• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Message from the president
 Letters
 61st annual convention program
 Building products exhibitors
 Energy and architecture in...
 Who's who at the institute
 1975 architectural design...
 Training paraprofessionals
 Inmates learn drafting
 Recent projects, newsnotes, and...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00221
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September-October 1975
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00221
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Message from the president
        Page 4
    Letters
        Page 5
    61st annual convention program
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Building products exhibitors
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Energy and architecture in Florida
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Who's who at the institute
        Page 14
    1975 architectural design awards
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Training paraprofessionals
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Inmates learn drafting
        Page 32
    Recent projects, newsnotes, and calendar
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Back Cover
        Page 35
        Page 36
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.

















































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The Florida Architect
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September
October 1975


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-III I -
Walter Goodman Residence; Architect: Charles Harrison Pawley, AIA, Miami, Florida; Cabot's No. 241 Bleaching Oil.

Bring Out the Best in Wood ...



Cabot's STAINS


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Goodman Residence by Architect, Charles
Harrison Pawley, AIA. The grain, the texture,
the very character of the wood itself will add
much to any home. Cabot's Stains bring out the
best in wood, enhance the grain and texture,
preserve the natural beauty of wood.


For exteriors: Cabot's Stains, available in 87
unique colors, are suitable for all types of
lumber and all wood surfaces. Stains offer a
unique combination of beauty, economy, and
protection for shingles, siding, clapboards,
paneling, decking, and fencing. A stained sur-
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For interiors: Cabot's Stain Wax combines the
soft penetrating color of a stain with a satin-
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in one application. Available in 14 pleasing
colors plus ebony, white, and natural. Suitable
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Cabot's Stains, the Original Stains and Standard for the Nation since 1877.
For color cards and further information, contact the following Cabot distributors:


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715 25th St., West Palm Beach, Fla. 33401







The Florida Architect

Volume 25 Number 5 September/October 1975


CONTENTS


Message From the President ........................ 4

Letters .............................................. ........... 5

Advertisers .................................... ......... 5

Orlando Hyatt House .................................. 5

61st Annual Convention Program ............... 6

Building Product Exhibitors ...................... 8

Energy and Architecture in Florida
by Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA ................. 12

Who's Who at the Institute ......................... 13

1975 Architectural Design Awards ............. 15

Training Paraprofessionals
by Dr. John B. Langley, AIA .................. 24


Inmates Learn Drafting .............................. 32

Recent Projects ............................................ 33

Newsnotes ...................................... ... 33

Calendar .................................... ........... 33


1975 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
/,ii. ,r) F. Bigoney
Howard Bochiardy
William Brainard
Ellis W. Bullock
Carl Gerken
Norman M. Giller
Martin Gundersen
Carl Gutmann, Jr.
William K. Harris
Jerome A. James
William Jollay
Walter L. Keller
Charles E. King FAIA
Bertram Y. Kinsey, Jr.
Robert H. Levison FAIA
Stephen Little
John McCormick
Harry G. Morris
Richard H. Morse
Robert F. Petersen
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Francis R. Walton FAIA
Jack West
Robert L. Woodward


President's message 4
President's Message 4


Awards 15




-







Inmate Drafting 32


FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1975

James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, President
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758

Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, Vice President
President Designate
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814

Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Secretary
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-2551

James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
5020 Cypress Street, Suite 211
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 872-8407


Cover: Oceanfront Condominiums, View
of Balconies 17
Next Issue: Convention Activities









DIRECTORS OF FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker, FAIA
1000 N. Ashley Street, Suite 806
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-0381

Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of The
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947

GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
David E. Clavier/Editor
Richard Schuster/Illustrator
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


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Controlled Circulation Postage Paid, Miami, Florida


FA/3







Message from the President

The prognosis for the year ahead is that it will be a difficult time for many of us.
The initial and perhaps the most continually pervasive issue deals with ourselves and
our relationship to our communities. In my mind this begins with the understanding of
who we are.
The architect is, I think, within this culture, one of the rare creatures. He has both
intuitive and visual gifts which unfortunately today held in low esteem basically
because people do not understand them. It is probably true that most architects do
not understand themselves. Perhaps because they are gifts, they are not looked at too
closely. However, it is important that those whom we serve in this culture begin to
understand who we are and what we do.
I do not mean to imply that every person in our profession is alike, yet at this point
in time, there is no reason why most of the architects in this state given their
knowledge, training and their experience, cannot turn out creditable and thoughtful
products for their clients who are the general public. Therefore, there must begin to be
ways that we can tell them who we are, what we do and how we deal with the world
'about us.
There are also other issues involved in the coming year. There are the issues of the
economic recession and of alternative practices. We perhaps will never again know a
period of growth as we have known it in the past. There is the issue of education and
requirements for continued licenses; there is the issue of relationships with the State
Board of Architecture as well as state and local governments; there is the issue of
energy and energy conservation; there is the issue of relationships with our fellow
professionals, the engineers as well as other disciplines that we must begin to relate to
in an understanding manner; there is the issue of the structure of the commissions and
how to make them more effective; and there is the issue of the old, old issue of the
components and how to get them actively involved in the processes of developing their
strengths within their own communities.
In this respect we perhaps need to form a diagnostic team which will go to each
component and begin to set up some guidelines and standards as to how they need to
structure themselves in terms of where they stand today and tomorrow.
Gentlemen, it is a new day. The good old days are now; tomorrow and the day after
tomorrow, so let us grasp our opportunities as they present themselves and deal with
them in a positive and active (not reactive) manner.
Therefore, I ask your endorsement for the program for the coming year which will
be presented at the convention. It is to strengthen both the components and our
association.
See you at the convention.

Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/4








LfMNMNTIM 7IT ENE DWBUVT au4E


Limey Jim's is a mecca for lovers of the good life


Aerial view of the Orlando Hyatt House complex

The Orlando Hyatt House, located in
Kissimmee, Florida at Walt Disney
World's doorstep, is the perfect location
for the Association's 61st Annual Con-
vention.
As the aerial photograph shows, the
clustered Hyatt complex is nicely self-
contained but with quick access to both
U.S. 192 and Interstate 4.
The Mid-Florida Chapter, AIA recog-
nized the Hyatt House and the architec-
tural firm, Reynolds, Smith & Hills,
Architects/Engineers with an Award of
Merit in 1974. That same year, W.
Edward Bell, Superintendent of the J.A.
Jones Construction Co., was recognized
with a Craftsmanship award for the light-
ing design of the lobby, lounge and
restaurant.
Limey Jim's Show Lounge will offer a
relaxing interlude to what will be a full
convention schedule.
The massive exhibit area and banquet
hall will provide ample space for all
convention activities.
The Orlando Hyatt House promises to
be exciting and at the same time con-
venient for all delegates, speakers and
exhibitors.
So, whether in the Convention Center,
Limey Jim's, The Beef Block, the Shop-
ping Mall, one of the eight Pools, the
lighted tennis courts or exhibit hall, the
Orlando Hyatt House is the place to be
October 2 5, 1975.


The spacious Convention Center (Cypress Ballroom)


Advertisers



Architectural Products ............................. 31

Cabot's Satin ....................... (second cover) 2

Construction Products Division
W.R. Grace & Co. ....................................... 10

Dunan Brick ........................ (third cover) 35

Orlando Hyatt House .......... (fourth cover) 36

Paver Systems ............................................ 29

Pavlow Office Furniture ........................... 34

PPG .................................... ............ .. 30

Professional Services ................................ 34

Safe-T- Lawn ........................................... 11

Solar Development..................................... 33

Universal Building Specialties................... 27

Western Waterproofing ............................. 23


Letters

Dear Editor:
I have received the copies of the Florida
Architect which you sent. Thank you very
much. Also, please convey my thanks and
appreciation to your illustrator who did the
clever illustration.
Again, thank you for the opportunity of
contributing to your magazine.
Very truly yours,


John Turner, Director
Planning and Research
Santa Fe Community College
Dear Editor:
Way back some months back your
excellent magazine had a most interesting ar-
ticle on how buildings weren't built to the
specifications of man, etc. We wanted to
excerpt or run a reprint of it ... but lost our
copy.
Could you dig it out, send it give us
reprint permission or refer to author with our
request to reprint?
Sorry I have to be so vague in description.
Best wishes,

David R. Arpin
Executive Vice President
FHMA
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT encourages com-
munications from its readers and reserves the
right to edit for style and/or economy. We
assume that any letter, unless otherwise
stipulated, is free forpublication in this journal.
Please address correspondence to: Editor, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, 7100 N. Kendall Dr.
No. 203, Miami, Florida 33156.


September/October 1975


I


I


FA/5







Thursday, October 2, 1975
10:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. Registration (Tamiami Lounge)
10:00 a.m. 1:45 p.m. Accreditation of Delegates (Tamiam
Lounge)
11:00a.m.- 1:00p.m. FAAIA Board of Directors Meeting (Ft
Lauderdale)
2:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. FAAIA Business Session (St. Cloud)
Florida Region Business Session
4:15 p.m. 7 IMPACTS
Speaker: William W. Caudill, FAIA (St
-Cloud)
4 ,b- Moderator: Weld Coxe

SWilliam W. Caudill, FAIA, Chairman of the
Board, Caudill Rowlett Scott Inc., has been a
proponent of the team concept of architecture
S' since he and John Rowlett formed the first
S team in 1946. Three years later the firm was
L formed and McCaudill has served as a principal
of this team of architects, planners and engi-
S ''* neers ever since.
Mr. Caudill was Director of the School of Architecture at Rice from 1961
to 1969 and also held that school's William Ward Watkin Chair until 1971.
He is now serving as a member of the Board of Directors of Herman Miller,
Inc. and as a Director of Rice University Center for Community Design and
Research.

