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Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00220
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: July-August 1975
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00220
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        3-6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text




















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Pages
3-6
missing
from
original







The Florida Architect

Volume 25 Number 4 July/August 1975


CONTENTS

IM PACT ....................................................... 3



Letters ................................... ............. 8



Advertisers ................................... .......... 8



What Price Security?

by William R. Brockway, AIA ............... 9



The Architect Interview

by Dr. John M. Turner ........................... 11



Florida Central Design Awards ................. 12



Recent Projects .......................................... 20



Newsnotes .............................................. 20


The Interview 11


Design Awards 12


Y ;- .-3 --- . "r -' -< -" -


Calendar .................................... ............


1975 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
William F. Bigoney
Howard Bochiardy
William Brainard
Ellis W. Bullock
Carl Gerken
Norman M. Giller
Martin Gundersen
Carl Gutmann, Jr.
William K. Harris
Jerome A. James
William Jollay
Walter L. Keller
Charles E. King FAIA
Bertram Y. Kinsey, Jr.
Robert H. Levison FAIA
Stephen Little
John McCormick
Harry G. Morris
Richard H. Morse
Robert F. Petersen
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Francis R. Walton FAIA
Jack West
Robert L. Woodward


21 RecentProjects 20


FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1975

James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, President
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758

Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, Vice President
President Designate
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814

Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Secretary
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-2551

James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
5020 Cypress Street, Suite 211
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 872-8407


Cover: Arbor Office Center, Clear-
water, Florida
Honor Award in Large Com-
mercial Buildings
Next Issue: 61st Annual FAAIA
Convention Issue






DIRECTORS OF FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker, FAIA
1000 N. Ashley Street, Suite 806
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-0381

Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of The
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947

GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
David E. Clavier/Editor
Richard Schuster/l Ilustrator
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


FA/7


..... ....








Letters


Dear Editor:
I found your disciplined arti
Earth Architecture" most gratif
architects have asked about the lo
vation and restoration of several I
which briefly are as follows:
Crystal River Complex: near
Crystal River clearly shown on
State Museum at the site exp
aspects of the Complex; the sit
served although bulldozers alme
the South Temple mound by
shells for local road construction
ago and a trailer park encroaches
east. The Complex has been bad
time, rain and vegetation an
restored carefully to approximal
grandeur so that it can be perceive
by the public.
Lake Jackson: take the road f
see north toward Havanna, at
beyond 1-10 turn right toward La
the road marked "state arche(
Three of the seven mounds are
well preserved, the remaining four
ownership and could be crushed
to provide sanitary land fill ove
garbage dumps. The entire site
sembled in public ownership,
restored. Time is running out c
best preserved site.
Mount Royal: location withhe
site is not protected and is bein
dalized resulting in accelerated
heedless destruction. The state
and registered the site as a Natio
but has not acquired the prop
nately. Possibly as a Bicentenni
Putnam County Commissioners c
the State and/or Federal Gover
quire this exceptionally importar
view of both eventual architect
and immediate establishment of a
tion area including a boat ran
John's River. I have discussed
Schweizer, FAIA, who is explori
at the State level.
All of the several hundred
sites in Florida cannot, and sh
acquired, preserved and restore
above and others like them are
worthy. The Governor should u
stantial resources of the Florida
the Department of History and
Florida Council for the Arts, tl
sociation of the American Ins
chitects and other interested
individuals to preserve and rest
irreplaceable heritage before var
dozers destroy what little remain
Yours very truly,
WILLIAM M(



Dear Editor:
As an architect trained in tl
System, it appears that architect
reduced to such bare bones tha
bury them like dogs bury their be


cle "Florida's
ying. Several
cation, preser-
historical sites

the City of
road maps; a
plains certain
e is now pre-
st destroyed
quarrying its
n a few years
to the south-
ly eroded by
d should be
te its original
ed more easily

rom Tallahas-
,out 6 miles
ke Jackson on
logical site".
protected and
Share in private
flat tomorrow
er neighboring
should be as-
preserved and
on our State's

Id because the
g terribly van-
erosion and
has surveyed
>nal landmark,
lerty unfortu-
al project the
would join with
rnment to ac-


Dear FAAIA:
I would like to express by greatest thank
you and appreciation for the $150.00 for my
expenses for the National VICA competition in
Washington, D.C.
I would like you to know that I had a great
time in our nations capitol and saw lots of
interesting things which will be in my memory
for many years to come.
I am only sorry to say that I did not place in
the first three positions in the national contest.
I still would like for you to know that your
contribution was very much appreciated.
Sincerely,
Angela Zahlten

Gentlemen:
Apparently your story about FAPAC in the
May/June issue of your Journal was not in-
tended to bring congratulations but money.
The purpose of this letter is to commend you
for the leadership in waking up to the impor-
tance of being much more aware and more
active in legislative matters.
As I speak to civic and service organizations,
my main point is to make them aware that they
have a duty and responsibility to themselves
and the public to assist in passing constructive
legislation and killing bad legislation.
The legislative process is a continuous and
necessary vehicle by which all of us can assist in
improving government.
Sincerely,
WILLIAM R. CONWAY
State Representative
District 29


Advertisers



Architectural Products ............................. 19



Cabot's Stain ....................... (second cover) 2



Dunan Brick ..........................(third cover) 23



Pavlow Office Furniture.......................... 22



PPG ...................................... .............. 18



Professional Services .................................. 22



W.R. Grace ........................... ......... ..... 10



THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT encourages com-
munications from its readers and reserves the
right to edit for style and/or economy. We
assume that any letter, unless otherwise
stipulated, is free for publication in this journal.
Please address correspondence to: Editor, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, 7100 N. Kendall Dr.
No. 203, Miami, Florida 33156.


