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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Advertisers
 Florida's earth architecture
 Estancia prize--winning design
 Miami-Dade community college downtown...
 Calendar
 National airlines' superhangar
 The corporate showroom
 FAPAC - "What is it?"
 Recent projects & Newsnotes
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00219
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: May 1975
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00219
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Advertisers
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Florida's earth architecture
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Estancia prize--winning design
        Page 12
    Miami-Dade community college downtown campus
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Calendar
        Page 17
    National airlines' superhangar
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The corporate showroom
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    FAPAC - "What is it?"
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Recent projects & Newsnotes
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Back Cover
        Page 27
        Page 28
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.

















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3. Rusty Scupper Restaurant, Oakland,
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Contractor: Hails Construction








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The Florida Architect

Volume 25 Number 3 May/June 1975


CONTENTS

Letters ................................................ 4


Advertisers ........................................ .... 4


Florida's Earth Architecture
by William N. Morgan, FAIA .................. 6


Estancia Prize-winning Design .................. 12


Miami Dade Community College
Downtown Campus ............................ 13


Calendar ................................... ............. 17


National Airlines'Superhangar ................. 18


FAPAC "What Is It?"
by Ernest Daffin, AIA ........................ 20


The Corporate Showroom ........................ 23


Recent Projects .......................................... 25


Newsnotes .................................................... 25


1975 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
William F. Bigoney
Howard Bochiardy
William Brainard
Ellis W. Bullock
Carl Gerken
Norman M. Giller
Martin Gundersen
Carl Gutmann, Jr.
William K. Harris
Jerome A. James
William Jollay
Walter L. Keller
Charles E. King FAIA
Bertram Y. Kinsey, Jr.
Robert H. Levison FAIA
Stephen Little
John McCormick
Harry G. Morris
Richard H. Morse
Robert F. Petersen
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Francis R. Walton FAIA
Jack West
Robert L. Woodward


-^/^ 7


Earth Architecture 6


MD Community College 13


What is FAPAC? 20


FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1975

James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, President
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758

Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, Vice President
President Designate
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814

Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Secretary
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-2551

James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
5020 Cypress Street, Suite 211
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 872-8407


Cover: Amelia Island Dunehouse
project
Next Issue: Florida Central Design
Awards








DIRECTORS OF FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker, AIA
1000 N. Ashley Street, Suite 806
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-0381

Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of The
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947

GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
David E. Clavier/Editor
Jay Keenan/ Advertising Representative
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Cp,1lrr,3I Jurn ..l r F-i-.-I .- Fiulil,,ij or tl- .-In-, 1:31!
lntll JL, *.-i 'A,. riirEc1;, I 1C., I *..,r-d -,do ptrih. n ia u, lra V ;-)( aho a Flotlid1 C-),oorr,~l ir. not
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Dr,., I, Mom,, Fli..1.l _31cA T.,lepni.nF (0 *.i1h I A J4 Oprn-nj i6OrElcll n. corr bulolse .rE
ri~ .~~e,:d' I~tho., of Iii- Editor 01 thm Fi.4, .d A,.o.c.al cu of tin 41A. Edt... .,l n m.,irl ji m
ti, t~pi,rt~a o0,.ll1jza lull ,..fair ; yi.rn tc. Ire aut1.., ar.dJ .:. THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT aua


FA/3








Letter



Gentlemen (Persons),
The January-February issue was an excellent
survey of older buildings in Florida re: the
North Florida Courthouse Survey by F.W.
Wiedenmann.
Of most exemplary merit was the article on
the Villa Koehne designed by Walter Burley
Griffin and obviously rendered by Marion
Mahony Griffin. I sent a copy of this article by
Marta McBride Galicki and Gunther Stamm to
Dr. H. Allan Brooks at the University of
Toronto and he was most appreciative of it.
Robert C. Broward, AIA


Dear Editor:
Thank you for mention of "Danish Design
in the Seventies," in the March/April issue
(page 25). Please note that Jorge Arango made
the statement, "Good Design is the perfection
of the essential" not King.
Thank you,
Bill King, Principal
A.1. GROUP, INC.


Gentlemen:
Are we so devoid of Architecture for our
magazine that we must use three pages for a
booze party, and six pages for nostalgia or
50% of the available space for rubbish.
Better to skip an issue than to indulge our
impressed budget on flights of Trivia.
Sincerely,
E. Abraben Associates, Inc.
E. Abraben, President


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT encourages com-
munications from its readers and reserves the
right to edit for style and/or economy. We
assume that any letter, unless otherwise
stipulated, is free for publication in this journal.
Please address correspondence to: Editor, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, 7100 N. Kendall Dr.
No. 203, Miami, Florida 33156.


Advertisers



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Dunan Brick Yard ...................................... 27

Hartco Wood Foam-Tile .............................. 21

Pavlow Office Furniture .............................. 26

PPG ..................................... ............... 2


Professional Services .................................... 26

Frank J. Rooney, Inc. .............................. 17


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I I


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FA/4



































I Architect: William G. Crawford, AIA, Ft. Lauderdale


Who raised the roof?
Who took this big bank and made it bigger? Without an aesthetic ripple.
Without compromising the original architectural design. Without
interruption of any banking business. Without inconvenience to customers
or personnel. Without water damage to top-floor tenants when the roof
was raised.
Answer: us.

Caldwell- Scott
Construction Company
8751 West Broward Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33317 Phone: 792-3000
A Subsidiary of
4 Gulfstream Land & Development Corp.







FLORIDA'S



EARTH



ARCHITECTURE


By WILLIAM MORGAN, FAIA


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Shell Ring Enclosure, Atlantic Coast, ca. 2000 B.C.


I I


Editor's Note: The author heads the firm of William Morgan Architects
with offices in Jacksonville and Washington, D.C. His interest in earth
architecture stems from his research at the Harvard Graduate School of
Design during the 1950's. Since that time he has resided and traveled in the
Far East, Europe, the Middle East, Southeast Asia and Latin America. In
1964 he began compiling information on earth architecture with the
assistance of a Wheelwright Fellowship. Two years ago the Graham
Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts awarded him a grant to
assist in completing a comprehensive study on earth architecture, which
will be published in book form in collaboration with Dr. Ludwig Glaeser of
the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. On this and the succeeding
pages Mr. Morgan records the design conceptions of some of the earliest
and some of the more recent earth architecture in Florida.

