• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Letters & Advertisers
 Florida architects elected...
 Hammock house
 Aerial photography
 Northwest design awards
 Sugarmill woods solar house
 General conditions
 Recent projects
 Calendar
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00218
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March-April 1975
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00218
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Letters & Advertisers
        Page 4
    Florida architects elected fellows
        Page 5
    Hammock house
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Aerial photography
        Page 13
    Northwest design awards
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Sugarmill woods solar house
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    General conditions
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Recent projects
        Page 24
    Calendar
        Page 25
    Back Cover
        Page 26
        Page 27
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.









43


RlHSWI'l

















































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The Florida Architect

Volume 25 Number 2 March/April 1975


CONTENTS

Letters .............................................. ........... 4


Advertisers .......................................... ........... 4


Florida Architects Elected Fellows ................ 5


Hammock House
by Elizabeth Rothra .............................. 6


Aerial Photography ................................. .. 13


Northwest Design Awards ......................... 14


Sugarmill Woods Solar House
by Harry Gordon ................................... 16


General Conditions A201
by H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA ..................... 20


Recent Projects ........................................... 24


Newsnotes ................................................. .. 24


Calendar .................................................. 25


1975 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
William F. Bigoney
Howard Bochiardy
William Brainard
Ellis W. Bullock
Carl Gerken
Norman M. Giller
Martin Gundersen
Carl Gutmann, Jr.
William K. Harris
Jerome A. James
William Jollay
Walter L. Keller
Charles E. King
Bertram Y. Kinsey, Jr.
Robert H. Levison FAIA
Stephen Little
John McCormick
Harry G. Morris
Richard H. Morse
Robert F. Petersen
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Francis R. Walton FAIA
Jack West
Robert L. Woodward


Aerial Photography 13


Solar House 16


Recent Projects 24


FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1975

James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, President
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758

Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, Vice President
President Designate
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814

Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Secretary
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-2551

James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
5020 Cypress Street, Suite 211
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 872-8407


COVER: Rendering of John Weller's
Hammock House by Ralph Fiol.
NEXT ISSUE: Earth forms architec-
ture.


DIRECTORS OF FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker, AIA
1000 N. Ashley Street, Suite 806
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-0381

Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 854-1414

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of The
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947

GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(904) 878-4191

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
David E. Clavier/Editor
Jay Keenan/ Advertising Representative
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


FA/3








Letter


Dear Editor,
There is nothing to say but FANTASTIC. If
you find yourself with extra time, I hope you
will do more stories on Florida House.
Dave, thanks for the great article and come
on back to your house soon.
Most sincerely,

Michael S. Mullin, Director
Florida House
Dear Editor,
I am pleased to see the journal's "new look"
and feel it is done in very good taste. I will be
looking forward to the next issue.
Sincerely,
Emmy Rayne
Rayne Associates,
Public Relations

Dear Editor,
Thank you for sending the January-
February issue of The Florida Architect. I am
pleased that you found our public service
advertisement useful.
Sincerely,
Fredrick Haupt III, Director
Public Affairs
National Trust for Historic Preservation


Dear Editor,
We were pleased to see the Old Bradford
County courthouse featured with a full page
photograph in the January-February issue of
your publication.
Since we are applying for a State-Federal
matching funds grant to help us restore this
building, we would like very much to have
some extra copies of this issue to use in mailing
out material to strengthen our case.
Yours sincerely,

Eugene L. Matthews, President
Bradford County Board
of Historical Trustees

Dear Editor,
We were pleased that you joined us at our
chapter meeting. The membership appreciated
in learning of the many activities available
through your office. The new magazine format
appears to be off and running and should be a
success.
Sincerely,

John Hobart, AIA
Secretary Florida Southwest Chapter, AIA


Advertisers

Architectural Products ............... 19

Brooks American Sprinkler Co. ......... 11

Cabot's Stain ....................... 2

Caldwell-Scott Construction Co.......... 12

Catalina Aquatech ................... 25

Consulting Opportunities .............. 5

Dunan Brick Yard ................... 27

Hartco Wood Foam-Tile ............... 18

Lindsley Lumber ................... 11

Murray Kitchens .................... 4

Pavlow Office Furniture ............... 26

PPG .......................... 22-23

Professional Services ................. 26

Waldmann Photography ............... 11


Too many European Kitchen
manufacturers have come to the United
States with the attitude that architects
should not only learn a foreign language
- but that they should accept foreign
dimensions for Kitchen cabinets. Murray
Kitchens believes just the opposite.


Our aim is to work with the American
architect. We even became the first
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Our cabinets have high gloss, high pressure
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Drawers are plastic on smooth running
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have adjustable shelves on our wall units.
And much, much more. Plus a tradition of
fine workmanship for over 100 years.

The only thing we have not totally
Americanized is the styling. It's beautifully
contemporary. European, with fresh clean
lines and rich, rich colors.

For more information contact:
William T. Langohr, CKD
District Sales Manager
Fairway Oaks Villas 3212
Amelia Island Plantation
Amelia Island, Florida 32034
(904) 261-9284
A division of Murray Kitchens (Export)
Limited, Youghal, Co. Cork, Ireland.


