• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Table of Contents
 Two by Kemp, Bunch and Jackson
 Declaration of dependence 1976
 Biscayne West competition
 Mid Florida chapter awards
 Florida Gulf Coast chapter...
 "Beauty can be made to pay..."
 Letters
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00225
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: May-June 1976
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00225
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Advertising
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Two by Kemp, Bunch and Jackson
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Declaration of dependence 1976
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Biscayne West competition
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Mid Florida chapter awards
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Florida Gulf Coast chapter awards
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    "Beauty can be made to pay..."
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Letters
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




























































*.-'1 *
'^.


14


IF-







































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to whom fell the task of drafting the formal
Declaration of Independence.


As one reflects back to the era of the
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Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Directors of Florida Region
Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414
Frank R. Mudano, AIA
1189 N.E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 33515
(813) 446-1041
Executive Director
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947
General Counsel
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191
FAAIA Officers for 1976
Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, President
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-5445
Carl Gerken, AIA, Secretary
P.O. Box 1431
Daytona Beach, Florida 32015
(904) 255-5471
James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
P.O. Box 22889
Tampa, Florida 33622
(813) 879-6782
FAAIA Board of Directors for 1976
James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
Howard B. Bochiardy
William W. Brainard
Glenn A. Buff
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Ishmael A. Byus
John W. Dyal
Bill G. Eppes
Norman M. Giller
Robert G. Graf
Raymond W. Graham
Carl O. Gutmann, Jr.
John Hobart
Jerome A. James
Charles E. King, FAIA
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Emily Obst
Mark H. Ramaeker
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Michael Ritter
Ed Saar
Newton L. Sayers
Ludwig Spiessl
Frank A. Vellake
Francis R. Walton, FAIA

The Florida Architect
Publications Committee
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
John W. Totty/Editor
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


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I O







Prologue


Biscayne West Miami's first ever
national architectural competition -
addressed itself to the problem of
providing in-town residential
environments responsive to the wants
and needs of the potential users.
(See pages 14 & 15 for the winning
entries)
The problem was theoretical in
content yet very real in seeking answers
to housing needs which must be
addressed the world over. Coming
into play here was a unique
characteristic of the architect, one
in as great a need today as ever.
That is his ability to be a visionary -
to propose broad far reaching
solutions to the many problems which
plague man's physical environment.
Granted these do not feel like very
visionary times with so many crises
ranging from ecology to energy to
merely coping with the recession. And
there are those who would argue that
visionary ideas are too far removed
from reality and only serve to prove
that the architect doesn't have his feet
on the ground.
But both are needed. The great
talent of the architect with his "feet
on the ground" is that he can take these
ideas and adapt them to the every day
needs of clients. The real genius of that
architect lies in his ability to make the
translation in such a manner that the
essence of the original is retained,
thereby bettering the condition of all
mankind.
It is in just such times as these that
visionary concepts are needed. The
problems are real, and remain, and the
enforced pause gives great opportunity
to develop thoughful solutions. When
building resumes again, as it will, these
solutions can then form a basis for
construction activity more in tune
with human needs than that of a few
years ago.
The concepts of Biscayne West are
equally adaptable to other urban areas
of Florida. They should be studied well.


SThe

Florida

Architect
VOLUME 26 NUMBER 3 MAY/JUNE 1976

7 Two by Kemp, Bunch & Jackson
Independent Life and Atlantic National Bank add
dimension to this firm's influence on downtown
Jacksonville

12 Declaration of Dependence, 1976
C. Herbert Wheeler, Jr. FAIA proposes a new professional
position astride both architect and engineer to co-ordinate
7 the role of each

--.14 Biscayne West Competition
S'.Four prize winning designs in Miami's first-ever national
'''* '' architectural competition offer real solutions to in-town
living
16 Mid Florida Chapter Awards
Seven projects are chosen as outstanding for 1976 in the
Orlando/Seminole County area
14
18 Florida Gulf Coast Chapter Awards
Sarasota/Bradenton is the locale for these seven award
winning projects

21 "Beauty Can be Made to Pay ..."
George Merrick, Founder of Coral Gables made this
Ordinance seeks to maintain the beauty he created
21 24 Letters
Advertisers

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida
Association of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned
and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for
profit. It is published bi-monthly at the Executive Office of the
Association, 7100 N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida 33156. Telephone
(305) 661-8947. Opinions expressed by contributors are no necessarily
those of the Editor of the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial
material may be reprinted provided full credit is given to the author
and to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and copy is sent to publisher's
office. Single Copies, 75 cents, subscription, $6.50 per year.
Controlled Circulation Postage Paid, Miami, Florida.

