<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 The cost of AIA membership/pro...
 Nomination of officers
 Designing for audio visuals
 From the state board
 Convention introduction
 Sarasota retrospect
 1976 architectural design...
 News, letters, and advertisers
 Florida housing finance agency
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00227
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: September 1976
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00227
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The cost of AIA membership/professionalism
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Nomination of officers
        Page 9
    Designing for audio visuals
        Page 10
    From the state board
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Convention introduction
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Sarasota retrospect
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    1976 architectural design awards
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    News, letters, and advertisers
        Page 37
    Florida housing finance agency
        Page 38
    Back Cover
        Page 39
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




- THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


ft."


lii


'ret : 'uEk A


4


<.4;r


n,-- tF


'.''


~ ~i;:X';1~


;a~-~i. P

:
L~l:t~q~~$~~ :Q1 I
-~---`I kr~~-i-:r-51 aiir~-~Mk-~~










"^--tt."3


-- -: .- -




Bring Out the Best in Wood ...
Cabot's STAINS




SUNNY SOUTH PAINT CO. LAINHART & POTTER CO.






Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Directors of Florida Region
Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414
Frank R. Mudano, AIA
1189 N.E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 33515
(813) 446-1041
Executive Director
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947
General Counsel
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191
FAAIA Officers for 1976
Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, President
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-5445
Carl Gerken, AIA, Secretary
P.O. Box 1431
Daytona Beach, Florida 32015
(904) 255-5471
James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
P.O. Box 22889
Tampa, Florida 33622
(813) 879-6782
FAAIA Board of Directors for 1976
James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
Howard B. Bochiardy
William W. Brainard
Glenn A. Buff
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Ishmael A. Byus
John W. Dyal
Bill G. Eppes
Norman M. Giller
Robert G. Graf
Raymond W. Graham
Carl O. Gutmann, Jr.
John Hobart
Jerome A. James
Charles E. King, FAIA
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Emily Obst
Mark H. Ramaeker
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Michael Ritter
Ed Saar
Newton L. Sayers
Ludwig Spiessl
Frank A. Vellake
Francis R. Walton, FAIA

The Florida Architect
Publications Committee
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
John W. Totty/Editor
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


A bunch

of

showoffs


Fetchingly displayed in Omega's new showroom
are arrogantly beautiful, new and unusual pieces in
decorative ceramic tile, terra cotta, marble facings,
carved stone and wood -from places like Italy...Spain...
Japan...Portugal and Mexico. Come and make your
eyes happy, weekdays 9-5.


THE LAST WORD IN TILE. OMEGA TILE


( DISTRIBUTORS
8940 S.W. 129th TERRACE MIAMI, FLORIDA 33156 (305) 233-5553


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 3




















III=


I1








Prologue
This year's Convention theme of
"200 PLUS" is one which calls upon
us to reflect on things past and at
the same time to look forward to an
uncertain future. Any given time is
good enough for reflection and
re-dedication but perhaps the
bicentennial year is a better time than
most.
Much will be said at this convention
about design the architects chief
"stock-in-trade" and an aspect of
practice that seems to have gotten
short changed lately.
Thus, if nothing else, convention
goers meeting this year in Sarasota,
Florida's premier city of
contemporary architectural heritage -
should re-dedicate their practice to
building a sensitive, humane
environment for the people of this
state.
Many changes are assailing the
profession and they must be
recognized, understood and adopted
for a successful practice in today's
society. But these are merely tools
which should enable the talented
designer to do his job better. Tools
which can provide a more reasoned
basis for design and bring additional
experts to the architectural team who
can best handle tasks unrelated
directly to design.
Certainly hard times are still with
the profession. However, it is my
impression that many of the most
active offices are design oriented
firms who have incorporated elements
of new marketing and management
techniques into their practice.
That the quality of architectural
design remains generally high in the
state was reflected by the choices
and comments of this year's design
awards jury. They singled out an
unprecedented twenty projects for
awards, feeling that the efforts of
a large number of architects were
worthy of recognition.
But the fact remains that this is
still an infinitesimal amount of the
work done by architects and yet a
smaller part of the whole built
environment. So we still need very
badly that re-dedication I spoke of
above.


SThe

Florida

Architect
VOLUME 26 NUMBER 5 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


13


19








23


7 The cost of AIA
FAAIA Executive Director Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
illustrates the cost of membership on a daily basis

9 Nomination of Officers
The four men who have been nominated for election by the
Convention to Board positions next year

10 Designing for Audio Visuals
Bob Schwartz of Central Audio Visual offers a few tips for the
designer

11 From the State Board
A new column of briefs on current enforcement activities of the
Florida State Board of Architecture

13 Convention Introduction
Welcome to the 62nd Annual Convention and Building Products
Exhibit. Page 14 the program, page 15 the speakers and page
16 a listing of the exhibitors

19 Sarasota Retrospect
A portfolio of Sarasota architectural heritage, including early
works by Paul Rudolph and Victor Lundy, which will be
viewed on the architectural tour

23 1976 Architectural Design Awards
Five Honor Awards, four Merit Awards and eleven
Honorable Awards were chosen by a distinguished
jury as representative of the best work in the state this year

38 Florida Housing Finance Agency
A proposed amendment to the state constitution to provide
for creation of this agency will be on the general election ballot
this fall

37 News
Letters
Advertisers

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and
published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for profit. It
is published bi-monthly at the Executive Office of the Association,
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida 33156. Telephone
(305) 661-8947. Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily
those of the Editor of the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial
material may be reprinted provided full credit is given to the author
and to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and copy sent to publisher's
office. Single Copies, 75 cents, subscription, $6.50 per year.
Controlled Circulation Postage Paid, Miami, Florida.


Cover: A close-up of the sun screen detail of Paul Rudolph's Sarasota
High School, one of the most widely recognized of his works in
- Sarasota. Quoting from Sibyl Moholy-Nagy writing in THE
ARCHITECTURE OF PAUL RUDOLPH: "The two dimensional
panel-bay elevation has developed into a three-dimensional enclosure
system, whose modular units penetrate the building body The
most important achievement of the Sarasota High School is the
symbosis of design and mechanical equipment into a monumental
form. It testifies to the space needs of a rapidly growing community,
and to the civic pride and ambition to find the most satisfying
aesthetic solution." Photo by Kurt Waldmann,


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 5











PPG GLASS

GAVE THIS AGING HOTEL

BEAUTIFUL

FACE*LIFT.

Skirvin Tower in Oklahoma City poshest offices in the city, and
isn't a hotel anymore (it isn't even headquarters of Continental
Skirvin Tower anymore), but it is, Federal Savings & Loan.
once again, a useful, profitable It's a beautiful, modern office
building. building. And PPG Solarban* 480
It was completely remodeled Twindow* reflective insulating
from the ground up and from the glass played an important part in
inside out. the transformation.
Now, it's the 101 Park Avenue First of all, it looks sensational.
Building, home of some of the Seeing the blue Oklahoma sky and


dazzling sunsets reflected in this
building, it's hard to remember the
dowdy, old bricks.
But, perhaps more important,
the glass is incredibly practical.
Its reflective coating reduces glare
and solar heat gain. And during the
burning summers on the Great
Plains, this is a welcome relief to
the air-conditioning system.
The glass is also double glazed
for insulation. So when those bitter
cold snaps blow down from the
north, everybody stays warm and
cozy.
Not all old buildings can or
should be remodeled They
shouldn't all be destroyed either.
Some, like the Skirvin Tower Hotel,
present a genuine architectural
opportunity. Not to mention a
challenge.
We think there's no better way
to meet the challenge and take
advantage of the opportunity
remodeling offers than with PPG
reflective glass.
Write to us. We'll send you a
Sweet's Catalog telling you more
about it. PPG Industries, Inc.. One
Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pa.
15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future
OU..rer Cc.nirnernal FcJeral ES. ingq & Loan
-rchie-t NIoll'ger La .rence? La*'rence ar,31 Fle ner
Okldr,rra : Ci N', Okla




INDUSTRIES





Many members over the years continually question the cost of
AIA membership. The question is raised during times when
construction activity is at a peak as well as during slowdowns
such as the present period.
To provide a concise answer is almost impossible since
much of the work of an Association is intangible, thereby
difficult to value in terms of dollars. The intent of this brief
article is to illustrate the cost of membership over a 365
calendar year in lieu of a lump sum.
Consider an average size firm of six persons, which includes
one principal, four registered architects and one secretary.
The four architect employees and the principal are AIA
members.
In this situation, annual AIA dues would be as follows:

National AIA, Regular: $78 x 5 persons $390.00
*National Supplemental: $50.54 x 6 persons $303.24
**Chapter dues: $45 x 5 persons $225.00
State dues: $75 x 5 persons $375.00
State firm dues: $20 x 6 persons $120.00
TOTAL $1,413.24
*Maximum payment providing all 6 persons earn $14,100
**Chapter dues vary. This assumes an average.

Divide this total by 365 and the cost for supporting the
AIA is $3.87 per day. Apply the proper figures to your firm
to establish a daily cost for the support of your professional
organization. Is this too costly a fixed overhead figure to
provide financial support for the organization which represents
you during both good times and bad times? Only you can
provide the answer to this question.