MURRAY
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Kitchens for living in


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


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FA/4






























The American Institute of Architects
announced the election of 62 members,
including three Florida architects, to the
College of Fellows, a lifetime honor
bestowed for outstanding contribution to
the profession.
Formal investitute of the new Fellows
will take place on May 19 at the
Institute's convention in Atlanta, Ga.
The three Florida architects to receive
this honor are William N. Morgan of
Jacksonville, H. Leslie Walker, Jr. of
Tampa and Donald S. Williams of
Clearwater.
William Morgan became a registered
architect in 1960 and established his own
practice soon after in Atlantic Beach. He
picked the Jacksonville area because it
"offered as great an opportunity for
building as any city I knew, and very
little basic architectural thought had been
given to this area. Jacksonville is large
enough to have the urban problems
typical of most cities, but small enough
to be influenced by a small design
group."
Morgan has taught in several architec-
tural schools; recent ones are Tulane and
the University of Florida. He thinks the
ideal education for every aspiring ar-
chitect would be an apprenticeship in a
good architect's office.
As a designer and principal, H. Leslie
Walker, Jr., has been involved in design
projects receiving awards from the
Florida Association of the AIA. He has
served the Florida Central Chapter as well
as the Florida Association as President,
and was elected a Director of the
Institute in 1972, representing Florida
and the Virgin Islands.


William N. Morgan, I
im N. it, g,'
William N. Morgan, FAIA


In December he was appointed Chair-
man of the AIA Governmental Affairs
Commission. This Commission is respon-
sible for developing and executing the
legislative program of the Institute,
communicating the positions of the
architectural profession on professional
and public policy issues to the United
States Senate and House of Representa-
tives; monitoring and influencing the
enactment of sound governmental agency
policies, procedures and programs which
affect the architectural profession, and
executing the profession's responsibility
in the social and environmental areas of
concern with respect to these programs.
Walker is an officer and stockholder in
the firm of Walker & McLane, Architects,
Engineers and Planners, Inc. of Tampa.

Donald S. Williams through long and
continuous public service and effective
leadership has gained for himself, and the
profession more than usual recognition
by citizens, architects and public officials.
In 1967 Williams was elected to a two
year term on the Clearwater city
commission and was re-elected three
successive times. The voters recognized
the importance of architectural influence
through Williams' leadership.
In 1973 Williams received the Florida
Association's Architects Community Ser-
vice Award with the citation "the overall
community has benefited physically,
economically and culturally as a direct
result of his leadership and service and
the public image of the profession of
architects has been enhanced."
Williams is a partner with Williams &
Walker Architects Chartered.


H. Leslie Walker, Jr., FAIA


March/April 1975


Donald S. Williams, FAIA


KNOW ABOUT FLORIDA
PROJECTS BEFORE THEY
GET TO THE
DRAWING BOARD

Information for architects
and engineers
that means money for you.
Consulting Opportunities is the
only comprehensive summary
of all the potential projects in
the State of Florida. And we
send this information to you
twice a week to assure you
that the information is timely.
Consulting Opportunities has
four main sources for
information:
(1) All legal advertising
in the state.
(2) News articles from all of
Florida's newspapers.
(3) Direct watts line telephone
conversations with officials.
(4) Information received by mail
from cities, counties, school
boards, and public
agencies.

Now, you will know the
entire potential market
for your services for
government projects
below the state level,
including special
authorities and agencies.

contact

T CONSULTING
OPPORTUNITIES
Potential Projects for Florida's Professionals
312 South Bumby Ave.
P.O. Box 8311
Orlando, Fla. 32806
Phone: (305) 898-5161


FA/5


MEMM K OEM it ~BMONMOM~








HAMMOCK HOUSE



oPart of the Lando

By Elizabeth Ogren Rothra


THE ARCHITECT'S CONCEPT

While the classical tradition of architec-
ture sought to erect structures superior to
the land and rising prominently above it,
Weller's approach is a dwelling that
becomes part of the land.
Hammock House was designed to be
an organic whole with its surroundings.
Natural materials of wood and stone, the
Elements of fire and water, and man's
A inventions of glass and brick all combine
to create enclosed living space that is not
remarkably different from the out-of-
doors. Additionally, architect Weller
wanted the house to be a strong
expression of the function of its mate-
rials.
His inventive scheme is a cluster of
four houses, each serving different func-
tions and completely joined by glass-
windowed walkways. Two sleeping
houses, a living house and the dining-
kitchen house make up the compound.
Two additional structures, the pagoda on
the terrace and the auto pavilion are also
roofed.
Architect John Weller, AIA Constructed of cement block, wrapped
with vertical cypress siding, all corners of
the structure are rounded with quarter
columns, blending the house into its
wooded setting. The cypress siding
(continued on next page)
Author Elizabeth Rothra's interest in Florida
architecture stems from an appreciation of the
early pine and coral rock houses built 'for
tropical living at the turn of the century by Dr.
John C. Gifford, a Dade County pioneer.
She published a book about Dr. Gifford and
his writings ("On Preserving Tropical Florida,"
University of Miami Press 1970), and also has
written for the Miami Herald's Sunday
magazine, "Tropic" and other publications.
Before coming to Florida she worked in
New York City as a publicist for Fred Waring's
television show, the Crusade for Freedom,
Radio Free Europe, and Chataugua Institution
as well as Communication Research Institute in
Coconut Grove. Born in western New York
State, she has been a Floridian for nearly
thirteen years and lives in South Miami with her
husband, Dann, and nine year old daughter,
Katie. Currently she is free lancing and working
on a biography of Florida's first naturalist, --
Charles Torrey Simpson. 4