It site with the -' ** "f '.t ?" f- '' ^ **- . .'-,.-I," ,- .- .' .(' ',.', ,jI-,t .
ral restoration '' - 9 :-- -.'
I public recrea- Sb -'' "' : ', 's J ^*,*y*-'- -4" 14 ..4-"A-" L'' "'
ip on the St. '-a, 0*. -4 iW &' '"-".'- ,W -- -,. i i '..-, '' '' .. ,
this with Nils 4 4 - --- -'-. f. . ~-, -,4'-- "" ,
ng possibilities ,- ",-2 A -* -- ', '

pre-Columbian ~ :
should not, be o3 [ "
d. But the 3 4 1
exceptionally -- ', 's s-i* ~ -~ -W 0 *- e
utilize the sub- '*k-v 14 A*' O, ',k 0;'i S e.---:'. 'i-44--. --- '
State Museum, '6 ; *--, '. 4 - '-p. -. p "* ',. ..-
Archives, the -- ~- t .- '. i ..
he Florida As- ,,i -25 oVt_-*- -o. :B f. ^ .- ..-*- *t--*-f-. _-I ,
stitute of Ar- :- ,. -' : Tr
groups and '-a-t si.BL8 X;. ,.Z
ore our State's 51 i ,t- ,* -
ndals and bull- F

b e-i-tt, ,|F$|T h # m. r ', --
ORGAN, FAIA. 4 ,,-
Jacksonville _-t



he Beaux Arts ; V S, b. W
cture has been : .-.4
t it's logical to A*m tmit^e- *w^iS3'
Jnes. ite%3 .fr. .e

Joe Balis, R.A. 11 1p v i.i : 1r,- i .. ,:, .. -_ -A, 8 .


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/8





"Locks were designed to keep honest people out?" True? We
have all heard that old cliche and, indeed there is some truth in it.
However, this is still inadequate reason for selecting anything less
than the very best security hardware for any house or building
that is worth constructing in the first place.
And what is the "very best" security hardware? Like so many
other questions in building design, this one has many answers.
Obviously, it is not practical to secure the front entrance of a
residence with a mechanism intended for bank vaults. For one
thing, the cost would be prohibitive probably somewhere
around five thousand dollars per door. But more importantly, the
bank vault look is simply not necessary to foil the average burglar
intent on breaking and entering a home.


What


Price


Security ?


BY William R. Brockway, AIA
Considerations
So we see that what is right depends on a couple of things.
First, it depends upon what is being protected and second, it
depends upon who is doing the breaking. Cost is also a
consideration, but in comparison to the total cost of the building
of its contents, definitely a minor consideration.
For most ordinary situations, homes and small businesses,
standard builder's hardware will provide what might be
considered adequate security. Why? Simply because the average
burglar is not interested in spending all night trying to open a
door that may not yield anything much after it is opened. The
more difficult you make his entry, the less likely he is to try.
Burglars may be lazy, but they are not stupid. A good strong
lock on the front door will do very little good if there are other
doors or windows which can be opened with little difficulty. To
be really secure, you need to provide approximately equal
protection on every possible means of entry to your house,
including such uncommon entrances as outside attic stairs, doors
to fireplace woodboxes, transoms and all windows.

Designs and Styles
Locksets come in many different designs and styles, including
some that only marginally qualify as security devices. Probably
the most common is the key-in-the-knob type lock, in which the
locking cylinder is imbedded in the handle that opens the door.
This is the most popular type of lock with commercial builders
because it is so easy to install. All that is necessary is to drill two
holes in the door and slip the lock in place. Takes about 20
minutes.
Unfortunately, most key-in-the-knob locksets (not all,
however) are very easily opened by slipping a thin knife blade or
celluloid credit card behind the beveled latch bolt and walking in.
Takes less time than using the key. If you choose a
key-in-the-knob lock, select one that has a deadlocking plunger
beside the latch bolt. This little gimmick, when depressed by
closing the door, locks the latchbolt in place so that it cannot be
withdrawn via the credit card trick.


A better quality lock (usually) is the mortise-type lock in
which the lock works are encased in a metal box which is mortised,
or set into, the wood of the door itself. A mortise lock cannot be
dismantled and removed from the door without opening the door
first. Mortise locks may be had with a number of locking devices,
including the beveled latch bolt normally used in key-in-the-knob
locks. More security is provided by a square cornered dead bolt
which, being neither spring loaded nor bevel faced like the usual
latch bolt, cannot be pried out of its keeper by ordinary means.
Once it is "thrown", or locked, it stays that way until withdrawn
by a key.
I There are many other types of standard locksets, such as rim


locks, cylinder locks without handles, unit locks and the like;
however, most of them are merely variations on either the
beveled bolt or deadbolt principle and most of what has been said
concerning key-in-the-knob and mortise locks applies to these
others as well.