The Cost of AIA
Membership/
Professionalism


"Every man owes a part of his time
and money to the business, profession
or industry in which he is employed.
No man has a moral right to withhold
his support from an organization
that is striving to improve conditions
within his sphers."
Theodore Roosevelt

You became an architect through an intensive professional
education program. The AIA's input into this educational
process has been and always will be significant. Thus you
came to the professional status you now enjoy-practicing as
an architect.
Quite frankly, it seems to me that you owe your profession
a debt for putting you where you are. That debt is the
contribution of your time and financial support. Such support
will enable both your professional organization and the
profession itself to become stronger.
The debt has been paid by many before you. I submit a
professional must be an involved member of this professional
organization. Otherwise, to be an architect in name only
does not fulfill the obligations of professionalism. FNK


I


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 7


SPECIFY HYAT.


West Coast Florida's prestigious
resort and convention center.









-I--.





Welcome to the Sarasota Hyatt House
at Watergate Center/ (813) 366-9000
1000 Blvd. of the Arts/Sarasota, FL 33577







Position Open



ARCHITECT
Concrete Promotion Council
of Florida needs qualified ar-
chitect to fill the position of
Executive Director. Preferred
qualifications: Award win-
ning background in concrete
design, promotion oriented,
sales ability. Liberal salary
and benefits. Office located
in Winter Park, Florida.
Please write:
T.E. Bronson, President
Florida Concrete and
Products Assn.
Post Office Box 160
Winter Park, Florida 32790


0)
U' co

K in
C~)0








000
U-





*) E O


8 /THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


WR Series t ;

CONTROLLER di

Infinite variable timing .
*14-day calendar programming .
Weather-resistant cabinet
Rapid advance between stations U-T-"_,TROL
Available in 6 and 11 stations

SEE IT AT THE SHOW
BOOTH 106

SAFE-T-LAWN, INC.
7800 N.W. 32nd St., Miami FL 33122
(305) 592-0801
* 0





James A. Greene, AIA
Tampa
Nominated for Vice-President/
President Designate


Howard B. Bochiardy, AIA
Orlando
Nominated for Secretary










Nomination of Officers


Felipe Prestamo, R.A.
Miami
Nominated to represent Associate and
Professional Associate members on the
Board of Directors


Carl Gerken, AIA
Daytona Beach
Nominated for Treasurer


The following men have been nominated for offices
in the Florida Association of the American Institute
of Architects and are to be elected by the
Convention to serve for the next year. Ellis Bullock
of Pensacola, elected Vice President last year, will
automatically become President of the Association.


James A. Greene has served
two terms as Treasurer of the
FAAIA and has served on the
Board of Directors for three
years. For the Florida Central
Chapter he has served as Pres-
ident, Vice President, Secret-
ary and Treasurer. Jim is
Chairman of the Association's
Finance and Budget Com-
mittee and has served for two
years on the National AIA
Task Force on Cost Based
Compensation Magagement.
In 1977 he will be Chairman
of that Task Force. Jim is
principal of his own firm in
Tampa and is presently Su-
pervising Architect for Dis-
trict 10, Division of Hotel &
Restaurants. He is a 1956
graduate of the University of
Florida with a B. Arch. de-
gree.


Carl Gerken is currently serv-
ing the FAAIA in the posi-
tion of Scretary. He has serv-
ed on the Board of Directors
for six years. As a member of
the Daytona Beach Chapter
Carl has been President and
Secretary. He is a member of
the DGS Advisory Committee
and a member of the Finance
and Budget Committee. He is
also a member of the CSI.
Carl is Vice President in
charge of the Architectural
Division of Russell & Axon,
P.A. Inc. He is a 1950 grad-
uate of the University of Flo-
rida with a B. Arch. degree.


Howard B. Bochiardy is cur-
rently a member of the Board
of Directors representing the
Mid Florida Chapter. He is
Chairman of the Education
Committee and was active in
the search for a new Dean of
Architecture at the University
of Florida. He is President of
the UF Architectural Guild
and is a past President of the
Jacksonville Chapter. In 1975
Howard received the An-
thony L. Pullara Memorial
Award for outstanding service
to the FAAIA. He is Vice Pre-
sident and Chief Executive,
Central Florida, for Rey-
nolds, Smith and Hills.
Howard is a 1951 graduate of
the University of Florida with
a B. Building Construction
degree and is a candidate for
an MA in Architecture.


Felipe J. Prestamo is cur-
rently Associate Dean for Ar-
chitecture and Planning,
School of Engineering and
Environmental Design, Uni-
versity of Miami. He has been
a Professor of Architecture
and Planning since 1969 and
served as Acting Chairman of
Architecture for several
months in 1975. Felipe has
r',rected a number of semi-
nars on transportation and
planning in South America
and frequently lectures and
travels through Central and
South America relative to
urban affairs. He is a 1954
graduate in architecture from
the Universidad de la Habana.
Felipe is a member of the AlP
and an Associate member of
the Florida South Chapter of
the AIA.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 9


~krP~EI.







Fundamentals of

Audio Visual

Design

By Bob Schwartz


Mr. Bob Schwartz is President and Owner of
Central Audio Visual, Inc. in Fort Lauder-
dale. After seven years background in audio
visual sales, design and consulting, he started
Central Audio Visual early in 1974. He is a
graduate of the audio visual facility and
media design course at Indiana University
and has provided design and a/v consulting
services for several large Florida companies,

Audio Visual design today requires an
ever increasing amount of technical
knowledge to provide your clients with
useable communications facilities.
Requirements for those facilities will
vary for a simple slide presentation
or a multi-media rear screen system.
Factors to be considered include screen
size, screen material, ceiling height,
viewing angles, ambient light problems,
audio equipment, acoustics, lighting,
electrical requirements, equipment
capabilities, new remote control
systems and much more.
In this article, only a few of these
items will be considered. It is
recommended that for more
sophisticated A/V facilities; a
professional audio-visual consultant
be retained to avoid many common
pitfalls.

Proper Screen Size
The matter of screen size is of
prime importance to your client. To
determine the proper screen size,
it is important to know what kinds
of media will be projected. Each
medium has its own proportions or


aspect ratios and the screen must be
wide enough and high enough for
any media which may be used. In
most cases, the common 35mm slide
will be used and the screen should be
square to accept vertical as well as
horizontal slides. Table I lists the
various size and aspect ratios of
common film media. Table II shows
the formulas used to determine screen
size, lens length and projection
distance.
Key dimensions of room size or
seating areas will help determine screen
sizes. For example, six times the
width of the screen (W) should be the
maximum distance to the last row
of seats. Two times the "W" should
be the minimum distance to the first
row. The 2W and 6W rules are based
on single screen images only, but
they may be used as guides when
planning multi-screen or cinemascope
screen sizes.
Generally, the limiting factor in
screen width is ceiling heights.
Because of the aspect ratios listed in
Table I, ceiling heights should, when
feasible, be determined after
calculating the proper screen size to
make the communications facility
useable. All too often, the screen size
is determined after the elevation of
the ceiling has been fixed. This
necessarily makes the importance of
room useability a secondary factor,
which; of course, is not in the best
interest of your client.

Front or Rear Projection
Many factors need to be considered
in determining which type of screen
should be used. Furthermore, there
are several different surfaces to
select from, which have specific light
reflectance or transmission
characteristics. Room dimensions and


seating area are of prime importance
in selecting the proper surface. Space
availability, lighting, media, as well
as audience capacity must be known
in order to properly select either front
and rear projection. Generally speaking,
for a wide spread audience, front
projection should be selected. On the
other hand, rear projection is
unexcelled when viewing angles do
not exceed 35 degrees at the furtherest
1/3 (one third) of the screen. Lights-on
viewing and no-screen shadows make
rear projection the best bet for some
instances. Here again, the client
must advise you of what is to be used
and accomplished in the
communications facility before the
proper decision can be made. The
main point here is not to assume one
projection screen is the best for all
situations.

Rear Projection
Because of the increased interest in
rear projection installations some of
the aspects of this type of installation
should be emphasized.
The projection room itself must
have sufficient depth for the screen
size desired. When possible, the use of
mirrors should be avoided to give
maximum flexibility and greater
economy for your client. A minimum
distance of 1/2 (one half) times the
screen width should be allowed for the
projection room depth. All surfaces
in the room should be painted with
a non-reflective flat black paint.
Lighting should be kept to a minimum
and directed away from the screen.
A raised platform should be of
sufficient height to place the projection
lens about 40 (forty) inches above the
platform floor and in the vertical center
of the screen.
CONTINUED PG. 36


TABLE I PROJECTION FORMATS:

APERTURE APERTURE ASPECT RATIO
WIDTH HEIGHT Width/Height
DESCRIPTION INCHESI INCHES) INCHES)


8mm Mollon Picture
Supur 8 Motion Picture
16mm Motion Picture'
16mm Cinemascope
126 IlnsltLoid Slides
35mm Motion PiClurC
35mm Cnemnscope
35Snm Filmstrip
2x2 Half Fiame
2x 2 Standard 35mm
Double Frame Slhdie
2.2 InsImatilc
2 2 Supershdes
2', 2'. Slides
3'i 4 Lantern Slide
3' x 4 Polaioid
4x5
Overhead Projector
Overhead Projector
Television Prolnclors


172
211
380
3801) IAi
669
825
(R)
910
902
I 346 (C)
1043
15
2 030
300 (CI
326
4 50
100
95 ID)


179
158
284
284
500
600

690
626
902
1043
15
2030
2.250 fCl
24
350
100
75 D01


TABLE II

Image Width = Image Aspect
Height X Ratio


Image Height =



DxA
F =
W

D FxW
A

DxA
W -


F A = Aperture Width in
Inches

W = Image Width
in Feet


FIGURE I


REAR SCREEN PROJECTION SYSTEM & SEATING AREA




n-..00 0. I




PLAN VIEW



SECTION
.SC- .. .