Photos by: Kurt Waldmann







































continues inside as well, and alternated
with window walls and glass doors which
bring in views of sky, clouds, trees, and
the reflections of water.
The four-square, pitched roofs of the
structures are clad with hand-split, cedar
shingles. Varying roof planes recall the
charm of an Italian hilltown.
Terra cotta floor tile paves the entry
and is used throughout the house for
walkways, kitchen flooring and the pool
terrace. Merging the house with the
terrace are wood decks softly edged with
ferns. To achieve the effect of the plants
emerging from under the decks, deep
trenches were pre-cut in the cement of
the terrace to accommodate plants, and
the decks extended just slightly over the
trenches.
Underscoring the architectural design,
ceilings are formed by the roof itself,
exposing the wing and joist construction
and the heavy beams that converge like
the spokes of a giant wheel. Roofs merge
over walkways and their rustic shingles
can be touched from interior staircases.
Furniture will be contemporary and
fixtures reduced to a minimum, all
subordinate to the architectural details.
Canister lighting is used throughout the
house. The decorating scheme will stress
earth tones contrasting and complement-
ing the pale stone of the chimney wall
and the warm rich stain of the wood.


This is a design of dramatic effects
rather than broad vistas. Visual excite-
ment is found in the garden foyer with its
broad expanse of glass and stone, and its
simply constructed open staircase that
rises thirty-five feet to the loft above the
living room. This dramatic entry is viewed
from the loft, and from the upper living
room where the east wall is open on
either side of the chimney and protected
by a railing.


Hammock House is full of the
unexpected. The formal living room can
be approached from four different
staircases, including a free-standing cir-
cular stair. A large porthole opens from
the loft, and another circular opening in
the ceiling of the sleeping house hall
reveals the roof beams. On the pool
terrace, a fan palm seems to float on its
private island reached by a wooden
bridge.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/8





Reason pervades the sense of surprise,
however. The Martin Escher stairs,
ascending and descending from the living
room give easy access to all parts of the
house. The porthole brings light and a
view into the loft. The circular stair is the I
shortest line between two points. The -
image of the fan palm is multiplied by its ;i S
watery moat while the bridge gives access
for tending.
The influence of traditional Japanese
architecture can be seen in Hammock
House in its sheltering roofs, the exten-
sive use of wood, the restraint in its
materials and decorating scheme, in the
garden views and the artful use of water
and plantings. However, the house has
none of the papery, aesthetic look of the r i -;--
Japanese style. It is a strongly American 0 .
expression of contemporary living. 'Z
LANDSCAPING

Charles Torrey Simpson, South Florida's
pioneer naturalist, once commented on
the practice of bulldozing all the large
trees before building saying, "Man des-
troys in hours what it took nature
centuries to create." Contrasting with
that principle, the Wellers hardly stirred
the ground to build Hammock House.
The ancient trees (one Ficus decora
with a span of 60') landscape the
property naturally, screening it from the
street and shading the house. Hung with a
variety of vines and bearing ferns in their
trunks and airplants in their branches,
they give a jungly, tropical look to the
l site. While grass will be used close to the
house, the native, wild plants will be
Sl encouraged on the borders.
John Weller is a landscape architect,
and both the Wellers are avid gardeners. It
was Weller's wife, Bebe, who planned the
sunken garden in the circle formed by the
entrance drive. Like one of the ferny lime
sinks of Florida's hammocks, it is edged
with native coral rock and planted with
ferns and palms. Focal point will be a
Latania palm. Borders are formed with
star begonia and red dracena provides
color contrast.
The gentle slope off the dining room
deck will be planted with a large variety
of native fern that grows thickly and to a
height of six or seven feet. This
fern-covered slope will require little
maintenance and create a cool, woodsy
appearance.
Large planters, one containing a tree
fern, flank the entrance with its wide
doors of hand-carved South American
mahogany.

(continued on next page)


March/April 1975


FA/9





HAMMOCK HOUSE


THE SITE

The Wellers had often admired this one
acre corner site since it was close to their
former house. Located in the Hammock
Lakes district, an area of fine homes not
far from Biscayne Bay, it had once been
part of a dense hammock of tropical
hardwoods; ficus, oak, pigeon plum,
native palms and the copper-barked
gumbo limbo, a rare tree seldom seen
anywhere in North America except in the
Florida Keys or botanical gardens.
The owner had cleared and mowed the
underbrush and tended the mature trees.
Hung with vines and airplants, many
retained the graceful arching habits
,- .learned in the hammock where competi-
tion for sunlight and moisture was keen.
Though the lot was not for sale, Weller
contacted the owner who agreed to an
interview with the family. He like the
plans for the house so well, that he agreed
to sell.
Weller resolved, at all costs, to plan the
house so that all the trees could be saved.
He studied and surveyed the site, noting
the position of each tree and designed the
house to fit around the foliage. Bringing
in the cranes needed to pour cement for
thirty-five foot high, quarter round
columns around the trees was difficult,
but with patience it was accomplished.
The foliage landscapes the house
naturally. One large ficus is framed
against the two-story, north wall of the
children's sleeping house. In fact, it is so
close to the window, that Weller's son,
Donny, calls it "Tom Sayer's Window." It
would be easy, but daring, to reach out a
hand and slide down the trunk.
The deck of the dining room wraps
around another large ficus whose multiple
trunks are safely anchored to a massive
root system. A hole cut in the eave
accommodates one of its limbs. Native
palms occur outside the window walk-
ways. *


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/10














































































March/April 1975


FA/11


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W ho built one of ^Architect: John L. Volk, Architect, AIA
Who built one of
America's showcase
showhouses?