Cover: Ft. Clinch State Park occupies the northern tip of Amelia Island
located due east of Fernandina Beach. The fort was named for General
Duncan Lamar Clinch, a veteran of the War of 1812, the Indian Wars
and the Mexican War. Ft. Clinch was originally designed as one of a
series of closed forts whose purpose was to protect most of the
important harbors on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Property for the
fort was acquired in 1842 and construction began in 1847. The plan is
in the shape of an irregular pentagon with the basic construction
material being brick. The incomplete fort was occupied by Confederate
forces in April 1861 for approximately eleven months. Union troops
reoccupied the fort on March 2, 1862, making it the first Union fort
occupied by the Confederacy to be reoccupied. Construction continued
in 1862-1865 but was halted in 1867 with the fort being placed on
caretaker status in 1869. From 1869 to 1898 something less than
minimum preventative maintenance was provided. Ft. Clinch was
briefly occupied in 1898 during the Spanish-American War. It was
again virtually abandoned from 1898 to 1936 when the site was
designated Ft. Clinch State Park. Photo by G. Wade Swicord provided
courtesy of Herschel E. Shepard, AIA.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976 / 5













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And a Firm commitment in the future by:
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6 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976


- ---~~











Independent Life and
Atlantic Bank Two
bold new structures by
Kemp, Bunch & Jackson
dominate the Jacksonville
skyline


INDEPENDENT LIFE


At'anuc Bank
---


















I-pku_





TM FLOOR PLAN gecm e


TOP PHOTO: The management
and design team: (I to r) standing
- John W. Dyal and Peter J.
Fritsch; seated Keith M. Kelly
and Project Architect Warren C.
Hendry, Jr. BOTTOM: The
production team (I to r) Subash
Gaitonde, Wah Yo Eng, Mohan
Pradhan, Cobrun Eason, Clinton
Parks, Warren Hendry, Jr. and
I inda M-ar


Warren C. Hendry, Jr., Project
Architect for the Independent
Life Building, explains his design
approach.

"Fortunately for all 3,000 people
who will work in Independent
Square, Independent has a long
history of understanding the rela-
tionship between good working
environment and successful
corporate operations. The new
home office required excellent
working stations for each staff
member in regards to function,
comfort, safety and aesthetics.
The program also called for
dining, shopping, banking and
meeting facilities for employees
and the general public.
"The architectural statement of
Independent Square is a direct
result of considerable analysis of
the functional requirements.
Company operations in certain
departments require very large
floors, while others can be fitted
into standard office tower areas.
This need produced a search for a


practical and aesthetic way to
enclose the larger departments,
other than by the standard
"wedding cake" solution. The
sloped base that resulted solves
the problem directly, and gives
the building its distinctive profile.
The corner frames above second
floor enclose the perimeter duct
system, and house secondary
emergency exits from the lower
levels."


CREDITS:
ARCHITECTS:
Kemp, Bunch & Jackson
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER:
Smith, Hardaker, Huddleston &
Collins, Inc.
MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL
ENGINEER:
Van Wagenen & Searcy, Inc.
LANDSCAPING DESIGN:
Urban Space Design, Inc.
INTERIOR DESIGN:
Alan L. Ferry Designers, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
The Auchter Company


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976 / 9


CLUB AT 34"
& 35" FLOORS









SERVICE TOP LVOORS
5 PSSEGER ELEVATORS
2 SERVE ELEVATORS


77I





The main massing elements of the
structure are the tower, the two
story banking base which is
woven in and out among the
tower columns and the platform
of the plaza, which extends out to
the sidewalks. Corners and inter-
section of the masses are carefully
detailed to articulate the differ-
ences between these three parts of
the building, yet the elements are
unified with symmetry and
proportion, and by the use of a
single material light gray cast
atnnf


Atlantic National
Bank Building -
Gray stone and
glass creates a
solid, urbane structure






Photos by Alexandre Georges











Project Designer Walter Q. Taylor
speaks about his concept for this
building.
"The significant challenge of the
Atlantic National Bank project
was to integrate the diverse
character of the large banking
space with multi-story office
space. Site restrictions didn't
allow the two elements to be
placed side by side, so a vertical
arrangement was made, producing
a base and a tower. Design effort
concentrated on articulating the
differences and the similarities of
these elements. Differences are ii
accentuated by form, similarities
related by surface material.
"Study of the office floors
produced a center core, which
also penetrates the main banking "i
lobby. This penetration was taken
advantage of, to produce a com-
plexity and variety which unfolds
as one moves around the lobby. "
"The tower design was deter- '
mined mainly from a concept of -"'
flexibility and quality of office
arrangements. The center core -
leaves the exterior wall free for
glass, producing a large number of
spaces with exterior light and
view. The column-free space
leaves office partitions account-
able only to the window mullions, L
allowing wide latitude in their HrIR-_
placement."'.

S- -r--- r T ABOVE: Materials and finishes in
the main banking lobby are detail-
ed and composed, reflecting the
<. solid, urbane massing of the build-
< ings' structure.

I- CREDITS:
o ::, - ARCHITECTS:
< I Kemp, Bunch & Jackson
H / *" STRUCTURAL ENGINEER:
0 Smith, Hardaker, Huddleston &
Collins, Inc.
U s MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL
_,- -- \ENGINEERS:
Van Wagenen & Searcy, Inc.
S. LANDSCAPING DESIGN:
Robert Hartwig & Associates
I INTERIOR DESIGN:
Alan L. Ferry Designers, Inc.
GENERAL CONTRACTOR:
t .The Auchter Company











U MAIN FLOOR PLAN m


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976 / 11







Declaration of

Dependence

1976
A call for a new
era of collaboration
between architects and
engineers






C. Herbert Wheeler, FAIA


Mr. Wheeler is an architect and professor of
architectural engineering at Pennsylvania
State University. He was recently in Florida
conducting seminars on new developments
in project delivery systems and will return this
fall to be on the program of the FAAIA
Convention in Sarasota. This article
was reprinted from the Consulting Engineer,
June 1975.