The reason for our recurring interest in the earth architecture of
the last 2,500 years is simple: Earth is the material on which
architecture 'is based. Earth is available, inexpensive, easy to
shape, and not subject to deterioration as are wood and other
building materials. Maintenance can be facilitated by clay facings,
by grasses or similar surface vegetation, or by combining sandy
soil with shells or other stabilizing aggregates.
The earliest form of earth shaping to modify man's
environment were middens, refuse mounds. About 4,000 years
ago along the Georgia and South Carolina coasts shell rings
appeared. These rings are shaped middens, the repositories of
shells placed purposely by man over a period of many years. At
Sapelo Island the ringed enclosure is 300 feet in diameter with
shell stabilized walls 17 feet high, a meaningful visual symbol of
extraordinary simplicity, strength and clarity, indicated the size
and age of the community. Similar shell structures were being
constructed at the same time (+ 2,000 B.C.) along the north
coast of Columbia and Venezuela, suggesting trans-Caribbean
exchange of architectural conceptions between North and South
America at a very early time. Present day examples of middens
shaped for the use of man are Mount Trashmore between Norfolk
and Virginia Beach involving an artificial lake created for fill over
a complex of sanitary land fill hills, an extensive forest with ski
slopes inside the Chicago Loop, and a land fill hills project
proposed for Milan, Italy.
By 537 B.C. (+ 150 years) Florida's earth architecture was
developing in the Crystal River area. The visual ideas found here
indicate contact with Middle America, and suggest that Florida's
architectural evolution may have begun several hundred years
earlier. Based on the noted stelae of the Crystal River Historical
Memorial, Ripley P. Bullen of the Florida Museum has established
definite contact between the architects of Florida and those of
Central Mexico about 440 B.C.


The vocabulary of Florida's earth architecture expanded
spectacularly at the Crystal River Ceremonial Complex over a
1,600 year period. The older temple mound is heavily shell
reinforced and rises 40 feet above the Crystal River on whose
beautiful bank it was built. From this structure a midden extends
northwesterly 400 feet. The large and more recent north temple
mound measures 235 feet in length and is ascended by a ramp
from the main plaza. The present eroded condition of these
mounds leaves to speculation the visual definition of the plaza as
a space, but the architectural conception is compelling and
unmistakable. The sensitive sequence of movement through space
and the masterful placement of the dominant elements in relation
to the total site render the Crystal River Ceremonial Complex one
of Florida's more significant and architectural ensembles.
A second example of Florida's pre-European earth architecture
is Mount Royal on the east bank of the St. John's River 17 miles
south of Palatka. The complex consists of three architectural
elements: a large conical mound to the north (positive mass), a
long and broad Grand Avenue sunken below adjacent grade
(interconnecting link), and an artificial lake set into an inverted
pyramid whose axis is rotated 90 degrees from the Grand Avenue
(negative mass). The arrangement of these elements reminds us of
Michaelangelo's composition of the Palazzo Farnese, the new
avenue and proposed bridge across the Tiber, and the terminal
mass of the Villa Farnesina. At Mount Royal, however, the
architect sites the complex so that an astonishing vista extends
southerly beyond the sunken lake and into the visual infinity of
Lake George "where the skies and water seem to unite," as
William Bartran observed during his visits to the site in 1757 and
1773. Again we recall a conception of Michaelangelo: the view
from the Compidoglio outward and downward through his
never-executed avenue traversing Baroque Rome.
Mount Royal's conical mound originally measured 550 feet in
circumference (177 feet diameter) and rose about 40 feet. Layers
of white and red silt taken from the mound suggest that the color
of the mound's facing may have been changed for various
occasions, a practice which has been verified at Kolomoki and
other sites. Veins of pure white and red clays suitable for facing
earth architecture are rare in Florida, but are found in substantial
quantities near the present day mining town of Edgar, 30 miles
east north-east of Mount Royal. These clays could have been
transported by shallow draft boats in an almost straight line of
water courses across the Rodman Reservoir and via tributaries of
the St. John's River to Mount Royal. The logistics of transporting
the required quantities of clay indicate a substantial sedentary
population, a highly organized society, and a food surplus
sufficient to feed the workers not engaged in food production.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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Crystal River Complex, ca. 200 B.C. 1400 A.D.


Mount Royal, ca. 1300- 1700 A.D.


I a


These are also the requisites for development of a large
architectural complex, and for the perpetuation of an
architectural tradition at Mount Royal from about 1200 A.D. to
the time of the European impact on Florida.
Consider the effect of a glistening, hand-rubbed red or white
clay-faced pyramid rising through the dense green live oak forest
into the vibrant blue Florida sky. Mount Royal's 150 foot wide
Grand Avenue originally was bounded by "a magnificent grove of
magnolias, live oaks, palms and orange trees, terminating at the
verge of a large, green level savannah," Bartram wrote, but today
an orange grove obliterates the noble processional way. The
Avenue was about (3,300 + 600 feet) in length and may have
accommodated 10,000 spectators on its flanking berms.
Several characteristics recur in Florida's pre-European earth
architecture: major complexes are always near, and are sited with
clear visual reference to, a major river or body of water. Both
Mount Royal and the Crystal River Complex are approached
from south to north so that the sun near midday illuminated with
maximum effect the temple structure being approached, and the
sun never is in the beholder's eyes during the approach. The
architecture is of such fundamental integrity that it is used not
only by succeeding generations but also by succeeding cultural
groups over a period of many centuries. Thus the architectural
symbolism was simultaneously timely and timeless, a measure of
architecture. The architectural spirit is clearly evident without
verbal explanation.
Another characteristic of Florida's pre-European architecture
concerns movement through space. The complexes of Crystal
River and Mount Royal and the well preserved mound group at
Lake Jackson are ensembles of negative and positive masses
arranged like sculptures under the light of the sun. Only by
proceeding through the ensemble does one comprehend the entire
architectural conception. Entering into an enclosed interior space
is not involved, nor is the movement between interior and
exterior space. The architectural essence is procession, a dynamic
movement rather than a static view. Art historian Alan Sawyer
comments on the gigantic Nazca drawings of birds on the
Peruvian pampas: "Most figures are composed of a single line that
never crosses itself, perhaps the path of a ritual maze. If so, when
the Nazcas walked the line, they could have felt they were
absorbing the essence of whatever the drawing symbolized." Like
the Nazcas the early Floridians could absorb the essence of their
architectural complexes only by walking through them.
Otherwise the compositions would have been comprehensible
only from aerial perspectives. Although today we are able to gain
aerial views of our 20th Century population centers, we find no
more comprehensive view from the sky than from the ground.


