• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Letters
 61st convention coverage
 New FFAIA officers
 Awards and more awards
 Convention camera
 Gold to Smith
 Dunan gets president's award
 Board of directors policy...
 Forces shaping architectural...
 Advertisers
 Energy and architecture in Florida,...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00222
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: November-December 1975
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00222
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Letters
        Page 4
    61st convention coverage
        Page 5
        Page 6
    New FFAIA officers
        Page 7
    Awards and more awards
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Convention camera
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Gold to Smith
        Page 16
    Dunan gets president's award
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Board of directors policy statement
        Page 19
    Forces shaping architectural practice
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Advertisers
        Page 23
    Energy and architecture in Florida, part II
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.








Jill II I









4ki

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The Florida Architect "A

Volume 25 Number 6 November/December 1975


1976 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
Howard B. Bochiardy
William W. Brainard
Glenn A. Buff
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Ishmael A. Byus
John W. Dyal
Bill G. Eppes
Norman M. Giller
Robert G. Graf
Raymond W. Graham
Carl 0. Gutmann, Jr.
John Hobart
Jerome A. James
Charles E. King, FAIA
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Emily Obst
Mark H. Ramaeker
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Michael Ritter
Ed Saar
Newton L. Sayers
Ludwig Spiessl
Frank A. Vellake
Francis R. Walton, FAIA


FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1976
Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, President
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
1823 North Miami Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-5445
Carl Gerken, AIA, Secretary
P.O. Box 1431
Daytona Beach, Florida 32015
(904) 255-5471
James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
5020 Cypress Street, Suite 211,
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 872-8407


DIRECTORS OF FLORIDA REGION

Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414

Frank R. Mudano, AIA
1189 N.E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 331515
(813) 446-1041

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947

GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
Carl Pruitt/Editor
Richard Schuster/Illustrator
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


4
LETTERS

5
CONVENTION COVERAGE

7
NEW FFAIA OFFICERS

7
EXHIBIT AWARD WINNERS

8,9
AWARDS and MORE AWARDS

10
CONVENTION CAMERA

16
GOLD TO SMITH

17
DUNAN GETS PRESIDENT'S
AWARD

19
POLICY STATEMENT

20
FORCES SHAPING
ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE

23
ADVERTISERS

24
ENERGY and ARCHITECTURE
Part II


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and published by the
Association, a Florida Corporation not for profit. It is published bi-monthly at
the Executive Office of the Association, 7100 N. Kendall Drive, Miami,
Florida 33156. Telephone (305) 661-8947. Opinions expressed by contributors
are not necessarily those of the Editor of the Florida Association of the AIA.
Editorial material may be reprinted provided full credit is given to the author and
to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and copy is sent to publisher's office. Single
Copies, 75 cents, subscription, $6.50 per year. Controlled Circulation Postage
Paid, Miami, Florida


November/December 1975


FA/3













Letters


Dear Editor:
I was touched by the sympathy expressed
in the beautiful spray of flowers sent by Dan's
professional colleagues. As the opportunity
arises, please convey the gratitude of the Hart
family to members of the Executive Board of
the Florida Association of Architects.
Most sincerely,

Marjorie Hart
(Mrs. R. Daniel Hart)


Dear Editor:
Thank you again for your affording me
the opportunity to be a participant in the
1975 Florida AIA Convention. You should be
pleased and derive a great deal of personal
satisfaction from putting together not only an
outstanding convention, but a viable AIA
organization.
I deeply appreciate the courtesy extended
to me and hope, if you are ever in Chicago, I
might have an opportunity to return your
hospitality.
Sincerely,

Thomas J. Eyerman
Partner Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Chicago, Ill.


Dear Editor:
I would like to express my appreciation
for the Presidents Award that you gave me at
your recent convention.
It is doubly gratifying to receive an award
for working at a job that I have enjoyed for
many years. One of the primary reasons for
this is the great people in your profession that
I have met and worked with.
Jane joins me in thanking the association
for the hospitality shown us at the Orlando
Hyatt House.
One more note I would like to
commend Fotis Karousatos for his part in the
convention and especially the banquet.
Yours very truly,

Otis Dunan
President
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc.
Miami, Fla.


Dear Editor:
Some fine examples of good architecture
were recognized in the October 1975 issue of
The Florida Architect, but why reward
another windowless schoolhouse?


The Francis Bellamy School in Tampa
appears to be another example of misinform-
ed educators and simplistic architecture
combining to harass the students.
Nils Schweizer's article on energy conser-
vation places the burden on architects who
have been designing with total disregard for
the environment.
Why do we reward a windowless school-
house? This is a prime example of the
backwardness we architects have achieved.
The energy and economic crisis will
remain for the next decade. Awaken Archi-
tects! Remember well what our past masters
have taught us. Stand up and be counted.
Keep up the good quality of this
publication.
Very truly yours,

F. Louis Wolff
F. Louis Wolff Associates
Ft. Lauderdale


Dear Editor:
I want to thank the FAAIA Board of
Directors, the Awards Committee, the FAAIA
membership, and you for a kind reception
and very pleasurable evening on October 4th.
The Award of Merit which I received is deeply
appreciated because the highest goals of the
architect's profession have become important
to me. I am happy to have been able, in a very
limited way, to participate in these goals.
Sincerely,

Sam Gowan
Assistant Director
For Special Resources
University of Florida
Gainesville


Dear Editor:
I don't know when I have more enjoyed a
working assignment! Your attention to our
needs and comforts, the hospitality of all
your colleagues, and the calibre of the
program people you put together for me to
work with made my role a treat.
Thank you for inviting us to take part.
I recall you saying you have a list of the
names and addresses of the members who
attended. A lot of people asked me for some
followup material and if there is such a list it
would be helpful.
Most cordially,

Weld Coxe
Coxe Associated, Inc.
Philadelphia, Pa.