6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. Official Opening of Building Products
Exhibits Salute to Exhibitors (Cypress


Evening


Ballroom)
On Your Own
Hospitality Suites


Friday, October 3, 1975


8:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m.

8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m. 2:00 p.m.

8:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m.



9:45 a.m. 11:30 a.m.


Coffee & Danish with Building Products
Exhibitors (Cypress Ballroom)
Registration (Tamiami Lounge)
Balloting for FAAIA Officers & Florida
Regional Director (Tamiami Lounge)
AIA Leadership Workshop Session No. 1 -
Chapter/Section Vice Presidents (St. Peter-
sburg)
IMPACT OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGE.
MENT (St Cloud)
Speaker: George T. Heery, FAIA
Moderator: Weld Coxe



George T. Heery, FAIA, is President and
Chairman of Heery & Heery, Architects and
Engineers, founded in 1945 in Athens, Georgia.
He is also President of the firm's Construction
Program Management subsidiary, Heery As-
sociates, Inc., chartered in 1966.


Mr. Heery and the firm have been considered leaders in developing the new
profession of construction management.
Mr. Heery has authored several professional journal articles and has just
published his first book, Time, Cost and Architecture, published by
McGraw-Hill of New York.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/6


UN N TIN





qR7CT 9


VORNBfBla











11:30 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. Buffet Luncheon with Building Products
Exhibitors (Cypress Ballroom)
2:30 p.m. ENERGY CONSERVATION EXPERTISE
A NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
FOR THE ARCHITECT (St. Cloud)
I Speaker: P. Richard Rittlemann, AIA
Moderator: Weld Coxe

SP. Richard Rittlemann, AIA, is a principal with
Burt, Hill & Associates of Butler, Pennsylvania.
He has been with the firm since 1967. Mr.
Rittlemann is a 1961 graduate of Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y., with a BA in
S Architecture.
Mr. Rittlemann, a member of the NASA/NSF Solar Energy Panel, has
worked on the design and implementation of several solar projects such as,
Sugarmill Woods in Florida, Atlanta School in Georgia and the State
University in New York.
Mr. Rittlemann was the author of "The Solar Utilization Guide," for the
GSA publication, Energy Conservation Guidelines for Office Buildings.


4:00 p.m.










' :
x-N ma~i -


IMPROVE EARNINGS BY IMPROVING
MANAGEMENT SKILLS (St. Cloud)
Speaker: Tom J. Eyerman
Moderator: Weld Coxe





Thomas J. Eyerman, AIA, is a General Partner
with the firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of
Chicago, Illinois. Mr. Eyerman is involved with
the business management of SOM.


He recently managed the business aspects of the Joint Ventures performing
the Crosstown Expressway for the City of Chicago.
Mr. Eyerman received a master of business administration degree from
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration in 1965.


5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

6:30 p.m.

6:45 p.m. 8:30 p.m.

Evening


Refreshments with Building Products Ex-
hibitors (Cypress Ballroom)
Briefing for Participants/Underground tour
of Disney World (St. Cloud)
Underground Tour of Disney World (buses
depart at 6:45 p.m.)
On Your Own
Hospitality Suites


Saturday, October 4, 1975


8:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m.

8:30 a.m. 12 noon
8:30 a.m. 9:45 a.m.


Coffee & Danish with Building Products
Exhibitors (Cypress Ballroom)
Registration (Tamiami Lounge)
AIA Leadership Workshop Session No. 2 -
Chapter/Section Vice Presidents (St. Peter-
sburg)


2:
2:


4:



7:


10:











c, -


12


:00 a.m. 12 noon MAKING INTERVIEW PRESENTATIONS
MORE EFFECTIVE
S -Speaker: Weld Coxe





a i Weld Coxe established his practice as a Manage-
t ment Consultant in Communication in 1967
after an 18 year career in professional business
development, corporate public relations and
-' i journalism.
In his business, Mr. Coxe has specialized in providing consulting service in
marketing and management to architects and engineers. The firm of Weld
Coxe Associates currently has clients in 25 states and also in Europe. Mr.
Coxe is author of Marketing Architectural and Engineering Services,
published in September 1971 by Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.

In addition to his consulting practice, Mr. Coxe is also editor of The Coxe
Letter, a monthly report of trends in the marketplace of architectural
services.


noon 2:00 p.m. Buffet Luncheon with Building Products
Exhibitors (Cypress Ballroom),
00 p.m. Exhibits Close
30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. Epilogue of Convention Program (St.
Cloud)
Moderator: Weld Coxe
Panel: George Heery, P. Richard Rittle-
mann, Tom J. Eyerman
00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. AIA Leadership Workshop Session No. 3 -
Chapter/Section Vice Presidents (St. Peter-
sburg)
30 p.m. Annual Awards Banquet (Cypress Ball-
room)
1975 Architectural Awards
FAAIA Honors & Awards


FUTURE OF THE PROFESSION
Speaker: Louis deMoll, FAIA
President-Elect AIA

Louis deMoll, FAIA, was elected First Vice
President and president-elect of The American
Institute of Architects during the AIA's 1974
convention. He will succeed to the presidency
in December, 1975. Mr. de Moll also served as a
*national Vice President of the Institute in 1972
and 1973, and as chairman of the Commission
on Institute Affairs during 1974.
Mr. deMoll is Chairman of the Board of the Ballinger Company, a
Philadelphia architectural and engineering firm that he has been associated
with since 1955. His architectural work has received numerous awards
from the Pennsylvania Society of Architects and the Philadelphia Chapter,
AIA, as well as design awards from Progressive Architecture magazine. In
1965 he was honored for his professional achievements by being elected to
fellowship in The American Institute of Architects.

Sunday, October 5, 1975

10:00 a.m. 12 noon FAAIA Business Session (Ft. Lauderdale)
FAAIA Board of Directors Meeting


September/October 1975


FA/7









BUILHJJN P UT) UL9UUYtBIUB )


308 American Forest Products Corporation
P.O. Box 21126
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33316
(305) 522-8522
Bond-Deck panelized roof decking



408 Architectural Products Consultants
4101 Salzedo Street
Coral Gables, Fl. 33146
(305) 445-1435
Form & Surfaces Products Doors Panels Planters -
Benches in carved woods-Bronze, etc.

503 Bradenton Stone Quarriers -
American Stone Corporation
4921 15th Street, East
Bradenton, Fl. 33507
(813) 756-9586
Florida Travertine Limestone products plus various
sealers and water repellants


507 Bradley Corporation
W142 N9101 Fountain Boulevard
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53051
(414) 251-6000
Washfountains, showers, safety equipment, accessories

601 Bradley Plywood Corporation
P.O. Box 1408
Savannah, Georgia 31402
(912) 233-3575
Bradley Cypress Exterior Plywood siding;
Bradley pre-finished paneling (Beauty-wall and
Forest-wall)

204 Robert Duncan Braun, APA:
Architectural Photographer
P.O. Box 1677
Winter Park, Fl. 32789
(305) 644-2124
Architectural Photography and photographic techniques
of benefit to the architect in promotion, record and
decor.

303 Cast-Crete Corporation
P.O. Box 11497
Tampa, Fl. 33680
(813) 621-4641
Architectural precast concrete and concrete products,
i.e., Joist, Beam Soffits, Periform, Sills and Lintels


301 Commercial Modernfold of Orlando, Inc.
107 P.O. Drawer H
Fern Park, Florida 32730
(305) 671-4463

Commercial Modernfold of Jacksonville
Jacksonville, Florida

Don Works Modernfold
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Acousti-Engineering Co.
Tampa, Florida
Divisiflex and Soundmaster


302 Commercial Systems Division
Commercial Roof Decks of Jacksonville
1515 Tutter Street
Jacksonville, Fl. 32211
(904) 743-5222
Steel Stud Systems

104 Construction Products Division
(Zonolite) W. R. Grace & Co.
321 Whooping Loop
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701
(305) 830-5151
Zonolite Insulating Concrete Roof Decks, Thermoclad,
Monokote Fireproofing Materials and other
insulation products

703 Del Mar Woven Wood
7411 Lorge Circle
Huntington Beach, California 92647
(714) 842-4444
Woven wood shades, draperies, room dividers, folding doors

402 Dwyer Products of Florida
255 Ottley Drive
Atlanta, Georgia 30324
(404) 875-8171
Dwyer Compact Porcelain Kitchens

702 Emco Plastics, Inc.
Rt. 3, Box 239
Bartow, Florida 33830
(813) 533-3364
Seamless Safe Pans for Shower Stalls
704 Floridale Products, Inc.
705 525 S. Andrews
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33301
(305) 524-8549
Pella windows, sliding glass doors and folding doors