We have yet to regain the distinguished art of urban design
which early Floridians practiced so effectively. We have yet to
regain the ability to discover and express the unique visual
qualities of a specific site, e.g., a shell ring at Sapelo Island, a
truncated pyramid and plaza at Crystal River, or a ceremonial
complex at Mount Royal. Regaining our sense of sight presents a
positive alternative to the visual tyranny of garbage cans,
telephone poles and automobiles which indiscriminately plague
our urban environments equally today.
Four hundred years after the arrival of Europeans in Florida a
new potential for earth architecture is evolving. Technology has
developed new methods of transportation and has required new
techniques to accommodate them. Expressways for automobiles,
airports for airplanes, and seaports for ships. New machines have
been created, permitting us to move more earth in two daysthat
earlier Floridians moved in two thousand years. The problem now
is to shape our environment for the better, not for the worse; to
harness technology for the spiritual needs of man in consonance
with our environment.




References:

Bartram, William; The Travels of William Bartram. Edited by
Francis Harper Yales University Press, New Haven. 1958.
Bullen, Ripley P.: Stelae at the Crystal River Site, Florida.
American Antiquity, Volume 31, No. 6. 1966.
Garcilasco De La Vega: The Florida of the Inca. Translated by
John Grier Varner and Jeannette Johnson Varner. University
of Texas Press, Austin. 1951.
Gentleman of Elvas: The Narrative of the Expedition of
Hernando de Soto in Spanish Explorers in the Southern
United States 1528-1543. edited by F.W. Hodge and Theodore
J. Lewis. Charles Scribner's Sons, New York.
Mclntyre, Loren: Mystery of the Ancient NazcaLines. National
Geographic Magazine. Volume 147, No. 5. 1975.
Moore, Clarence B.: Certain Aboriginal Mounds of the Florida
Central West Coast. Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences
Journal, Vol. 12.
Silverberg, Robert: Mound Builders of Ancient America. New
York Graphic Society. Grenwich, Conn. 1968.
Squire, E.G., and Davis, E.H.: Ancient Monuments of the
Mississippi Valley. Smithsonian Contributions to Knowledge,
No. 1. 1848.
Stuart, George E.: Who were the "Mound Builders"? National
Geographic Magazine, Volume 142, No. 6. 1972.


May/June 1975


FA/7




FLORIDA'S PAVILION FOR THE UNITED STATES
BICENTENNIAL has been designed for the shores of Biscayne
Bay. The complex includes a 6,000 seat amphitheater, a
restaurant seating 350, a 10,000 square foot exhibition hall, and
extensive backstage facilities. The prototype is the Greek
amphitheater at Delphi. A man-made hill is created and a
hurricane resistant tensile roof is designed to shelter spectators
from the rain and sun. Gentle ramps give access to the hilltop
from which unfold views of the flat surrounding terrain. The
conception is a cloud hovering over Delphi. As at Crystal River
and Mount Royal, processional movement is encouraged and
required to understand the design intention.


SECTION 2BR SECTION 3BR


A REGIONAL OFFICE BUILDING for a national corpo-
ration is located on a rolling hillside overlooking a lake to the
west near Altamonte Springs. An expressway defines the site's
north boundary. The earth enclosed complex is designed for
visual comprehension both for the pedestrian within and the
motorist passing by at 30 times the pedestrian's rate of
movement. From the south one enters into a rectangular berm
enclosed parking terrace bounded on three sides by trees and on
the fourth by the upper office level. Entering this level across a
sunken garden bridge one arrives in an open reception and
secretarial area from which offices open toward the lake to the
west and the entry garden to the west. A central stair leads down
to the skylighted lower level containing a conference room,
employees lounge, and service areas.


0


THE AMELIA ISLAND DUNEHOUSES propose to shaft
through a remarkable series of undulating dunes near the Atlantic
Ocean. The unit exteriors follow the dune contours, giving access
from one side and views out to the opposite side through an
insect screened porch. The conception minimizes the impact of
man on nature with the view of preserving both visually and
physically the magnificent oaks and dunes. Individual residences
would be of minimum visual importance, with greater
prominence being assigned to places of public gathering. This
architectural principle is well illustrated at the Crystal River
Complex and Mount Royal: Temples and plazas are the major
elements of the community, with modest private dwelling
subordinated to the central public elements.


U


THE ATLANTIC BEACH DUNEHOUSES are set into a
15 foot hugh duneside overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, preserving
the natural character of the site. One enters from a berm enclosed
plateau upslope through a descending tunnel to a sunken landing
from which foyers open to the north and south. From the upper
level sleeping platform one continues his descent around the
curving structural shell and down into the living area below from
which a panoramic view of the Atlantic opens to the east across a
private terrace above a sunken dune garden. Interior partitions
and stairs are held away from the bearing shell to clarify the
relation of bearing to non-bearing components, further
emphasized by indirect lighting at closet tops and stair edges.
Recessing the dunehouses into the earth avoids visual competition
with neighboring above grade frame residences.


't------~B-----r












i-i


THE HILLTOP RESIDENCE in Central Florida is sited to
provide panoramic views of citrus groves in the rolling terrain
below. From this site five counties can be viewed, and as many as
seven thunderstorms have been counted at one time. One enters
the pyramidal earth structure at its base and moves horizontally
into its center. From the foyer three spaces emanate: the study
with reflecting pool terrace to the right, dining room and kitchen
with a terrace and garden to the left, and sleeping areas with
terraces directly ahead. A stair and elevator lead from the foyer
upward to the observatory designed for unobstructed views of the
surrounding countryside. A pyramidal roof shelters the glass
surrounded observatory, creating a sense of openness in contrast
to the earth defined lower spaces.


THE REED RESIDENCE in Atlantic Beach is designed for a
dunesite closely surrounded by above-grade frame dwellings. One
enters from the street at level grade along a retaining wall leading
into the foyer near the center of the dune. Directly ahead across
the living area is a south facing sunken garden with visual privacy
from neighboring backyards. A dense canopy or 40 foot high live
oak trees visually defines the vertical dimension of the sunken
garden. The master bedroom occupies the upper level of the
truncated pyramid and is open to the living area below. Children's
bedrooms are arranged to the north, remote from the parents
entertaining area. The site becomes the structure.