Dear Editor:
I want to personally commend you, your
staff and the Florida Association of the A.I.A.
for a "Super Convention"! It was undoubt-
edly the best I've ever attended. I'm very
happy to see the strong direction established

Continued on FA/17


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
encourages communications from
its readers. We invite you to
address all correspondence to:
Editor, THE FLORIDA
ARCHITECT, Suite 203, 7100
N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida
33156. It is assumed that
any letter, unless otherwise
stipulated, is free for publication
in this journal.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/4












61st


CONVENTION

COVERAGE



Architects from all over the state
gathered for the 61st Annual
Convention and Building
Products Exhibit sponsored by
the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects.
The Convention, held October
2 5, was attended by more
than 500 one of the largest
turnouts in recent years.
Its theme ... IMPACT... was
the topic of William W. Caudill,
FAIA. Caudill was the initial
speaker and he spoke of the
7 IMPACTS: Forces Shaping
Architectural Practice. (The
Florida Architect feels his words
are worth repeating and have
reprinted his speech beginning on
FA 20.)


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New FAAIA Officers were
voted in by acclamation. Awards
were presented. Speakers were
heard. Exhibits were viewed
and discussed. Those who
attended lead and learned and
laughed. They made this
convention a most successful
one.
The convention camera and
note pad were there, too. The
pictures and words in this issue
tell the story about IMPACT -
the 61st Annual Convention
and Building Products Exhibits.


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FA/5


November/December 1975


i__


. 1-6












































3.






























1. A scene at the Registration Desk. Left to right, are, Weld
Coxe, one of the Convention speakers, Fotis Karousatos,
Hon. AIA, Executive Director of FAAIA, Mrs. Georgia
Coxe, and, Jerry James, AIA, Convention Chairman.


2. President James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, cuts the ribbon
officially opening the Building Products Exhibit.


3. Left to right, Robert Grof, AIA, James Austis, AIA,
and Robert Gunderson, AIA, pictured at the Delegate
2. Accreditation Desk registering John McCormick, Jr., AIA.



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/6






































1976 FAAIA Officers
New FAAIA Officers and Executive Committee were elected for the
coming year. Pictured, left to right, are: Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA,
Vice President/President Elect; Carl Gerken, AIA, Secretary; James
A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer; Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, President;
Frank R. Mudano, AIA, Regional Director; Herbert R. Savage, AIA,
Regional Director; J. Michael Huey, General Counsel, and Fotis
Karousatos, Hon. AIA, Executive Director.


November/December 1975


THOMAS C. RUFF and JIFFY BLUEPRINT WIN

TOP AWARDS at 61st 'BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT'

FAAIA members and guests had
the opportunity to view the latest in
new products at the Building
Products Exhibits facet of the
61st Annual Convention.
There were standouts, but the
Association selected two exhibits
to honor.
Thomas C. Ruff and Comoany of
Maitland and Jiffy Blueprint of
Clearwater were chosen as the
winning exhibitors.
The 1975 Exhibit Award for
Display Excellence was garnered by
Thomas C. Ruff, and Jiffy Blueprint
took the 1975 Exhibit Award for
Educational Value of Display.
Educational Value of Display. Jiffy Blueprint's John Hannigan
takes the award for his company.


FA/7






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BOCHIARDY RECEIVES ANTHONY L. PULLARA
ANTHONY L. PULLARA AWARD TO FLORIDA
MEMORIAL AWARD CENTRAL CHAPTER


The framers of the Anthony L.
Pullara Memorial Award felt they
would like to recognize and individual
who best carried on the tradition of
service exemplified by Tony.
Howard B. Bochiardy, AIA, is the
recipient of the 1975 Anthony L.
Pullara Award as the Outstanding
Individual for Service to the
Association.
Bochiardy has been active in
Florida Education as the AIA
Representative of the Dean Search
Committee and Curriculum
Committee for the development of a
new College of Architecture at
Florida A & M University. He was
instrumental in helping organize a
group to develop courses of study for
Architectural Para-Professionals.
He is President of the University
of Florida Architectural Guild,
Commissioner of Education and
Research for the FAAIA and State
Director for the Mid Florida Chapter
AIA.


The Florida Central Chapter is this
year's winner of the
Anthony L. Pullara Memorial Award.
Robert Levision, Chapter President,
accepted the award.
The Award was established in
1965 to honor the life of a dedicated
man, Anthony L. Pullara. He gave
full time to the profession of
architecture and was an active
Regional Director of the
American Institute of Architects
representing Florida. While he was
the State Legislative Chairman, he
carried on an exhaustive schedule
working on legislative programs.
Framers of the Memorial Awards
said, "It is hoped that these awards
will perpetuate Tony's memory and
those things for which he stood for
in our profession."
It seems fitting that the Chapter
to which he was so closely tied
would carry on his memory.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/8


AWARDS... AWARDS... AWARDS ... AWARDS ... AWARDS...








































ARCHITECT COMMUNITY AWARD OF MERIT TO
SERVICE AWARD WON TELEVISION NEWSMAN
BY BILL EPPES MARSHALL CLEAVER


ASSOCIATION
AWARD OF MERIT TO
SAM GOWAN


The recipient of the 1975 Architect
Community Service Award is
Bill G. Eppes, AIA.
The Award is presented to the
architect whose active leadership in
community activities and service has
been a direct benefit to the
community in which he lives.
Eppes has been active with the
Alachua County Charrette. The
purpose of the Charette is to
educate the public and gain awareness
of critical concern in Alachua County.
He is presently President and
director of activities and presides
at all steering committee meetings,
giving direction to the total organized
effort. On several occasions he has
appeared on television and radio to
inform and describe the Charette
activities.
Eppes practices Architecture in
Gainesville and also teaches in the
Department of Building Construction
at the University of Florida. He has
served as Vice President and
President of the Florida North
Chapter of the AIA.


Marshall S. Cleaver, WLCY-TV
Director of News and Public Affairs,
won an Award of Merit.
Cleaver has been instrumental in
communicating architectural
accomplishments of the Central
Florida area for many years. He has
produced television programs
promoting outstanding architecture.
He has assisted the Florida
Central Chapter as well as the
Florida Association with design
awards just as he did at the recent
FAAIA Convention.


Sam Gowan, assistant Director of
Special Resources for the University
of Florida Libraries, was presented
an Award of Merit for his leadership
in preservation of the architectural
heritage.
Gowan's interest in architectural
preservation is well-known in the
Gainesville area. Through enthusiasm,
knowledge and skill, he accomplished
work which other experienced
preservationists had considered
impossible.
He sponsored throughout Alachua
County an inventory of buildings
over 50 years old. He was
instrumental in the conception,
organization and realization of
Historic Gainesville, Inc., a
non-profit corporation dedicated to
architectural and urban preservation.