-Same people who constructed Yankee Stadium and Nova University. Same
people who built fifteen apartment buildings and motels in the last
six years. Caldwell-Scott.
Makes sense to call us-for five reasons.
Our South Florida longevity. Our work. Our cost.
Our speed. And our empathetic banking and legal plug-in's.

Caldwell-
SConstruction Company
8751 West Broward Blvd.
S co tt Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33317 Phone: 792-3000
A Subsidiary of
Gulfstream Land & Development Corp.






. ". ...- - -. -, "/














Miami skyline


Do- It Yourself





By David E. Clavier




It was never said that, "curiosity kills the bird."
So, in a fit of curiosity, architect John Weller and myself
made like birds to see what his 'Hammock House' looks
like from far above.
Daring the facts that it was Friday the 13th and I enjoy
having both feet on the ground, I joined Weller
and our pilot as we skimmed the Miami skyline. For ten
minutes we hoovered over 'Hammock House' snapping
shutters, changing film and, most important, hanging on.
From our experience here are a few dos and don't
to consider when planning "do-it-yourself aerial photography":

Do make sure you have enough seatbelts for all
passengers (especially important when there are
no doors).
Don't- take off without an adequate supply of film and
photography equipment.
S.. -' Do see that your personal affairs are in order.
"" "' ~ Don't- ignore all the great sites from 300 feet.
SDo plan to have a great time.

S "75 "T


.---.: ~ ~ L--_ ,,,..,.!: "> -i


March/April 1975


FA/13










Northwest Chapter


Design Award Winners






The Florida Northwest Chapter of The American Institute of
Architects recently held their annual design awards competi-
tion. The architectural awards jury included John E. Jarvis,
Director, Campus Planning, University of West Florida and
John T. Carey, Ph.D., Director, Art Department, University of
West Florida.
Certificates of Merit and Honor were presented to the
following firms in their respective categories;
Architectural awards for residential design: Merit Award 4
(1st Place) to The Bullock Associates of Pensacola for the
Lindley Camp residence, Pensacola Beach. Honor awards to
The Bullock Associates for the William Ray residence,
Pensacola and the Dr. William H. McCaw residence, Pensacola
Beach; Bayne Collins & Associates of Panama City for the
John F. Daniel residence; Ricks/Kendrick/Stokes/David -
Architects, Inc. of Fort Walton Beach for the Dr. Alex Trum
residence and the W.B. Harbeson III residence.
Architectural awards for institutional design: Merit Award j -"I -
to Ricks/Kendrick/Stokes/David Architects, Inc. for the
City of Fort Walton Beach's Indian Temple Mound Museum.
Honor awards to Ricks/Kendrick/Stokes/David Architects,
Inc. for the Okaloosa-Walton Junior College, Niceville, Florida
and the School Board of Okaloosa County's Max Brunner Jr.
Junior High School; Hugh J. Leitch, Architect, for the a
University of West Florida's Commons Building and the
Administrative Complex; The Bullock Associates for the U.S.
Post Office Annex and Maintenance Facility, Pensacola.
Architectural awards for commercial design: Merit award to
Hugh J. Leitch, Architect, for Southern Pine's Inspection
Bureau Office Building, Pensacola; Honor awards to
Ricks/Kendrick/Stokes/David Architects, Inc. for a Triplex
apartment complex for H. French Brown, Jr., Winston G.
Walker and Dr. Malcolm C. Crotzer of Fort Walton Beach,
Florida, and the Brooks Reality Building for John W. Brooks;
Kenneth Woolf, Architect, for Baptist Hospital's Professional
Office Building, Pensacola, Florida; and the Bullock Associates "
for the Hillbrook Condominiums, Pensacola., -
Architectural awards for rehabilitation design: Merit award .
to The Bullock Associates for the Barksdale Law Office
Building, Pensacola, and a Merit award to Mandeville Smith,
Architect, for the restoration of the Black Insurance Agency,
Panama City, Florida.
Architectural awards for Site/Parks/Recreational design:
Merit award to Hugh J. Leitch, Architect, for the Mutual
Federal Savings & Loan Association, Pensacola, Florida,
Parking Mall and a Merit Award to Ricks/Kendrick/Stokes/
David Architects, Inc., for Wayside Park and Fishing Pier for
the Okaloosa Island Authority, Fort Walton Beach, Florida.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/14





























~7-


RESIDENTIAL DESIGN HONOR AWARD COMMERCIAL DESI
John F. Daniel Residence Southern Pine's Inspe
Bayne Collins & Associates, Architects Hugh J. Leitch, Archil