Florida Central Chapter Auxiliary
Sanford Goin Memorial Fund

Florida South Chapter
Women's Architectural League


Florida Political Action Committee
7100 N. Kendall Dr., Suite 203
Miami, Fl. 33156
(305) 661-8947

105 General Electric Company
5266 Highway Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32205
(904) 783-1000
General Electric Weathertron (Heat Pumps)

103 Gory Associated Industries, Inc.
1773 N.E. 205th Street
Miami, Florida 33179
(305) 651-7611
Concrete Roof Tile

406 Graphic Systems, Incorporated
601 N. Ferncreek
Orlando, Fl. 32803
(305) 898-8392
Architectural signing, directories, and related products






805 Heywood-Wakefield Company
3010 10th Street
Menominee, Michigan 49858
(906) 863-2661
Movable classroom furniture, lecture room and
auditorium seating

306 Hymar Stone Corporation
P.O. Box 484
Lakeland, Fl. 33802
(813) 686-4296
Buckingham Virginia Slate and natural stone products


701 Kawneer Company
P.O. Box 516
Jonesboro, Georgia 30236
(404) 478-8841
4000 series doors/Panic guard entrances; V.H.M.

407 Keeman Brick of Central Florida, Inc.
P.O. Box 398
Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701
(305) 831-1050
Brick and related material

802 Lake Shore Markers, Inc.
654 W. 19th Street
Erie, Pennsylvania 16512
(814) 456-4277
Lifetime aluminum signs, markers, building letters,
plaques, letterlites, incandescent lifting products

405 Leaf Fiberglass
17900 S.W. 216th Street
Goulds, Florida 33170
(305) 247-1151
Fiberglass planters and landscapers


404 Lees Carpets
Valley Forge Corporate Ctr.
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406
(215) 666-7770
Commercial carpet for schools, hospitals, offices


304 Libbey-Owens-Ford Company
1819 Peachtree Road, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
(404) 355-2410
Vari-Tran Reflective Glass

202 Medeco Security Locks, Inc.
P.O. Box 1075
Salem, Virginia 24153
(703) 387-0481
High security U. L. Listed locks and lock cylinders

201 Mercer Plastics Co., Inc.
1 Jabez Street
Newark, New Jersey 07105
(201) 589-4444
Mirror Finish Wall Base, Commercial Wall Base,
Stair Treads & Nosings, Corner Guards, Door
Saddles, Vinyl Edges & Nosings for Carpeted Floors

403 Miller Associates
a Division of Hill Bros., Inc.
2605 N.W. 75th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33122
(305) 592-6440
TWX (810) 848-5883
Hydrotherapy Health Spa

305 Nutone Division of Scovill
Madison & Red Bank Roads
Cincinnati, Ohio 45227
(513) 527-5409
Sterling Lighting, NuTone Electrical Built-Ins

502 Office Suites, Inc.
359 N. Wells Street
Chicago, Illinois 60610
(312) 467-6290

707 PPG Industries
One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222
(412) 434-2891
PPG Performance Glass, PPG Mineral Products


(continued on next page)


----- -- -- -----
408 407 406 40 06Refreshmens



204 401 402 403 404 501 502 503 504 & 05
---, | --- --- --- -- ----- ----- ---- -----
203 308 307 306 305 608 607 606 605
804

803
202 301 302 303 304 601 602 603 604

201 107 106 105 104 707 706 705 704 802


-Refreshmnts 101 102 103 701 702 703 801


\Main Entrance


Student Exhibits


Stairs




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203 Paver Systems, Inc.
1800 4th Avenue, North
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
(305) 585-5587
Interlocking paving block "L OCKBL OCK",
New Paving System "TURFBLOCK"

804 Safe-T-Lawn, Inc.
7800 N.W. 32nd Street
Miami, Florida 33122
(305) 592-0801
Irrigation Equipment

801 Southeast Lathing & Plastering Bureau, Inc.
3177 Petite Forest Drive, N.E.
Marietta, Georgia 30060
(404) 973-1137
Exterior stucco textures for Exterior Wall Systems
Interior veneer plaster systems

101 Stratton Industries, Inc.
P.O. Box 1007
Cartersville, Georgia 30120
(404) 382-9350
Contract/Institutional Carpet and
Hush-Wall Division Acoustical Wall Carpet


602
603
604
706


Thomas W. Ruff & Company of Florida, Inc.
501 George Avenue, East
Ir:.,.:l Florida 32751
(305) 628-2400
Business and contract furnishings-office furniture
contract furniture, carpet-draperies, etc.


605 Venetian Marble Products, Inc.
P.O. Box 5967
Pompano Beach, Florida 33064
(305) 943-0200
Family of reconstituted marble products featuring a
built in whirlpool system in modular bathtubs

106 Western Waterproofing Co., Inc.
4924 LaSalle
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 877-7646
Waterproofing and Deck Coating


401 The Seabridge Company
6407 Georgia Avenue
West Palm Beach, Fl. 33405
(305) 585-3606
Chicago Faucets; Symmons non-scald showers; Jensen
Stainless steel sinks; Kelsey-Hayes Dura-Lav

803 Wimer-Stubbs Associates, Inc.
P.O. Drawer W
Deland, Fl. 32720
(904) 734-5235
Auditorium seating, stadium seating, Science (lab
furniture), Gym lockers, gym flooring, interior moveable
partitioning, Decorative concrete surfaces

501 Wrono Enterprise Corporation
608 208 N.W. 5th Avenue
Hallandale, Florida 33009
(305) 921-6574
Aluminum Wrol-Up Shades and Thermo-Wrol Shutters


Advanced Engineering


Safe-T-Lawn is constantly a step

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Irrigation Equipment Manufacturers
SAFE-T-LAWN, INC. 7800 N.W. 32 Street


* Miami, Florida 592-0801


September/October 1975


STL


__


FA/11













Energy and Architecture


in Florida

By Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA


PART I
As an architect, I have been concerned
about both the natural and man's con-
structed environments. In the energy
crises these have come together head on. I
say crises because while the scarcity of
fossil fuels represent one alarming aspect
of the problem; the other side of the coin
involves the serious aspects of a social
structure, seemingly determined to waste
energy resources in every sense of the
word. Both the waste of energy and
degradation of resources are becoming a
specter of our time and this is primarily
due to the habits programmed into our
psyche by the long history of cheap
subsidized energy and the seeming
supremacy of the vast industrialization
which made this country a world power.
Well, all that is over. The dollars and
efforts we will spend in the next fifteen
to twenty years, both public and private,
for simply energy, that will be wasted,
will be massive; unless we are willing to
begin to conserve.
I would like to address the energy
issue in terms of that which may be saved
in the structures we have created and will
continue to create.
We have come to understand that 33%
of the total energy used in this country is
in the maintenance of our structures;
residential, commercial and institutional.
Energy demand could be reduced by
introducing retrofitting programs by
approximately 30% (at this time this is
wasted energy) and in the construction of
new buildings as high as 80% over pre-
viously built structures. If we re-visit,
finetune and use energy conservation
measures, then we take some averages of
these. If we retrofit our buildings (using
the 30% figure) and create new buildings
that have a 60% savings over 7 years ago
in our new buildings, by 1990 we could
appreciate 12.5 million barrels per day of
petroleum.


We now invest vast quantities of
our dwindling capital resources in strate-
gies which have less potential, less cer-
tainty and longer delayed pay-offs.
With our heavy reliance on foreign oil
in this state, we must begin to create
energy efficient buildings of all types.
There is today in this state a piece of
legislation which talks to lifecycle cost
analysis. This Act is called the Florida
Energy Conservation in Buildings Act of
1974. This piece of legislation is Senate
Bill 733 passed in the legislature in 1974.
It directs the Department of General
Services to promulgate rules for conduct-
ing lifecycle cost analysis of alternative
architectural and engineering designs on
all state owned buildings; requiring an
energy performance index. The lifecycle
cost analysis is basically a design tool to
evaluate the energy efficiency of all
known materials and mechanical systems
in the buildings to promote energy con-
servation and design. It is defined as the
cost of operating and maintaining the
facility over the life of the structure. The
life of the structure in this case means
anywhere from 40-60 years. However, I
have the feeling in the back of my mind
that the structures which we build today
must last not 20-40 years as we have been
building them, but they must last and be
useful as high as 100 years. This calls for
both long lasting materials and flexibility
in the structures.
Today the Department of General
Services has created a system whereby
this lifecycle cost analysis may be
measured on a performance standard
basis, and to this end they have created
three documents. The first document is
the Florida Energy Conservation Manual
which is basically the establishment of
energy performance indices (EPI). Each
index will establish the permissible use of
energy, in a given type of building,
measured in BTU (per thousand gross


square feet per year). Any building found
to exceed this budget must be redesigned
until that energy budget is met. The
second document consists of the Florida
Lifecycle Analysis Manual. This docu-
ment prescribes a method for the archi-
tect and the engineer by which to estab-
lish the EPI for that building in the
schematic and preliminary design phases.
The main tool of this procedure is a
computer program named Florida Life-
cycle Energy Environment Technique
(FLEET). The third document is the
Computer Program User Manual. The
procedure proposed would be a manda-
tory requirement for all state owned
facilities 5,000 square feet or larger and
small spaces leased by the state in size of
20,000 square feet or more. It must be
understood that the lifecycle cost analysis
is only the first of ways we are beginning
to find where energy may be saved in
which this program of conservation may
be served. It is extremely important that
this program be supported and that we are
able to have time to work out wrinkles.
At least it is headed in the right direction
in terms of our profession, (performance
standards rather than prescriptive).
The American Institute of Architects
report dealing with "A Nation of Energy
Efficient Buildings by 1990", estimated
that the consumer dollars required to buy
the energy which will be wasted because
of non-energy efficient buildings, as-
suming they continue to be built and
assuming that we continue to use the
buildings as they now stand, will be
between 892 billion and 1,499 billion
dollars for the fifteen year period ahead.
It therefore becomes obvious that we
must begin to produce methods by which
we can deal with this problem. The
lifecycle cost analysis is one of those
methods. It deals with many factors in a
building; the number of stories, the shape
of the building, the orientation of the
insulating properties of walls, roofs and
floors, proportion of window area to wall
area, shading coefficients, etc.
The rest of this article will touch
briefly on the many aspects of conserva-
tion in buildings in the following areas:


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/12


















1. Retrofitting or What is possible in
existing building.
2. Design parameters for new construc-
tion.
3. A brief glimpse into the future of pos-
sible alternative sources.