THE McCONDICHIE RESIDENCE in Ponte Vedra Beach
overlooks the Atlantic Ocean to the east. Earth berms flank the
structure on three sides and define the entry court. Entering from
the west one moves through a series of low and high spaces
opening onto a screened garden facing the ocean. Upper level
bedrooms flank the two story high, clerestory-lighted dining
room. The 96 foot square pyramidal base is subdivided into 12
foot square modules from which the plan's order derives. Low
berms to the north and south define exterior access ways from
the beach to shower and dressing areas, and visually conceal
storage areas for beach paraphernalia while providing views from
the interior of the beach to the north and south.


U


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THE DICKINSON RESIDENCE employs an earth base to
impart a sense of security and firmness on an oceanfront site in
Atlantic Beach. The second story mass of structure clearly
dominates the composition, eliminating the vertical monotony of
a one to one proportion of upper to lower floor. The earthen
berm extends outward to the property edges clearly stating the
visual relationship of the interior spatial mass to its total site.
Entering from a circular drive to the west one views the Atlantic
directly ahead across the central beachroom and broad stepped
terrace descending toward the beach to the east. The arrangement
of an elongated, one room deep rectangle on earthen terraces and
berms recalls the site composition of the Mayan Palace of the
Governors at Uxmal.








Estancia Prize-winning Design


Architect's rendering of executive/professional home.


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flear plan


Arvida's 1975 Architectural Competition Jury; Architects Frank F. Smith,
George Reed and Peter Jefferson.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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The Arvida Corporation recently an-
nounced the winners of their 1975
Architectural Competition for design of
original single-family homes for Estancia.
The competition, which was open to
registered architects from Broward and
Palm Beach Counties, called for original
single-family homedesigns for Estancia, a
72-acre residential community, which
includes a seven-acre natural hammock
preserved in its original state.
The jury included; Frank F. Smith,
AIA, of Sarasota, Peter Jefferson, AIA, of
Stuart, and George F. Reed, AIA, of
Coconut Grove.
Architect Robert Currie, AIA, of the
Delray Beach firm of Jacobson & Currie
took top honors in the design competi-
tion. The second place award was won by
~Edward Bywaters of Ft. Lauderdale and
third place was taken by Ernest G. Arias,
AIA, of Delray Beach.
During the judging, Smith, Jefferson
and Reed examined site plans, elevations
and renderings of the entries. Each home
design was created for one of three
specific lots within Estancia, and was
specifically intended to appeal to one of
three basic buyer groups primary
housing for executive/professional,
second home buyers and recreation
minded, active retirees.
Commenting on the competition itself,
Reed said, "What we have here is more
than a corporation involved just in
development and construction; and this is
more than simply a contest for its own
sake. Arvida is demonstrating a sincere
interest in style and design, and in the
environment created by the communities
it builds."
Currie's winning entry is a 1,855
square-foot home designed for the exe-
cutive/professional group. The design
involves a large central courtyard with
three living modules a master bedroom
suite; a second, two-bedroom module and
a central living/dining/kitchen area. The
plan, Jefferson noted, is "introverted,"
with glass doors opening onto the
courtyard from all rooms.
Commenting on the winning entry,
Jefferson said, "This design has exciting
form, and it's compatible with the
over-all spirit of Estancia. This entry is
clearly superior to any other design
entered, particularly considering that the
home could be built for a realistic cost."


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Miami-Dade Community College


Downtown Campus


Since its inception in the 1960's, Miami-Dade Community
College has been located on two large suburban campuses,
both of which provided ample space for all of the activities
which are normally associated with a community college. The
decision to build a third campus in Downtown Miami involved
the need for a change in this campus concept and presented a
challenge to the College and its Architects, Ferendino/Grafton/
Spillis/Candela. The answer to that challenge is the new
Downtown Campus for Miami-Dade Community College,
which is now serving as both an educational institution and as
the keystone in the rebirth of Miami's Downtown.
The basic goals for the new campus were two-fold. The
College wanted to serve the downtown residents, especially the
minority groups in the area; and to revitalize the deteriorating
neighborhood. The new building was to make a positive
impact while being a good neighbor to the community. The
architects have designed the Downtown Campus to realize
these goals.
The key to the design is openness; an openness that lets the
City in. The building was purposely set at an angle to allow the
fabric of the city to expand into the campus at all four
corners. The large plaza serves, the community college as well
as the 1920's Post Office and the Victorian Church in the next
block. Hilario Candela, the officer-in-charge of design for the
project, stated that the design was based on the idea that the
whole Downtown Miami area would be the Campus for the
College, not just the city block that it was to occupy.


The "see through, walk through" feeling was realized not
only in the exterior spaces surrounding the building, but
within the building itself. Community use was encouraged by
the creation of a truly open building, without the traditional
doors and gates. The building is massed around a six-story
atrium capped at the top by a full skylight which opens to the
constantly changing sky above. Both students and passers-by
are drawn to the building and encouraged to enter or pass
through the structure.

N.E. 4th Street


I HE 3rd Str, t
SITE PLAN


May/June 1975


FA/13


























_---
.. ........




The plazas which surround the building create an urban park which provides a true "campus" feeling for the College. By placing the
major plaza to the west of the campus building, the architect paid tribute to the U.S. Post Office, one of Miami's landmark buildings. A
visual link between the two buildings was assured by the use of precast panels which are identical in color and similar in texture to the
Post Office.















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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/14











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Just as the building itself has become a focus for downtown
renewal, the atrium has become a focus for the activities of the
community college. All of the key elements of the building are
easily recognizable from the ground level of the atrium and
one can move swiftly from there to any destination by way of
the escalators which intersect the plaza and zig-zag upward
along one of the walls. The atrium itself is naturally ventilated
with air entering through the large openings at the plaza level
and exhausting through louvers beneath the skylight, while the
program areas surrounding the core are air-conditioned.