10 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


Image Width
Aspect Ratio


F = Focal Length
of Lens in
Inches

D = Projection Distance
In Feet


'rm r. Inc mo~l a~~nll, u~~a i,,,,, I I


















The following is the listing of the
officers of the Florida State Board
of Architecture.

BOARD MEMBERS
President
Mr. Jeffe G. Hoxie
1417 Dixon Blvd.
Cocoa, Florida 32922
Telephone: AC 305/636-3093
Term Expires June 1977

Vice President
Mr. Harry E. Burns, Jr. AIA
P.O. Box 2516
Tallahassee, Florida 32304
Telephone: AC 904/576-2181
Term Expires June 1977

Secretary-Treasurer
Mr. Andrew J. Ferendino FAIA
800 Douglas Entrance
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: AC 305/444-4691
Term Expires June 1979
Board Member
Mr. William Stewart Morrison AIA
P.O. Box 46
Pensacola, Florida 32502
Telephone: AC 904/432-6198
Term Expires June 1979

Board Member
Mr. R. Carroll Peacock AIA
400 Royal Palm Way
Palm Beach, Florida 33480
Telephone: AC 305/655-4063
Term Expires June 1979
Attorneys
Mr. Selig I. Goldin, Attorney
Goldin, Turner and Cates
P.O. Box 1251
Gainesville, Florida 32601
Telephone: AC 904/378-1673

Mr. James C. Rinaman, Attorney
Marks, Gray, Conroy and Gibbs
P.O. Box 447
Jacksonville, Florida 32201
Telephone: AC 904/355-6681


Executive Secretary
Mr. Herbert Coons, Jr.
Suite 110 Oakland Building
2009 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
Telephone: AC 904/488-6685 or 488-6734

Administrative Assistant
Mr. Earl Clinton Smawley III


From the State Board
Beginning with this column, THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT will, from
time to time, print information on current activities of the State Board
of Architecture. The material is submitted from the Board office and
any questions should be directed to that office.

























Recent Enforcement Activities

Herbert Anson: This case is presently under active litigation.
The charges are a result of allegations of kickbacks in
connection with Cedars of Lebanon Hospital in Miami. The
Board rejected the recommended order of the hearing officer
under the Administrative Procedures Act, Florida Statute
120, that the charges be dismissed with prejudice. The case
is currently in appeal from that order.

Michael Hrabcak: Allegations in this case stem from the
construction of a shopping center in New Port Richey,
Florida, in which it is alleged Mr. Hrabcak submitted false
progress reports in connection with the construction loan
agreement. It is alleged that $150,000 in overpayments were
made on a total project loan of 2.7 million dollars. Formal
charges have been filed for violation of Florida Statute 467
and Rule 21-B. A hearing is scheduled in Tampa, Florida,
September 21, 1976, to be held at Tampa International
Airport.

Raouf B. Raphael: This case represents formal charges against
a non-registered person for the practice of Architecture. Suit
has been brought against Mr. Raphael for violation of Florida
Statute 467 and Rule 21-B.

Clarence V. Blezard and Associates George F. Yecko:
Charges in this case stem from an American Legion Retirement
Home in Lakeland, Florida, in which an unauthorized
partnership contracted for architectural services. Also, it is
alleged, the Florida Registered Architect sealed drawings for
the project for which he did not have responsible supervisory
control. Formal charges have been filed against Clarence V.
Blezard and George F. Yecko for violation of Florida Statute
467 and Rule 21-B.

H. H. Johnson: It is alleged that Mr. Johnson operated a
Branch Office in violation of the Rules of the Board. Formal
charges have been filed against Mr. Johnson for violation of
Florida Statute 467 and Rule 21-B.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 11






Let us help you hatch your next one.
When you begin planning your next building, give us a call before you get to the blueprint
stage.
Our Building Industry Consulting (BIC) Service can help you plan for the communications
that will be needed initially and in the future. There's no extra charge for this service, and
it can save your client money and prevent costly alterations later.
We can also assist you in planning for renovations or additions to present buildings. Check
the Call Guide section of your white pages directory for the BIC number in your area.

@ Southern Bell
















J J S,



















r A
p.;


Convention
Guide

Sarasota welcomes you
to the FAAIA 62nd An-
nual Convention and
Building Products Ex-
hibit, October 7-10 at the
Sarasota Hyatt House.
The Convention theme of
"200 PLUS" will be
borne out by an out-
standing array of profes-
sionals each looking
forward to coming trends
in practice.
This section is your
complete Convention
Guide: the Program, the
Speakers, the Building
Product Exhibitors, a
Portfolio of Sarasota ar-
chitecture to be viewed
on the Architectural
Tour and the FAAIA De-
sign Awards for 1976.
Conventions can be a
time of relaxation and of
renewal. This one prom-
ises to be both.
PQ .;-


Van Wezel Performing Arts
Hall, located north of the
Hotel, where the conven-
tion seminars will be held.
Designed by the Taliesin
Fellowship in the late
1960's.


Hamilton Center on the
New College campus of the
University of South Flori-
da, site of the Annual
Awards Dinner on Friday
evening. Designed by I.M.
Pei & Partners of New
York City.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 /13






Program

Wednesday, October 6, 1976

Building Product Exhibits set up
Convention Center
FAAIA Executive Committee
Meeting (Conquistador Room)
1:00 p.m. AIA Chapter Planning Program
(Four Flags)

Thursday, October 7, 1976

Building Product Exhibits set up
until 4:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m. AIA Chapter Planning Program
(Four Flags)
10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Registration
(Convention Center)
10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. Accreditation of Delegates
(Convention Center)
2:15 p.m. 4:15 p.m. FAAIA Board of Directors Meet-
ing
(Four Flags)
2:15 p.m. 4:15 p.m. FAAIA Business Seccion
(Four Flags)
4:30 p.m. Professional Program
(Van Wezel Hall)
Organization of Architectural
Practice / Where Do We Go
From Here Speaker: WalterA.
Netsch, FAIA
7:00 p.m. Salute to Exhibitors Official
opening of Building Products
Exhibits
(Convention Center)
Evening On your own for dinner
Hospitality Suites will be open

Friday, October 8, 1976

8:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. Coffee & Danish visit Building
Product Exhibits
(Convention Center)
8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. Registration
(Convention Center)
10:30 a.m. Noon Professional Program
(Van Wezel Hall)
Project Documentation Systems
Speaker: C. Herbert Wheeler,
FAIA
Noon 3:00 p.m. Exhibitors Buffet Luncheon
(Convention Center) (Cash Bar)
3:30 p.m. Professional Program
(Van Wezel Hall)
Energy Conservation and the De-
sign Profession Speaker: Fred
S. Dubin, P.E.
6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Cocktail Party with Building


8:00 p.m.


Product Exhibitors
(Convention Center)
Architectural Awards Dinner
(Hamilton Center, USF) -
Speaker: John M. Johansen,
FAIA, Chairman, Architectural
Awards Jury
Hospitality Suites


Saturday, October 9, 1976

8:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. Coffee & Danish visit Building
Products Exhibits
(Convention Center)
8:00 a.m. 12:00 noon Registration
(Convention Center)
10:30 a.m. 12:00 noon Professional Program
(Van Wezel Hall)
Design Trends Speaker: John
M. Johansen, FAIA
12:00 noon 2:00 p.m. Exhibitors Buffet Luncheon
(Convention Center)
2:00 p.m. Exhibits Close
2:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. Architectural Tour of Sarasota
(Buses depart from Hyatt
House)
3:00 p.m. Panel Discussion
AIA Ethical Standards / Pro-
posed Revisions
(Four Flags)
Moderator: Frank R. Mudano,
AIA Florida Regional Director.
Panel: John M. McGinty, FAIA
Robert M. Lawrence, FAIA
7:30 p.m. Annual Banquet (Ballroom)
Speaker: John M. McGinty,
FAIA First Vice President
Future Trends in Society Re-
sources / Energy / Consumerism
/ Technology How They Ef-
fect the Future of the Profes-
sion

Sunday, October 10, 1976

10:00 a.m. FAAIA Business Session
(Four Flags)
FAAIA Board of Directors Meet-
ing
12:00 noon 62nd Annual Convention Ad-
journs




Ladies Activities
Ladies are invited to attend all the professional programs and social
events as listed in the program schedule. In addition, the ladies
of Sarasota have put together a few activities which will be of interest
to the ladies attending the convention:
Friday, October 8, 1976
St. Armands Key Shopping Excursion and lunch at the Columbia
Restaurant, including a fashion show. Buses will depart beginning at
9:30 a.m. and will shuttle from the Hyatt to St. Armands Key until
10:30 a.m. Buses will return to the hotel following lunch with the last
shuttle departing at 3:30 p.m.
Saturday, October 9, 1976
A free demonstration of "Weaving and Macrame" conducted by
Connie Mudano and Jackie Ferguson, beginning at 10:00 a.m. in the
Four Flags Room.
For a limited number, approximately 12 ladies, a special "Dance
Discovery" will be available for ladies who wish to receive instruction
on dance exercises. Ladies must bring their leotards and tights.