Up to now, two great professions -
architecture and engineering have
orbited gloriously in their own
spheres of influence, trying to maintain
"independence" or, rather, trying
not to be dominated by each other.
Politely aloof, these professions now
face the invasion of integrated
organizations that offer collaboration
under one roof by all who participate
in the design and construction process.
I believe that the fourth quarter of
the 20th century will see the integration
and collaboration of the professions,
as the need for dependence becomes
as apparent to the design professions as
the need for independence was apparent
to those who gathered in the fourth
quarter of the 18th century to make
the Declaration of Independence
of 1776. Architects and engineers will
reexamine their differences, reappraise
their contributions to the design and
construction process, and face head on
the need for interprofessional teamwork.
A "Declaration of Dependence"
in 1976 could open up the channels of
communication for a new level of


collaboration for the fourth quarter
of the 20th century.

Who Is to Lead the Team?

Interprofessional engineers who serve
architects say that it is the function
of the architect to coordinate the work.
This is the way it was done in the era,
long past, when building was not
very sophisticated. But the complexity
of building design and the science of
the spatial environment make it difficult
for young or old architects to grasp
acoustics, illumination, water vapor
transmission, heat flow, thermal
transmission, and the many other
technical characteristics of spatial
design.
Architectural education falls short
in preparing the young architect for
the role of design coordinator. Similarly,
engineering education practically ignores
the preparation of the young engineer
for the role of design collaborator
because he is given no knowledge of how
the architect works and thinks. The
specialization and sophistication of both
architectural and engineering education
appears to be pulling the graduates
even further apart. It is tending
to polarize the two fields, which often
are taught separately on the same
campus.
Until architectural educators bring
more engineering into their education
and continuing education, it is doubtful
that architects will be able to lead the
team intelligently. Similarly, as long
as engineering educators do not provide
some architectural design and planning
orientation to their students, it is
doubtful that engineers will be able to
lead the building design team. In lieu
of leadership by either, it may be
necessary to establish a subprofession
of prime professional A-E coordinators,
who would have the necessary breadth
of understanding of all elements of the
design process, as well as all elements
of the building. This may be the key
to the future.

Architect-Engineer Collaboration

Collaboration and cooperation of
architects, engineers, and other members
of the building design team require
magnanimous gestures by each of the
professions and professional societies
to work together in every phase of
the design procedure. Most important
is that the professions define the needs


of each for the other and develop
a mutual respect.
A Declaration of Dependence by
architects for engineers as well as
a Declaration of Dependence by
engineers for architects will open the
door for collaboration and cooperation.
The essence of good communications
is the sharing of problems, which starts
with joint recognition of problems.
The following suggestions, which have
been brewing in my mind for 30 years,
are offered as a set of joint studies
that could follow from a Declaration
of Dependence:
joint education. To establish a
climate of respect and regard, the
education of architects and engineers
should be coordinated. This does not
mean that they must be educated in
the same schools or departments or by
the same teachers, but it does mean
that they should be educated not only
to "do their thing" well, but to
appreciate the fact that there are other
people on the building design team
with whom they must work; to do their
thing well requires interdisciplinary
collaboration in all parts and systems
of the average building.
joint internship. This coordination
should be continued during the internship
and early experience phases. To
capitalize on the momentum of a good
education, the collaborative type of
internship should be devoted to the
integration of the design process
whenever possible.
joint registration. In addition to
starting together and working together,
architects and engineers should be
registered by cooperating registration
groups whose programs are coordinated.
This does not mean they must be
registered by the same board, but it
means they should be registered for
their capability to design for fire safety,
health, and welfare as well as for their
knowledge in their own field of specialty.
They also must know where they relate
to others on the building team.
Joint public relations. Another
important factor is the public's image
of the architectural and engineering
professions. To enhance the image of
both, the public relations, community
relations, and community services
aspect of cooperation should be highly
touted in newspapers, magazines, and
on radio and TV, and be seen in full
operation at the national and local levels.
joint business development.
Architects and engineers can work


12 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976





together to their mutual advantage in
the field of new business development,
whether by joint ventures, professional
association, or cooperative presentations.
This can satisfy the client's need for a
totally designed building, not an
all-architecture or all-engineering type
of building.
joint quality control.
Interprofessional agreements create
many liability problems, according to
professional liability experts. Working
relations should be incubated in the
atmosphere of "who cares whether he
is an architect or engineer as long as
he works well with the rest of the
team." The joint review of documents
and the art and science of
interprofessional checking and
coordination should be developed.
joint compensation. The design
professions must develop a more
equitable and disciplined agreement for
payment of services. The end of
standard fee schedules and the
introduction of new methods of
computing fees has left the field wide
open. No method of compensation
for the consultant can be fair if it
is set up on the percentage of
construction cost basis and then on
a percentage of fee breakdown
between the prime professional and
his consultant. Consultants should
be paid for the work they do. It
is wrong for the prime professional
to make an agreement with a consultant
to serve him on what might be termed
a contingency basis-contingent on the
client's desire to pay his bills. Getting
together on this one will do more for
the collaboration of design professionals
than almost any other problem.
joint code of services. Compensation
requires an understanding of the overall
scope of services to be provided to the
client, but more important, it requires
a much better definition of who does
what: What does the architect do?
What do each of the engineers do? As
building design becomes more
sophisticated, it becomes increasingly
difficult to determine the boundaries
of design.
joint energy conservation. The need
for energy conservation makes it
imperative for architects and engineers
to work together. The problem in design
of glass walls or air curtain vestibules,
or other elements of interdisciplinary
building design, can only be solved by
close cooperation. The alternatives are
already evident. The "all-engineered