November/December 1975


FA/9




























































1. FAAIA Board of Directors meeting.
2. Convention scene at the Building Materials' In-
ternational booth.
3. H. Leslie Walker, FAIA, left, receives a gift of
appreciation for his 3 years service as Regional
Director from Florida to the AIA National
Board of Directors.
4. Architects and their ladies trip the light fan-
tastic.
5. AIA Leadership Workshop for new Chapter
Officers.
6. James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer, explains the
1976 budget and the proposed new dues struc-
ture.
7. President James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, makes
his farewell address...
8. ... and, accepts his gift as out-going President.
(What is Jim telling his new Egret? )






8.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


7. -"


FA/10



















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Gas Supply...




...were going to have enough!

An analysis of natural gas availability in Florida today, presented by the Florida Natural Gas Association.


What are the facts behind the supply of
natural gas?
Natural gas consumption has exceeded new
discoveries for a number of years. However, if natural
gas is deregulated, the industry feels we should see an
increase in drilling and exploration when wellhead
prices are permitted to seek a level at which gas can
again be developed and produced at maximum
efficient rates.
Can residential and commercial customers be
sure they will not have their gas cut due to lack
of supply?
Yes. We do not anticipate any difficulties in
continuing to serve these customers. Our market
mix and temperate climate means residential and
commercial customers will not have service
interruptions as may be the case in other parts of the
nation. The industry expects increased drilling and
further exploration will insure that these customers
will continue to receive sufficient quantities of
natural gas for their present and foreseeable needs. As
a backup measure, in the event of further natural gas
supply depletions, we could augment distribution by
supplying synthetic gas as was done prior to the
introduction of the natural gas pipeline in 1959.
Who will be affected most by any potential
shortage?
Primarily, Florida's industrial customers. They will


continue to receive less natural gas if the shortage
condition continues. However, industrial customers
are on interruptible natural gas service and have
stand-by sources for fuel in the event of a curtailment
of supply.
What is the natural gas industry doing to
prevent current shortages and meet future
demands in Florida?
We are joining in the national effort to support
deregulation of prices and are engaging in an
increased oil and gas exploration program in the
vicinity of our pipeline sources. We are also
encouraging the conservation of gas by homeowners
and other consumers.

Can you as an architect, contractor, or engineer
specify natural gas for commercial and
residential projects with confidence?
Yes. The natural gas industry is over 150 years old,
and has a superior record of dependability. It is still
today's best energy buy. For example, the use of
electric power for heat requires the expenditure of
over 2.5 times more natural fuel than would be used
in direct- fired heat- producing equipment such as gas
furnaces, water heaters, ranges and clothes dryers.
It all boils down to this... you can rely on gas people
throughout the state to continue serving you with
safe, economical, dependable gas. We don't intend to
let the pilot lights go out in Florida.


4-~--- ---




The Florida Natural Gas Association
David M. Lapham, President, P.O. Box 610907 North Miami, Florida 33161











Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., FAIA,
received the 1975 prestigious
Gold Medal Award during
award festivities at the 61st
Annual Convention.
The Gold Medal is the highest
award the Association can give
and is presented to an
individual architect who has
performed most distinguished
leadership and service to the
Association over an extended
length of time.
Smith has served his
profession with the Palm Beach
Chapter, the Florida Association
of the AIA, for many years.
He is a valued leader with his
local chapter and held the
Presidency in 1962.
For three years, 1963-1965,
he served on the Board of








Directors of the Florida
Association. In 1966 he was
elected Vice President/President
Elect and in 1967 assumed the
office of President of the
Association.
During 1968-69, when he did
not have an official position
with the Association, Smith
continued to work for his
profession and served on
National AIA Committees.
In 1970 he assumed the
position, to which he was
elected in 1969, of Florida
Regional Director representing
the profession on the Board
of Directors of the American
Institute of Architects. He
served in this position until
1973. But in May of that year,
at the National AIA Convention
in San Francisco, Smith was
elected Secretary of the AIA.
He was re-elected to that
position in 1974 and still serves.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/16
















Letters
Continued from FA/4

by this convention toward strong learning
sessions and not just social and Association
business sessions.
I also want to thank you and the
Association for the Honorable Mention
Design Award we received for our Bellamy
Elementary School. I won't argue with the
jury's comments at this time, but I do think
they probably missed some of the most
significant points of the Bellamy design.
1. The school was designed, built and
occupied in a total of fourteen months, a
process which had never previously been
accomplished in less than two year's time.
2. It was constructed for $19.50 per sq. ft.
and $300,000 under the School Board's
budget. This was accomplished by our
office using a phased bidding, fast-track,
construction management approach which
required us to administer twelve separate
contracts.
3. We also had the responsibility and control
of all interior design and furnishings-a
first in this County and perhaps in the
State.
-4. We performed these services under a very
unique fee arrangement with the School
Board wherein we received a basic
percentage fee of the final construction
cost plus another higher percentage fee of
all dollar savings under their budget.
5. The school's namesake is the author of the
Pledge of Allegiance (not the Star
Spangled Banner as reported by the
Florida Architect), who, incidentally,
spent the final 20 years of his life in
Tampa, Florida.
I really feel that of all those honored this
project was probably the most germane to
this convention's theme and I was probably
negligent for not bringing that to the
convention's attention at the time of receiving
the award, but I felt it might not have been
appropriate.

Thank you again for a great convention.
Sincerely,

H. Dean Rowe, A.I.A.
Rowe Holmes Associates, Inc.
Tampa


Dear Editor:
We were impressed with the article
"Inmates Learn Drafting" in the Septem-
ber-October issue of the Florida Architect.
I was wondering if your company could
possibly donate four copies of the Septem-
ber-October issue of the Florida Architect
so that I could give one copy to our Draft-
ing instructor, two copies to the student
and still have a copy to keep in my office.
Thank you for your consideration in


this matter.
Sincerely yours,

Walter D. Ramos
Vocational Coordinator
State of Florida
Division of Corrections
Raiford, Florida



(John E. Stefany, A.I.A., will continue to
serve as a member of the State of Florida's
Department of Education Advisory
Council on Environmental Education.
The Florida Architect is pleased to
reprint the following exchange of letters
from Commissioner Ralph D. Turlington
and Stefany.)