Retrofitting

We begin with retrofitting an energy
conservation measure which has two sub-
headings or criteria definitions. One is
"leak plugging" and the other is "belt
tightening". An example of this in trans-
portation is as follows: Belt tightening
simply means to go to work on foot or
ride in a motor pool. An example of leak
plugging means to tune the car to im-
prove its gas mileage. We will discuss both
of these areas in retrofitting, remember-
ing that each building has unique proper-
ties.
The first area I wish to discuss is
electric heating. Resistance electric heat-
ing is popular simply because of the low
first cost. However, it is generally extrava-
gant and inefficient. Normally the tradi-
tional practice has been to provide higher
standards of thermal insulation so that
heating cost would be competitive. These
systems, when they are used, need to be
reviewed for long time alternatives. If a
system of this kind is in an existing
building, to be remodeled, it would be
advisable to contact the engineer who
specified the equipment and discuss with
him the possibilities of alternatives. The
low first cost factor that we once enjoyed
is no longer valid in the foreseeable
future.
The reduction of glazed areas. It might
be advisable to simply remove and replace
any glass incidental to a heavy solar gain.
The replacement would be with properly
insulated materials. If this is not possible
then either absorbing or reflective glass
may be used to advantage. It is also
possible to use heavy draperies, specially
manufactured solar blinds or glass coating
such as Solar-X.
Infiltration and ventilation Leakage
of air to the outside can be substantially
cut with effective weatherstripping. As
ventilation standards lower, you need to


begin to check out the equipment with a
qualified engineering consultant, prefer-
ably the designer of the system, to see if
thee are any advantages in the lowering of
these standards for you. This is important
particularly when it comes time to re-
place compressors in A.C. systems. There
are significant amounts of tonnage to be
cut in terms of lowering ventilation stand-
ards. (In a book published in 1953 by the
O'Conner Engineering, Inc., it talks about
air conservation engineering which dis-
cusses air recovery equipment, catalytic
combustion, as well as savings through air
conservation. The Conner filter was devel-
oped so that virtually no outside air was
required for a building system. However,
in 1953 the recovery or reclamation of air
was beyond imagining for most people).
With more and more pollutants in our
exterior air, the problem comes closer to
home.
The stack affect in infiltration In
tall buildings substantial amounts of infil-
tration at ground level entrances and the
creation of vertical convection currents
occur. In this instance it is necessary to
create air locks, vestibules and perhaps a
series of doors. The old revolving door
would be a significant contribution to
solving this problem and in our climates
in Florida, much air conditioning is lost
as is heat in northern climates with
freezing temperatures.
Heat exchangers These are devices
that can recapture the heat or cool from a
building and transfer this same rejected
heat or cool to the incoming air supply
which also can begin to contribute to
saving significant amounts of energy.
Functional change There should be
a recognition in changing conditions or
functions in the use of spaces which can
lower energy costs in many ways, par-
ticularly in remodeled spaces. Perhaps,
this is a significant area of alternative
practice.
Colors and surfaces Particularly sur-
faces to be repainted in Florida should be
painted in light colors as heat reflecting
surfaces rather than heat absorbing sur-
faces.


Lighting It is interesting to chart the
lighting standards of schools for the past
50-75 years or in this century. Before
1910 the schools required 3 foot candles.
Between 1910 and 1930 the figure rose
to 18 foot candles. From 1930 to 1950
the figure rose to 30 foot candles; from
1950 to 1975 the figure rose from 70
foot candles to 150 foot candles depend-
ing upon the task. If we lowered require-
ments of 150 foot candles to 50 foot
candles we would create a 90% reduction
in energy consumption in these lamps.
It is also a fact that fluorescent lamps
are three times as efficient as incandes-
cent lamps. Something that is not much
discussed is high frequency light which
occurs at 3,000 cycles per second as
opposed to the 60 cycles per second. This
cuts operating costs and improves lamp
life and performance. Both the General
Services Administration and the National
Bureau of Standards estimates the reduc-
tion in lighting may be as high as 15% in
existing buildings (minimum) and 25% in
new buildings (minimum).
The opportunities for retrofitting are
valid in terms of our practices. Let's get
with it. It's fast becoming a total world.
Private business, state or local govern-
ment could reduce energy consumption
by better than 15% without any resulting
increase in labor costs by a management
program consisting of: 1) proper auto-
mated data control centers; 2) instrumen-
tation; 3) regular checking of weather
seals, air leaks, etc.; 4) regular checking of
leaking taps; 5) proper maintenance pro-
cedures; and 6) a program of machinery
adjustment inspections.
At the beginning of this series I dis-
cussed what our habits have done to our
psyche. We all know that we put on
sweaters to go to the movies. Our atti-
tudes toward the heating and cooling of
our buildings must change. We must be
able to set our thermometers at 78 in the
summer and 68 in the winter. We are a
nation of over-heated and over-cooled
people.
In "Energy and Architecture" Part II, Mr.
Schweizer will discuss the role of New
Structures Design and Future Alternative
Energy Systems.


September/October 1975


FA/13























Who's Who at the Institute









KEY WORD DIRECTORY TO INSTITUTE ACTIVITIES


THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS

1735 New York Avenue, N. W.
WASHINGTON, D. C. 20006
(202) 785-7300


The following list is provided for those who wish information, opinions, or
analyses on the indicated subjects from Institute staff in Washington.


SUBJECT


Accounting for Architectural Office
Accounting System Computerized
(use of)
Accreditation of Architectural Schools


Advertising (AIA Journal)
Advertising Campaign
Advocacy

A/E Procurement in the States
A/E Selection
Affirmative Action
Agreements (AIA forms)
Orders/Sales
Interpretations

AIA Filing System
AIA/Ford Scholarship Program
AIA Foundation

AIA Journal (see other listings under
"Journal")
AIA Minority/Disadvantaged
Scholarship Program
AIA Research Corporation
Arbitration
Architect/Owner Relations
Architects in Government

Architectural Education Counseling
Architectural Secretaries Association
Architectural Study Tours
Architectural Training Laboratories
Assistant Secretary of the Institute
Assistant Treasurer of the Institute
Association of Collegiate Schools
of Architecture, Inc. (ACSA)
Association of General Contractors
Association of Student Chapters
(ASC/AIA)


STAFF


Alan B. Stover
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA

Dr. Hugo Blasdel,
Executive Director, NAAB/
James E. Ellison, AIA
Michael M. Wood
Muriel Campaglia
Robert T. Coles, AIA/
Harold Glover
Elizabeth Chalmers
Arnold J. Prima, Jr., AIA
Robert T. Coles, AIA


Terry L. Peck
Alan B. Stover/
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Robert A. Class, AIA

Jeanne Butler, Curator/
Administrator




John P. Eberhard, AIA
Alan B. Stover
Alan B. Stover
Bruce H. Schafer/
Marshall E. Purnell
Education Director
Terry L. Peck
Jacqueline Watson
Stuart W. Rose, Ph. D.
J. Winfield Rankin, Hon.AIA
William G. Wolverton, Hon.AIA
David Clarke, Exec. Dir./
James E. Ellison,AIA
Edward G. Petrazio,AIA
Student President/
James E. Ellison, AIA


TELEPHONE
(202 area code)
(785 exchange)
7254
7250

833-1180

7347
7282
7259
7234
7229
7386
7374
7234


7327
7254
7250
7258
7344
638-3105




7344
785-8778
7254
7254
7382
7384
7349
7327
7397
7354
7388
7322
785-2324
7347
7250
7272
7347


Audio Tape Cassettes
Audiovisual Materials
Automatic Practice Technology
Awards Programs
Baldwin Memorial Archives
Barrier-Free Architecture
Black Executive Exchange Program
(BEEP)
Board of Directors
Building Codes & Regulations