box," lacking in architectural character
and function, is the result of some
early energy conservation studies.
Joint environmental impact studies.
Of similar importance is the new field
of environmental impact. Almost all
decisions with regard to environmental
assessments of a new building require
the diligent analysis of the technical
man as well as the esthetic and human
considerations of the architect.
joint life-cycle design. The whole
field of life-cycle design and costing
in building design lends itself to an
integrated approach. When you compare
the costs of energy and the maintenance
of a building with the cost of the original
design services, it becomes apparent that
a few more dollars spent on A-E services
can amount to tremendous savings over
the 30-40 year life of the building. A
whole new ball game is in the wind for
architects and engineers, especially those
who collaborate on life-cycle design
and life-cycle costing.
joint value analysis. Architects and
engineers have talked for many years
about the value that they offer their
clients. But scientific techniques have
not been available to do the job that
should be done until recently, when
some Federal agencies and sophisticated
large clients began to push the value

When you compare the costs of
energy and the maintenance of a
building with the cost of the
original design services, it becomes
apparent that a few more dollars
spent on A-E services can amount
to tremendous savings over the
30-40 year life of the building.

analysis concept. The problem at the
moment is that value analysis is valuing
architecture right out of the building.
Architects and engineers should
establish a code of procedures for value
analysis, value architecture, and value
engineering, all of which can work
together for better buildings.
joint documentation. Coordination
of documentation is another big area
that needs improvement. The lack of
cooperation is evident in the way
architects and engineers in different
offices document the same job. Each
uses his own pet ideas for referencing,
detailing, numbering, and organizing
the drawing formats. Although they
use the same size drawings and
sometimes even the same imprinted
paper, it is only recently that some


effort has been made to coordinate
the information to make sure that
there is no duplication. This is a
particular problem when engineers draw
architectural layouts for their system
drawings or architects draw engineering
equipment information on their
drawings.
joint construction management.
Construction management is another
approach that is gaining acceptance.
With it comes all of the problems and
procedures necessary to phased
construction, such as A-E coordinated
scope drawings or pricing drawings
upon which to select a construction
manager, make an agreement, and
initiate the letting of separate contracts.
Firms are finding it is difficult to
establish scope and pricing drawings
without complete integration of the
building systems. In fact, it is bringing
home the need for coordination of all
systems.
Joint multidisciplinary systems
design. Certainly the interdisciplinary
or multidisciplinary elements of
buildings or systems of buildings require
thought from architects, engineers, and
everyone on the team. For example,
the floor-ceiling sandwich impinges
structural framing, duct-work,
pipe-work, ceilings systems, lighting,
and other elements. The same
interdisciplinary coordination is
necessary for the floor electronics and
the building enclosure.
joint building completion. The
satisfactory completion and tune-up
of the building makes it necessary
for architects and engineers to work
together to clean up and hand over
a completed and operable building to
the owner. At the end of a project,
when all the systems and elements are
being fitted together, is when problems
occur. This is the time for construction
feedback, which should involve good
A-E coordination.

Current Professional Collaboration

This is not intended to imply that no
efforts have been made in the field of
interdisciplinary cooperation. In fact,
ICED (Interprofessional Council on
Environmental Design) has published
one of the most important documents
of this era, "Interprofessional
Collaboration in Environmental
Design," which establishes certain tenets
of the design professionals. It speaks to
CONTINUED PAGE 26


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976 /13







Biscayne


West
The results of Miami's
design competition are
now on display as a part of
the Bicentennial Celebration


The jurors at work: Left to right
are George Acton, AIA, AIP,
Director of Planning, City of
Miami; Paul Rudolph, FAIA, New
York; Harry Weese, FAIA,
Chicago and Ralph Warburton,
AIA, AIP, Professional advisor
from Miami.


The jury found the general quali-
ty of the entries high, the amount
of effort expended commendable,
the understanding of a very dif-
ficult urban design problem com-
prehensive and the variety of the
solutions offered exciting.
The proposed relationship to
the existing infrastructure, the
existing and proposed methods of
access and the relationship to
facilities and activities outside the
project boundaries were often
thoughtfully considered, although
this was sometimes ignored by the
participants. The effort to break
down the scale and impact of the
built environment concerned
almost all of the participants and
provided the principal design im-
petus for most. The emphasis on
humanization and giving a "sense
of place" in variety of interior
and exterior private and public
spaces permeated the thinking of
many.
Technological innovation
played a relatively small part in
the whole (all the finalists'
proposals could be constructed
with today's technology), al-
though two of the four finalists
devoted much thought to devel-
oping a "comprehensive system
approach" to the project which
might have more universal appli-
cation and therefore greater
meaning for similar projects.
Many made by implication and
word good suggestions regard-
ing the staged building of an
immense project and this affected
their solutions in a positive man-
ner. Technological innovation
always costs more at first; there-
fore, two of the prize winners can
be said to be more "practical and
economical" today than the
others. However, since the pro-
gram was addressed to the
"future", the present economic
equations will not remain the
same in the year 2000. The more
sophisticated entries may become
the more economic since both are
based on technologies which to-
day show great promise.