May/June 1975


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The new structure has been in operation since the Fall of 1973
and it presently serves over 7,000 students both day and night.
A full academic curriculum offering associate degrees in arts,
science and general studies is housed within the campus
building. The vertical campus contains classrooms, laborato-
ries, a library, a student activity center, a bookstore and all of
the other spaces which are normally found in a community
college. The structure contains 190,000 square feet on seven
floors (including a full basement).
Although the building has won many design awards, the
most satisfying effect of the campus for both the community
college and the architects is the way that the facility is now
being used, as envisioned, the campus has become an activities
center for both students and downtown residents alike. The
Downtown Campus is providing the opportunity for all
members of the community to take part in the educational
system whether it is by enrollment, attending an occasional
lecture, relaxing on the roof-top terrace, or having lunch in the
plaza during one of the weekly lunchtime lively arts concerts.
Perhaps most important is the success of the Miami-Dade
Community College Downtown Campus and the encourage-
ment that it will give to those who believe in Downtown
Miami and its future growth.


DOWNTOWN CAMPUS, MIAMI-DADE COMMUNITY COLLEGE,
Miami, Florida. Architects: Ferendino/Grafton/Spillis/Candela, Ar-
chitects/Engineers/Planners Andrew J. Ferendino, FAIA, Chairman
of the board; Hilario F. Candela, AIA, Senior Vice President, Design;
Rafael J. Portuondo, AIA, Vice President, Project Architect; Dean J.
Newberry, IBD, Vice President, Interiors. Engineers: Ferendino/
Grafton/Spillis/Candela Juan M. Lagomasino, PE, Vice President,
Mechanical; Alberto Otero, IES, Vice President, Electrical. Cost
Consultant: Cole Early. Contractor: Frank J. Rooney, Inc.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/16

















FRANK J. ROON E Y. INc..
GENERAL CONTRACTORS


Miami Ft. Lauderdale
Memphis Little Rock
Jackson, Mississippi


* Tampa Orlando
* Dallas Houston


Calendar


FAAIA Executive Committee Meeting
July 11 Tampa Host Hotel
Forester's Award Entries Due
July 15
FAAIA Board of Directors Meeting
July 25 Orlando Hyatt House
FAAIA Convention and
Building Products Exhibit
October 2 5 Orlando Hyatt House


May/June 1975


NOTICE OF ADVERTISEMENT

CITY OF BOCA RATON

NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES CENTER DESIGN



The City of Boca Raton, Florida anticipates construction of a building to
house a variety of social services. The budget is set at $111,000 (including
architects fees) and the floor area, in a single story structure, will be the
maximum that current costs will allow. The function of the building is to
initially house 3 agencies; habilitation, retarded pre-school children and
pre-natal clinic. However, provision for expansion will be required in the final
design. The site has not been finally selected at this time, but it will be in the
City of Boca Raton and will be generally flat.
The City will accept until 11 July 1975 resumes or qualification
statements from registered architects wishing to perform such work, and
should include a rough time estimate for completion of design, working
drawings and contract documents ready for bid advertising.
Responses should be addressed to: Walter R. Young, Director of
Community Development Dept., City Hall, 201 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Boca
Raton, Florida 33432. Telephone inquiries to: Mark David 395-1110 Ext.
306.


FA/17




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- ,- .... --n--- ,a


LEGEND


1. In-Flight Kitchen No. 2

2. Simultrain Building

3. Parking Structure No. 1

4. Hangar No. 2

5. Parking Structure No. 2

6. Ground Training Facilities

7. In-Flight Kitchen No. 1

8. General Utilities Building

9. General Office Building

10. Maintenance Building

11. Hangar No. 1

12. Base Overhaul Building


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Hangar No. 2 for National Airlines

Architect: Greenleaf/Telesca
Miami, Florida


NATIONAL


AIRLINES'


Structural Engineer: Kellermann & Dragnett, Inc.
Little Falls, New Jersey

General Contractors: Blount Brothers
Montgomery, Alabama

Steel Fabricators: Allied Structural Steel Company
Hammond, Indiana


SUPERHANGAR


The Project: To design a hangar complex
to include overhaul facilities and adminis-
trative facilities for a major U.S. airline.
In 1967 the Dade County Aviation
Department began a $45 million National
Airlines, Inc. expansion program. Green-
leaf/Telesca Kellermann & Dragnett,
Inc., a joint venture comprised of
Greenleaf/Telesca Planners Engineers
Architects, Inc., and Kellermann &
Dragnett, Inc., was formed for the
purpose of acting as consulting planners,
engineers and architects to Dade County.
Eight years and several national
awards later the National Airlines Hangar
No. 2 towers over the Miami skyline. The
$29.2 million superhangar (just part of
the 1967 expansion program) is the
largest cantilevered building in the world.
The pie-shaped cantilevered design
was selected because it requires 20 per
cent less floor area than an equivalent
rectangular hangar. The hangar complex
has over a half-million square feet of
office space with an adjacent 1100-car
parking structure.
There were two basic purposes of the
complex: to provide a facility for major
overhaul work on any of National's fleet
of aircraft with backup shops, storage and
administrative spaces for this function;
and to provide general office and
executive areas for National's business
operations.
The 11-story tower core and the two
5-story wings, which contain shops,
administration and executive areas, com-
prises the counterweight for the 212'
cantilevered roof structure.


--


The structure, of fireproof construc-
tion, is built on a foundation of
approximately 3600 piles, and is designed
to withstand hurricane force winds of
130 mph.
Aircraft fuselage and tail maintenance
is facilitated by eight, 3-ton bridge cranes
on curved runways with suspended work
crew platforms.
According to CONSULTING EN-
GINEER (June 1974), "National Airlines,
which leases the facilities from Dade
County, wanted maximum utilization of
the space with flexibility to accommo-
date various aircraft, both present and
future. It also required: Ease of ingress


and egress from aircraft apron; A
minimum of wasted motion in setting up
servicing of various aircraft; Elimination
of as much clutter as possible from the
floor of the hangar during aircraft
servicing; Protection for disabled aircraft
during hurricanes."
The National Airlines No. 2 Hangar
Complex has been named one of the 13
"most beautiful steel buildings in
America" by the American Institute of
Steel Construction.
The American Consulting Engineers
Council presented Greenleaf/Telesca -
Kellermann & Dragnett, Inc. with the
1974 Grand Conceptor Award for the
complex.