14 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976








Speakers


JOHN M. McGINTY,
FAIA
Jack McGintyis presently
serving as First Vice Presi-
dent-President Elect of the
AIA. He has been a princi-
pal in The McGinty Part-
nership, Architects, Inc., of
Houston, Texas, since
1966. In addition, he is a
Principal of The Crane De-
sign Group, a joint venture
firm practicing in the field
of urban design and plann-
ing. Jack was founder and
present board member of
Houston Urban Bunch, a
non-profit community de-
sign center. Other civic as-
sociations indicate his wide
range of interests: member,
Kiwanis Club of Houston,
Houston Philosophical So-
ciety, Rice University Ar-
chitectural Alumni Asso-
ciation, Harris County
Grand Jury Association,
Houston Council on Hu-
man Relations, White
House Fellows Association.
His work within the AIA
has spanned the local, state
and national levels.


WALTER A.
NETSCH,FAIA
Walter Netsch, a design
partner in the Chicago of-
fice of Skidmore, Owings
& Merrill, is noted for his
"field theory" approach to
design, an example of
which is the new Sarasota
Library. Netsch received
his B. Arch degree from
M.I.T. in 1943 and joined
SOM in 1947 following
three years in the Corps of
Engineers. He received an
Honorary D.F.A. Degree
from Lawrence University
in 1968. He is presently ac-
tive in a number of cultural
and art organizations in the
Chicago area. Netsch has
been a frequent lecturer
and teacher at Universities
across the U.S. as well as in
Canada and India. He has
traveled widely throughout
most of the world and has
had his work published in
all the major architectural
journals of this country
and in several foreign mag-
azines.


JOHN M.
JOHANSEN, FAIA
John M. Johansen is one of
the most widely acclaimed
Architects practicing to-
day. In the twenty seven
years since he established
his practice, his work has
received both national and
international attention for
its boldness, imagination
and freshness of approach.
Over the years Mr. Johan-
sen has received repeated
honors and awards from
the American Institute of
Architects, several regional
chapters of the A.I.A., the
Medal of Honor from the
New York Chapter of the
A.I.A., the Brunner Award
from the National Institute
of Arts and Letters, the
U.S. Department of
H.E.W., and The Royal In-
stitute of Architects of
Ireland. He is a graduate of
Harvard Graduate School
of Design, B. Arch., 1942,
M. Arch., 1943. He holds
an Honorary Doctorate of
Fine Arts, University of
Maryland 1965 and an
Honorary Doctorate of
Fine Arts, Clark Universi-
ty, 1970.


C. HERBERT
WHEELER, JR., FAIA
C. Herbert Wheeler Jr., is
an Architect and Professor
of Architectural Engineer-
ing, Pennsylvania State
University. Professor
Wheeler received his B.S.
(1937) in Architecture
from the University of
Pennsylvania and M.S.
(1940) in Architecture
from M.I.T. Prior to join-
ing the Curtiss-Wright Cor-
poration in 1958, he held a
variety of architectural de-
sign and managing engineer
positions responsible for
the structure of industrial
and commercial buildings.
In 1964, he went to Penn-
sylvania State University.
He was Director of Re-
search Projects on Emerg-
ing Techniques of Archi-
tectural Practice. Among
his many professional ac-
tivities throughout North
America, he was an active
member in 1972-1975 of
the AIA National Office
Practice Committee and
the Accreditation of A & E
programs.


FRED S. DUBIN, PE
Fred Dubin is President of
Dubin-Mindell-Bloome As-
sociates, P.C., Consulting
Engineers and is the Man-
aging Partner of Fred S.
Dubin Associates, Interna-
tional. He received his
BSME from Carnegie In-
stitute of Technology in
1935 and is a registered
Professional engineer in 25
states. He has been adjunct
Professor at Columbia Uni-
versity School of Architec-
ture, Visiting Professor at
University of Southern
California School of Ar-
chitecture and guest lec-
turer at 20 other schools.
He is currently Consultant
to AIA Energy Task Force,
AIA Research Corporation
on Energy Matters and has
participated in many Solar
Energy and Energy Conser-
vation conferences.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 15







Building

Products

Exhibitors



205 BEST STEEL PRODUCTS
5505 Gray Street
ltampa, FI. 33609
(813) 872-8515
Granowall and Granostruct veneer panels, curtain wall
and fascia systems

406 BIGELOW SANFORD, INC.
Suite 230, 1515 N.W. 167th Street
Miami, Fl. 33169
(305) 621-4896
Carpets Textile Floors

502 CLEARVIEW CORPORATION
3318 S.W. 2nd Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33315
(305) 522-8526
Solarshade Aluminum Windows

407 COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS
1126 South Division Avenue
Orlando, FI. 32806
(305) 425-5048
W P. Hickman Co., Inc., Aluminum Facia, Gravel stop
and coping systems

M. M. BAYARD OF ORLANDO, INC.
1126 South Division Avenue
Orlando, FI. 32806
(305) 425-5048

W. P. HICKMAN CO., INC.
1126 South Division Avenue
Orlando, Fl. 32806
(305) 425-5048

408 COMMERCIAL ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS
1126 South Division Avenue
Orlando, FI. 32806
(305) 425-5048

COMMERCIAL MODERNFOLD
P.O. Box 8674
Jacksonville, Fl. 32211
(904) 743-5222

DON WORKS MODERNFOLD
P.O. Box 23147
Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33307
(305) 772-2666

DAVIDSON & SON ACOUSTICS
3910 Goodrich Avenue
Sarasota, FI. 33579
(813) 355-7717
Modernfold operable walls, folding doors, and
folding partitions.

409 CONCRETE PRODUCTS, INC.
P.O. Box 130
Brunswick, Ga. 31520
(912) 265-6900
Permadeck Roof Decking

410 CONCRETE PROMOTION COUNCIL OF FLORIDA,
P.O. Box 160 INC.
Winter Park, FI. 32790
(305) 644-8279
Display, Concrete Conserves Energy



16 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


412 DURABLE PRODUCTS, INC.
600 Oak Street
Pt. Orange, Fl. 32019
(904) 767-2522
One piece acrylic surface, fadeproof tub/shower &
shower units

104 DWYER PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA
7254 Roswell Road
Atlanta, Ga. 30328
(404) 231-0145

ST. CHARLES MANUFACTURING
1600 Main Street
St. Charles, III. 60174
(312) 584-3800
Dwyer Compact Porcelain Kitchens;
Residential/Hospital/School/Case Work

505 FLORIDALE PRODUCTS, INC.
506 P.O. Box 20927
Orlando, Fl. 32814
512 (305) 894-7491
Pella Products Pella Windows, sliding glass doors &
folding doors

301 GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
5266 Highway Avenue
Jacksonville, Fl. 32205
(904) 783-1000
General Electric Weathertron (heat pumps)


401 GORY ASSOCIATED INDUSTRIES, INC.
1773 N.E. 205th Street
North Miami, Fl. 33179
(305) 651-7611
Cement Roof Tile

501 W. R. GRACE & COMPANY
CONSTRUCTION PRODUCTS DIVISION
62 Whittemore Avenue (ZONOLITE)
Cambridge, Mass. 02140
(617) 876-1400
Zonolite Insulating concrete roof decks, Thermoclad,
Monokote fireproofing materials and other insulation
products

601 GRAHAM SALES, INC.
1918 Robinhood Street
Sarasota, Fl. 33579
(813) 921-6658
Flexible interior partitioning systems by
Hough Manufacturers

207 GRAPHIC SYSTEMS, INC.
601 N. Ferncreek Avenue
Orlando, FI. 32803
(305) 898-8392
Architectural signing, directories and related products

602 H P PANEL COMPANY
808 N. Rome Avenue
Tampa, Fl. 33606
(813) 251-1033
Micarta Laminate, Designer stone and tile, barnboard,
teakwood


603 HEYWOOD-WAKEFIELD COMPANY
3010 Tenth Street
Menominee, Michigan 49858
(906) 863-2661

206 BRADLEY CORPORATION REPRESENTED BY
HOLIAN ASSOCIATES, INC.
1129 E. Altamonte Avenue
Altamonte Springs, Fl. 32701
(305) 830-1105
Bradley plumbing fixtures and toilet room accessories







201 FRANCISCAN TILE, INTERFACE CORPORATION
P.O. Box 2048
202 Clifton, New Jersey 07015
(201) 773-3945
Ceramic tile

404 IVOR A. SINGER & ASSOCIATES, INC.
715 Diane Circle
Casselberry, Fl. 32707
(305) 831-7489
Allcom Florence Corporation Security Mail -
Communication Systems RAR Enterprises -
commercial & institutional washroom concepts

403 JIFFY BLUEPRINT SERVICE, INC.
411 South Garden Avenue
Clearwater, Fl. 33516
(813) 446-2423
Drafting room furniture and a printing machine, plus a
movie

411 KAWNEER COMPANY, INC.
7460 Chancellor Drive
Orlando, Fl. 32809
(305) 859-9000
I line entrance, VHM, Seamless mullion, panic guard
entrances shadowform, panel mullion systems