RESIDENTIAL DESIGN MERIT AWARD
SLindley Camp Residence
The Bullock Associates



COMMERCIAL DESIGN HONOR AWARD
Baptist Hospital's Professional Office Building
Kenneth Woolf, Architect




INSTITUTIONAL DESIGN MERIT AWARD
Temple Mound Museum
Ricks/Kendrick/Stokes/David Architects, Inc. -



REHABILITATION DESIGN MERIT AWARD SITES/PARKS/RECR
Black Insurance Agency Mutual Federal Saving
Mandeville Smith, Architect Hugh J. Leitch, Archit
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GN MERIT AWARD
action Bureau Office Building
tect


A-4 .- A- o
NATIONAL DESIGN MERIT AWARDS
s & Loan Association
tect


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March/April 1975


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FA/15










































Model of the SUGARMILL WOODS SOLAR HOME in Homosassa Springs.


SUGARMILL WOODS
By Harry Gordon


EDITOR'S NOTE: Sugarmill Woods Solar House located in Homosassa
Springs, Florida is a prototype house designed for Parkland Properties,
Inc. to demonstrate the use of Solar Energy for residential heating and
cooling in a warm humid climate. The house was designed by Burt, Hill
& Associates, Architects.
According to an article in the November 14, 1974 Engineering News
Record, "Using solar energy to heat domestic water and to heat and
cool the nations' buildings, which use about 25% of the total energy
consumed in the U.S., would result in a significant savings in fuel
consumption. Savings in the total amount of energy consumed by
buildings is estimated at an average of 20%."
Last October the Florida Legislature passed a law requiring all
housing build in the state to contain plumbing for solar heating of
domestic hot water.
These things taken into consideration should make this article on
the design features of Sugarmill Woods Solar Homes of particular
interest to Florida architects.
Harry Gordon works for Burt, Hill & Associates, Architects.


The implementation of solar energy to provide heating,
cooling, and domestic hot water in residences has great
potential for the reduction of consumption and utility bills. It
is necessary though to integrate a well designed solar energy
system with a building which exhibits low energy consumption
to realize this saving.
The solar home at Sugarmill Woods is designed with several
features which make it an energy-economical home, even
without solar energy. The major areas of glass and light weight
wood walls are oriented in directions which receive relatively
minor amounts of solar heat gain. Furthermore, these walls are
insulated with R-11 fiberglas and are shaded by substantial
roof overhangs. The windows are insulating glass and are well
shaded.
The exterior walls, which face the directions having


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/16



















































SOLAR HOUSE


critically high amounts of solar heat, have a combination of
high mass and insulation to reduce the solar gain. (As the
accompanying section shows). They are composed of an
exterior surface of one-inch fieldstone, set in mortar, backed
by one-inch of Polyurethane insulation, set on eight-inch
concrete blocks with sand filled voids. The placement of the
insulation near the exterior wall greatly increases the length of
time for heat transfer to occur through the wall. This has the
effect of stabilizing the interior temperature near the comfort
level. Portions of the exterior wall are bermed with earth to
add mass and increase the insulative value. This also has the
effect of lowering the visual profile of the elevation from an
architectural viewpoint.
These energy conserving features reduce the peak cooling
load to less than one-third the cooling load of a conventional


home of this size. Furthermore, by reducing the range of
indoor temperature differences, the mechanical equipment can
operate closer to its capacity for greater periods of time,
resulting in increased efficiency.
The solar system is primarily designed to contribute the
entire requirement for domestic hot water and approximately
sixty percent or more of the space cooling requirement. The
space heating requirement and swimming pool heating will also
be supplied by solar energy. The nine-hundred square foot
array of flat plate solar collectors, tilted at 14 degrees from
horizontal and oriented 17 degrees west of south, is located on
the garage roof, directly above the mechanical room and the
900-gallon water storage tank. This collector tilt and
orientation were chosen to optimize heat production on hot
summer afternoons when the highest cooling loads occur. In


March/April 1975


~
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FA/17






SUGARMILL WOODS SOLAR HOME


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NEOPENE


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SOLAR
COLLECTOR
FRAMINr
DETAIL


addition, the 14 degree tilt corresponds to a 3 on 12 pitch,
common in residential construction.
The solar energy will be used to provide space cooling by
the use of a hot water fired absorption chiller. The solar heat is
used to maintain the moisture absorbing salt solution in the
machine at proper concentration. This evaporated moisture
represents heat which is removed from the room supply air by
a cooling coil. When there is insufficient solar energy available
to do required cooling, the requirement will be met by a
conventional reciprocating chiller. This reciprocating machine
is also equipped with a heating coil, which uses solar heated
water when there is a space heating requirement.
There is a heat exchanger to supply the required heat for
domestic hot water and an additional heat exchanger to supply
heat to the swimming pool when it is needed.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/18










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March/April 1975


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FA/19












GENERAL CONDITI1



The Rules of the Ga


H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA
Small Office Practice Series


)NS


THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


rme


II


1. CONTRACT DOCUMENTS
2 ARCHITECT
3. OWNER
4. CONTRACTOR
5. SUBCONTRACTORS
6 SEPARATE CONTRACTS
7 MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
8. TIME