Auxiliary Devices
There are, however a number of auxiliary locking devices,
which might be considered for additional security. The simplest,
and one of the best, is the common sliding bolt. These come in
two varieties, surface mounted and recessed. This is nothing more
than a round or square bolt, sliding in a track either in or on the
door, which can be inserted into a keeper on the door frame. It
can only be closed or opened from one side, but provides
excellent security at very low cost.
Another very good auxiliary locking device is the surface
mounted vertical bolt lock. It is operated by a thumbturn on the
inside and a key on the outside. In this lock, a vertical sliding bolt
travels through mating holes in the lock (on the door) and a
keeper (on the jamb), very much like a hinge pin connects the
two halves of a common butt hinge. Jimmying the pins in such a
lock is virtually impossible, although a talented thief might be
able to pick the cylinder.
Probably the least effective auxiliary lock is the familiar chain
and keeper which permit you to open the door a few inches to
see who is calling late at night. These locks are no stronger than
the screws that hold them in place and that is not very strong. If
you want to look at a caller before opening, a far better way is to
install a fish-eye lens peephole and/or an electric intercom.

Lock Pickers
Not too much has been said about the problem of locks being
picked. Most burglars who prey on houses and small businesses
are not lock pickers. It is usually easier to get in some other way.
However, lock pickers do exist and a good one can pick a
standard duty cylinder lock in less than a minute. If you have the
sort of valuables that might attract a lock picker, then high
security cylinders in all your locks would be a good investment.


July/August 1975


FA/9




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2. Your Zonolite Roof Deck
incorporates three major design
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Insulperm insulation board, and
new Zonolite Base Ply Fasteners.
All three speed drying, permit the
application of built up roofing
within 48 hours.
3. Zonolite Roof Decks meet
strict new U values and have
earned Factory Mutual's Class I
rating for fire and wind resist-
ance. These are important
whether you're just after "shade


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a completely insulated building.
It doesn't take a very hard look to
see that Zonolite Roof Decks
represent a great value in dollars
and sense. Construction
Products Division, W. R. Grace
& Co., 321 Whooping Loop,
Altamonte Springs, FL 32701.


GRACE


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The Architect Interview:


SOME SUGGESTIONS
FROM A COLLEGE ADMINISTRATOR


BY John M. Turner, PH. D.
Santa Fe Community College

The economic life-blood of an ar-
chitectural firm flows from commissions
and contracts with clients. Very often,
the contracts are awarded as the result of
an interview with a prospective client on
a competitive basis with other architec-
tural firms. These interviews (considering
only the time elapsed during the actual
interview) generally consume very little
time; perhaps a half hour to an hour
duration. Thus, when one considers the
importance of the relatively brief inter-
view to an architectural firm, it is
surprising that in many instances, ap-
parently little planning or preparation
goes into the presentation.
An invitation extended to an architect
to make a presentation before a group is
often proceeded by submission to that
body of such preliminary documents as
GSA form 251, brochures, pamphlets,
and the like. Little will be said here in
regard to these items since the GSA form
is fairly standard and experience shows
that the majority of brochures and
pamphlets have been well prepared.
Suggestion No. 1

When your firm has been invited to
appear before the selection committee,
determine the date, time and place of the
presentation. Be particularly careful to
inform yourself as to the amount of time
allotted and plan your presentation to
remain within that time. This point


should be made quite emphatically:
courtesy to the interview group and
respect for those firms scheduled to
follow you require that every effort be
made to finish on time. The interview
group may indicate some division of the
time allotted such as 15-20 minutes for
your presentation and 10-15 minutes to
answer questions. If such a schedule is
not established, leave a few minutes to
answer questions anyway. Do not be
dismayed if you are given only 15-20
minutes to describe your firm and its
accomplishments. If you feel you cannot
adequately describe your firm in that
length of time, chances are you are
dwelling on things of great importance
and interest to you, rather than to the
interviewing group.

Suggestion No. 2

If possible, visit the site of the
interview beforehand and determine how
best to make your presentation. Make
observations as to seating arrangements -
where will the group be seated and where
should you stand to address them? Other
information you should obtain includes:
are there adequate electrical outlets and
are they located conveniently? Are there
tables available to hold projectors, flip
charts or other aids? Are there projection
screens in the interview room? Insofar as
possible, try to use your own equipment.


This will save you from being faced with
unfamiliar or faulty equipment at the last
moment (supplied by a well-meaning
host) and spoiling what would otherwise
have been a winning interview.