509 KEEMAN BRICK & SUPPLY COMPANY
P.O. Box 643
Pompano Beach, FI. 33061
(305) 972-3141
Brick stone pavers fireplaces barbeques




112 KNOLL INTERNATIONAL
800 Douglas Entrance
113 Coral Gables, Fl. 33134
(305) 446-0211
Chairs and tables designed by: Marcel Breuer, Harry
Bertoia, Cini Boeri, Charles Pollock, EERO Saarinen,
Charles Pfister, UFFICIO TECHNICO, and the leisure
outdoor collection designed by Richard Schultz

305 KOPPERS COMPANY, INC.
4380 Georgetown Square
Atlanta, Ga. 30341
(404) 458-8851
Forest products

303 LAKE SHORE MARKERS, INC.
654 W. 19th Street
Erie, Pa. 16512
(814) 456-4277
Lifetime aluminum signs, plaques, letters, letter-lites
and markers

503 LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD COMPANY
1819 Peachtree Road, N.E.
Atlanta, Ga. 30309
(404) 355-2412
Vari-Tran coated energy saving glasses

504 MARTIN FIREPROOFING GEORGIA, INC.
2200 Military Road
Buffalo, N.Y. 14217
(716) 692-3680
Fibroplank structural cement-fiber roof decking, steel
edge creteplank (Nailable concrete plank) roof decking




510 MEDECO SECURITY LOCKS, INC.
P.O. Box 1075
Salem, Va. 24153
(703) 387-0481
U.L. Listed high security locks and lock cylinders,
providing the ultimate in key control


103 MERCER PLASTICS COMPANY, INC.
1 ]abe/ Street
Newark, New Jersey 07105
(201) 589-4444
Vinyl wallbase, vinyl carpet moldings, nosings and
saddles stair treads and accessories




702 MERIDIAN PRODUCTS, INC.
11 Tomahawk Drive
703 Indian Harbour Beach, Fl. 32937
(305) 773-0412
Largostone replica of quarried coral stone/interior &
exterior Largostone reproduction of ancient hand
carved paneling/interior Architectural mouldings and
trim; contemporary furniture for Florida living/indoor
and outdoor

203 MILLER ASSOCIATES
2605 N.W. 75th Avenue
Miami, Fl. 33122
(305) 592-6440
Thermill solar heating system

101 MOEN/STANADYNE
377 Woodland Avenue
Elyria, Ohio 44035
(216) 323-3341
Moen faucets, stainless steel sinks

107 MONIER-RAYMOND COMPANY
1212 6th Street
P.O. Box 158
Corona, Cal. 91720
(714) 735-4670
Monray "Spanish" & contemporary roof tiles, featuring
a funous resistent qlaze finish

204 NUTONE DIV., SCOVILL MFG. CO.
1361 S.W. Flagler Terrace
Miami, FI. 33135
(305) 541-0115
Recessed & architectural lighting, bathroom accessories
and equipment, security systems, apartment
communication

102 PALM BEACH CLAY TILE COMPANY
P.O. Box 10282
Riviera Beach, Fl. 33404
(305) 848-1076
Clay floor and roof tile (barrel and shingle)

302 PAVER SYSTEMS
1800 4th Avenue, North
Lake Worth, FI. 33460
(305) 586-2957
Interlocking concrete paving blocks "LOCKBLOCK"
(reg. trademark). Erosion control/soil conservation block
"TURFSTONE" (reg. trademark)

109 PLAZA DOOR COMPANY, INC.
P.O. Box 1948
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33402
(305) 833-5712
Plaza aluminum and glass sliding door units and screens



111 PPG INDUSTRIES, INC.
One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222
(412) 434-2894
Reflective glasses, single and double glazing

304 REED FOREST PRODUCTS, INC.
550 Pharr Road
Atlanta, Ga. 30305
(404) 261-6383
Contract vinyl wallcoverings



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 17






Building Products Exhibitors, Continued


306 THOMAS W. RUFF AND COMPANY
501 George Avenue
307 Maitland, FI. 32751
(305) 628-2400
INDUSTRIAL OFFICE SUPPLIERS
P.O. Box 4938
Jacksonville, Fl. 32201
(904) 781-8500

LIVINGSTON OFFICE PRODUCTS, INC.
1121 Twiggs Street
Tampa, Fl. 33602
(813) 223-5533

WILLIAMS FURNITURE DIVISION OF
ELLIE'S, INC.
Main street at Five Points Mall
Sarasota, Fl. 33577
(813) 365-1400

CENTRAL The Office Products Center
5301 N.W. 37th Avenue
Miami, Fl. 33142
(305) 524-4645
Office furniture and panel systems

106 SAFE-T-LAWN, INC.
7800 N.W. 32nd Street
Miami, Fl. 33122
(305) 592-0801
Irrigation equipment

405 SCHEFFER STUDIO, INC.
51 Main Avenue
Clearwater, Fl. 33515
(813) 442-4296
Architectural renderings and computer perspectives


105 THE SEABRIDGE COMPANY
6407 Georgia Avenue
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33405
(305) 585-3606
Chicago Faucets; Symmons non-scald shower valves;
Jensen stainless steel sinks; Theodore Efrom fiberglass
shower stall; Universal water systems

507 SUMMITVILLE TILES, INC.
3369 Stonecrest Court
Atlanta, Ga. 30341
(404) 455-8022

CRAFTSMAN SUPPLY
P.O. Box 3267
Pensacola, Fl. 32506
(904) 455-5429

FLEMING & SONS, INC.
464 Cassat Avenue
Jacksonville, Fl. 32205
(904) 783-1240

GULF TILE DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
2714 N. Armenia
Tampa, FI. 33607
(813) 251-1132

TILE CONTRACTORS SUPPLY COMPANY
2821 N.E. 20th Way
Gainesville, Fl. 32601
(904) 372-0466



18 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


TILE CORPORATION OF AMERICA
4220 N.W. 7th Avenue
Miami, FI. 33137
(305) 751-3687

WATSON DISTRIBUTORS, INC.
958 Orange Avenue
Winter Park, FI. 32789
(305) 644-9619
Materials manufactured by Summitville

508 TILE CORPORATION OF AMERICA
4220 N.W. 7th Avenue
Miami, Fl. 33127
(305) 751-3113
Italian floor and wall tiles, French glass tiles & mosaics,
marble tiles, Swedish Hoganas ceramics, Summitville
Tiles

511 TUB MASTER CORP.
413 Virginia Drive
Orlando, FI. 32803
(305) 898-2881
Folding Shower doors and skylights

110 UNIVERSAL PRODUCTS EXCHANGE, INC.
216 Base Avenue
P.O. Box 1508
Venice, FI. 33595
(813) 488-5501
WELCO (dry processing engineering copier)


402 VIOLA ASSOCIATES, INC.
Arrow Lock Corporation
Architectural Metal Industries
410 E. 10th Court
Hialeah, FI. 33010
(305) 885-2489
Arrow Lock Corp., door locks
Architectural Metal Industries Toilet Room Accessories

701 WESTERN WATERPROOFING COMPANY, INC.
4924 LaSalle
Tampa, Fl. 33607
(813) 877-7646
Waterproofing and Deck Coating

108 WILLEN WIRTZ ASSOCIATES
228 Phipps Plaza
Palm Beach, Fl. 33480
(305) 655-1060
Flexible Light Strip; modular cabinets showing the
various potential uses of this light strip for architects
and designers

KURT WALDMANN
Architectural Photography
1905 N.W. 115th Street
Miami, FI. 33167
(305) 685-2898
Architectural Photography

FLORIDA CENTRAL CHAPTER AUXILIARY
Sanford Goin Memorial Fund

FLORIDA SOUTH CHAPTER
Women's Architectural League

WOMEN'S ARCHITECTURAL LEAGUE OF
The Broward County Chapter, AIA

FAAIA BOOK DISPLAY
AIA Contract Documents, Books & Manuals






Drohlich Building (late 1960's)
Edward J. Seibert, Architect

An office building of modular
construction, stucco on concrete
block.


Chamber of Commerce
(early 1950's)
Victor Lundy, FAIA, Architect

An early example of the laminat-
ed wood structures for which
Lundy was noted. Distinguished
by a bright Oriental tile roof.











Steinmetz Studio (early 1950's)
Paul Rudolph, FAIA, Architect

An early commercial structure de-
signed by Rudolph still occupied
by the client and unchanged from
the original construction.


Sarasota

Retrospect
Among all the cities in Florida,
perhaps Sarasota alone comes to
mind as the one city possessing a
significant heritage of contempo-
rary architectural works. This
heritage springs from a brief mo-
ment in time the turbulent
decade following the War when
pent-up creative energies were re-
leased in an outpouring of build-
ings, several of which today rank
as classics.
Paul Rudolph was the primary
wellspring of this creativity, fol-
lowed by Victor Lundy. These
two left behind not only a herit-
age of work but of younger archi-
tects whose career, begun in their
offices, flourishes today in Sara-
sota and other parts of Florida.
Paul Rudolph, interviewed re-
cently in his New York office,
spoke of his early days in Sara-
sota: "It was a most important
period for myself- an illuminat-
ing period. The work gave me a
feeling for materials that I might
not have gotten anywhere else,
also, because of working with
house clients I learned to deal
with people. This perhaps is the
best training of all for a young
architect."
The buildings shown in this
section are scheduled to be seen
on the Convention architectural
tour. They are representive of ar-
chitecture in Sarasota but there
are other buildings of design qual-
ity or historical interest which
should be visited for a complete
understanding of this unique area.
Time, in many cases, has not
treated these buildings well. Many
are not properly maintained,
some have had additions which
are not of the same genre as the
original. Asked about changes and
additions which have altered his
buildings, Rudolph replied: "I re-
sent the changes very deeply.
Change is an implied part of the
life of a building, but the way in
which it is accomplished is impor-
tant. There must be an under-
standing of what was the original
intent."