This document has been approved and endorsed


9 PAYMENTS AND COMPLETION
10 PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND
PROPERTY
11. INSURANCE
12. CHANGES IN THE WORK
13. UNCOVERING AND CORRECTION
OF WORK
14. TERMINATION OF THE CONTRACT

The Associated Genera Contractors of America


One of the architects' best friends is AIA
Document A201 "General Conditions
of the Contract for Construction," yet
there are a great many specifications
written that indicate that some architects
don't really know their friend nor how to
treat her for full satisfaction.
The need for a document to establish
the rights, responsibilities and relations of
the participants in a building contract was
recognized in 1888 when the AIA and the
National Association of Builders devised a
uniform building contract. Out of this
early document has evolved through
twelve editions, the current 1970 edition
of the General Conditions of the Contract
for Construction. It consists of 14
Articles, which have become the national-
ly accepted working rules for relation-
ships in construction projects:
1. Contract Documents
2. Architect
3. Owner
4. Contractor
5. Subcontractor
6. Separate Contracts
7. Miscellaneous Provisions
8. Time
9. Payments and Completion
10. Protection of Persons and Property
11. Insurance


12. Changes in the Work
13. Uncovering and Correction of Work
14. Termination of the Contract
Before 1888 every building contract
worked under a set of relationships and
procedures unique to the project es-
tablished ad hoc by the owner, or the
architect, or the money lender. In the day
when architects and builders had work
loads of one or two projects per year, one
had time to form relationships and
develop procedures. But in the go-go
zip-zap society of today, things are so
complex, that standardization of rights,
responsibilities and relationships that are
broadly accepted is as important to a
successful construction project as is the
skill of design.
The AIA General Conditions has in its
formation the accumulation of ninety
years of experience that learned from
cases before arbitration boards and the
courts, lawyers, other design professionals
as well as architects and the Associated
General Contractors of America. It is not
a perfect document. It is, however, the
document that currently has the broadest
acceptance for building contracts, is
constantly evaluated and kept relevant
and acceptable to an ever-growing num-
ber of government agencies and institu-
tions. Although there are a number of


agencies and institutions that believe their
relationship with the world processes are
so unique that, as was done in 1880,
general conditions written especially for
them can satisfy their requirements
and/or idiosyncracies, this practice is of
questionable value and should be discour-
age in favor of the AIA Document.
Because the U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, one of the
World's largest investors in professionally
designed projects, encourages the use of
AIA Document A201, it is safe to assume
that any other document of general
conditions is either (1) for work so
unique that standard anything is inap-
plicable or (2) is charting a new course
ahead of its time and without benefit of
legal precedence or (3) and most likely
situation, the product of irrelevant and
archaic practices.
In this paper "general conditions"
means those in the AIA Document A201,
1970 edition, General Conditions of the
Contract for Construction.
The general conditions form one of
the four parts of the construction
contract: (1) the general conditions part
of the specifications (2) the product/
workmanship part of the specifications
(3) the drawings and (4) the owner/con-
tractor agreement.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


AIA Document 4201
General Conditions of the Contract
for Construction
THIS DOCUMENT HAS IMPORTANT IECAS CONSEWUENCS, CONSULTATION
WITH AN ATTORNEY IS ENCOURAGED WITH RESPECT TO ITS MODIFICATION


TABLE OF ARTICLES


FA/20













The general conditions are standard-
ized paragraphs describing the rights,
responsibilities and relations of the
participants in the construction contract
including the architect. They are the
distillation of years of experience in the
building industry and reflect the national
consensus. They are adaptable to private
and public work, and to lumpsum
contracts and cost-plus contracts. They
set the rules, having the status of laws for
the project, by which the construction
project shall be administered.
If an architect is thoroughly familiar
with the general conditions, he will know
the strengths and limitations afforded
him in the administration of the construc-
tion of his project. Such knowledge will
permit him to exercise his services with
confidence and effectiveness. In a dispute
a quotation from the proper reference to
the general conditions is frequently worth
a dozen tempertantrums on the job site.
It is also the most professional attitude
one can exercise in the resolutions
develop from national experience and a
national consensus of that experience,
cannot be adapted to every project
without some modification or amplifica-
tion. Supplementary general conditions
must be written by the architect to
modify and extend the general conditions
as the unique characteristics of his project
require. In fact some of the general
conditions carry very little weight with-
out these supplementary conditions. For
example:
"7.5.1 The Owner shall have the right
to require the Contractor to furnish
bonds covering the faithful perform-
ance of the Contract and the payment
of all obligations arising thereunder if
and as required in the Instructions to
Bidders or elsewhere in the Contract
Documents."
Item 7.5.1 only reserves for the
Owner, "the right to require the Contrac-
tor" to furnish bonds. If the Contractor is
required to furnish bonds, then those
must be stated elsewhere in the specifica-
tions. Article II of the general conditions
related to insurance has similar para-
graphs. Insurance is required, but the
minimum limits of liability and coverage
for various types of insurance must be
specified elsewhere in the specifications.
Usually these modifications are in-