Suggestion No. 3

Consider very carefully the individual
persons, as well as the total number of
people you intend to bring with you to
the interview. "The more the merrier" is
not a good rule-of-thumb here. It is
simply not necessary to bring all the
principals of the firm and introduce each
of them. Firms which bring too many
people to the interview run the risk of
creating confusion in the minds of the
interview group in later deliberations as
to who was representing a given firm. If
five to ten firms are being interviewed on
the same day, and each firm brings four
or five people to represent the firm, the
number of individuals the interviewing
group needs to keep sorted out becomes
unmanageable. Probably no more than
two, or in some special cases, three,
individuals need to appear before the
selection group. In the case of large firms,
one principal is sufficient to present an
overall picture of the firm's general
capabilities and specific areas of ex-
pertise. The architect who would have
direct responsibility for the project could
then take over. (continued on FA/21)


July/August 1975


FA/11






JURY:
Robert L. Durham, FAIA
S. Scott Ferebee, Jr., FAIA
Ellamae Ellis League, FAIA


SPONSORS:
The Producers' Council, Florida West Coast Chapter
Florida Central Chapter, AIA
Architects Annual Building Award Association


Presenting the



Florida Central Design Awards


wt eraomn


ARBOR OFFICE CENTER
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA
ROWE-HOLMES ASSOCIATES, AR-
CHITECTS, INC.




FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
HEADQUARTERS COMPLEX
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
C. RANDOLPH WEDDING, A.I.A.,
ARCHITECT

BEACON WOODS VILLAGE
SQUARE COMPLEX
PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA
EUGENE R. SMITH & ASSOCIATES,
INC., ARCHITECTS


THE VISIT TO THE SITE REINFORCED THE JURY'S
IMPRESSION THA TA MARRIAGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND
NATURE HAS CREATED AN ENVIRONMENT OF UNUSUAL
QUALITY. PERHAPS THE AWARD SHOULD GO TO THE
PERSON, WHETHER OWNER, LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT OR
ARCHITECT WHO MADE THE DECISION TO SAVE THE
HANDSOME TREES.
THE WAY ONE IS LED INTO THE CENTRAL PLAZA IS
ADMIRABLE. THE PARKING IS SKILLFULLY SCREENED
AND, EVEN THOUGH THE HIGH PORTION OF THE
COMPLEX IS ONE FLOOR UP, THE SERIES OF PLATFORMS
MAKES THE APPROACH VERY PLEASANT.
ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE IS BEAUTIFULLY
FINISHED AND HONESTLY EXPRESSED. THE NATURAL-
ISTIC LANDSCAPING CREATES AN ENVIRONMENT IN
WHICH IT MUST BE VERY PLEASANT TO WORK.
THE JURY, AFTER CAREFUL DELIBERATION, FEELS
THAT OUT OF ALMOST ONE HUNDRED PROJECTS
REVIEWED, THAT THIS PROJECT MERITS BEING SINGLED
OUT FOR A "FIRST" HONOR AWARD, THE BEST IN THE
SHOW


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


LARGE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS


HONOR AWARD:







MERIT AWARDS:


louth etelon


FA/12


MP-'I-
.. . '.
.... ..r -






SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS


MERIT AWARD:
SYSTEMS EXECUTIVE OFFICES
TAMPA, FLORIDA
LEE SCARFONE & ASSOCIATES, -
A. A., ARCHITECTS


MERIT AWARD:
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS &
LOAN OF CLEARWATER
DUNEDIN, FLORIDA
WILLIAMS & WALKER ARCHI-
TECTS CHARTERED


4-rj~i


J" T T-1"


MERIT AWARD:
CARROLLWOOD BRANCH OFFICE,
FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS &
LOAN ASSOCIATION
TAMPA, FLORIDA
McEL VY, JENNEWEIN, STEFANY &
HOWARD, ARCHITECTS


o
A6A &j I

mule~jis-771


- .


July/August 1975


IRLe~_r38


F" .-t-


FA/13






RESIDENTIAL SINGLE FAMILY


RESIDENCE FOR MR. & MRS.
TONY LETO
TAMPA, FLORIDA
EUGENE R. SMITH & ASSOCIATES,
INC., ARCHITECTS


MERIT AWARDS:


A DESIGN OF SIMPLE THREE DIMENSIONAL CLARITY,
WELL RELATED TO THE NATURAL BEAUTY OF THE SITE.
THE SEPARATION OF THE PRINCIPAL LIVING AREAS
INTO DISTINCTIVE UNITS CREATES EXTERIOR LIVING
AREAS OF UNUSUAL CHARM.
THE CIRCULATION OF THE PLAN WAS NO DOUBT THE
DESIRE OF THE OWNER. WHILE IT MIGHT NOT SUIT THE
AVERAGE FAMILY, THE JURY FINDS THE ENTIRE
COMPOSITION TO HAVE GREA T APPEAL.