FIRST PLACE
Ralph E. Johnson
Kellam and Smith, Architects
Columbus, Ohio



THIRD PLACE
William Kirby Lockhard
Tucson, Arizona


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14 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976





LEFT
University of Miami student
Project by Ralph Gahl mounts
solar energy collectors on
top of three towers

RIGHT
University of Florida team
of Jorge Carbonell, Roberto
Castellanos and Donna Stuart
produced a solution encompassing
low rise and high rise elements.


Jw. 2


V


t.~ .-~


- I I
SECOND PLACE
A. James Gersich
Gary Kastner
Thomas Reuter
LaCrosse, Wisconsin


FOURTH PLACE
Darryl William Scherba
Michael D. Miller
Cleveland, Ohio


BISCAYNE

WEST


The Biscayne West competition
challenged entrants to design a new
50 acre in-town community of 7000
residential units and ancillary facilities
in relation to the surrounding area in
downtown Miami. The program was
theoretical but based on just such a
community proposal for the same area
as part of an Urban Development and
Zoning Plan prepared by Wallace,
McHarg, Roberts and Todd for the
City.
The Visual Arts Committee of
Third Century U.S.A., the Greater
Miami Bicentennial Organization has
stimulated interest in the potentials of
developing downtown Miami as the
pedestrian center of the region. The
competition was sponsored by the
Southeast Banking Corporation and
the Lowe Art Museum of the
University of Miami and attracted
103 architects from 43 states.
"The four top winners as well as
twenty honorable mention solutions
are on display at the Lowe Art
Museum through July 11 in an
exhibition titled "Design the Next
200." Also displayed are models of a
similar project for a downtown site on
the Miami River built by architecture
students at the University of Miami
and the University of Florida.


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1
ALTAMONTE MALL BRANCH
OF AMERICAN
FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN
. Design Excellence Honor Award:
ARCHITECTS: Murphy, Hunton,
4 'IN Shivers and Brady. Allied
Profession Honor Award: Lighting
Design, Robert Laughlin,
Lighting Consultant, Craftsmanship
Award: Tuttle/White Contractor.
"Superb interior design is, in fact, the
architectural statement, supported by
ingenious lighting and fine craftsman-
Sship."

'' II










4

Mid Florida

Chapter

Awards
Architect
Jurors Lester Pancoast,
Ellis Bullock and
John Don Puckett
selected these
projects for Awards 5







Jim,


16 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976



















































3 &~glafZi


2
FLORIDA BRACE OFFICE,
WINTER PARK

Design Excellence Honor Award
ARCHITECT: Don Duer

"Simple angular construction re-
sponds to site and produces a sculp-
tural result of highest quality. Inte-
riors of offices and work areas are
rewarding."

3
WINDERMERE BRANCH OFFICE
OF WINTER PARK
FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN

Design Excellence Honor Award
ARCHITECTS: Lewis Associates, Inc.

"Quiet understatement reinforces
pedestrian scale and natural materials
and feeling of the small community it
serves."

4
WINTER PARK NATIONAL BANK

Design Excellence Merit Award
ARCHITECT: Don Duer

"Highly articulated, playful and color
rich interiors, good craftsmanship,
excellent site relationships."

5
MISER'S MALL
ORLANDO

Design Excellence Merit Award
for Graphic Design
ARCHITECTS: Helman, Hurley,
Charvat & Peacock. GRAPHICS
CONSULTANT: Jim Hanson

"Fresh, low budget visual capricious-
ness which should be encouraged to
swallow a larger part of our depressed
mediocre strip buildings."

6
RED BUG ROAD
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Seminole County

Design Excellence Merit Award
ARCHITECTS: Gutman-Dragash-Matz

"Splendid plan reflects in simple
massing and low budget materials."

7
CYPRESS WOODS CONDOMINIUMS
Orlando

Allied Profession Merit Award,
Landscape Architecture
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS: Wallis-
Baker Associates

"Compatible with existing and creat-
ed landscape of handsome spaces
between building spaces made exotic
by man-made reflection pools and
streams."
























173


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PLANNING DISTRICT
BRADENTON DOWNTOW\V 1)1
ZOLl ER-ABBOTT* FRlfDM AN th' il


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18/THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976


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Florida

Gulf Coast

Chapter

Awards


The projects were
chosen by Juror Architects
Nils Schweizer, FAIA, Gus Paras
and William Harvard









'. -
la6.t~


3


3 PROJECT AWARD
VACATION COTTAGE
ARCHITECT: Edward J. Siebert
"A one on one piece of Architec-
ture, set in a natural environment
and responsive to that environ-
ment, both in terms of the aware-
ness of the energy problems of
our country and the awareness of
the ecological and cultural history
of the area."


i-l


1T


1 PROJECT AWARD
PLANNING OF THE CENTRAL
BUSINESS DISTRICT OF THE
CITY OF BRADENTON
ARCHITECT: Zoller, Abbott
Architects/Planners
"This is one of the major issues of
our time and is important because
it is probably in these small towns
of Florida that the future of the
City as a congregating place in
Florida lives."