Mr. John E. Stefany
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
102 Whiting Street
Tampa, Florida 33602

Dear Mr. Stefany:
In order to ensure participation by re-
lated private organizations, other state
agencies, and interested lay persons in the
planning and implementation of the re-
cently established office of environmental
education in the Department of Educa-
tion, an advisory council has been appoint-
ed to review progress and to make recom-
mendations to my office and staff for
future activities in this area.
Your high degree of interest, broad
background of training, and experience
qualify you exceptionally well for ap-
pointment to this council. Consequently, I
am pleased to invite you to become a
member.
It is anticipated that meetings will be
called at intervals that will not constitute
an undue imposition on your time. Mr. C.
Richard Tillis, Director, Office of Environ-
mental Education, will work directly with
the group.
I shall appreciate your accepting this
assignment and an early letter from you
indicating your willingness to serve.
Sincerely,

Ralph D. Turlington
Commissioner
Department of Education
State of Florida


The Honorable Ralph D. Turlington
Commissioner
State of Florida
Department of Education
Tallahassee, Florida 32304

Dear Commissioner Turlington:
In response to your recent letter re-


questing that I continue to be a member
of the State of Florida's Department of
Education Advisory Council on Environ-
mental Education, I am pleased to accept
this invitation to remain a member.
Those of us who have served on the
committee as well as great many people
both within and beyond the State of
Florida who know of the accomplishments
that this program has achieved are en-
thusiastic supporters of the program. I am
a member of the National Committee on
Environmental Education of the American
Institute of Architects and currently chair
its task force on legislature which is using
Florida's experiences as an example from
which to draft model legislature. It is sa-
tisfying to know that the rest of our coun-
try can look to Florida as a leader in this
field.
Sincerely,

John E. Stefany
Architect, A.I.A.







PRESIDENT'S AWARD
TO DUNAN BRICK'S
OTIS E. DUNAN


Otis E. Dunan, President of Dunan
Brick, is the winner of the 1975
President's Award.
Dunan received the award during
the Awards Banquet at the FAAIA's
61st Annual Convention &
Building Products Exhibits in
Orlando. This award is presented to
an individual who is considered
to have given continuous support to
the profession of architecture
in Florida.
Dunan has been a brick and
building products supplier in South
Florida since 1935. He has been
an active member of the South
Florida Chapter of the Producers
Council, has served as President of
the Greater Miami Manufacturer's
Association and is past Chairman
of the Greater Miami Industrial
Exposition.
A regular at the meetings of the
Florida Chapter of the AIA, he
has given support and helped support
fine architecture in South Florida.
Dunan Brick has been a consistent
advertiser in the Association's
Official Journal, The Florida
Architect, since its inception 21 years
ago.


FA/17


November/December 1975










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Board of Directors


Policy Statement


The following is a Policy
Statement which has
been prepared by the Board of
Directors of the Florida
Association of the American
Institute of Architects regarding
the proposed State Building
Code to be effective by January
1, 1977, as set forth in House Bill
No. 3231 of the legislature of the
State of Florida.
As Architects, we are pleased to
see legislation being undertaken to
unify the standards for
construction throughout the State.
We are hopeful that with these
uniform standards the State will
also take the opportunity to
establish uniform interpretation
of those standards and to enact
uniform qualifications of the
officials charged with their
enforcement. Only in this
manner will the construction
industry be truly aided by the
legislation; and the best interest
of the residents of the State of
Florida be uniformly and
efficiently served.
We, the members of the Board
of Directors of the Florida
Association of the American
Institute of Architects, wish to
express our opinion regarding the
character and quality of the
proposed State Building Code, in
hopes that our comments might
offer some guidance and assistance
in the deliberations that you are
about to undertake.
1. As Architects, we are concerned
about a code which would not


provide for innovative design
by assuming the responsibility
for design that should rightly
be left to the licensed
professionals.
2. As innovators, we seek a new
code which will readily permit
changes in technology to be
incorporated into acceptance.
3. As parties responsible to
budgetary limits, we are
concerned about codes which
are unnecessarily restrictive and
proprietary in nature. Such a
code favors special interest
groups, eliminates competition,
and increases cost.
4. As practitioners who provide
services throughout the
southeast United States, we
hope the code will be structured
in a manner that typifies the
major established life safety
standards presently recognized
on a regional-wide basis.
5. As professionals constantly
trying to keep abreast of code
changes, we hope the new code
will not require a tremendous
transitional period resulting
from the reeducation of both
the design professionals and the
enforcers of the new code.

6. Finally, as tax payers we are
concerned about the creation
of a new State Department
to administer and maintain such
a code, whose staffing demands
would further tax the State
budget while providing services
which may be readily available
through private enterprise at
little or no cost to the tax payer.
Mindful of these objectives, we
further recognize:


1. The Southern Building Code
Congress and its family of
building codes including the
Standard Building Code are
performance codes which
specify minimum requirements
for fire and life safety and
delegate the design
responsibility to the design
professional.
2. The Standard Building Code
is presently used in over 2,000
jurisdictions in 21 southeast
states; including the greater
majority of Florida communities.
3. The Southern Building Code
Congress is continuously
endeavoring to unify their
requirements with other
nationally recognized life safety
codes toward a uniform standard
across the nation.
4. The Southern Building Code
Congress regularly reviews and
adopts changes in materials and
construction systems in a
continuing effort to be current
with new building trends as
they are developed.
5. The Standard Building Code
can and is frequently amended
on local levels to adjust to
specialized community concerns.
6. The Standard Building Code is
easy to use, familiar to most
professionals in the State, and
established in the majority of
its interpretations.
7. The Standard Building Code can
be adopted by the State of
Florida at no charge; and
published at competitive cost
through private enterprise.
We, the members of the Board

Continued on FA/26


November/December 1975


FA/19















7 IMPACTS:


Forces Shaping



Architectural Practice


William W. Caudill, FAIA
Chairman of the Board
Caudill Rowlett Scott, Inc.