Building Management, Architectural
Building Systems
Building Types and Design Programs
Business Management Department
Business Management (office)
Bylaws (Institute)
CACE & CACE Annual Meeting
Careers in Architecture Materials
Change of Address (written requests)
Chapter Bylaws (component)
Clearinghouse of State Legislation
Climate Control Programs
Codes and Regulations Center
Codes and Standards

COFPAES
College of Fellows
Commission on Professional Practice
Community Design Center Program
(CDC)
Community Development Act
Community Services
Compensation System
Compensations Management
Competitions, Architectural
Component Services
Component Editors Conference
Component Gov't Affairs
Component Grant Program
Component Presidents' Letter


FA/14


Sandy Kashdan 7357
Kathy Kalt 7295
Robert A. Class, AIA 7258
Maria Murray 7390
Susan Cosgrove 7294
Maurice Payne, AIA 7364
James E. Ellison, AIA 7347

J. Winfield Rankin, Hon. AIA 7388
James R. Dowling/ 7256
Thomas V. Tiedeman 7253
Robert A. Class, AIA 7258
Joseph A. Demkin, AIA 7252
Maurice Payne, AIA 7364
William G. Wolverton, Hon. AIA 7322
Robert A. Class, AIA 7258
J. Winfield Rankin, Hon. AIA 7388
Robert A. Harris, AIA 7378
Irma Brown 7348
Tom Ainsworth 7335
Robert A. Harris, AIA 7378
Elizabeth Chalmers 7386
Joseph A. Demkin, AIA 7252
James R. Dowling 7256
James R. Dowling/ 7256
Thomas V. Tiedeman 7253
Arnold J. Prima, Jr., AIA 7374
Jacqueline Watson 7397
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA 7250
Harold Glover 7229

Michael B. Baker, AlP 7359
Harold Glover 7229
Robert A. Class, AIA 7258
Robert A. Class, AIA 7258
George E. Pettengill, Hon. AIA 7296
Robert A. Harris, AIA 7378
Evagene Bond 7267
Thomas Bennett 7385
Evagene Bond 7267
Peggy McCarthy 7377
(Continued on FA/28)


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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HILLTOP RESIDENCE
Central Florida


Architect: William Morgan Architects, P.A.
220 East Forsyth Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202

Structural Engineer: Haley W. Keister

Builder: Howard Woodward

The problem was to create a hilltop residence without
disturbing the natural contour of the hill. Also needed was to
provide panoramic views of citrus groves in the rolling terrain
below.


Jury Comments:

The Hilltop Residence shows a very strong original concept
It is essentially simple and consistent but at the same time
affords a variety of spacial and visual experiences.
It is obvious that this unique design was developed for a
particular individual. It reflects the client's needs and
aspirations as well as the creativeness of the architect.
This exceptional building has a sense of form approaching
pure sculpture.


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Jury Comments:

The Oceanfront Condominium shows great ingenuity. It is a
very original solution to a problem that frequently produces
mediocre results. The concept dominates the surroundings but
is creative in plan and in sculptural form.
This project is a powerful sculpture but does not violate
structural integrity or lose individual scale.
One juror had serious questions about the responsibilities
(social and ecological) of this project.


OCEANFRONT CONDOMINIUM
Ocean City, Maryland

Architect: William Morgan Architects, P. A.
220 East Forsyth Street
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
Structural Engineer: Sherrer-Bauman & Associates

Consulting Engineer: Horst Berger
Geiger-Berger Associates, P. C.
Lighting Consultant: William Lam Associates, Inc.
Mechanical Engineers: Atchison and Keller, Inc.

Owner: Mr. John S. Whaley
Contractor: The Farms Company

The problem was to provide a variety of living units with
direct views of the ocean, all units with oceanfront balconies
and a limited number of units with large terraces.


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WEST RESIDENCE
Sarasota, Florida


Architect: West and Conyers/Architects and Engineers, Inc.
777 South Palm Avenue
Sarasota, Florida

General Contractor: Phelps and Gentry, Inc.

All exterior walls are "Ocala block," concrete block with a
natural limestone aggregate. The glass in the West residence is
solar bronze set in aluminum frames of medium bronze
anodized aluminum.


Jury Comments:

The West residence utilizes a straightforward pavilion
concept, simple in planning yet meticulous in details. There is
a feeling of exhilaration and at the same time an overall
serenity.
Of particular note was that the jury felt that form was not
sacrificed by connecting the pavilion structures.
This house gives a great sense of privacy. The building is not
ridden with cliche's but shows restraint and good taste.
The West residence is done in the best tradition of the
architectural profession.


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RENOVATION OF DOUGLAS ENTRANCE
Coral Gables, Florida

Architect: Ferendino/Grafton/Spillis/Candela
800 Douglas Entrance
Coral Gables, Florida

Consulting Engineer, Landscape Architect, General Contractor:
Ferendino/Grafton/Spillis/Candela

In the 1920's, developer, George E. Meltick conceived of
Douglas Entrance/ La Puerta de Sol (Gate of the Sun) as the
gateway to the growing city of Coral Gables. Now, 50 years
later, the firm of Ferendino/Grafton/SpillisCandela has
restored Douglas Entrance to the majestic building it was first
intended in the 1920s.


ORIGINAL FLOOR PLAN
' i *' "


Jury Comments:

The renovation of Douglas Entrance resulted in efficient
use of space, pleasing interiors and the saving of an old
building that is a credit to the community. All the positive
qualities of recycling were done with skill, a high level of taste
and sensitivity.
This project shows a respect for the best of the past while
anticipating trends of the future.


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Jury Comments:

The Dake residence is a fine use of wood, both from a
structural and a detailing point of view.
The design concept takes maximum advantage of existing
trees. There is a great variety developed from a simple, orderly
system.
This would appear to be a great place to live.


DAKE RESIDENCE
Jacksonville, Florida

Architect: Robert C. Broward, Architect
1922 Felch Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida

Contractor: Donald Back

The client desired an unusual but comnnonsense house
which in its design would recall old Florida coastal houses and
would be entirely of wood.


SE CT I N A-A
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Jury Comments:

The Lee residence is a good solution for an urban lot
maintaining a sense of privacy both internally and externally.
There is a great relation to the outdoors. Interior space is fused
to exterior space thereby making maximum use of the lot.
The atrium focuses on an introverted concept. Exciting
interior vistas unite a series of spacial sensations. Great variety
and multiplicity is achieved with simple, consistent architec-
tural forms.
The living room designed to open onto two long sides
should have great appeal.


LEE RESIDENCE
Miami, Florida

Architect: Borroto and Lee, Architects and Planners

Contractor: Owner

The Lee residence is located on a moderately wooded city
lot with heavy street traffic. The owner required privacy and
facilities for active family life.


,-r~







Jury Comments:
The living space of the Klein Residence, with pool and hard
surfaces would appear to recognize and accommodate an
indigenous tropical life style.
This residence has a clear structural system. The orderly
plan and the simple use of materials gives a warm and
comfortable feeling. The design is very competent.
Some of the jury members felt that this house was possibly
too austere from the exterior.
Because of the materials selection this house should "wear
well" over the years.




KLEIN RESIDENCE
Miami, Florida

Architect: Donald Singer, AIA
224 S.W. First Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Structural Engineer: De Zarraga & Donnell, Inc.

Landscape Architect: W.T. Bradshaw
Contractor: Edwin Vihlen

The Klein residence was designed for a large family with
five teenage children and an enterprising bent towards
entertaining large groups of people.




Jury Comments:
The Francis Bellamy Elementary School seems to be an
important community symbol. The design doesn't take itself
too seriously but has a whimsical feeling, a sense of humor.
Adaptability and flexibility, permitting the school's
administration and teachers to not feel timid about changing
arrangement, graphics, furniture, etc., stimulates the learning
process.
The jury felt that greater restraint with relation to color
selection would help the interiors. The interior graphics
seemed to be somewhat overdone.
The architect is to be commended for giving the
Hillsborough County Board of Education value for their
building dollar.


playground








-----playground


111


,F ~, ; . ,-'. -- .- ,





FRANCIS BELLAMY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Tampa, Florida

Architect: Rowe/Holmes Associates Architects, Inc.
5444 Bay Center Drive, Suite 205
Tampa, Florida

General Contractor: Peter Brown Co., Inc.
Sitework & Foundation Contractor:
Proefke-Nielsen Construction Co.

Structural Steel Frame Contractor: Gulf Steel Corp.
Roof Deck & Insulation Contractor: Giffen Industries
Graphics Contractor: Brandon Sign Co.

Francis Bellamy Elementary School. named after the
author of the National Anthem, is a patriotic symbol for the
community.


I.





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Training Architectura


WILL WE TRAIN PARAPROFESSIONALS
TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE
DESIGN CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY?

Dr. John B. Langley, A.I.A.
Mid-Florida Chapter


The answer seems to be "yes", if the FAAIA
Education and Research Commission's program
meets its goals of attracting and keeping a larger
segment of high potential students. To do this
educators must broaden the secondary curricu-
lum base and expand Brooking's (1969) basic-
ally cognitive federal model, used at many
community colleges, to include many of the
affective objectives which the Design/Con-
struction professionals have set as high priority
education goals. The 15-member commission
made up of state department of education
consultants, architects, and architectural educa-
tors took step number five in that direction this
summer. Twelve high school drafting teachers
from around the state spent 13 days in Orlando
working with 15 architects and other experts to
build the foundation for a solid Design/Con-
struction Technology Program which will even-
tually go from grade 11 through the communi-
ty college. Co-sponsored by the department of
education, the FAAIA, and Florida Technologi-
cal University, the aim of this college credit
workshop was to expand the view of archi-
tectural drafting from the house plans of the
past to instructional experiences encompassing
the total Design/Construction industry and
leading to the training of architectural and
other paraprofessionals.