2 PROJECT AWARD
ENERGY DEMONSTRATION
PROJECT
ARCHITECTS: TheTwitchell
& Allen Group

"The large energy demonstration
project implies a future technol-
ogy as well as a demonstration of
life style in our culture for the
people who go there."
4 MERIT AWARD
PINE RUN
ARCHITECT: Frank Folsom
Smith & Partners

"Pine Run is an extremely com-
petent job of housing. It is ex-
tremely well detailed and well
executed."

5 MERIT AWARD
THE GREENHOUSE
RESTAURANT
ARCHITECTS:
Zoller, Abbott Architects/Planners
"There is in this building a diver-
sity of contrasts which are well
handled, plus exciting spaces. The
interior spaces have been closely
related to the outdoor environ-
ment so that the thing blends very
nicely."

6 MERIT AWARD
SIESTA KEY CHAPEL
ARCHITECT: Frank Folsom Smith
& Partners
"The Chapel reflects a very simple
structure for worship and com-
munity set in a natural setting
with obvious concern for both the
setting and the simplicity of the
worship service."
7 MERIT AWARD
FIRST CITY SAVINGS &
LOAN BUILDING
ARCHITECT:
West & Conyers
Architects-Engineers
"It is monumental in nature and a
technically competent design.
There is an extremely nice play of
masses against the perforated
forms of the trellis."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976 / 19


3






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CORAL GABLES FLORIDA 33134








"Beauty Can Be Made to Pay...

Coral Gables Ordinance It is now over fifty years since George
provides a means of preserving Merrick said those words, years that
the best of George Merrick's city have seen the city he planned and laid
out prosper. Today, the first historic
preservation ordinance in Dade County
has been enacted to assure that the
beauty he created will continue
to endure.
Enacted in October 1973 by the
Coral Gables City Commission, the
purpose of Ordinance 2050 is "to
promote the cultural, educational,
economic and general welfare of the
public through the preservation and
protection of the historic or
architecturally worthy buildings,
structures, sites, quaint neighborhoods
and artifacts which impart a distinct
aspect to the city of Coral Gables and
which serve as visible reminders of the
history and cultural heritage of the
*The title of this article is quoted history and cultural heritage of the
from an interview with George City, the state and the nation."
Merrick which appeared in the Jack- The Coral Gables of the 20's scarcely
sonville Times-Union on June 28, exists today except in the integrity of
1925. the plan drawn by surveyor W. C. Bliss
BEL : Te G a E e of for Merrick and in the early buildings
BELOW: The Granada Entrance off
of S.W. 8th Street, completed in and plazas remaining from that heyday.
1924. The site of the City was originally

~31~LI~S~~l~l~ll~~lJ~~l? pC'


pinecovered scrub land, quite isolated
from other local population centers.
Today's quiet streets lined with black
olive, oaks, ficus and other tropical flora
spring from a plan which was a
significant departure from the gridiron
pattern that characterized most city
development in 1921.
George E. Merrick, the founder of
Coral Gables, was a man of extraordinary
vision. Reasoning that his city lay in the
approximate latitudes of the
Mediterranean, he sent his team of
architects, landscape architects and
engineers to study structures in that
area in order to emulate them in
building his City. He provided sites for
churches and educational institutions.
He studied rapid transit of the time and
laid out a trolley route around the
perimeter of the city. He even offered
an airfield landing site to the Southern
Transport Company. Merrick planned
for shops, a crafts section for artisians
and established criteria for building
construction of such solidity that Coral
Gables structures withstood the
CONTINUED



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"BEAUTY CAN BE MADE TO PAY .
devastating 1926 hurricane better than
other parts of Dade County.

The Preservation Ordinance
Section 7 of the Ordinance establishes
the Historic Preservation Board of
Review which is "responsible for a
comprehensive and continuing survey
of buildings, structures, sites and quaint
neighborhoods of historical significance
in Coral Gables." It is a ten member
Board whose members must be residents
of the city during their terms and must
have lived in the city at least five years
prior to appointment. They serve at the
will of the City Commission.
General criteria for determination of
structures and sites having historical
significance follow those developed by
the National Trust for Historic
Preservation. Quoting from the
Ordinance: "Districts, sites, buildings,
structures and objects of national, state
and local importance are of historic
significance if they possess integrity of
location, design, setting, materials,
workmanship, feeling and association
and:
A. That are associated with events
that have made a significant contribution
to the broad patterns of our history, or
B. That are associated with the lives
of persons significant in history, or
C. That embody the distinctive
characteristics of a type, period, or
method of construction, or that
represents the work of a master, or that
possess high artistic values, or that
represent a significant and
distinguishable entity whose components
may lack individual distinction, or
D. That have yielded, or may be
likely to yield, information important
in prehistory or history."
The procedure of designation as
a historic landmark is as follows:
Nomination by a property owner or by
the Board for review by the Board;


provision for appeal if property owner
disagrees with the classification;
recommendation to the City
Commission; approval and recording of
a covenant to run with the land by the
City in the Public Records of Dade
County.
Once designated as a historic
landmark, no structure or site may
"may be demolished, moved or changed
in the exterior appearance by addition,
reconstruction, alteration or
maintenance, or removal of or
destruction of trees located on the site,
until an application for a Certificate of
Approval has been submitted to the
Historic Preservation Board of Review
and it has been approved by the Board
and the Zoning Administrator."