HONOR AWARD:


**' -* .-~' r.r ^. -5 -.Y r If f r f-^ -*- *
' ** * /*^-*- .*^ i -.f.f-f .-<; .


INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS


MERIT AWARD:


HA VATAMPA MANUFACTURING
AND STORAGE FACILITY AND
CORPORATE HEADQUARTERS
TAMPA, FLORIDA
McEL VY, JENNEWEIN, STEFANY &
HOWARD, ARCHITECTS


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


THREE SPECULATIVE HOUSES
(HOUSE No. 3)
PINELLAS COUNTY, FLORIDA
ARG ARCHITECTURE, AR-
CHITECTS

BIERLEY RESIDENCE
TAMPA, FLORIDA
JOHN HOWEY, ASSOCIATES, AR-
CHITECTS

RESIDENCE IN BEACH PARK
TAMPA, FLORIDA
FRIEDMAN & MacKENNA, A.I.A.,
ARCHITECTS, INC.


FA/14





RECREATIONAL BUILDINGS


HONOR AWARD:


AFRICAN VILLAGE AMPHI-
THEATER
BUSCH GRADENS TAMPA, FLO-
RIDA
PECKHAM-GUYTON, INC., ARCHI-
TECTS


THE STRONG SCULPTURAL QUALITY OF THE DARK
ROOF OF THIS SIMPLE STRUCTURE HAD MUCH APPEAL
FOR THE JURY. THE COMPLEMENTARY LIGHT SAND-
BLASTED WALLS WHICH LEAD ONE TO IT, SKILLFULLY
INTEGRATE THE CONTOURS OF THE SITE WITH THE
FORM OF THE SHELTER. MECHANICAL FACILITIES HAVE
BEEN HONESTLY EXPRESSED IN A WAY WHICH DOES NOT
DETRACT FROM THE SIMPLICITY OF THE ROOF.
THE DOMINANT SHAPE OF THE FORM DOES MUCH TO
ADD INTEREST TO AN AREA WHERE MANY THINGS ARE
HAPPENING AROUND IT. THE JURY FINDS IT A
SIGNIFICANT PIECE OF REAL ARCHITECTURE IN AN
UNREAL WORLD OF FANTASY.


CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE GOLF
AND TENNIS CLUB COMPLEX
TAMPA, FLORIDA
EUGENE R. SMITH & ASSOCIATES,
INC., ARCHITECTS


ST. PETERSBURG MUNICIPAL
PIER
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
HARVARD-JOLLY & ASSOCIATES,
ARCHITECTS


RESIDENTIAL MULTI-DWELLING

.-$-- ..a- ..-r-7,.: 7. ;- -




1A -


PERHAPS BECAUSE THERE IS SO MUCH MEDIOCRE
MULTI-HOUSING BEING PRODUCED IN AMERICA, THE
JURY FOUND ITSELF CAPTIVATED BY THE EXCELLENT
UNIT FLOOR PLANS, THE INTEREST OF THE EXTERIOR
COMPOSITION AND THE QUALITY OF ENVIRONMENT
PRODUCED BY THE SITE PLAN. THE CLUSTERS HA VE ALL
THE CHARM AND SIMPLICITY OF A WHITE-WASHED
GREEK VILLAGE. PRIVACY IS MAINTAINED BETWEEN
UNITS AND WHILE MANY GARAGE DOORS FACE THE
STREET, THEY DO NOT SEEM TO DETRACT FROM THE
CHARM OF THE INDIVIDUAL ENTRANCE COURTS. THE
SPACES BETWEEN THE CLUSTERS HAVE BEEN
ATTRACTIVELY CONCEIVED TO ADD TO THE OVERALL
QUALITY OF THE PROJECT.


HONOR AWARD: FAIRWAY TOWNHOUSES
CARROLLWOOD VILLAGE TAM-
PA, FLORIDA
EUGENE R. SMITH & ASSOCIATES,
INC., ARCHITECTS


MERIT AWARDS:


THE CLUSTERS ON THE LAKE
WINTER HA VEN, FLORIDA
JAMES K. COLEMAN, JR., ARCHI-
TECT

THE BREAKERS CONDOMINIUM
REDINGTON BEACH, FLORIDA
ROWE-HOLMES ASSOCIATES, AR-
CHITECTS, INC.


July/August 1975


MERIT AWARDS:


FA/15









RELIGIOUS BUILDINGS


HONOR AWARD:


CHURCH OF THE HOL Y CROSS
ST PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
A NDERSON-JOHNSON-HENR Y-
PARRISH, INC., ARCHITECTS


A SOLUTION FOR A COMMUNITY PARISH PROVIDING A
FUNCTIONAL WORSHIP SPACE WELL ADAPTED TO THE
NEW LITERGY OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. THE CRISP
CYLINDRICAL CONCRETE FORMS CREATE AN INTEREST-
ING FACADE AND ARE REPEATED EFFECTIVELY AT THE
CHANCEL. THE MAJOR AND MINOR ENTRANCES ARE
WELL RELATED TO THE PARKING AREAS ON EACH SIDE
WHICH THE JURY HOPES WILL BE ULTIMATELY
ATTRACTIVELY LANDSCAPED. THE ARCHITECTURAL
QUALITY OF THE CHANCEL FURNISHING ADDS TO THE
QUALITY OF THE TOTAL COMPOSITION.