Speech presented to the
61st Annual FAAIA Convention


IMPACT? At this 61st
annual convention, "impact
,,impact" implies an
impelling or compelling
effect on our society,
society meaning the
Florida Association of AIA.
But that's too pluralistic.
Your concern (and mine)
is not so much with
what's going to happen to
society. It is:
WHAT IS GOING TO
HAPPEN TO YOU (AND
ME)?
Damned if I know. That
lost my credibility.
Five years ago I never
could have guessed how
I'd be practicing today. Or
rather, how my partners
would be practicing -
so that I could attend
meetings like this and, in
my magnificent ignorance,
tell people like you what
you will be doing five
years from now.
But I'm no fool. I'm not
up here soloing. With me
are the notions and words
of people smarter than I.
I did my homework. I got


William W. Caudill, FAIA,


help. I've asked respected
thinkers to identify
certain impacts which will
shape the five-year future
of architectural practice.
These impacts fall under
seven headings:
(1) GOVERNMENT.
(2) RECYCLING,
(3) CONSUMERISM,
(4) ACCOUNTABILITY,
(5) PROFESSION,
(6) PROCESS and
(7) PRODUCT.
Here goes. But first let me
warn you what I'll tell
you will sound negative.
Change generally does. But
if we as architects conduct
our affairs with wisdom
and enthusiasm, we will
not be left naked and
destitute by the winds of
change, as the old cliche
goes.

IMPACT NO. 1 -
GOVERNMENT
GET SET FOR MORE G.I.
(government-issued)
DIRECTIVES.
Years ago when our firm
made the jump from Texas
to New York, I was
shocked at the amount of
governmental interference
during the design process.
"These Northeasterners
are over-civilized," I said,
"too many codes, too
many agencies, too many
town meetings, too many
groups from which to
get approvals." I see this
same complexity of
process heading south
- and fast. Local and
state governments want
part of the action in the
design process. They'll get
it.
The U.S. government is
already asking more
services from practitioners


by demanding life-cycle
costing which may prove
that the more expensive
quality item may cost less
in the long run. Makes
sense. But makes more
work during design, too.
Dr. James R. Wright,
National Bureau of
Standards, says that the
government is especially
concerned with life safety.
He writes, "Life safety,
particularly that aspect
attributed to fires, will
impact building
design. Worth noting is the
Federal Fire Prevention
and Control Act that was
signed into law in October
1974."

Jeff Corbin, who heads
CRS' Interiors/Graphics
Croup, also emphasizes life
safety when he refers to
new tough governmental
guidelines addressing
flammability. "These," he
said, "will naturally affect
the nature and cost of
materials and furnishings
used in interiors of
buildings."
You'll begin to think that
regulatory agencies know
only how to add. Damn
few know how to subtract.
I don't see a tapering off
of the government telling
us what to do. I can only
see more government
involvement. That will be
an impact.

IMPACT NO. 2 -
RECYCLING
RECYCLING WILL
BECOME A STRONG
IMPACT.
Bob Blaich, who heads
Design for Herman Miller
Inc., commented this way,
"Recycling is with us


FA/20


and it demands a different
attitude and variable skills
not inherently at play in
many architectural firms.
Were I starting in business
today, I would concentrate
on this problem." So we
better learn the art of
rejuvenating buildings.
We have an attitudinal
change ahead of us. That's
the toughest kind.
When I contacted my
sources, I said make your
statement short. Steve
Kliment, architect/editorial
consultant in New York,
wins the prize for brevity.
He responded with three
words, "Conserve our
neighborhoods." Knowing
Steve, I can assure you
there is a hell of a lot
of intellectual content
behind this classic example
of verbal economy.
Recycling the
neighborhood may mean
saving this very nation.
Kliment's comment goes
beyond Architecture.
Max De Pree, Chairman of
the Board of Herman Miller
said this, "Wouldn't it be
great if new buildings could
be designed in such a way
that they offered the
users that liberated feeling
one has in using a grand
old building." Bullseye!
When old buildings are
successfully recycled, they
generally make new
buildings feel sterile. New
buildings, therefore, will
have a new yardstick for
measuring quality based on
the same quality of
fine old buildings.
Dr. Harold B. Gores,
President of Educational
Facilities Laboratory, Inc.,
New York, gave this
picturesque statement,



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT














"Except for housing, we are
overbuilt. As the
population in our big cities
continues to thin out,
leaving empty buildings on
the beach as the tide goes
out, many more architects
will have to develop
expertise in designing and
specifying the interiors
of existing shells."
Corbin backs this up with
this statement, "Because of
the increasing costs of
new construction, the
renovation of existing
structures will become
more and more viable both
economically and
politically."
Gores, however, in his
inimitable way, addresses
this message to architects:
"Be of good cheer the
world is wearing out.
Whatever the hazards of the
next few years, be of good
cheer, because at the rate
we are currently
undermaintaining our
properties, America will
have to be built again in a
few years." See, I told
you it was not going to be
all negative.

IMPACT NO. 3
CONSUMERISM
ARCHITECTS WILL BE
AFFECTED BY THE RISE
OF CONSUMERISM.

Max De Pree says, "More
and more people are
insisting on their right
of involvement in the
building process, partly
because they get better
value working for
themselves, and partly
because they have a strong
need for a personal
involvement in their own
environment." The users
are not sitting back
anymore, letting the
professionals tell them
what to do, then quietly
paying the bill for the
mysterious services
rendered.
You already know what is
happening to Law. The
legal profession, under
consumer pressure, is
searching for ways to bring
its services within the
financial and



November/December 1975


comprehensive reach of
everyone. It's succeeding,
too. All professions are
affected. The guy on the
street is beginning to have
a say. Standard fees are
being questioned, even
outlawed. Horrors! They
are monkeying with our
code of ethics. Dr. Gores
states, "The tighter money
gets, the greater will be
the pressure on all the
professions (including
architecture) employing
standard fee schedules.
Both Federal Government
and consumer groups are
targeting on licensed
professionals whose fees
may be set by profession
rules and agreements, or
by State law. Doctors,
lawyers, pharmacists,
dentists and even funeral
directors are already
caught in the net."
Architects next? It's a
good bet. And when this
happens, our current
code of ethics will be
obsolete, A lot of us have
already experienced the
shock of change from the
impact of consumerism.