Scott Building (late 1950's)
William Rupp and
Joseph Farrell, Architects

An early experimental use of pre-
cast concrete featuring details of
an oriental character. The build-
ing has been altered from its orig-
inal state.











Photos: Kurt Waldmann


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 /19





Galloway's Showroom
(late 1950's)
Victor Lundy, FAIA, Architect
A dramatic laminated wood struc-
ture with glass enclosure. Several
of the glass panels have been filled
in and the building is presently
vacant.


First City Federal Savings (1975)
Jack West, Architect
A concrete structure featuring
massive cantilevered lattices.
Winner of a 1976 Gulf Coast
Chapter award for Architectural
Merit.


Sarasota High School (1958)
Paul Rudolph, FAIA, Architect
An early example of Rudolph
"massive" concrete structure,
today much altered by glass walls
enclosed and light scopes closed
off. "This building is intended to
suggest the uniqueness of the Flo-
rida climate through carefully ar-
ranged modular sun shields and
interior ventilating and lighting
scopes." Winner of a National
AIA Award.


"'sv wgi"


*~a


r~so


7~1 a-


t'


St. Paul's Lutheran Church
Victor Lundy, FAIA, Architect
Sanctuary (1968)
Concrete structural walls with a
tent-like roof of wood on steel
cables suspended from a 139 foot
free span truss.
Assembly Building and
Office Building (1950's)
Two more examples of the Lundy
laminated wood structure with
broad wallkways on each side of
the enclosed space.


20 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


7


r -Jfc.**e4B





Paulk Medical Building (1961)
Bert Brosmith, Architect
A modular concrete block struc-
ture which was designed as the
first phase of a proposed medical
complex, never realized.


Sarasota

Retrospect


Riverview High School (1957)
Paul Rudolph, FAIA, Architect

The first large scale public struc-
ture by Rudolph in Sarasota, de-
signed as a slender steel frame-
work with horizontal sunshades
over glass walls. Glass roof moni-
tors have been removed and the
building altered for air condition-
ing. A new addition has been
completed to the west.


Greenhouse Restaurant (1976)
Zoller-Abbott, Architects
A modular glass structure of light
framing set in a jungle. Winner of
1976 Gulf Coast Chapter and
FAAIA Awards for Architectural
Merit.







Sanderling Beach Club (1952)
Paul Rudolph, FAIA, Architect
Bent plywood vaults and slender
wood columns created a light
structure well suited to its ocean
front site. Standing today virtual-
ly unchanged from the original
construction.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 21
































Residence for
Mr. & Mrs. David Cohen (1952)
Paul Rudolph, FAIA, Architect

An outstanding example of Ru-
dolph's early residential work,
still occupied by the original own-
ers. The house is in excellent re-
pair and almost unchanged. Winn-
er of Record House Award in
1956.


Siesta Key Chapel (1975)
Frank Folsum Smith &
James Holliday, Architects

A rustic structure of heavy wood
construction nestled among trees.
A winner of 1976 Gulf Coast
Chapter Award for Architectural
Merit and 1976 FAAIA. Honor-
able Mention Design Award.


Healy Guest House
(cocoon house) (1949)
Twitchell/Rudolph, Architects

An exercise in tension roof struc-
ture, one of the most famous of
Rudolph's early designs and winn-
er of numerous awards. Unoc-
cupied at present, the building is
still in its original form.


Sandy Cove Condominium
(late 1960's)
Frank Folsum Smith, Architects

A residential project of intimate
scale built around an interior lake.
Two story units accented by a
low rise tower. Winner of an
FAAIA Honor Award in 1970.


22 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976







The fascinating yearly process
of selecting architectural de-
sign awards was handled this
year with aplomb by a distin-
guished jury who themselves
are recognized for their de-
sign accomplishments: Walter
A. Netsch, FAIA of SOM,
Chicago, John M. Johansen,
FAIA of New York, and
Henry M. Cobb, FAIA of I.M.
Pei & Partners, New York.
A design awards program
is a positive action a re-
cognition of excellence. This
years jury felt that the overall
quality of the work submit-
ted was very high a fact re-
flected in the unusually large
number of awards given.
They felt that encouragement
should be given to all archi-
tects whose work had good
qualities deserving of recogni-
tion. The jury could not draw
too tight a line, refusing to let
numbers arbitrate design ex-
cellence.
In addition to design qual-
ities considered in selecting
awards, the jury was cogni-
zant of such factors as build-
ing siting, the appropriateness
of materials, function of plan
and, in keeping with the
times, potential for energy
savings. Awards were not
limited by building type al-
though some fared better
than others. The jury felt in-
stitutional buildings tended
to be unresponsive to human
scale and needs. No high rise
apartment building was
chosen. It was the juries'
opinion that this building
type still has not been very
well solved, not just in Flori-
da but all across the country.
Herein then are the
choices which represent the
best of Florida architecture
for 1976.


Architectural Design Awards


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 23






Honor

Award


Private Residence
Martin County, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Peter Jefferson
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT:
Frederic B. Stresau


The best house among the entries.
It speaks of the complexity of life
with a healthy simplicity, not
mannered. Fine use of the wood
vernacular in the way of early
Florida homes.







































Peter efferson, AIA




Peter Jefferson, AIA


6I


' a


I


24 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


















. .





ii --


I' -4-



0: -


LIL~iZf


GROUND FLOOR
PLAN


Honor

Award


Jacksonville Jewish Center
Jacksonville, Florida

ARCHITECTS:
Freedman/Clements/Rumpel
ENGINEERS:
Morales & Shumer
Structural
Wilder Associates
Mechanical/Electrical
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Daniel Construction of Florida
OWNER:
Jacksonville Jewish Center



The best of the non-residential
projects. A marvelous plan with
interpenetration and relationship
of interior spaces. Pleasing build-
ing mass and masterful site plan.
The jury hopes that the sun
doesn't bake through the sky-
lights.




















Norman H. Freedman, AIA








James E. Clements, AIA









Peter L. Rumpel, AIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 /25


FI.A ,.


,3






Honor

Award


Rio Mar
Rio Grande, Puerto Rico
ARCHITECT:
Robert Bradford Browne
ENGINEERS:
Capacete-Martin & Associates
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS:
Edward D. Stone, Jr. & Associates
OWNER:
Rio Mar Condominiums, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Rio Mar Construction Co., Inc.



A beautiful setting and massing
reminiscent of Mediterranean hill
towns. The project succeeds in
solving a complex effort and is
exceptionally well done for this
new life style.







































Robert Bradford Browne, AIA


26 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976






r


Lr. ,


. :.


Honor

Award



Ocean Pines Yacht Club
Ocean City, Maryland

ARCHITECT:
Robert Bradford Browne
INTERIOR DESIGNERS:
Sally Kintzing & James Merrick Smith
OWNER:
Boise Cascade Recreation Community Corp.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Crist Stuart Associates, Inc.



The new Newport mannerest
architecture with great scale and
polish. Quiet, fragmentary pattern
of the site plan can accept ritual
formalism. However, one juror
termed the building 'out of date'.
















































Robert Bradford Browne, AIA

ii


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 27


- ------,..

--- W -- -.


.;-~i.~..
xr .......-x,
ra


t'-






Honor

Award



Rayburn Swim & Tennis Club
Sam Rayburn, Texas

ARCHITECT:
Robert Bradford Browne
ENGINEERS:
George Jiri Hladik
Structural
Severud-Perrone-Strum-Bandel
Structural Cable
Sasnett Engineering, Inc.
Mechanical/Electrical
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS:
Edward D. Stone, Jr. & Associates
OWNER:
American Lakes & Land Company
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Temple Associates, Inc.


The best project of a specialized
solution using natural materials in
a technologically advanced mann-
er. Good plan with excellent re-
solution of structure and pro-
gram. The geometry of the pool
shows the wooded site to advant-
age.





































Robert Bradford Browne, AIA


-~


VA,.

4 7~s~A


28 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


~LOD~L PL~N 111.-110
~ci~bY








0-111 A ;.


mopl iq~i,~


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 29


S,. Merit
Award


Borroto Residence
_71% Key Biscayne, Florida
ARCHITECTS:
k .r1 Borroto & Lee, Architects and Planners
LANDSCAPING:
Borroto & Lee, Architects and Planners
1, OWNER:
Wilfredo Borroto
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Wilfredo Borroto


A straightforward restatement of
a modern Florida house using
standard materials common to the
area. Works well in its suburban
neighborhood.















"Merit

Award

Greenhouse Restaurant
Sarasota, Florida
ARCHITECTS:
Zoller-Abbott Architects/Planners
LANDSCAPE & INTERIOR DESIGN:
Zoller-Abbott Architects/Planners
OWNER:
Governor and Mrs. Hugh Gregg
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Beall, Pierce, Inc.