cluded in a companion section to the
general conditions entitled "Supplemen-
tary General Conditions."
But a recent development has altered
this usual practice. When the US Depart-
ment of Health, Education and Welfare
adopted AIA Document A201 as the
General Conditions for construction
projects supported by the Department,
AIA Document A201 had to be sup-
plemented with those stipulations re-
quired by law for all Federal Projects. A
"Federal Edition" of A201 was devised
and is now available. This edition adds to
the regular Document A201 a "Sup-
plementary Conditions," AIA Document
A201/SC. Since the Supplementary Con-
ditions are now used to adapt the General
Conditions to unique situations (such as
the requirements of all Federally support-
ed projects), modifications to the General
and/or Supplementary Conditions will be
done in section called "Special Con-
ditions" or some similar title. This is
important to remember, because many
other governmental agencies and institu-
tions (including large corporations) are
being encouraged to accept AIA Do-
cument A201 for its general acceptability
as well as legal predictability, and using a
supplementary conditions document to
give the unique general requirements.
The AIA Document A201 is critized
for its comprehensiveness. The agree-
ment, the general conditions and sup-
plementary conditions (and recently the
special conditions) are recognized as the
contractural legal part of the construction
contract. If this be true, then AIA
Document A201 is not pure, for this
document includes administrative and
work-related items, more appropriately
placed in a work-related part of the
specifications as Division 1 General
Requirements of the 16 Division format
for specifications recommended by the
Construction Specification Institute
which format is being adopted by an
increasing number of specification writing
and using institutions. Many believe that
such items as requirements for shop
drawings and samples, substitutions,
cleaning, cash allowances, etc. are more
appropriately in a section under Division
1 instead of General Conditions. It can be
debated that these work-related items are
steeped in legal precedence and, there-


fore, should be retained in General
Conditions. Wisdom dictates the use of
AIA Documents A201 without any, but
the obvious modifications for optimum
value of legal and historical precedence. If
Division 1 of the specifications is to be
project oriented, its purity will be
violated by the inclusion of conditions,
work-related or otherwise, that affect all
projects generally.
The virtue of friend AIA Document
A201 is its predictability. Only such
paragraphs that require modification
should be modified but those requiring
modification for meaning, should be
modified, not ignored. If there is no
institutional supplementary conditions
augmenting the General Conditions, then
the necessary modifications to the
General Conditions are made in com-
panion section of the specifications
entitled "Supplementary General Condi-
tions." If institutional supplementary
conditions are needed to augment the
General Conditions, then modifications
of both the General Conditions and
Supplementary Conditions are written in
a section of the specifications entitled
"Special Conditions."
If an institutional general conditions is
forced upon you for inclusion in the
Contract Documents, which are obviously
inappropriate and inadequate for the
building project for which you are
architect, consider writing a "Supplemen-
tary General Condition" that virtually
rewrites the general conditions, using the
conditions of AIA Document A201. A
better way, however, is to convince the
Client that he should use AIA Document
A201 for its obvious benefits. Get his
lawyer to help to convince him. There is
no benefit to the architect to have to
administer each project by a set of
different and uncontested rules. Neither
is there a benefit to the Contractor, the
Subcontractor, the Supplier and, if he
only knew, the Client. It is the architects'
obligation to advise his Client where he
needs advice. Be sure he knows the
virtues of using AIA Document A201 -
"The General Conditions of the Contract
for Construction." 0


March/April 1975


I


FA/21







PPG Solarool"


Bronze reflective


glass is not as


expensive as


it looks.
Compared to tinted glass it can add as little as
10% to the cost of the total wall system.
Yet it brings virtually any type of light-com-
mercial building to life with the unique and prestig-
ious esthetics that only reflective glass can offer.
There's no limit to the effects you can achieve.
Wood, concrete, masonry, and metal can all be
dramatically complemented by reflective glass.
But besides good looks, Solarcool Bronze
reflective glass gives you good performance, too.
Since it is reflective, it shields the sun's glare
and reduces heat gain more efficiently than tinted
glass. So your air conditioning system is more
economical.
In cold climates it can save on your heating
costs, too. Because it becomes an excellent
insulator when used in double-pane construction.
So treat yourself and your next building to
the remarkable beauty and excellent performance
of Solarcool Bronze reflective glass.
For all that you get it's not all that expensive.
To find out more about it, see your local
glass distributor, or write for our free booklets to:
Dept. F35, Solarcool Bronze, PPG Industries, Inc.,
One Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222.
PPG: a Concern for the Future
1. Professional Office Building. Panama City. Florida
Architect. James Graham Chapman
Contractor Jean Mordellet
2. Roanoke Office Building. Phoenix. Arizona
Architect: E. Logan Campbell
Contractor: Shuart Corporation
3. Tucker Office Building, Atlanta. Georgia
Architect: Arkhora & Associates
Contractor Hails Construction
4. Otero Savings & Loan. Colorado Springs, Colorado
Architect: John L. Glusti Associates
Contractor: Lembke Construction
5. Rusty Scupper Restaurant, Oakland, California
Architect: Sandy & Babcock
Contractor: Williams & Burrows, Inc. INDUSTRIES.


a..n~








RECENT PROJECTS


University Branch of Pensacola
Home & Savings Association

Architect:
Look & Morrison, Architects of Pensacola


Pensacola Home & Savings Association has
chosen the slogan for its new building: "FROM
UNDER THE TREES CAME OUR NEW
BRANCH."
The 6800 sq. ft. building is,unique, even for
the city that rightfully boasts that it was the
first European settlement in continental North
America. For in a time when glistening slabs of
masonry or sky scraping giants claim most
architectural headlines, the University Branch is
almost hard to find. As the slogan suggests, the
branch came out from under the trees, huge
four-and-five hundred year old oaks whose
limbs almost touch the blending roofline and
adds an accent which emphasizes the building's
style.