IMPACT NO. 4 -
ACCOUNTABILITY
ARCHITECTS WILL
HAVE TO BE MORE
ACCOUNTABLE

Today clients tend to
think architects are rather
lax with their (the clients')
money. There will be a
day of reckoning. My
partner, Tom Bullock, who
serves on the AIA Board,
spells it out in no uncertain
terms, "We must be
accountable not only
for good design but
for cost estimates that are
right, and for scheduling
that is real." He adds this
corker, "Architects might
have to become the builder
to assure these things."
Bullock continues,
"Within five years the real
'master builder' will
emerge. It could be
architects." He adds,
"Design solutions will
require more services, more
creative processes, and
more total delivery
commitment than today's
traditional process." If


architects don't respond,
someone else will. We can't
hide anymore from
responsibilities.
Dr. Gores beautifully sums
up the case for more
accountability this way:
"A companion impact to
rising consumerism will be
increased demand for
accountability. This has
already happened in
education, and will
intensify in architecture,
but probably not to the
intensity in ancient Rome
where an architect,
having designed an arch,
was expected to stand
under the keystone as it
was being inserted into
place. If the arch failed,
the architect was the first
to know. This, presumably,
was known as instant
accountability."

When Gores says it, it's
said. So much for the
impact of accountability.

IMPACT NO. 5 -
PROFESSION
THE PROFESSION WILL
CHANGE AND FAST.
FAST?

The world is moving too
fast to see beyond five
years. We used to think of
long-range plans as 20-year
plans. Now a long-range
plan is a five-year plan.
Things have changed
drastically during the past
five years, but it seems to
me the profession hasn't
kept up. A few individuals,
yes. A few firms, yes. But
as a whole, the architectural
profession hangs tough
to a limited-scope,
no-risk, all important
notion of what an architect
is. The public won't
continue to buy this
over-inflated self-portrait
of the architect. Or his
services. People are damn
tired and disgusted with
the building industry. They
attribute to architects
much of the indecisiveness,
time-consuming complexity,
and expensive manner of
getting a building up.
As already stated, the
public is demanding
accountability. Many


owners think they can get
it not through the usual
architectural services, but
through construction
management, fast tracking,
even through total services
relating to design,
construction and financing.
The buying public doesn't
give a tinker's damn about
the prerogatives, the
safeguards or the limits of
architectural services or
about ethics. It just wants
to get the job done
efficiently and
economically no matter
who does it or how.

Bullock states, "The
AIA has got to decide
whether it is going to be
only a society for
architects, who design
buildings, or whether it is
going to open its
membership to specialists
like construction
management people,
behavior space planners,
town planners and
building-type engineers.
And once we open up
to them," he asks, "can
the AIA keep these
specialists within the
membership if we
continue to legislate
their behavior based on
our present ethics."
I don't know where I first
heard this. It might have
been Frank Lloyd Wright,
but I completely agree with
the person who said, "We
should change the name of
the AIA to 'the American
Institute of Architecture.'"
Architecture is a lot
more important than
architects. We have a moral
obligation to give
architecture to the
majority. In sum, we are in
the Pushed Profession. We
better respond.

IMPACT NO. 6 -
PROCESS
PRESSURES WILL
INCREASE FOR NEW
PROCESS IN PRACTICE.

Dave Bullen, working with
John Eberhard and the
AIA Research Corporation
last year, trying to get on

CONTINUED


FA/21













William W. Caudill, FAIA
top of changes, says, "Tell
them that the next five
years will see significant
changes in the architectural
profession in three major
areas: attitude, process
and product. The right
attitude will be acceptance
of the energy acknowledged
as major parts of design
solutions." Regarding
process, "life-cycle costing
will become standard
procedure," according to


Bullen, and "the use of the
computer will increase for
both energy analysis and
life-cycle costing."
Regarding product, "Count
on it," he says, "form
will change."

Architect Charles
Thomsen, President of
CM Associates, a
construction management
firm, succinctly states,
"Despite the impotent


philosophizing of the
zealots for building
systems and the antizealots
against building systems,
each year sees more
construction done in
factories and less custom
field construction." The
use of industrialized
building systems is not a
passing fancy.

Jonathan King, who
helped pioneer modern-day


building systems and knows
their strengths and
weaknesses if anyone does,
says this about the future
of systems, "In years to
come, architects will have
different sets of problems
and constraints, but look
forward to increasing use
of industrialized building
systems."


Continued on FA/23


GEORGE T. HEERY, FAIA
President and Chairman
Heery and Heery, A tlanta
... talked and showed slides on the
IMPACT of Construction Management.


R. RICHARD RITTLEMAN, AIA
Principal
Burt, Hill & Assocs., Butler, Pa.
. stressed the technical aspect of energy
conservation.


THOMAS J. EYERMAN, AIA
General Partner
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Chicago
... addressed delegates on how to improve
earnings by improving management skills.


WELD COXE
Management Consultant
Weld Coxe Assocs.
... spoke on how to make effective
interview presentations.


LOUIS DE MOLL, FAIA
President Elect AIA
Chairman of the Board
Ballinger Company, Philadelphia
. told members what the future of the
profession holds.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/22















William W. Caudill, FAIA


However, systems scare
designers. Most don't like
these erector sets. They
don't want to work in the
constraints of systems.
When systems were first
used with fast tracking
and construction
management, designers in
CRS barely survived the
trauma. Our people
suffered shock the
shock of change. If your
firm hasn't yet, it will.
But, Thomsen, says,
"Change has to come, if
only to satisfy the
demands of time. Our
clients today consider
time very important."
Count on it, time will
become even more
important. "Inflation
continues," says
Thomsen, "but inflation
is not the only pressure
on time. The owner wants
immediate results. He
wants the building up -
ready to move into before
high interest rates rack his
budget." George Heery,
I'm sure, will spell this
out in greater detail
tomorrow morning.