A good.plan with intimate break-
down of spaces for dining. The
large glass walls work well for an
evening operation but would be
questionable for daylight hours. A
specialized scheme with excellent
indoor/outdoor visual relation-
ships.






Merit

Award


Community Center
Lauderhill, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Roy D. Smith
ENGINEERS:
Bertram S. Warshaw & Associates
INTERIORS:
Office of the Architect
Paola D. Smith
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS:
Stresau, Smith & Steward
OWNER:
S & R Of Inverrary
CONTRACTOR:
Harry T. Jones Construction Co.


The space frame is a good use of
technology as a sun roof, a unify-
ing element for the project. A
good plan and community orient-
ed solution.


* Low -H-




LOWER LBV~t.


Merit

Award---

Vacation House
Florida West Coast
ARCHITECT:
Edward J. Seibert
CONTRACTOR:
Warren Beale


A pragmatic profile offering ex-
cellent natural ventilation and
adaptation to site. However the
jury felt the shutters, in color and I
shape, were a distracting element.


30 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


~C~\-- -; tn:
--i? ( --" ~~' ~'


"";;L~4; : sl;
-br






Honorable
Mention


Dunehouses
Atlantic Beach, Florida
ARCHITECT:
William Morgan Architects
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Ross Construction Company





Sophisticated hedonism and a
great place to get lost in. An in-
teresting construction technique
which deserves further explora-
tion. A strong contrast in siting
between this and adjacent struc-
tures.


Honorable
Mention


Miami Police Department
Miami, Florida
ARCHITECTS:
Pancoast Architects
Bouterse Borrelli Albaisa Architects
Planners Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
A.D.H. Builders


A difficult institutional problem
tackled with vigor and logic,
with some concern expressed over
the relationship of the parking
structure. A good beginning for a
future complex of governmental
buildings.


Honorable
Mention


Hideaway
Mandarin, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Boyer & Boyer
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
George Longino






An excellent relation of solution,
interior and site into a complete
whole. Possibly the most totally
consistent and complete of all the
projects viewed.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 19






Honorable
Mention


Siesta Key Chapel
Sarasota, Florida
ARCHITECTS:
Frank Folsom Smith
James B. Holliday
CONTRACTOR:
Ron A. Royal, Inc.






An unpretentious, straightfor-
ward, fine entry. The use of wood
is unsophisticated but well detail-
ed and well adapted to the site
and use of the building.


Honorable
Mention


Architects Office
Miami, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Charles Harrison Pawley
CONTRACTOR:
Lewis E. Weaver





An excellent recycling of a ware-
house space into an office. In-
terior design very well done and
carried out with great efficiency
and consistency. A good place to
work.


Honorable
Mention


Apogee Townhouses
Miami, Florida
ARCHITECTS:
Joint Venture
Charles M. Sieger
Denis E. Arden
Robert Altman
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Hammer Construction/
Waite Construction


Good plans well worked out to
give great open interior spaces, re-
alizing that such openness would
not be desired by all people. Ex-
terior treatment did not measure
up as well as interiors.


32 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976


=






Honorable
Mention


Cypress Place Office Complex
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Oscar Handle
CONTRACTOR:
John Dec







A pleasing office complex in
wood, creating a modest non-
hostile environment. Not, how-
ever, a universally applicable solu-
tion to office design.


Honorable
Mention


Valencia Community College
Orlando, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Reynolds, Smith and Hills,
Architects-Engineers-Planners, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Williams Development Company




A well executed multi-use educa-
tional facility, designed as a col-
lection of parts with a way of
moving through. The jury felt the
interiors did not match the qual-
ity of the exterior.


Honorable
Mention


Arbor Office Center
Clearwater, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Rowe Holmes Associates Architects, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Proefke Nielsen Construction Co.




The ground level is an elegant
mixture of high and low building
masses. The buildings work well
together and the plaza is well in-
tegrated with the existing trees.
However, the jury expressed dis-
appointment in the pedestrian
quality of the main building itself.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 33


U.





Honorable
Mention


Kearsarge Woods Resort Condominium
North Conway, New Hampshire
ARCHITECTS:
Baldwin & Sackman -v
BUILDER:
Mara Development Corporation I F






A lovely site and placing of build-
ings, very good plans and a great
use of wood, though perhaps a bit
overdesigned. Interior spaces are
very well treated.


Honorable
Mention


The Loading Dock Restaurant
Tampa, Florida
ARCHITECT:
Rowe Holmes Associates Architects, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
Fred Curtis, Inc.





A good job of creating a dining
space in a portion of an old down- di
town warehouse. Interior design,
with a mixture of old and new, is
well done.




An architect is many men.
He is a man of the arts.
Because of his artistic skills and vital awareness,
he is a man most important to his community.
It is the duty of an architect
to focus his attention
on the pulse of that community
its urban planning, educational
opportunities, good government.
It is the responsibility of the architect to be involved,
to express himself,
to lead the way -
to see creative ideas
become part of major community decisions.


34 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976











PPG REFLECTIVE GLASS

HELPED A

65-YEAR-OLD BUILDING

RECAPTURE ITS YOUTH.


Like many buildings of its vintage,
the Mills Building in El Paso, Texas,
was architecturally priceless but
seemed economically worthless.
Built in the Louis Sullivan style,
it was a local landmark. As it got
up in years, it went down in value,


and a wrecker's ball loomed large
in its future.
Then it got new owners and a
new chance.
They gutted the building and
completely refurbished the inside.
On the outside, they used PPG


Solarcool" Bronze reflective glass
and matching spandrels. But they
did it respectfully and preserved
the building's architectural integrity.
The result is fascinating. Real
Sullivan-style architecture updated
by PPG reflective glass. It's
"Pygmalion" put to music to create
"My Fair Lady'.
But more than being beautifully
reflective, PPG Solarcool Bronze
is also beautifully practical.
It cuts El Paso's desert sun down
to size. Both glare and solar heat
gain are reduced, which helps the
air-conditioning system operate
more efficiently. And more
economically.
As construction costs continue
to go up, more and more building
owners will turn to you for remodel
ing ideas. We think the Mills Build-
ing demonstrates that one of the
best ideas is to remodel with PPG
reflective glass. It's beautiful,
practical and incredibly adaptable.
Find out more about all the
choices you have once you choose
PPG reflective glass. Write PPG
Industries, Inc., One Gateway
Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future
Owner: Pinehurst Properties, Inc.
Architect: Greener & Sumner, Architects, Inc.,
Dallas



INDUSTRIES


. C_. .. % mmm j


_











PPG REFLECTIVE GLASS

HELPED A

65-YEAR-OLD BUILDING

RECAPTURE ITS YOUTH.


Like many buildings of its vintage,
the Mills Building in El Paso, Texas,
was architecturally priceless but
seemed economically worthless.
Built in the Louis Sullivan style,
it was a local landmark. As it got
up in years, it went down in value,


and a wrecker's ball loomed large
in its future.
Then it got new owners and a
new chance.
They gutted the building and
completely refurbished the inside.
On the outside, they used PPG


Solarcool' Bronze reflective glass
and matching spandrels. But they
did it respectfully and preserved
the building's architectural integrity.
The result is fascinating. Real
Sullivan-style architecture updated
by PPG reflective glass. It's
"Pygmalion" put to music to create
"My Fair Lady."
But more than being beautifully
reflective, PPG Solarcool Bronze
is also beautifully practical.
It cuts El Paso's desert sun down
to size. Both glare and solar heat
gain are reduced, which helps the
air-conditioning system operate
more efficiently. And more
economically.
As construction costs continue
to go up, more and more building
owners will turn to you for remodel
ing ideas. We think the Mills Build-
ing demonstrates that one of the
best ideas is to remodel with PPG
reflective glass. It's beautiful,
practical and incredibly adaptable.
Find out more about all the
choices you have once you choose
PPG reflective glass. Write PPG
Industries, Inc., One Gateway
Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future
Owner: Pinehurst Properties. Inc.
Architect: Greener & Sumner, Architects, Inc.,
Dallas



INDUSTRIES







Buildings


West Side Skill Center, Jacksonville
A new facility for the West Side Skill
Center, School No. 280, for the Duval
County School Board, is presently out for
construction bids from the architects,
Willis and Veenstra. The project includes
specially designed areas for forty seven
different kinds of instruction ranging
from truck maintenance and construction
trades to food service, fashion design
and cosmetology. The design intent is to
upgrade the image of traditional vocational-
technical schools.


USF College of Business Administration
Rowe Holmes Associates Architects have
designed this building currently under
construction on the USF campus in Tampa.
It includes a 500 seat teaching auditorium,
general classrooms, faculty offices,
administrative offices and student and
faculty lounges opening onto a three story
open atrium. The bermed parti has
produced the most energy efficient building
ever built at The University of South
Florida with 2.5 times more square footage
of enclosed conditioned space per ton of
air conditioning than any previous building
on campus.