May/June 1975


FA/19














rrI


Architect: Schweizer Associates Architects, Incorporated
of the Environmental Design Group, Incorporated
Winter Park, Florida
Principal in Charge Tom R. Hurley, AIA.
Structural EDG Engineering, Incorporated
and Mechanical of the Environmental Design Group, Incorporated
Design: Winter Park, Florida


Tilden, Denson & Lobnitz, Inc.
57 W. Gore Avenue
Orlando, Florida


'.-.1 ..-n i .. T -
0-






1.' -- i -

The design of the corporate offices and
distribution facilities of Universal Build-
ing Specialties is a unique example of
meeting the clients needs.
Universal Building Specialties business
is wood. Their operations range from
assisting architects and engineers in design
planning to supply and/or installation of
wood products.
Tom R. Hurley, AIA, designed the
corporate offices and distribution facili-
ties in Lakeland to be multi-functional.
According to Hurley, "The structure is,
of course, all wood construction and
incorporates many different systems of
structure and finish for demonstration
purposes. A good deal of effort was made
to integrate these dissimilar components
into a design which showed continuity."
The Western Red Cedar featured in
each office serves as a showroom for the
many variations of interior wood design.
The interior wood is left in its original
state. The exterior is finished with
bleaching oil and stain to give the
appearance of aged cedar.
The ground level houses a reception
area, dispatchers, the yard supervisor, a
meeting room for construction crews and
tool storage. The upper level contains the
management offices, computer room,
conference room, sales offices and em-
ployee lounge. The salesmen's offices are
built over the entry, while the president's
office and conference room have the view
to the yard and storage structure.
The dissimilar components of this
all-in-one structure blend into a well
integrated design and create an interesting
"corporate office showroom."


Landscape: Foster-Herbert Associates
846 N. Irma Avenue
Orlando, Florida


"The interior wood is left in its original state."


"The exterior is finished with bleaching oil and
stain to give the appearance of aged cedar."


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Lighting:


FA/20





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Our most recent building is being
considered by the landmarks commission!


Cartoonist: Henry Dovilas

Reprinted from INLAND ARCHITECT


PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT 7576-1
June 16, 1975


Procurement of Professional Services
Architecture-Landscape Architecture-Engineering-Land Surveying

The State of Florida, Department of General Services, Division of
Building Construction and Property Management, announces that
professional services in the disciplines of architecture, landscape
architecture, engineering and land surveying will be required during
fiscal year 1975-1976.
Individual projects for which professional services will be required,
will be advertised in the Florida Administrative Weekly as published by
the Department of State, Division of Elections. Subscription to this
publication may be obtained by writing to: Mrs. Elizabeth Cloud,
Division of Elections, Department of State, The Coleman Building,
Tallahassee, Florida 32304. Phone (904) 488-8427.
Qualifications should be sent to: Dixie S. Phelps, Administrative
Assistant, Bureau of Construction, 512 Larson Building, Tallahassee,
Florida 32304. Phone (904) 488-0439.
To be considered for professional services, the following
qualification data should be submitted: A) 251 form updated
bi-annually (January and July). B) Professional Qualifications
Supplement updated bi-annually (January and July). C) A copy of each
applicable Florida registration certificate updated annually. D) Proof of
insurability updated annually. E) If the firm is a corporation, a copy of
a current "Certificate of Good Standing" must be furnished. This
certificate has to be requested from the Department of State, Division
of Corporations, The Capital, Tallahassee, Florida 32304. Phone (904)
488-3140.
A copy of the Rules governing "Procedures for Contracting for
Professional Services" including selection and negotiation procedures
may be obtained from Dixie S. Phelps at the above address.
All questions concerning the selection procedures should be
addressed to Dixie S. Phelps at the above address.


-Distributors-
Walton Wholesale Corp. L.B. Sowell Corp.
7110 NE 4th Court 1405 2nd Ave.
MIAMI (305) 754-2518 TAMPA (813) 248-5071
FT. LAUDERDALE (305) 522-8151 1915 N. Orange Blossam Trail
WEST PALM BEACH (305) 832-3707 ORLANDO (305) 423-7648


May/June 1975


FA/21











Architectural


Products


viP

WATERPROOFING SYSTEM

7245 N.W. 43rd Street 305/592-6045
Miami, Florida 33166

NEW!
AQNUA-CHEK
DECORATIVE
WATERPROOFING MASONRY COATING
Above or below grade ... it checks
moisture. Meets Fed. Specs.
For data:
phone (305) 592-3500, or write
ATLAS CHEMICAL CO.
4801 N.W. 77th Ave.
Miami, Florida 33166
0;r-- 1010r


HYMAR STONE CORP.


UNIVERSAL BUILDING SPECIALTIES, INC.


Western Red Cedar
Laminated Wood Products
Tectum Roof Deck
P.O. Box 1722 Lakeland, Fla. 33802
FLA. Toll Free (800) 282-9583


DISTRIBUTORS OF NATURAL BUILDING
STONE AND BUCKINGHAM VA. SLATE


P.O. BOX 484, PH. 813-686-4296
LAKELAND, FLA. 33802






INDUSTRIES 1248 New Tampa Hwy.
Lakeland, Fla. 33802
(813) 682-6163
Prestress Concrete (813) 682-6163
Concrete Pipe
Ready Mix Concrete
Limerock
Concrete Block

J6 A Sub.ldlarv of Guiltram Land and Develooment CorD. L


IU/Iz Yui7 lI a] UI -Il-VfI
No Glass or High Voltage
No Cold or Weather Dim-Out
Components or Complete Letters
Prompt Quotation
FREE PLAQUE & SIGN CATALOG
Clair C. Burcaw 305 276-5319 Fred McClimans 813 392-2143
Apt. 518 2400 S.W 22nd Ave. Seminole, Fla. 33542
Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 P.O. Box 3123
LAKE SHORE MARKERS
P.O. Box 59. Erie. Pa. 16512


Tobias. Fidler. Associates
Lighting Systems
Ceiling Systems
Medical Systems
Power Systems
1893 Northeast 164 Street
Post Office Box 600277
North Miami Beach, Florida 33160
Miami 305/949-7282
Broward 305/782-6444


Fr 5,
Sg .
*- 1. i~d


Available at the DIXIEPLY
nearest you
MIAMI, TAMPA, ORLANDO,
WEST PALM BEACH


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/22































FAPAC



What Is It?