Management void has
been filled primarily by
general contractors, a few
construction management
companies, and a number
of clients, but very few
architects. The future will
belong to those who build
the capability and produce
the results wherever they
may come from. The
profession needs to
develop new strengths. So
do each of us. We have
to flex with the change.

IMPACT NO. 7 -
PRODUCT
CHEAP LABOR. CHEAP
ENERGY. WENT THE
WAY OF THE BUFFALO.
Forrest Wilson, Chairman
of the Department of
Architecture and Planning,
Catholic University of
America, put it uniquely:
"The age of great
discoveries is over. The
search for innovation in



November/December 1975


building seems the same as
the search for oil. All the
easy-to-find fields have
been discovered. The
search for oil today is
incredibly more
sophisticated than it was
a century ago. So is the
search for new ways of
building." Wilson
attributes this to the
increasingly higher cost of
labor, coupled with its
increasing inefficiency.
Building "now employs
assemblers, not craftsmen,"
he says. That's why
building systems are coming
into the picture so
strongly. No more cheap
labor. And no more really
skilled labor.
Throughout my lifetime,
first cost was the prime
consideration "Make it
cheaper." Not now. And
not from here on. There
are two pressures on us:
First cost and life-cycle
cost. What this means is
that we must develop new
skills to negotiate the
trade-offs between cutting
first cost and achieving
long-range operational
efficiencies and
economies. It won't be
easy.
Back to Dr. James Wright
(National Bureau of
Standards) and to the
no-cheap energy notion:
"Energy use and energy
conservation will impact
building design. With the
rising cost of fuels and
the large amount of fuels
used in buildings, the
application of existing
technology could have a
dramatic impact on the
way architects design
buildings." He goes on to
say that architects will
have to recognize the
potential of solar energy.
"Technology for solar
energy systems is still
developing and will
continue to do so over
time, but for the moment
most solar energy
equipment is very large
and bulky. (I might add:
and very expensive). The
very nature of the
equipment and its size will
present a tremendous


challenge to the designers
of buildings as they
attempt to integrate these
large panels and massive
structures into their
buildings. Architects will
have to draw upon all of
their creative talents."
Believe him. He's right.
One of my favorite
architects in fact a
person very dear to me -
said this, "Energy
conservation as a design
determinant will be the
name of the game these
next five years. The
energy crisis could have
much more impact on
building design than the
great 'form givers' of the
last three decades -
architects like Frank
Lloyd Wright, Le
Corbusier, Mies Van Der
Rohe, Walter Gropius and
Louis Kahn. Energy will
be the new form giver."
Who said that? I did.

WRAP-UP

Am I preaching doom?
No. I'm convinced
architects have an exciting,
satisfying, profitable
future. Am I just scaring
you to get your attention?
Of course not. I'm not
kidding. We are under
pressure this very day.
These seven impacts are
real. They'll create more
pressure in the immediate
five-year future.
So what else is new?
The architectural
profession has always had
its pressures. It'll survive -
if it responds. In fact, it
can thrive.
Once (at the turn of the
century) we were pressured
to get out of building
construction. We did. Now
we are being pressured to
get back in. We may.
Architects respond to
pressures, despite what our
worst critics say. But there
is nothing wrong with
bringing pressure to bear
on our profession or any
other profession. Change
is not likely without
pressure. And change is
needed. Big, fast change -
like it or not.


I've given you seven
impacts impacts which
will cause architects to
change their attitudes and
ways of doing things.
These are only a few.

I'm eager for change. You
should be too. We should
look forward to the
immediate five-year future
shaped by these seven
impacts. What a great
time to reassess our worth.
Should we be? Or
shouldn't we be? It's time
to remind ourselves that
architects are not here to
perpetuate their
profession, but to serve
people by creating
buildings which possess
architecture. Once we stop
serving, we lose our
justification for existence.
Today we have an
opportunity to
re-establish that we are a
life-improving,
contributing profession.
And we can contribute.
What a unique place we
have among all
profession.





ADVERTISERS

18
Architectural Products

2nd Cover
Cabot's Stains

3rd Cover
Dunan Brick

14,15
Florida Natural
Gas Association

8
Foster Refrigeration

5
Miller Associates

11,12,13
PPG

26
Professional Services

4
Solar Development, Inc.


FA/23











PART II


Energy and


Architecture


in Florida



By Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA

Years ago the prophecy of function in
architecture was discussed by Frank
Lloyd Wright as he talked about human
and organic unity within building struc-
tures and the relationship of the building
to the climatic conditions, to the site, the
weather, etc.. Other architects in this
country have espoused for the past sever-
al decades, the European school of archi-
tecture which has dealt with shapes that
basically express function in purely
aesthetic and "humanistic" terms. It may
be we need to once again revisit Frank
Lloyd Wright's concept of "organic" with
all its implications.
It stands to reason, in terms of energy,
the initial things that we need to be
concerned about in terms of new build-
ings are: 1) orientation in terms of the
suns heat in our southern climate; and 2)
the shape of that building in relationship
to both the environment (basically sun,
wind and vegetation) and in relationship
to the interior functions it begins to
serve. This becomes an extremely com-
plex set of competing values and must be
recognized as such if we are going to
produce the kinds of buildings that will
be responsive to design for conservation
programs. A lifecycle cost analysis pro-
gram formally introduces a program
which can act as a design tool for a
structure which has as many as eight
sides.
Total energy systems are a means to
cut line losses inherent in the central


generation of electrical power. It also
provides for heat sources for use in a
major complex of buildings. While it may
be difficult to match loads, it is always
worth investigating.
Insulation The one facet of new
buildings with the most substantial im-
mediate and potential benefits to energy
conservation is insulation. "U" value is
the combined thermal value of different
materials creating a surface from interior
to exterior. It simply expresses the ease
with which heat passes through the con-
struction of that surface. The lower the
"U" value, the better the insulation.
Typical values are as follows: 1.13 for a
sheet of glass; .85 for 4" of solid concrete
and .06 for good exterior stud wall with
3-1/2" of fiberglas insulation. The state in
its review of its new statewide building
code is encouraging higher insulation
standards in buildings.
The general growing opinion is that
"U" values for all surfaces, rooks and
dide walls should not exceed the .06 "U"
value, in terms of practical economics.