THE SHARP CONTRAST BETWEEN A WORN-OUT OLD
WHITE HOUSE AND AN EFFECTIVE PROFESSIONAL
OFFICE RAISES THE PROJECT TO AN HONOR AWARD IN
COMPETITION TO A LARGE FIELD OF ENTRIES. THE
JURY'S CONCERN ABOUTSOME CIRCULATION PA TTERNS
OF THE PLAN A RE OVERCOME BY ADMIRATION FOR THE
0 VERA L L SOL UTION AND THE A TTRA CTI VENESS OF THE
ENTIRE COMPOSITION.


ADDITIONS & RENOVATIONS


HONOR AWARD:





MERIT AWARDS:


WILLIAMS & WALKER OFFICE
BUILDING
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA
WILLIAMS & WALKER ARCHI-
TECTS CHARTERED

DON CESAR RESORT HOTEL
ST PETERSBURG BEACH, FLORI-
DA ROBERT D. VODICKA, ARCHI-
TECT

YMCA OF CLEARWATER
CLEARWATER, FLORIDA
MUDANO ASSOCIATES ARCHI-
TECTS, INC.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/16









INSTITUTIONAL BUILDINGS


MERIT AWARD:;


ST. PETERSBURG JUDICIAL
BUILDING
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA
ANDERSON-JOHNSON-HENRY-
PARRISH. INC.. ARCHITECTS


EDUCATIONAL BUILDINGS

HONOR AWARD: BAUDER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
SEMINOLE, FLORIDA
PRINDLE-PATRICK AND PART-
NERS, ARCHITECTS

A SIMPLE PLAN OF EFFECTIVELY INTER-RELATED
SPACES IS WELL SUITED TO AN OPEN PLANNED
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. THE REPETITION OF THE UNITS
ADDS TO CONSTRUCTION ECONOMY AND THIS IS
EFFECTIVELY EXPRESSED ON THE EXTERIOR OF THE
BUILDING. THE TOWER MASSES FORMED BY LAVATORY
AREAS OF THE PLAN GIVE A COHESIVE QUALITY TO THE
EXTERIOR COMPLIMENTED BY THE PLAIN HORIZONTAL
FRIEZE.
COLOR HAS BEEN USED ON THE INTERIOR IN AN
INTERESTING WAY ADDING INTEREST TO THE LARGE
OPEN AREAS. THE ARCHITECTURAL ENVIRONMENT
APPEARS TO BE WELL SUITED TO AN INNOVATIVE
EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AND ALL PRODUCED AT A
VERY MODEST BUDGET.


MERIT AWARDS:


PLANT CITY COMPREHENSIVE
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
PLANT CITY, FLORIDA
RANON, MclNTOSH, BARNARDO &
RAMIREZ, ARCHITECTS

PASCO-HERNANDO COMMUNITY
COLLEGE
DADE CITY, FLORIDA
JOHN WARREN WHITE, A.I.A., AR-
CHITECT


July/August 1975


;--s- r' fs_
a I


'' """ "'"'"
I;.
B.IPP~~N P~-
r.^'Le~lY-?I


FA/17
























_ _-R: .".i. - :.^o :-. '. .- ;.. .- : .; ..
-"........ ff ^ ^l ....
: 71 tl2%


PPG Solarcool active glass.


Its looks don't reflect its pce.


Compared to tinted glass,
Solarcool reflective glass can add
as little as 10% to the cost of the
total wall system.
Yet it brings virtually any type
of light-commercial building to life
with the unique and prestigious
esthetics that only reflective glass
can offer.
There's no limit to the effects
you can achieve. Wood, concrete,
masonry, and metal can all be
dramatically complemented
by reflective glass.
But besides good looks,
Solarcool reflective glass gives you
good performance, too.
Since it is reflective, it shields
the sun's glare and reduces heat
gain more efficiently than tinted


glass. So your air conditioning
system is more economical.
In cold climates it can save on
your heating costs, too. Because
it becomes an excellent insulator
when used in double-pane
construction.
So treat yourself and your
next building to the remarkable
beauty and excellent performance
of Solarcool reflective glass.
For all that you get, it's not all
that expensive.
To find out more about it, see
your local glass distributor, or write
for our free booklets to: Dept. F75,
Solarcool, PPG Industries, Inc.,
One Gateway Center, Pittsburgh,
Pa. 15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future


1. Professional Office Building, Panama City,
Florida
Architect: James Graham Chapman
Contractor: Jean Mordellet
2. Roanoke Office Building, Phoenix, Arizona
Architect: E. Logan Campbell
Contractor: Shuart Corporation
3. Rusty Scupper Restaurant. Oakland,
California
Architect: Sandy & Babcock
Contractor: Williams & Burrows, Inc.
4. Tucker Office Building, Atlanta, Georgia
Architect: Arkhora & Associates
Contractor: Hails Construction







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INDUSTRIES


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July/August 1975


FA/19


WNIZi~






RECENT PROJECTS


A...