Projects of the Board
Mrs. Arva Parks is present Chairman
of a very hardworking and dedicated
Board. She spoke of two milestone
efforts in preserving Coral Gables' past.
The first is acquisition by the City of
the Merrick House located at 907 Coral
Way. Built at the turn of the century
by George Merrick's father, the home
will henceforth be known as "Coral
Gables House" and will be utilized by
the citizens of Coral Gables as a meeting
house for community boards and
organizations and as a hospitality center
for the city. It is the first "city house"
in the country. Fundraising and
restoration, involving other local
organizations such as the Junior League
and Garden Club, are now under way.
The second effort is presently in
process and represents action in advance
of pressures which all too often result
in destruction of landmarks. Coral
Way, the first street in the city and
its residential center, boasts some twenty
five residences over fifty years old,
including a number of coral rock
construction. An ordinance has been


passed by the City Commission and by
Dade County Commission designating
the portion of Coral Way from Lejeune
Road to Red Road as an Historic,
Canopied Roadway. Bills to this effect
are now before the state House and
Senate. Successful designation will
protect the street from widening which
would destroy its oak canopy and the
historical significance of five of the
city's original plazas.
Giving tremendous impetus to the
work of the Board has been help
provided by Professor Woodrow W.
Wilkins, special Advisor to the Board and
Professor of Architecture at the
University of Miami. Over a period of
several years the work of students in his
class on "Documentation of Historic
Architecture" has given the Board
documented drawings of many of
Coral Gables' important structures.
These include measured drawings of the
Merrick House, the Old Police and Fire
Station and most of the picturesque
plazas and entrances which were a vital
part of the city's original plan.
Denman Fink, an uncle of George
Merrick and one of the first architects of
the city, indicated that there was a
definite philosophy behind the planning
of the plazas and entrances. Their
purpose was to provide a sense of
elegance upon entering the city and to
impart a feeling of space and place at
the intersection of main streets.
In 1976 these buildings and plazas
continue to enhance life in Coral Gables
as well as provide a link to a past not
too distant in time but none-the-less
historic for South Florida. This
ordinance is a first for Dade County
and one of few in Florida. As awareness
of the intrinsic value in preserving our
past heritage increases, it is hoped that
more communities will enact such
ordinances.
JWT


22 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976































BID
"-^


SThe structures shown here represent
some of the heritage of George
S. ffMerrick. TOP: A student drawing of
S i the El Prado Entrance at the corner
Sof Red Road and S.W. 8th Street.
LEFT: The City Hall, completed in
1927. BELOW: DeSota Fountain
Plaza designed by Denman Fink in
1926 with the Biltmore Hotel, com-
pleted in 1926 in the background.
BOTTOM: Douglas Entrance at S. W.
TI 8th Street and Douglas Road, com-
S pleted in 1927.


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New Members
Feb, March, April, May & June









CORPORATE
Broward County Chapter
Jeremo A. Goebel
Daytona Beach Chapter
J. Bruno Basil
William Palmer
Florida Central Chapter
Jan Abell
Joseph G. Alcure
Charles Block
James R. Johannessen
Martin T. Lott
James D. Ruyle
Phillip Van Etten Scalera
J. Bruce Smith
Gerald L. Suetholz
Florida North Chapter
James Burnette
Joseph Garcia
Allen Isaac
Rolland A. McKellips
Roger A. Paluzzi
Florida Northwest Chapter
Gerald Brocato
Florida South Chapter
Aramis Alvarez
Yiannis Antoniades
Giorgio Balli
Daniel Capotorto
Emilio A. Cerra
Bernard Horovitz
Don Sackman
Richard S. Sciandra
William Sterling





AIA ASSOCIATES
Broward County Chapter
Frederic Nagler
Florida Central Chapter
Richard Moss
Florida North Chapter
Lourdes Soler Dupere
Paul D. Kelley
Florida South Chapter
Felipe J. Prestamo
Larry M. Schneider

ASSOCIATES FAAIA
Broward County Chapter
Constance Bigoney
Hibbard Casselberry, Jr.
Florida Central Chapter
Avikam Wygodski
Florida North Central Chapter
Melissa Nash
William M. Price
Mid-Florida Chapter
Raymond L. Scott


Letters










Editor:
I have received the March/April
issue of The Florida Architect and
want to thank the Florida Association
of the American Institute of
Architects for publishing the cover
photograph of our State Capitol and
the resolution supporting its
preservation.
This support and encouragement
from the Florida Association, an
organization of great integrity and
dedication, is very important.
As you know, a copy of the
resolution was formally presented to
the Governor and Cabinet recently by
your president, Nils Schweizer, and
in my opinion this expression has been
of great assistance.
Efforts to save our Capitol from
destruction, of course, will require
continuous vigilance and it is
encouraging to know we will have the
Florida Association's support. Again,
my gratitude and that of the citizens
of Florida.
Sincerely yours,
Bruce A. Smathers
Secretary of State