By Ernest Daffin, AIA, Chairman FAPAC


On March 28, 1974, the Board of Directors of FAAIA passed a
resolution establishing a political action committee, which has been
named FAPAC (Florida Architects' Political Action Committee). The
FAPAC Board of Directors is composed of fifteen members at present,
with at least one member representing each of the twelve AIA Chapters
in Florida. The FAPAC Directors for a two-year term are:
G. Clinton Gamble ...................................... Broward County Chapter
Carl Gerken .................................................... Daytona Beach Chapter
J. Benton Stewart............................................. Florida Central Chapter
Jack West ................................................. Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
Myrl Hanes ....................................................... Florida North Chapter
C. Ernest Daffin .................................. Florida North Central Chapter
William Stewart Morrison .......................... Florida Northwest Chapter
Robert J. Boerema ............................................. Florida South Chapter
William R. Frizzell..................................... Florida Southwest Chapter
Robert F. Darby .................................................. Jacksonville Chapter
Jack R. Jones ...................................................... Mid Florida Chapter
James H. Anstis ................................................... Palm Beach Chapter
James E. Ferguson, Jr. ............................................... President, FAAIA
J. Michael Huey ............................................................. Legal Counsel
Fotis N. Karousatos.................................. Executive Director, FAAIA
The FAPAC Board of Directors at their initial meeting on September 5,
1974, elected the following officers for FAPAC:


Chairman
Treasurer
Secretary


.......................................................................... Ernest Daffin
................................................... ............. Myrl Hanes
................................ ........................................... James Anstis


I would like to quote a statement made by a member of the Florida
Legislature. "It is difficult for people in professions to realize just how
much influence government has over our lives, and we don't have all in
the legislative body who are friendly to professions. There are those
who want to lower standards, there are those who would vote for things
bad, not only for a profession, but bad in the public interest So for
heaven's sake, heed the admonition of President Eisenhower some years
ago, 'be a part time politician.' Pay attention to your representatives
and senators and communicate with them. Let them know how you
feel."
Use of contribution funds will be used mostly within our own state
with a small part going for national elections. Money is not used to buy
votes. This is impossible. However, when contributions are given to a
candidate, it does open the door for communications, and this is all we
want. We want the opportunity to be heard with the merits of our
legislation, or the demerits of someone else's legislation.
Contributions to FAPAC by architects aren't intended to supplant
the support many architects now provide for political candidates either
by means of work or dollars. The dollars contributed to FAPAC will
allow the profession to support candidates on behalf of the profession
in Florida.
Another reason for contributing to FAPAC is our own Architects'
Association (FAAIA) cannot legally engage in raising and spending
monies for political purposes. .................................................... The
Association may donate time, money, staff and supplies to FAPAC as a
political education project for its members and our Association has
contributed many dollars and staff time to FAPAC so far. Solicitation
of contributions to FAPAC was launched at the Association's annual
convention last year at Marco Island and several thousand dollars were
pledged at that time. This is the first general announcement of FAPAC
(continued on next page)


May/June 1975


FA/23






to the profession in Florida and I urge every architect to join FAPAC
today. This is the only profession we have and it must be protected. It
has provided you a good way of life, now you can assure that those
who come after us will enjoy it too.
Clip the coupon that appears at the end of this message and return it
today with your check. This united action by the profession will allow
FAPAC to begin its work early for the 1976 elections.
The following are important facts pertaining to FAPAC which every
architect in Florida should become acquainted with:
The Florida Architects' Political Action Committee is a voluntary,
nonprofit, unincorporated group whose membership consists of
concerned architects interested in the practice of architecture in
Florida.

Why was FAPAC Organized?
Government evolves from the political process. The architectural
profession can further its desire for good government more effectively
if its members operate politically as a cohesive group with common
objectives. Architects concerned with the selection of political leaders
who effect the future of the profession can be more effective if they
work together.

What are the objectives of FAPAC?
(1) To promote and strive for the improvement of government by
encouraging and stimulating architects and others to take a more active
and effective part in governmental affairs.
(2) To encourage architects and others to understand the nature
and actions of their government, as to important political issues, and as
to the records of office holders and candidates for elective office.
(3) To assist architects and others in organizing themselves for
more effective political action and in carrying out their civic
responsibilities.

Who directs FAPA C Activities?
A fifteen member Board of Directors guides FAPAC activities.
These members are knowledgeable leaders of the architectural
profession. FAPAC Board members include one member from each
FAAIA chapter appointed by the FAAIA Board of Directors, the
President, Executive Director and General Counsel of FAAIA.

How are Candidates Selected?
The FAPAC Board of Directors has the responsibility for the final
decision in determining which candidate will receive financial
contributions. A "candidate support committee" screens candidates
and makes recommendations to the Board, based on criteria which has
been established and the "track" record of the various candidates.

Four criteria are basic:
(1) The candidate's demonstrated interest and support of the
architectural profession.
(2) The candidate's electability, based upon information from polls
and other sources.
(3) The incumbency of the candidate.
(4) Whether or not the candidate has requested support

Is FAPA C Affiliated with Either Major Party?
FAPAC is a bipartisan effort seeking to support and elect those
candidates best qualified for elective office regardless of party
affiliation.

What is the Relationship between FAAIA and FAPAC?
FAPAC is an autonomous organization, separate from the FAAIA.
Its mission is to help elect good legislators. It is the FAAIA's
responsibility to present the profession's policies and positions to the
legislators.


Is FAPA C A Permanent Organization?
Experience proves that one-shot programs of political education or
action do not get results. Effective candidate support demands
politically knowledgeable people who keep up-to-date on issues,
candidates and campaign techniques. It is also important that
candidates know FAPAC is a permanent organization.

Are Contributions to FAPAC Legal?
A Federal Statute, Title 18 U. S. Code, Section 610, prohibits
corporations from making any contribution or expenditure in
connection with any federal election. Furthermore, Title 18 U. S. Code,
Section 611, prohibits any person, corporation or professional
association which has a federal government contract or a contract
which uses any federal funds from making any contribution to any
federal candidate for public office. However, any person, corporation
or professional association can contribute to state political candidates,
and therefore, FAPAC can use your contribution in whatever form -
individual, corporate or professional association. But, FAPAC must be
notified if Section 611 above applies to you so that your contribution
will only be utilized for state political candidates.