-^ LSenate Dome in Tallahassee

SAmerican Express Regional Center TOPPING OUT the pre-engineered
dome over the Senate wing of Florida's
.. Architect: new $45 million state capitol building in
Walter E. Heller & Company Southeast Ferendino Grafton Spillis Candela Tallahassee are workmen for Elgin Con-
of Coral Gables struction Co., the Butler Builder in that
Architect of Record: area. The Triodetic structural system
Obst Associates, P.A. of Palm Beach Visitors to the Southern Regional measures 80-ft. in diameter and corres-
Operations Center of American Express ponds to a similar one to be installed over
The Heller building was designed in in Plantation, Florida will enter the the house chamber. The project, which is
total concept to serve the rapidly growing building through a sky-lit "atrium" lobby due for completion in 1976, was designed
needs of the Heller organization and with tinted glass ceiling, admitting light by Edward Durell Stone of New York
create a pleasant and open atmosphere from five stories above to the Florida and Reynolds, Smith & Hills of Jackson-
for day-to-day business, flora growing in planters below. ville.
...... .... ............................................................... ..........................
served as a courthouse for 83 years, until a new UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT HEAD
courthouse was constructed in 1973.
Se w s n o t e He also announced the Acceptance of the Iowa State University is looking for a Head
N W Florida Southern College Architectural District or Chairperson for the Department of Architec-
in Lakeland and the Casa de Josefina in High- ture. The position is a full time job for a
I land Park to the Register. permanent professor. This position is vacant as
The National Register is the nation's official of September 1, 1975 and is to be filled by July
E a 0" . ; listing of sites and properties of historical, 1, 1976.
C 'k X i Wfl r architectural and cultural significance. The qualifications for appointment are, (1)


DESIGN COMPETITION

The FAAIA recently held its 1975 Architec-
tural Competition Awards Program in the Host
Hotel, Tampa. From the 92 entries the jury
chose six awards of merit and two honorable
mentions.
The jury spent two days reviewing the slides
and supporting material to narrow the winners
to the eight. Above, the members of the jury
review one of the entries. They are, left to
right, Francis P. Gassner, FAIA of Memphis,
Marley Carroll, AIA of Charlotte and Harry A.
Golemon, FAIA of Houston.
The eight award winners will be featured in
the September/October 1975 THE FLORIDA
ARCHITECT.
CLAY COUNTY COURTHOUSE

Secretary of State Bruce A. Smathers re-
cently announced the acceptance of the former
Clay County Courhouse (January/February
1975 THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT) to the
National Register of Historic Places. The ar-
chitecturally significant old courthouse is one
of only four Florida 19th century courthouses
still standing. Completed in 1890, the building


e =-







STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP

Craig Thomson is the 1975 recipient of the
Andrew J. Ferendino Student Scholarship
Award, established by the firm of Ferendino/
Grafton/Spillis/ Candela, Architects, Engineers
and Planners, Miami. This award is granted
annually to the outstanding student of the
University of Florida Department of Architec-
ture.
Craig, born in Inyokern, California,
graduated from the University of Florida in
1972, bachelor of design in architecture, with
high honors. As a graduate student at the
university he is now working for a master of
arts in architecture. Craig was selected by the
college of architecture faculty as outstanding
student to receive this year's scholarship award.


Master of Architecture or equivalent, (2) Ar-
chitectural Registration in the United States,
(3) Administrative or managerial experience,
preferably in higher education and (4) teaching
experience in an accredited architectural
program. Applications are due by October 30,
1975 to:
Rabindra N. Mukerjea, Chairman
Search Committee
College of Engineering
104 Marston Hall
Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa 50010




In Memoriam

The Association was truly saddened by
the passing of R. Daniel Hart, Past Presi-
dent of the Northwest Chapter, AIA, and
Past President of the Florida Association
of Architects. Mr. Hart took part in the
unification of the three AIA Chapters in
Florida in the 1940's which helped to
bring our Association to what it is today.
We deeply regret the loss of one of our
past leaders.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


- --_ .
% .> ,-- *


FA/20






THE ARCHITECT INTERVIEW
(continued from FA/11)

Furthermore, the image projected by
your representatives should be weighed.
A firm may have on its staff the most
brilliant designer in the country, but if
that person has an abrasive manner, or
appears uncertain or unconvincing, the
chances of that firm being selected may
be significantly reduced. In this same
regard, the interviewee should avoid
presenting an impression of over-
confidence and glibness lest the image of
"con-artist" be projected.

Suggestion No. 4

In selecting the best means for
presenting their accomplishments, many
firms use photographic slides of buildings
they have designed. This is an excellent
approach, but several comments are in
order. First, it is not necessary to show
slides of every building you ever de-
signed! Second, it is doubtful that
showing 10 or 20 photos of the same
building is beneficial. Third, use only
those shots which illustrate some par-
ticular technique or show features that
are otherwise pertinent to the specific
presentation. Fourth, use only good
photos. Nothing is more detrimental to
an effective presentation than a murky,
unfocused scene accompanied by the
comment, "If the light were better, you
could see how well we handled space
relationships in this building."
In choosing slides for the presentation,
establish some kind of selection priority.
An example of such a system might be
(1) recency of construction, (2) relevance
to the proposed project, and (3) compara-
ble budget to that of the proposed
project.