Letters
Dear Mr. Totty:
I read with much interest the
article by Ms. Joan Jefferson on
"How Will Your Building Burn" in
the J uly/August issue of your fine
magazine.
Unfortunately, Ms. Jefferson is
correct in pointing out the lack of
compatibility and uniformity
between the "patchwork" fire
prevention codes used in numerous
areas throughout Florida, including
the State Fire Marshal's Office,
and the building codes generally
enforced throughout the state.
The Board of Building Codes and
Standards has recommended that
some uniformity can be achieved ...
indeed must be achieved in Fire
Prevention Codes and Building Codes,
however, the legislature has only
adopted an Interim Code which
includes all the codes in use throughout
the state in 1974. This only served
to require every governmental entity
to have a code, not provide needed
uniformity of basic requirements.
We continue to work towards adoption


of a minimum building code that can
be used by the architect, engineer,
and building community alike to
assure safe design and practical
regulation for both structural and
fire safety. The fire service does not,
however, want their provisions to be
the same as the building code
regulations, since they feel building
codes are not adequate. This is an
erroneous philosophy, since building
codes now have companion fire
prevention codes, and those codes
deal in detail with high rise structures,
open atriums, windowless structures,
and numerous other complex new
techniques.
Of significance, however, is the
fact that architects must be more
active in the code process; on the
local, state, and model code level.
We need your expertise, and your
assistance on the political level, for
whether we like it or not, the
political interests of suppliers, and
the individuality of geographic
regions of our state have influenced
today' code status more than any
other factors. It will continue to do
so until your profession, as well as
others so mutually affected, take the
time to help us improve it for the
benefit of all.
Sincerely,
Thomas M. Moses, Chairman
Florida Board of Building
Codes and Standards

The following letter to AIA
Director Frank Mudano is in
comment on the proposed changes
to the ethical standards.

Dear Frank:
Carl Gerken indicated it would be in
order for us to write to you on the
subject of the new ethics. I find the
August JOURNAL has a lot of good
stuff in it. I can add little, but here
goes.
For generations we have lived
under an umbrella held by the general
contractor. Our every habit and
document has derived from this
condition. The nice umbrella has been
folded and put away. Now we have
a world of broker contractors and
construction management. "Heery"
was right our General Conditions
do less than good service for these
jobs. Now that the rain is falling, we
need everything from raingear to
snorkels to survive. It would appear
that some retreading and some
collaborating are in order. Available
consultants to step in and instruct us
on the requirements of documents
for the new contracts, or a full
collaborator to deliver construction


management at a fee, and award
several contracts. At least the
umbrella could be reestablished and
in our hands.
New ethics will follow new
methods but the new methods need
not give up our "professional
disinterestedness" as a stock in trade.
I would divide advertising into
three major forms and purposes.
(1) Specification advertising provides
the buyer with valuable information
he can keep against the day of decision
and purchase. (2) Selection
advertising announces and displays
the existence and character of
products with an eye to establishing
the need for the product and its
source of supply. (3) Triphammer
advertising using direct and subliminal
constant reminder of a brand name
for impulse buying.
Frankly, I can see a well limited
type one for architects, but type two
should be institutionalized (AIA), and
type three for us would be demeaning
and has no place. Any advertising
which infers that there is a "best"
architect is destructive of the
profession. Advertising that instructs
as to experience, viewpoints, interest,
etc., could be useful to the buyer.
Yours truly,
Francis R. Walton, FAIA

Advertisers
4th Cover
AIA Documents
36
Architectural Products &
Professional Services
2nd Cover
Cabot's Stains
3rd Cover
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
8
Florida Concrete and
Products Association, Inc.
3
Monier-Raymond Company
3
Omega Tile Distributors
6/35
PPG Industries
8
Safe-T-Lawn Inc.
7
Sarasota Hyatt House
12
Southern Bell
8
Kurt Waldmann,
Architectural Photography
4
Western Waterproofing


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976 / 37






The general election this November will find
the following proposed amendment to the
Florida Constitution on the ballot:
"Proposes an amendment to Article VII
of the State Constitution to provide a new
Section 16 which authorizes the issuance of
revenue bonds to finance or refinance hous-
ing and related facilities in Florida, secured
primarily by pledged revenues at least equal
to the annual bond payments. Limiting the
bonds which may be outstanding in one fis-
cal year, to $100,000,000."
Passage of this amendment will have a
great effect on both the architectural pro-
fession and the building industry. The fol-
lowing analysis of the proposal is presented
for your information. Further information
may be obtained from: "Homes for You",
1720 S. Gadsden Street, Tallahassee, Florida
32302.
Florida Housing

Finance Agency
An Analysis by John J. Koelemij
Chairman, Florida Council on State
Housing Goals

By creating a Housing Finance Agency,
the State of Florida joins some 39
other states in providing an institution
that will act as a conduit for federal
monies that would not otherwise be
available to Florida for the purpose
of financing housing for low, moderate
and middle income families. The
Agency is designed to issue bonds and
the resultant funds would then be
available for use by a state agency in
the purchase of mortgages, fully
insured by the federal government under
under existing F-HA or other HUD
programs. A constitutional amendment
must pass on Nov. 2 to allow the
state to sell the revenue bonds
necessary to fund the agency.
The mortgages would be purchased
from mortgage banking firms, savings
and loan institutions or any other
recognized lender which is authorized
to do business with FHA. In effect,
the FHA insurance guarantees the
state against any project failures and
possible foreclosure results risks.
FHA will pay, in cash, any loss up to
and including the total amount of the
outstanding balance of the mortgage.
The holder of the mortgage, be it
a financial institution or a Housing
Finance Agency is thus fully
protected. It is important to note
that these funds will not come from
state tax sources, but rather will be
funded out of the FHA insurance
fund and/or the Mortgage Insurance
fund. These monies are collected at
the rate of 'Y percent of the balance
of the mortgage monthly, and are kept
in a separate fund from which the
payments are made in the event of
foreclosure. What this means is that
tax dollars are not involved at all,
whether from State or federal sources.


Congress has authorized HUD to
provide insurance on any bonds issued
by a Housing Finance Agency because
of the condition of the bond market
last year. The bonds will thus, in
a sense, be almost like government
bonds because the insurance on the
mortgage not only will make them
more marketable but will result in
a lower cost or interest rate.
The financial institutions will
originate the loans with their
customers (private builders) and the
Agency will act as a clearing house
for these project loans. In practice,
the loans will first be processed by
the Agency, sent to FHA to determine
feasibility and the ability of the
sponsor to perform and this
information will then be heavily
weighed by the lender before it
would make a commitment to deal
with the sponsor.
Finally, the Agency would agree
to purchase the loan from the financial
institution. The project itself would
carry the current approved interest
rates. At the present time this
rate is 9% for FHA projects. The
Finance Agency, thus, would in
effect receive a somewhat higher
rate of interest than it might be
expected to pay for its bonds. This
would give the Agency income with
which to pay its operating expenses.
This is much like the FHA which
operates from the fees it receives
from applications on mortgages and
other business done through its offices.
Florida's Housing Finance Agency
would not deal with the problem-
plagued public housing projects similar
to those in the areas of New York
and St. Louis. The approach to
public housing has changed
considerably in recent years and there
is no longer the idea that large housing
complexes are the best way to house
citizens in big cities.


"The housing needs of the
people will never be fulfilled
in Florida unless we act with
greater determination in
combining the efforts of state
government, of private industry
and of the construction trades
in a more comprehensive way"
Governor Ruben Askew


The Housing Finance Agency is
expected to need some appropriation
to get started. From that point on
the agency will be self-supporting.
Another question which has been
raised about Housing Finance Agencies
is will they become a burden on the


taxpayers. Any losses suffered
because of the failure of a project are
covered by a special mortgage
insurance fund which is paid for by
all of the existing and future projects
insured by FHA. This mortgage
fund has a substantial balance at the
present time and even though the
housing industry has gone through
drastic periods of recession, it remains
in solid financial condition. Also, all
homes or projects built under this
program will be taxed at their full
value just the same as other properties,
unlike public housing projects which
are tax exempt.
The question has been asked: Why
should Florida become involved in
providing housing for low and
moderate income families when some
of the undertakings have been failures
in the big cities like Detroit,
Washington, and Chicago? The
answer is that some of the big-city
programs were intentionally high-risk
under the acts of the Housing Laws
of the U.S. which were used to finance
projects. In the troubled times of the
1960's, inner-city loans for housing
projects were imprudently made and
rehabilitated housing units were
financed, sold and abandoned, creating
severe blighted areas. This process
demonstrated that government cannot
move people where they do not want
to live without dire social disruptions
and the inherent consequences.
The Florida Housing Finance
Agency is equipped with safeguards to
protect against the pitfalls of the past.
The finance agency will only deal
with properly-recognized lending
institutions in the state of Florida and
all project sponsors will be screened
to further maintain the credibility
of the agency.
The Housing Finance Agency could
prove to be an effective and
meaningful vehicle in meeting the
state's housing needs especially in
light of the rapidly increasing
land-labor-material-and-financing
costs which has priced a decent,
sanitary home beyond the reach of
far too many Floridians. This
program can be used for any type of
housing single or multi-family -
as long as it serves the low, moderate
and middle income families.
Finally, the Housing Finance Agency
creates an opportunity for a
private/public partnership in the huge
job of housing Floridians. Developers
and builders working with private
lending institutions through a
Housing Finance Agency can be a
new-found formula for the steady
pace of housing production needed
to provide shelter for a growing
population.


38 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 1976













Why Call
Washington
ai when you

Miami?

document ts

boolk 20% discount to AIA members
Sawn for prepaid orders with over night
UPS service for most of Florida
II 1 1n u a Bi outside of Miami.
available
through
FAAIA
305/661-8947
Address orders to:
FAAIA
Documents Department
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156