How Can You Join FAPAC?
You may join FAPAC by forwarding your contribution to the
FAPAC Office, 7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203, Miami, Florida
33156. Active Membership dues are $25, or more, per year. Sustaining
Membership dues are'$100, or more, per year.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/24







RECENT PROJECTS


Walter E. Heller & Company Southeast

Architect:
Robert Kolany, AIA of Palm Beach

The Heller building was designed in total
concept to serve the rapidly growing needs of
the Heller organization and create a pleasant
and open atmosphere for day-to-day business.
The exterior is highlighted by reflections
from "golden" solar glass panels. Specially-
designed, 10-foot-tall glass panels open onto
expansive areas of Medici red carpeting in the
office interiors.
Poor and Swanke, New York, was the
interior architect and Richard P. Vacca, Palm
Beach, was the contractor.




Newsnotes







UF COUNCIL APPOINTMENTS

W. Stewart Morrison, AIA of Pennsacola and
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA of Miami have
been appointed to the University of Florida
Council of Advisors.
The UF Council is one of nine representing
professional experience and leadership to all
State universities.


Key Capri Condominiums


Architect:
Lewis Associates, Inc. of Orlando

Unique on its 6.4 acre island site in Boca Ciega
Bay in Treasure Island, Key Capri, with its
board form concrete and solar bronze glass
exterior, stands out in condominium develop-
ments.
Although its design is of standard double-
loaded corridor, the manipulation of the
balcony locations allows for a creative exterior
rythm and provides a variety of configurations
to repetitively stacked unit types.
On site and in-building recreational ameni-
ties complete a package of total living on "your
own private island."


Angela Zahlten


VICA DRAFTING WINNER


PLANNING DIVISION APPOINTMENT

Bertil Lindblad, AIA, has been appointed as
chief of the Building Division of the Depart-
ment of Community Planning and Development
for the city of North Miami.
Lindblad will be concerned with planning,
zoning and code enforcement problems


Angela Zahlten, winner of the State Architec-
tural Drafting VICA (Vocational-Industrial
Clubs of America) Competition, held in
Jacksonville, Fla., has received $150.00 from
the FAAIA. This will be used for partial
expenses to send the state winner to the United
States Skill Olympics to be held in Washington,
D.C.


Southern Bell Telephone Facilities

Architect:
Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Architects -
Engineers Planners, Inc. of Jacksonville

This new communications facility for Southern
Bell Telephone Co., Amelia Island, Florida, was
honored for its design achievements in a recent
Job-of-the-Year competition sponsored among
Zonolite roof deck applicators by Construction
Products Division of W.R. Grace & Co.
Taking its cue from the traditional Spanish
environment at Amelia Island, the firm
conceived a structure of earth-toned Spanish
stucco, cedar shakes and a steep-sloped roof.


STREET FURNITURE

Producers of "street furniture" are invited
to submit their products for inclusion in
STREETSCAPE Equipment Sourcebook. This
publication is to be prepared by the Center for
Design Planning under a grant from the
National Endowment for the Arts (Architec-
tural and Environmental Arts Division), a
Federal Government agency.
"Street furniture" means products intended
for use in streets, sidewalks, parks, plazas,
malls, or other public places. Among the items
included are equipment related to lighting,
traffic control, information-giving, public safety
and security and the general category of
"amenities and good housekeeping."
Entries must be received by July 15, 1975.
There will be no entry fee. Further information
and entry blanks can be obtained from the
Center for Design Planning, 3417-1/2 M Street
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20007.


May/June 1975


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FA/25








Professional


Services


iF I Ardaman& Associates, Inc.
Consulting Engineers in

SOILS, FOUNDATIONS and
MATERIALS TESTING
6015 Randolph Street, P.O. Box 13003
Orlando, Florida 32809 (305) 855-3860


Orlando Sarasota Cocoa
Tallahassee Pensacola Ft. Myers


Engineers*Planners

DIRZ-SSCKINGBR & RSSOCIRTSS, INC.
o00 W. BUPFnLO RVNUe u TR-MPR, FLR. 33603
(813) 229-2631


WILDER ASSOCIATES, INC.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS


ELECTRICAL
MECHANICAL
SANITARY


Phone 904/398-2323
4401 Emerson St.
Jacksonville, Florida 32207


Building Florida
Since 1921


S 0. F Box 1912 Ph: 813-253-5321
Tampa, Florida 33601 1202 Carmen St.


-IE FICEFRIUEFO NEIR


OFFICE FURNITURE, INC.
2801 S.W. 31st AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133
444-8221


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/26






LOOK: FOR -


l. I- .


ON NORTH EAST ORTIETH TTKRET


WE ARE IN A JOINT VENTURE
TILE COMPANY Of FPALM &EACHN
S.-OWROOM OP MASONRY


WITH LA PALAPA
CUEAT1CE1 A
SURPACE.S-


IN LOS ANtELIES INTRESTADO TILE PFOM
INTERSSTATE I|S SALT LAKE cTY CAST TILE
AND CLAY PAVERS FROM TERIIA PIRMA
IN HOUSTON PA~/ER AMD FAcING UNITS PROM
PEE DEE AND PLANT CITY- MEXICAM CLAY
TILE FROM SALTILLO -
IN OUR VIA AND PATIO WE DIF"PL.AY CAST
COBBLE STONES AND SOME oP TI-E SEVERAL BRICK
AND TILE WE RECOMMEND POR EXTERIOR PAVING-
WE ALSO SHOW SOME OF T4H PACltN6 STOIE5
THAT ARE AVAILABLE-
TE-E FLOOR DISPLAYS ARE EI-IA.NCID BY
FURNITURE ARRANGEMENT PROM
COMPLETELY CASUAL OF AIALEAH


S. OWRoo)M


: 84 N.
(3S6)


E. 40+h STIEET- MIAMI
57 4094


LAKE WORTH
16(s 7+h AVE. NORTH
C505) 56t- 5710


I IDJI


BRICK


IIALEAH
1001 SE. II+h s.
(30S5) 87-l525






THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Florida


Architecture and Allied Arts Library
University of Florida
Gainesville, Fla. 10
32601









The Florida Association of The American Institute of Architects
61st ANNUAL CONVENTION AND BUILDING PRODUCTS EXHIBIT
Orlando Hyatt House
Kissimmee, Florida
October 2 October 5, 1975







3a i




















Further information about the Convention
may be obtained from the FAA/A office:
7100 N. Kendall Dr., Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156


L