Florida South Chapter
Gentlemen:
On Wednesday, May 5th, 1976,
Mr. Michael Bier, Architect, was a
visitor to our school. He spoke to a
group of 48 aspiring young architects.
I am unable to be too complimentary
about him. Frankly, he is one of the
most enthusiastic young men we have
ever had the pleasure of having at our
school. Mr Bier has a very special gift:
the ability to communicate. And, on
every level. The kids have just been
raving about him.
Thank you for assisting us in
obtaining Mr. Bier. Certainly he is a
credit to your Institute and to the
profession he represents.
Appreciatively yours,
Maurice W. Boire
Occupational/Placement Specialist
Thomas Jefferson Junior High School


Editor:
As an addendum to the "Practice
Profile of Clements/Rumpel/Associates",
I feel it should be noted that all of
the projects shown with the exception
of the "renovation of the
Klutho-designed building" were the
products of "Freedman/Clements/
Rumpel".
I should like it to be known too,
that Freedman did not simply
disappear. I am continuing to practice
and find myself enjoying architecture
more by being involved in the total
design/construct process rather
than segments thereof.
Very truly yours,
Norman H. Freedman, AIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
encourages communications from
its readers. We invite you to
address all correspondence to:
Editor, THE FLORIDA
ARCHITECT, Suite 203, 7100
N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida
33156. It is assumed that
any letter, unless otherwise
stipulated, is free for publication
in this journal.


Advertisers


3
Alexander School, Inc.

26
Architectural Products &
Professional Services

2nd Cover
Cabot's Stains

3rd Cover
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.

4
Florida Natural Gas Association

20
Gables Offset, Inc.

6
George Doro Fixture Company

3
Omega Tile Distributors

25
PPG Industries


24 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976


































PPG Solarcool glass

gave an old department sto


a brand-new life.


Once Millers Department Store,
it is now the Biernbaum Building,
a valuable commercial-office rental
property.
And PPG Solarcool Bronze
reflective glass and matching span-
drels made the big difference.
They did more than just reno-
vate this building. They revitalized it.
PPG Solarcool reflective glass
gave the building a shimmering,
lively, contemporary look ordinary
glass could never match.
While it costs somewhat more
than tinted glass, Solarcool reflec-
tive glass causes such a dramatic
transformation, and can make a


building so easy to rent, that in the
long run its higher price can prove
a very profitable investment.
Plus, it's reflective. Which
means it reduces glare, heat gain,
and even some of your air-
conditioning costs. And since it can
be cut, tempered, and made into
insulating units locally, it's especially
convenient for remodeling and
renovation work.
With the skyrocketing cost of
new construction, renovation is
becoming a more and more attrac-
tive alternative. And renovating
with PPG Solarcool Bronze reflec-
tive glass may well be the most


r


attractive of all.
For complete details see your
local glass distributor, or write:
PPG Industries, Inc., Solarcool,
Dept. F-36, One Gateway Center,
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future
Project: The Biernbaum Building,
Knoxville, Tenn.
Owner/Contractor: Ralph Biernbaum Real
Estate, Stamford, Conn.
Architect: Weeks and Ambrose,
Knoxville, Tenn.



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26 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT MAY/JUNE 1976


.4 '


1. .4


Declaration of Dependence
CONTINUED
the selection of the design professional,
but does no more than establish the fact
that there is a prime professional and
that it is he who makes contact with the
client. The agreement also speaks to
the fact that the prime professional
should coordinate the work, but much
is left to the imagination on how design
professionals really work together.
Another commendable effort has
been made by NAELC (National
Architect-Engineer Liaison Commission),
which developed the "Guidelines for
Professional Collaboration of Architects
and Engineers at the Local Level."
In Canada, the Ontario Association
of Architects, the Association of
Professional Engineers of Ontario, and
the Ontario General Contractors
Association joined together to study
and publish a joint document on project
management services, which outlines
all of the services and attempts to
establish the fact that good professional
services are necessary in the field of
overall project management.
There also are many examples of
architects, engineers, and builders
getting together in various states to
establish certain specific guidelines for
contracting. Pennsylvania, Minnesota,
and other areas have examples of active
groups working together for the
betterment of relations at the local and
state levels.

United Professions
for Better Architecture

The time is right for the professions to
work together to eliminate duplication
of effort and wasted money, while
producing a better building for the
client. The building industry is ready
for a "Declaration of Dependence,"
which would establish a strong demand
for an interdisciplinary professional
body to set forth the primary
characteristics of collaboration. The
alternative is that the large government
agency, the large corporate body, or the
large integrated A-E firm will
accomplish such unification, with the
professional societies looking on from
the sidelines.
Interprofessional collaboration must
be accomplished if we are to retain the
professional characteristics of individual
professionals working together with no
influences other than that of dedication
to serve the client. *








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Logo design by Peter Rumpel, AIA








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* *
200 PLUS From
1976 into Tomor-
row ... Architects
Jack McGinty, Wal-
ter Netsch, John
J ohansen, Herbert
Wheeler and others
examine where the
profession is headed
as the nation enters
its third century.
The 62nd Annual
Convention and
Products Exhibits,
October 7-10, 1976
at the Sarasota
Hyatt House.




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