THREE YEAR STUDY
Preliminary to the workshop were three
years of study by the commission. Under the
chairmanship of Howard Bochiardy, AIA, this
study had produced a review of existing pro-
grams, an analyses of goals and needs, the
development of secondary school outline curri-
cula, and most importantly the development of
a plan for local architectural, engineering, and
contracting participation in, and assistance to
the educational program. The purpose of this
report is to indicate to architects what any
chapter can and should do to provide local high
school teachers with a new view of needed
technical foundations.


Dr. Langley, a member of the Mid-Florida
Chapter since 1956, was awarded his
Ed.D. this year by the University of
Florida. His area of research was Post
Secondary Design/Construction Technical
Curriculum and Instruction. He is a mem-
ber of the FAAIA Education and Re-
search Commission and serves as a Florida
area coordinator for the Continuing
Education Program of the AIA. He was
elected to Phi Delta Kappa in 1949 and
served as Greater Orlando Chapter Presi-
dent 1973-74 and delegate to the
National Biennial Council. He is an Ad-
junct Instructor in Architectural Tech-
nology at Seminole Community College,
Sanford, Florida.

THE UNEXPECTED WORKSHOP
That the conventional view of high school
architectural drafting did not prepare the parti-
cipants for the workshop was evident in some
of the evaluation reports. However, from the


specifics of drawing details to a technical survey
curriculum based on contemporary educational
theory was an adjustment that 70 percent of
the teachers had started to make by the end of
the workshop.
The workshop presented at Mid-Florida
Technical Institute in Orlando was developed
around an outline of twenty subject areas
prepared by Bill G. Eppes, AIA, Professor of
Building Construction, University of Florida,
from the commission's secondary school curri-
culum outline. The subject areas were:
1. Organization of the Construction Industry.
2. Employment Opportunities in Construc-
tion Industry.
3. History and Evolution of House Construc-
tion in U.S.
4. Construction Documents.
5. Zoning, Building Codes, and Other Con-
struction Industry Regulations.
6. Material Manufacturers and Suppliers.
7. Organization of Working Drawings and
Plan Reading.
8. General Contractor Organizations.
9. Sub-Contractor Organizations.
10. Architectural and Engineering Office Or-
ganization Responsibilities and Work

Activities.
11. Shop Drawings.
12. Building Inspection.
13. Construction Equipment and Tools.
14. Drafting Standards and Techniques.
15. Materials Properties and Uses Wood.
16. Materials Properties and Uses Masonry
and Concrete.
17. Materials -Manufactured Components.
18. Building Equipment.
19. Construction Methods Light Con-
struction.
20. Construction Methods Heavy Con-
struction.
The commission, through a grant from the
FAAIA retained Mr. Richard Zipperly of En-
vironmental Design Group to assemble the


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/24
















Paraprofessionals


faculty and coordinate the daily activities. His
efforts brought about the participation of 15
members of the Mid-Florida Chapter A.I.A. and
others from professional and supplier organiza-
tions. Dr. Robert F. Paugh of Florida Techno-
logical University coordinated the academic
portion of the workshop.
FOUNDATION IN OBJECTIVES
Before starting with the Design/Construc-
tion portion of the program, each participant
was reintroduced to performance objectives
through a two-day course with the Phi Delta
Kappa A Programmed Course for Writing of
Performance Objectives (1972), a constructed
response linear program (pp. 1-49). Three
elected chairmen were provided with the com-
panion Instructor's Manual for Teachers and
Administrators. A performance objective ideal-
ly contains three parts: one, a statement of
what is to be known or done by the student;
two, how the student is to show that he knows
or has done Part I; and three, how well he is
expected to have accomplished the objective.
Performance objectives are divided into
three categories which represent the primary
domains of learning. The least sophisticated is
the congnitive level. (Bloom 1956) This repre-
sents primarily mental and intellectual pro-
cesses. Included are knowledge, application,
analysis, synthesis, and at the highest level of
cognition, evaluation. Dave (1961) set the next
level of learning domain as the psychomotor
level which is primarily physical and neuro-
muscular. These are the manipulative learning
experiences which come from imitation,
manipulation which develop precision, articula-
tion, and naturalization. Krathwohl (1956)
provided a taxonomy for the highest domain of
learning, the affective. This level is primarily
attitudes, values, and feelings. Students must be
willing to receive and respond to the education-
al experience. At higher levels he must value
what he has learned. Finally he most organize
his value conflicts and make them characteristic


of his behavior and life style. With this brief
review the workshop members then started the
presentations. Each of the 20 three hour
sessions, as structured by the author, were
divided into two parts; the first part was a
presentation of the specific subject area infor-
mation by lecture, demonstration, film, or field
trip in which the whole group participated. This
was organized around the presenter's written
outline and a tape recording was made when
the presentation was primarily lecture. The
outline and tapes will be part of the commis-
sion's future study materials.

WORK SHOP PARTICIPATION
After each presentation, the group divided
into three committees. Each committee had an
elected chairman who was responsible for the
assigned review and grading of participants. To
bring into clearfield their perceptions of each
presentation, the workshop members were then
assigned the task of analysis and synthesis.
With the presenter as consultant the first of
these committees discussed what cognitive ele-
ments from the presentation should be included
in a grade 11 or 12 program. These elements
were entered in the "Cognitive" notebook as
appropriate program or performance objectives
for that subject area. At this point the presenter
went on to consult with the second committee
while the first committee listed what
educational experiences students might have to
best meet these cognitive objectives. They also
listed how the local AIA Chapter and others
might assist them in providing these necessary
experiences.
The second committee's task was more
difficult. After listening to the presentation,
they were assigned the task of determining
related affective objectives. A case in point:
Allen E. Arthur, Jr., A.I.A., an elected member
of the Orange County Commission, spoke on
Zoning Ordinances and Building Codes. The
committee on affective objectives entered in


the "Affective" Notebook: (Stated in the
"pre-objective" form).
The student should accept the concept

of building codes and appreciate the
need for zoning, safety regulations, and
construction standards.
This committee then went on to suggest
how this objective might be met in the class-
room and what the Chapters might do to help.

GENERAL GOALS
The third four member committee was
assigned a task unrelated directly to the presen-
tation. They were asked to discuss and provide
performance objectives related to 15 general
educational goals of Design/Construction Tech-
nology prioritized as to importance by the
professional consumers of their product:
1. Learn how to examine and use information
in problem-solving.
2. Develop a desire for learning now and in
the future.
3. Develop pride in work and a feeling of
self-worth.
4. Gain a general education related to the
Design/Construction industry.
5. Learn how to be a good manager of office
time, property, and resources.
6. Develop skills in reading plans, preparing
construction documents, and the nomen-
clature of the design professions.
7. Develop skills to enter a specific field of
the Design/Construction industry.
8. Develop good "office" character.
9. Learn about and try to understand the
changes taking place in the Design/Con-
struction industry.
10. Practice and understand the requirements
of building construction health and safety.
11. Appreciate culture and beauty in the
world.
12. Learn how good citizenship in the com-
munity effects the Design/Construction in-
dustry.
13. Gain information needed to make job
selection.
14. Learn how professional organizations assist
the Design/Construction industry in serving
the community.
15. Learn how to respect and get along with
people who think, dress and act dif-
ferently. (continued on next page)
(continued on next page)


September/October 1975


FA/25






Paraprofessionals
(continued)


Each of the general goals was expanded with
similar goals to explain and clarify its meaning.
These goals and their priority order were
developed by the author in a recent study of
Central Florida architects, engineers, and con-
tractors. (Langley, 1975). The developed ob-
jectives, experiences, and supportive aids were
entered into the "Goals" Notebook.
The committee assignments were rotated
twice each day in order that all participants
were given an opportunity to contribute. Under
the direction of the committee chairman the
day's entries were reviewed and edited before
the next day's presentations.


THE COMMISSION'S WORK AHEAD
From this one workshop the commission
has the task now to review, edit, and organize
some 60 pages of presentation outline, 30 hours
of presentation tapes, and 165 pages of
teachers' responses. It is hoped that funds will
be forthcoming which will allow the prepara-
tion of a High School Design/Construction
Technology Study Guide that will bring to
interested high school teachers not only goal
priorities, curricula, program and performance
objectives, and suggested teaching techniques,
but most importantly, a listing of who in each
community will coordinate the professional and
organizational help which the teachers have
requested. If the commission's goals are to be
realized, the professionals must recognize that
they are part of the community's educational
contract with the student


THE CLUSTER CURRICULUM
When the high school program study guide
has been completed, the commission then must
address itself to the task of suggesting a
modified community college Design/
Construction Technology curriculum which
expands, specializes, completes, and reinforces
the program at the high school level. This
program must take into consideration the cur-
rent community college concept of clustering.
The author suggests that clustering be done
around the two elements of design and
construction. Those students going into the
design cluster would be trained toward para-
professional careers in architectural offices and
the offices of the several engineering disciplines.
These graduates of the two-year community
college program would work with licensed
professionals.
The second cluster would contain those
educational experiences leading to technical
careers in construction management, contract-
ing, subcontracting, material supply and govern-


mental agencies dealing with codes and inspec-
tion. That these clusters have a great deal in
common should be recognized in the first year
of the community college program with the
specialization coming in the second year.