Minimum surface area and architec-
tural shapes to improve the insulating
properties. The extreme theoretical case is
the geodesic dome. This design produces
the minimum surface area for a given
amount of cubage. An energy efficient
structure is the one-half cube shape with
surfaces of equal "U" values. This is a
simplistic theoretical model which is high-
ly artificial because it does not discuss
window openings, glass, etc.. However, it
does approach an excellent model and
says something to us in terms of the high
rise buildings we have been creating.
People have asked how to insulate the
roof of a building without using the
energy intensive fiberglas insulation. In
the traditional alpine houses the roofs are
pitched to carry snow as insulation
throughout the cold winter. In this
climate there are such things as earth
masses on roofs with gards on top which
could provide the amount of mass that
would effectively deal with insulating
qualities. There is also the practice of a
3" to 4" sheet of water on flat concrete


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


In part two, the conclusion of Schweizer's
article, he discusses the role of New
Structure Design and future Alternative
Energy Systems. (Please refer to the
September/October issue for Part I
of "Energy and Architecture. ")


FA/24



































roofs whose evaporative capabilities can
act as a cooling agent.
Glass-The reduction of glazed areas in
a building is important as well as shading
the windows. New situations constantly
occur in terms of new forms for self-
shading and inward sloping walls which
produce new shapes.
There are many special ways of glazing
being evolved in terms of air condition-
ing. There is heat absorbing glass and
there is also reflective glass. Glass has
stimulated the awesome solar heat prob-
lems in large high rise glass buildings.
Everybody wants to build a glass tower.
This has come to us from Meis Van der
Roe and the marvelous glass housing he
conceived. Our lesser imitations in archi-
tecture have presented us with extremely
difficult problems in terms of energy
conservation. Glass may be used in dif-
ferent sealed combinations with clear
plate to produce different values of trans-
mission. In this, the process of conduc-
tion, radiation and convection occur.
Obviously, window shutters become a
vital factor in both retrofitting and new
structures. It is interesting to note that
when we review our exposure to the
climatic systems all wind calculations are
based on no movement (or maximum
movement) and we often forget this fact.

The efficiency of heating and cooling
systems More sensitive thermostats,
more automatic controls and centralized


plants generally contribute to energy
savings as well as reviewing the new
variable volume systems in place of the
old heating and A.C. systems which are
generally wasteful.
Heat pumps It is a well known fact
that heat pumps are particularly efficient
in Florida. Both in terms of the heating
capacity and their excellent and efficient
cooling.
Artificial mechanical ventilation We
have discussed this kind of ventilation in
terms of retrofitting. At this point in time
5, 10, and 15 cubic feet per minute are
standards for various types of structures.
These could be reduced to 3 to 4 cubic
feet per minute in most areas which
should include charcoal filter systems as
well as other systems for cleaning air.
Heat exchangers were also previously
discussed. These devices are available
which can recapture the "heat" or "cool"
before it is exhausted from the building
and transfer a portion of the heat or cool
to the incoming air supply. This will
reduce the amount of energy required to
heat or cool all of the incoming air.
Window shading has been discussed.
Elaborate devices are in the process of


being manufactured. Often glass set in
deep reveals can make a significant dif-
ference. A self-shading effect either by a
balcony or a floor or trees or sloped wall
can provide energy efficiency.
The last in the list is the cost of energy
to produce building materials themselves.
One analysis showed it would take .77
million kwh of electrical energy to
produce 5.7 million pounds of stainless
steel to cover the surface of a high rise.
As compared to the greater figure of 2.1
million kwh to cover this same surface
with 4 million pounds of aluminum.
However, the lifecycle cost analysis has
not become this sophisticated to date
though it may well in the future begin to
deal with net energies involved; this be-
comes an obvious goal in the process of
energy conservation.

Alternative Energy Systems

Much work to date is being done on
alternative energy systems. The one of
the greatest of these for the area of
Florida is the solar collector. This solar
collector, through hot water, heats both
water and space and does it excellently in
terms of today's technology. It is esti-
mated that 13.9% of national energy
usage is in the residential area in these
terms. Approximately an 8% of the na-
tional energy used is in commercial struc-


CONTINUED


November/December 1975


FA/25









Energy and Architecture in Florida
Continued from FA/25


POLICY
STATEMENT


tures in terms of both water and space
heating. Many people are now working on
the process in which solar energy can
provide air conditioning systems with
enough heat for the absorption process.
The solar collector occurs in all parts
of the world at this point. There are over
2-1/2 million in Japan, as far as we know
there are probably 60,000 in operation in
Florida. They are in operation in Califor-
nia and Australia. Israel has the largest
desalinization plant in the world run by
solar energy. Among other alternatives
which are being pursued are: windmills,
fuel cells, hydrogen produced by the
electrolysis of water, latent heat storage
mechanisms and geothermal possibilities
as well as wave action. However, it should
be recognized that most alternative
systems and their refinements, with the
exception of water and space heating by
solar energy, are still in the future. A


conservative estimate would be 5 to 10
years.
In summary, retrofitting whether
"leak plugging" or "belt tightening" can
conserve a minimum of 30% of our
energy costs. It is of equal importance in
the design of new structures that all
professionals, involved in the process,
begin the design process as a team and
that all available design processes such as
lifecycle analysis become tools as an
initial step in the process. We have two
alternatives for the next 5-10 years. We
must begin to design energy efficient
buildings or we will slowly bankrupt
ourselves as a state and a nation. The
erosion process leading to bankruptcy is
without reality to most of us because it is
insidiously working 24 hours a day. We
therefore must, as a profession, become
committed to conservation in both the
private, and public aspects of our lives.


Continued from FA/19

of Directors of the Florida
Association of the American
Institute of Architects, therefore,
would recommend to the
Committee on the State Building
Code the adoption of the
Standard Building Code and the
other codes of the Southern
Building Code Congress as the
basis for the proposed uniform
minimum State Building Code;
amended in those areas only where
consideration of a State wide
concern justifies such amendments
and with further amendments of
area wide concern emanating from
the jurisdictions wherein those
special concerns exist.


Professional

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Consulting Engineers in CONSULTING ENGINEERS

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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/26







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