.R. Grace & Co.
1200 N.W. 15th Avenue
Pompano Beach, FL 33060

FLORIDA ARCHITECT/Spring, 1981
































Longview, Coconut Grove, Florida
Architects: Robert Altman & Bernard Auburn.


Soleil
WOOD AND EXTRUDED ALUMINUM ROLL DOWN SHUTTERS


DIVISION ELR, INC.
2810 N.W. SOUTH RIVER DRIVE MIAMI, FLORIDA 33125 (305) 443-1053











































Let your imagination soar with

the elegance of Gory Roof Tile.


Gory Perma-Shake tiles deliver the subtle
texture and highlights of hand-hewn wood
shakes while offering quality-conscious archi-
tects and builders the unsurpassed practicality
of durable concrete. With Perma-Shake tile
there is no concern about flammability, rotting
or bug infestation.
Additional texture and massive shadow line
silhouette is easily achieved through the random
mixing of high profile and standard flat tiles.


Blends of compatible colors enhance Perma-
Shake tiles'natural weathered look. For the rustic
appearance of wood with the assurance of con-
crete, specify Perma-Shake tile by Gory.
For color samples, descriptive literature and
specification sheets, write Gory Roof Tile, 1773
Northeast 205th Street, North Miami, Florida
33179 or call us at (305) 651-7611. In Florida
800-432-1021.



AN 1=L= COMPANY


Tile shown: Perma-Shake Blend. Builder: Classic Construction Corp., Boca Raton Bath and Tennis Club. Robert Crawford, Architectural Designer.




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