THE SPIRAL CURRICULUM
A second concept should also be recognized,
that of the spiral curriculum. Under this con-
cept there should be a definite effort to
establish job entry level sequences which
prepare students not only to stop their training
at specific points short of the total program,
but also pick up where they left off in
continuing education to complete the next
higher level.


ARTICULATED CURRICULUM
Preprofessional training should also be
among the goal concepts of an integrated
community college program. This comes into
important consideration because of two factors.
First, while secondary school drafting courses,
because of their perceived vocational nature,
have not attracted a majority of the more
academically motivated students, the Design/
Construction Technology Program as being
introductory to all of the professional univer-
sity level Design/Construction careers should
increase the numbers of both young men and
women who aspire to this level. For this reason
several community college programs should
plan for articulation with the professional
upper-level university programs. The profession
bound students will then not only have a
greater opportunity to seek this goal because of
local availability, but will complete the com-
munity college program with job entry level
skills in their chosen field should they for any
reason be unable to complete the two to four
years required to attain professional licensed
status.
The second element of the preprofessional
concept deals with attrition in the professional
schools. The author has been recently told that
the percentage of entering freshmen who com-
plete professional school programs ranges from
a high of 20 percent to a low of 8 percent.
Regardless of the preciseness of these figures, to
maintain required class size and quality in
upper and graduate division programs requires
very large infusion of diminishing resources at
the lower division level.
From the professional viewpoint, the com-
munities' needs may be best served by the high
attrition rate that permits only the most quali-
fied to graduate and become licensed. From the
humanist view of education, this price may be
no longer acceptable. Certainly when contem-
porary economics and public accountability are
considered, the professionals must lead the way
toward major changes in present patterns.


There is one other factor which may per-
suade the professionals to support the para-
professional program. It is a purely selfish one.
In the author's past 14 years as an office
principle one pattern has repeated itself over
and over again. Architectural graduates seem to
stay only until they had gained the technical
experience needed to set up their own practice.
Their educational investment was so high that
continued secondary status was not perceived
as being reasonable. This has been somewhat
ameliorated by the growth of large corporate
practice at the expense of the small office. A
proper paraprofessional program will provide a
steady level of technicians interested in growing
at the line level within a single firm.
There will still be openings for the profes-
sional graduate at the staff training level of the
large firms, and the graduate who wishes to go
it alone will have a stronger technical back-
ground. This will reduce the burden on the
small offices of the expense of completing the
graduate's training. It may even extend the time
that sole proprietorship in the profession can
exist.
In conclusion, the FAAIA Education and
Research Commissioners have moral, ethical,
and value considerations to make as they move
on to the remaining parts of their task. To
make the decisions best for the community and
the profession, they will need the support and
cooperation of both the educators and the
licensed design professionals. The summer
workshop has been a strong step in that
direction.


REFERENCES

Bloom, Benjamin S., Editor. Taxonomy of
Educational Objectives, The Classification
of Educational Goals, Handbook I: Cog-
nitive Domain. New York: McKay Co.,
1956.
Brooking, Walter J., Developer. Technical Edu-
cation Program Series No. 9, Architectural
and Building Construction Technology.
Washington: United States Government
Printing Office, 1969.
Dave, R.H. Psychomotor Domain Taxonomy.
Department of Curriculum and Evaluation,
National Institute of Education, New Delhi,
India.
Krathwohl, David R., Bloom, Benjamin S.,
Masia, Bertram B. Taxonomy of Education-
al Objectives, The Classification of Edu-
cational Goals, Handbook II: Affective
Domain. New York: McKay Co., 1956.
Langley, John B., Sr. Goals for Design Con-
struction Technology Programs in Com-
munity Colleges. Ed.D. Dissertation, Univer-
sity of Florida, 1975.
Phi Delta Kappa. A Programmed Course for
the Writing of Performance Objectives and
Instructor's Manual for Teachers and Ad-
ministrators. Bloomington, Indiana: Phi
Delta Kappa, Inc., 1972.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/26









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Institute
(Continued from FA/14)
Computer Applications
Computerized Financial Management
System
Computerized Specifications

Conference on Federal Agency
Construction Programs
Congressional Action Team
Congressional Liaison

Congressional Punch List
Construction Cost Control
Construction Industry
Construction Management
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Continuing Education Program
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Contractors Liaison

Contracts and Forms (AIA Documents)
Orders/Sales
Interpretations

Controller
Convention, AIA
Copyrights (AIA Documents)
Cost Based Compensation
Council of Architectural Component
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Data Filing
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Robert A. Class, AIA
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John H. Schruben, FAIA/
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(202 area code)
(785 exchange)
7258
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7369
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7379
7379
7381
7379
7258
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7254
7256
7354
7254
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(202 area code)
(785 exchange)


7327
7254
7315
7364
7366
7390

7364
7390
7363
7250
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7258
7388
7347
7250
7250
7364
7296
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7347
7234
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7384
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7374
7315
7379
7381
7379
7250
7294
659-3996

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7339
7274
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7396
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7258
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7256
7234
7349
7347
7234
7379
7256
7258
833-1180

7347
7382
7384
7359
7379
7381
659-3996

7347
7264
7392

7256

638-3105


FA/28







(202 area code)
(785 exchange)


Office Practice
On-the-Job Training Programs
Pension Programs membership
Personnel Practices
Personnel Programs
Practice Aids for Small Offices
Preservation Programs

Press Relations
PRL
Procurement
Producers Council Liaison
Product Literature Filing System
Product Management Control
Production Systems for Architects
and Engineers (PSAE)
Professional Liability Insurance
Professional Practice Department
Professional Practice Programs
Programming
PSAE
Public Affairs Conference
Public Relations Department
Public Relations Letter
Public Service TV and Radio
Announcements
Publications Marketing
Regional/Urban Design Assistance
Teams (R/UDAT)
Registration


Research Council
Research Corporation
Research Fellowships
Research Programs
Research Switchboard
Reston Conference
Review of Architectural Periodicals
(RAP)
Review of Architectural Periodicals
(RAP) Tapes
Roster of Registered Architects
R/UDAT
Scholarship Programs
Schools of Architecture

Small Office Practice Programs

Social Events
Solar Energy
Special Assessment Program
Specifications

Standard Accounting Manual
Standards of Ethical Practice
State Government Affairs Committee
State Government Affairs Committee
State Laws
State Legislation Information
Student Affairs

Student Building Type Competitions

Subcontractor Liaison
Survey of the Profession
Sweet's Catalogues
Switchboard
Systems Building
Teachers' Seminar (AIA/ACSA)
Technical Programs
Technician Training Schoolt Program
Training Laboratories, Architectural
Uniform Construction Index
Uniform System
Unprofessional Conduct Charges
Urban Programs
Regional/Urban Design
Assistance Teams
Value Analysis
VISTA/AIA Joint Program

Women in Architecture


September/October 1975


Robert A. Class, AIA
James E. Ellison, AIA
William G. Wolverton, Hon. AIA
Alan B. Stover
Mary Sessions
Robert A. Class, AIA
Maurice Payne, AIA/
Mark Maves
Nancy Hallmark
Evagene Bond
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Robert A. Class, AIA
Joseph A. Demkin, AIA
John H. Schruben, FAIA/
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Alan B. Stover
Robert A. Class, AIA
John H. Schruben, FAIA
Nicole Gara
Muriel Campaglia
Evagene Bond
Muriel Campaglia

Kathie Davis
Michael B. Barker, AlP

Hayden P. Mims,
Executive Director, NCARB/
James E. Ellison, AIA
Donald Conway, AIA
John P. Eberhard, AIA
Donald Conway, AIA
Donald Conway, AIA
Donald Conway, AIA
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Sandy Kashdan

Stuart W. Rose, Ph.D.

Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Michael B. Barker, AlP
Harriet Halbig
David Clarke/
James E. Ellison, AIA
Robert A. Class, AIA/
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Jacqueline Watson
Joseph A. Demkin, AIA
Arnold J. Prima, Jr., AIA
John H. Schruben, FAIA
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Alan B. Stover
J. Winfield Rankin, Hon. AIA
Elizabeth Chalmers
Elizabeth Chalmers
Elizabeth Chalmers
Elizabeth Chalmers
Student President/
James E. Ellison, AIA
Maurice Payne, AIA/
Mark Maves
Alan B. Stover
Edward G. Petrazio, AIA
Robert A. Class, AIA
Hilda Gasch
Joseph A. Demkin, AIA
James E. Ellison, AIA
Robert A. Class, AIA
James E. Ellison, AIA
Stuart W. Rose, Ph.D.
Robert A. Class, AIA
Robert A. Class, AIA
Maureen Marx

John Gaillard/
Michael B. Barker, AlP
Marshall E. Burnell
Harold Glover

Alan B.Stover


7258
7347
7322
7254
7324
7258
7364
7366
7264
7267
7250
7250
7258
7252
7369
7250
7250
7250
7254
7258
7369
7379
7259
7267
7259

7274
7359

659-3996

7347
7351
785-8778
7351
7351
7351
7250
7357

7354

7250
7359
7350
785-2324
7347
7258
7250
7397
7252
7374
7369
7250
7254
7388
7386
7386
7386
7386
7272
7347
7364
7366
7254
7250
7258
0
7252
7347
7258
7347
7354
7258
7258
7392

7363
7359
7384
7229

7254


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PRESENTS NEW QUALITY PAVING

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can be created around buildings, pool decks, driveways,
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Turfblock is a multi-purpose paving block. It accepts
great loads (6000 P.S.I.) when embedded with grass. It
allows you to landscape with Turfblock and grass such
things as parking lots, access roads, golf courses, or
where there is a need for both greenery and heavy vehicle
use. Another use is in erosion control. The apertures in
Turfblock allow the grass to root holding the earth
against water or wind erosion at an economical cost.
Paver Systems, Inc. manufactures these blocks in
Lake Worth, Florida and can deliver on pallets anywhere
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Distributor inquiries invited.


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FA/29


























-W "!- j-... I' "-4" "

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PPG Solarcool elective glass.


Its looks don't reflect its price.


Compared to tinted glass,
Solarcool reflective glass can add
as little as 10% to the cost of the
total wall system.
Yet it brings virtually any type
of light-commercial building to life
with the unique and prestigious
esthetics that only reflective glass
can offer.
There's no limit to the effects
you can achieve. Wood, concrete,
masonry, and metal can all be
dramatically complemented
by reflective glass.
But besides good looks,
Solarcool reflective glass gives you
good performance, too.
Since it is reflective, it shields
the sun's glare and reduces heat
gain more efficiently than tinted


glass. So your air conditioning
system is more economical.
In cold climates it can save on
your heating costs, too. Because
it becomes an excellent insulator
when used in double-pane
construction.
So treat yourself and your
next building to the remarkable
beauty and excellent performance
of Solarcool reflective glass.
For all that you get, it's not all
that expensive.
To find out more about it, see
your local glass distributor, or write
for our free booklets to: Dept. F95,
Solarcool, PPG Industries, Inc.,
One Gateway Center, Pittsburgh,
Pa. 15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future


1. Professional Office Building, Panama City,
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Architect: James Graham Chapman
Contractor: Jean Mordellet
2. Roanoke Office E uI1ir,.l Phoenix, Arizona
Architect: E. Logan Campbell
Contractor: Shuart Corporation
3. Rusty Scupper Restaurant, Oakland,
California
Architect: Sandy & Babcock
Contractor: Williams & Burrows, Inc.
4. Tucker Office Building, Atlanta, Georgia
Architect: Arkhora & Associates
Contractor: Hails Construction







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September/October 1975


,- iv


FA/31


























Pen and ink drawing done by student-inmate


Inmates Learn Drafting


Student working on drafting problem
at Union Correctional Institution


More than 50 inmates of the Florida
correctional system are giving up the
classic act of drawing an X across each
day on a calendar in favor of drawing
floor plans and elevations. Instead of idly
marking time by crossing off dates, the
men are in drafting classes, learning more
valuable ways to use pencils.
And more will learn architectural
drafting skills as drafting classes are
opened in two more institutions next
year, according to the Florida Depart-
ment of Offender Rehabilitation.
The men spend up to a year in
half-day sessions learning drafting from
lettering through production of a com-
plete set of working drawings of a
2,000-square-foot, two-story house. The
work "must be good enough to hand to a
builder," according to Charles Beatty,
who teaches two classes at Union Correc-
tional Institution near Raiford.
"For the most part they (inmates)
seem more interested than the usual
public school students," Beatty said.
"For one thing they have asked for this
course. And they are screened with a
test."
That is also true at Sumter Correc-
tional Institution near Bushnell where
former draftsman George Kirkwood
teaches the other two classes.


"If a man wants to learn to become a
draftsman he has all the opportunity in
the world right here," Kirkwood said.
Kirkwood's goal with the men is to
help them achieve a proficiency level of
at least junior draftsmen. He estimates
that two-thirds of his graduates could
step right into employment at that level
and then learn more with experience.
"Some of them could start right in as
architectural draftsmen," Kirkwood said.
"I'm proud of the work that they do."
One man who has graduated from
Kirkwood's class was hired by DOR as a
draftsman. He has since been promoted
to cost estimator in material take-off.
How well the other graduates have
fared is not known. DOR began for the
first time this year to follow up on


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


f i ~


FA/32


graduates to see how the various types of
vocational training has affected them
after release. More than 1,500 are in
vocational training now.
Statistics show that 62 per cent of
those in the state correctional system do
not have any occupational skill. And
most have not finished high school. Thus
both vocational and academic training are
provided.
For the drafting course graduates who
must remain incarcerated after finishing
the training there are sometimes inmate
drafting positions. Some men design
projects under supervision of staff mem-
bers.
Those who complete the course and
are released leave with a certificate from
the State Department of Education. The
state education department certifies the
course material and the instructors under
the same criteria used in public schools.
Those who have completed only part of
the course are issued certificates of partial
completion. The certificates list on the
reverse side the level of attainment
achieved.
Those to be released have the aid of
vocational placement counselors who
work at each major institution to help the
men find jobs.


HELP

AMERICA

WORK.


Hire the

ex-offender.
He'll work a lot harder
than someone who hasn't been
to jail, because he
doesn't want to end up back
in it. So if you have ajob to give,
call the National Alliance of
Businessmen. Get people off
the welfare rolls,
and on the payrolls.

SThe National
SAlliance
t of Businessmen


P A Public Service of This Publication
S& The Advertising Council


Illc;a*
4$PI~,






RECENT PROJECTS


S't'^f-i BHIIIII '' '


Swimming Pool and Bath House for
Palm Springs North Park/School

Architect:
Leff & Alexander, Architects of Miami

The facility will serve the community
and the public school located adjacent to
the site which is in northwest Dade
County.
Materials used are split-face fluted
block exterior walls, and exposed con-
crete parapet.



Newsnotes


FLORIDA SOUTH WINNERS
Proud winners of the annual Design Awards
Competition sponsored by the Florida South
Chapter of the AIA are shown as they displayed
their glass plaques during the Design Awards
dinner at the Marriott Hotel (Aug. 2) in Miami.
The winners were chosen by a jury of AIA
members including Donald Singer and Philip
Rickman, both of Ft. Lauderdale, and Robert
Curry of Delray Beach.
Shown are (left to right) Don Lee of
Borroto and Lee, who won first place for the
design of Lee's own home; South Miami Archi-
tect Charles Harrison Pawley, who took second
place for the design of his own office; Arthur
Pyle, a designer for the firm of Barry Sugarman,
third place winners for a home in South Miami,
and fourth place winner Lester A. Pancoast,
who is also Vice President/President Designate
of the Chapter, for his design of a community
center.


The Bank of Miami's New Building

Architect:
Fraga & Associates of Coral Gables

The ground level exterior of the new
Bank of Miami building is of bronze
aluminum and a tinted glass storefront
rising above a new granite sidewalk.
Above, the building is surfaced with
white aluminum columns bordering
tinted glass panels, with a concrete fascia
at the top and bottom.
FERENDINO APPOINTED FSBA
Governor Reubin O'D. Askew announced
that Andrew J. Ferendino, FAIA, Chairman of
the Board of Ferendino/Grafton/Spillis/Cande-
la, Architects-Engineers-Planners, Miami, has
been appointed to the Florida State Board of
Architecture for a four-year term.
Ferendino has been registered to practice
architecture in Florida since 1936.
He joins other Board members, Harry E.
Burns, Jr., Jeffe G. Hoxie, R. Carroll Peacock
and William S. Morrison.









Calendar

National Trust for Historic Preservation
29th Annual Meeting
Boston, Massachusetts
October 8-12
Florida-Caribbean Theatre Design Conference
Florida Atlantic University
October 10-14
CRSI Design Award Entries Due
November 15
Conference on Architecture and the Justice System
Arlington, Va.
November 16-18


Largo Medical Center


Architect:
Peter Marich, Associates, Inc.
of Largo, Florida

Largo will soon have one of the most
modern medical centers in the country.
The Largo Medical Center will initially
be a 246-bed facility with provisions for
an additional three floors of 82 beds
each.
The center will feature a structural
bay system that is 23 feet wide, with
31-foot and 19-foot spans. Bethlehem
Steel Corporation provided about 700
tons of structural steel shapes for this
project.


September/October 1975


FA/33









































































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FIE OFIE FRNT R FR ITEIR


FA/34 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


























DUNAN


BRICK









Welcome**
Florida
Association
of the
American
Institute of
Architect's
Convention
October 2-5


ORLANDO HYATT
HOTEL WORLD
800/228-9000 Gets You Hyatt Worldwide
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The Award
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1974 Merit Award in recognition
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1974 Merit Award
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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
Controlled Circulation Postage Paid
Miami, Florida




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University of Florida
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