Suggestion No. 5

Try to anticipate questions that are
likely to be asked by the group. Typical
questions generally involve such areas as
(1) the length of time required for the
preparation of design and working draw-
ings and when your architectural firm
could begin work on the project, (2)
approximate cost per square foot for the
proposed construction (or conversely,
how much square footage could be
constructed within a given budget), (3)
potential number of bidders expected to
be interested in the project, (4) method
used to advertise the project, (5)
proposed construction management,
supervision and inspection procedures,


(6) previous experience with similar
projects, and (7) an approximate fee
range.
Smaller firms which do not have
in-house engineering capabilities should
have several alternate consultants in the
various technical fields, if possible. The
reason for this is the prospective client
may have had (or heard of someone who
had) unhappy experiences with a consult-
ing firm previously. Thus, it is to the
architect's advantage not to be totally
committed to that particular firm!

Suggestion No. 6

In preparing for the interview, find out
as much as possible about the proposed
project. It is not necessary to go to the
interview with elaborate printed pro-
posals for handling the project, but it
would be advisable to formulate a few
thoughts as to specific approaches. The
architect must strike a fine balance
between the desires of his client on the
one hand and good architectural design
practices on the other.
In addition, for construction projects
involving the expenditure of public funds,
the architect must show that he is
knowledgeable about pertinent federal,
state and local regulations governing such
expenditures. This point becomes par-
ticularly important in executing contracts
between institutions (such as public
colleges) and contractors, where the
statutory requirements under which the
institution operates must prevail over
contractual agreements.

Suggestion No. 7

Finally, a few general comments on
the interview process: (1) where an
institution has existing buildings, don't
make derogatory comments about those
buildings or the architect who designed
them. This is like criticizing someone's
children-the parents may be aware of
their shortcomings, but they do not
appreciate hearing someone else discuss
them! (2) When addressing the interview
group, talk directly to them by maintain-
ing eye contact. Do not talk to the wall,
floor or ceiling. Visual contact helps
maintain mental contact. (3) Assume that
your audience is composed of intelligent,
adult business people who understand
why you want to be selected to design
their project. It is not necessary to
convince them that your sole interest is a
desire to "help" them. (4) Adjust your
presentation to the group being ad-
dressed. The same approach may not


work for faculty groups as for trustees or
for a group composed of attorneys,
engineers or other architects. To this end,
determine beforehand, if possible, the
composition of the interview group. (5)
The use of visual aids has been discussed
previously. One final point concerns the
use of flip charts. These can be very
effective if used properly. The main thing
to keep in mind is to limit the amount of
information contained on a single chart.
For example, if you want to show how
certain economic or construction indica-
tors have varied with time, it is confusing
to present six to ten of these indices
plotted on the same chart, showing
monthly variations over a span of several
years. The average person would require
several minutes to study and comprehend
the significance of such a chart. Since you
will likely spend less than a minute on
that particular chart, the net effect on the
group is confusion, or at best, non-
comprehension. A good rule-of-thumb
would be "keep it simple and straight-
forward."
Several architectural firms have
pointed out to me that they make
presentations before selection committees
fairly frequently. This fact should further
emphasize the importance of preparing
for each interview. Putting together an
integrated, well-planned presentation
demands care and time. Since many of
the general points made here should be
applicable to most interviews, attention
to the details suggested will actually save
the firm time and help put its best foot
forward to maximize the chance for
selection by the interview group. *


Calendar

AISC Award Program- submissions due
August 23, 1975
61st Annual FAAIA Convention
October 2-5, 1975
Guild for Religious Architecture
Regional Conference Duke Univ.
October 10-12, 1975
Florida Concrete & Products Assn.
5th Annual Award Program
November 7, 1975
AIA Board Meeting
September 4-13, 1975


July/August 1975


FA/21







Professional


Services


V U Ardaman&Associates, Inc. W ILDER ASSOCIATES, INC.
Consulting Engineers in CONSULTING ENGINEERS


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


OFFICE FURNITURE, INC.
2801 S.W. 31st AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133
444-8221


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FA/22















-






UNAN BRICK CNtIWO=g
S*. P O r PANELLING AND

BRC PRO -M -RA -
A T GEOGI STN S1P GERI PINS LD

FAEDRC -


WILIMBUC AND OW-RS
INTERSTATE WA INR-STADe

KNG MONTI FUNIHE A Wk CA




D3N MAN OTE CIAI5MT-LL -
FRD OUT TO F*'H- O TF- LOAIN AN

19I505- TkS VAIT TRA 15 A\ALA
F5 *RO AT S4 RE. 40r S-r' MIM A













LA WOT MIM HLA -A





THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
Controlled Circulation Postage Paid
i- Miami, Florida


Univrl y of *4 U,,,a f .
SAr.'t. ine Arts Library
291 ;'-. lph *,.r,.r fHall
ainv'vi Le, Fla. 3


The Florida Association of The American Institute of Architects
61st ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBITS
Orlando Hyatt House
Kissimmee, Florida
October 2 October 5, 1975 *


Further information about the Convention
may be obtained from the FAAIA office:
7100 N. Kendall Dr., Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156


I I -' 1 111 ~-1111


[impatv




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