-ef I I- .


Continental Park Recreation Building

Architect:
Leff & Alexander,
Architects of Miami

"The most functional, vandal-proof recreation
building in our Park system to date," is the way
Fred Beauregard, Chief of Plans and Design for
Dade County Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment, characterizes the recently completed
Continental Park Recreational Building.
The County has asked the architectural firm
to repeat their design in a new location,
Tropical Estates Park.


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,- .. '_
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Admirals Walk Condominium


Lakeland Florida Civic Center

Architect:
Renfroe-Setliff-Regnvall of Lakeland

Aluminum, concrete and glass for a dazzling
partnership at the recently completed Lake-
land, Florida Civic Center.
The Center includes four buildings. In
addition to a convention hall, the $13 million
complex also has an 8,000 seat sports arena, a
2,800 seat theater and a maintenance and
mechanical building.
All four building in the Center utilize
prestressed concrete in combination with
Amarlite's structural gasket curtain wall system
and "Safetyline" entrances.


Architect:
Schwab & Twitty Architects, Inc.
of West Palm Beach

Admirals Walk, majestic high rise condominium
residences on A1A in Boca Raton, received an
annual award for excellence from the Com-
munity Appearance Board of the city of Boca
Raton, Florida.
According to John Shoup, AIA, Chairman
of the Board for four years, "the award takes
into consideration architecture, land planning,
landscaping, graphics and how the building
relates to its natural setting and to the
surrounding area and structures." Shoup also
added, "we look for the properties that go far
beyond minimum requirements."


Dade County School
Employees Credit Union

Architect:
Watson/Deutschman/Kruse/Lyon of Miami

According to the Florida Tile, Marble &
Terrazzo Institute, this circular structure is just
about maintenance-free because of the amount
of tile used on the exterior. 6500 square feet of
tile faced the outside of the building.
The architects used a Swedish tile called
Hoganas, with each piece of tile 2" wide and
10" deep. The Credit Union building is located
in Coral Gables.




Newsnotes


Professor Prestamo


Professor Sampson


UM APPOINTMENTS

Professor Felipe Prestamo, AlP, has been
appointed acting chairman of the department
of architecture, architectural engineering, and
planning and Professor James Sampson has
been named director of the architectural
engineering program in the University of Miami,
School of Engineering and Environmental
Design.
Professor Prestamo holds degrees in ar-
chitecture from the University of Havana, and
in urban planning from Massachusetts Institute
of Technology. Professor Sampson received his
architectural engineering degree from the
University of Illinois and his civil engineering
degree from the University of Oklahoma.
ADDY AWARD

Chas Cary, president of Chas. Cary Advertising
won a first place "ADDY AWARD" from the
Fort Lauderdale Ad Federation for the
Caldwell Scott Construction Company ad,
"Who raised the roof? ", (page 16, January/
February FA).


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Bln,i?<~l,^W


FA/24


7














CONTEMPORARY DESIGN PANEL
In conjunction with an exhibit titled, DANISH
DESIGN IN THE SEVENTIES, the Miami Art
Center sponsored a contemporary design panel
discussion.
Member of the panel were Jorge Arango,
AIA a Coconut Grove architect, William King,
president of Al Group and Soren Dyssegaard,
press counselor with the Consulate General of
Denmark in New York.
King's definition of 'good design' is "the
perfection of the essential."
ARCHITECTURE GRADUATES
Architecture departments in the State of
Florida are interested in keeping in touch with
recent graduates. According to Brock
Hamacher, Associate Professor at the University
of Florida, "Over the past three years the
Department has awarded 184 Bachelor of
Design (AE) degrees. A majority of these
continue here in Graduate School in pursuit of
the professional degree, MAA. At the present


time we find it difficult to keep track of those
persons who have Bachelor of Design from here
and who have gone to work in an architect's
office, gone to another school or something
else."
NEW MANUALS AVAILABLE
Two new manuals from AIA are now available
through the Florida Association's office. The
new manuals are "Compensation Management
for Architectural Services," M-188 and "The
Architect and the Shelter Industry," M-182.
Using the "Compensation Management
Guidelines," the architects can, first of all, help
their clients decide what architectural services
will be required for their projects; second, it
will help the architects themselves develop
reliable estimates of their own costs in
performing each individual item of service, and
from those estimates, arrive at equitable
compensation.
Topical sections within the "Architect and
Shelter Industry" report include: 1) An
overview of the shelter industry, 2) The impact
of new trends on the shelter industry, 3) The
background of the residential design team, 4)
The architect's role as a member of the building
team, 5) A description of architect/planner's
responsibilities and work, 6) A survey of fees
and 7) Contracts between architect/planners
and builder/developers.


Calendar

FAAIA Board of Directors Meeting
May 1 Orlando Hyatt House

Paolo Soleri Exhibit
May 13 Ft. Lauderdale Museum

AIA Convention
May 18-22 Atlanta, Ga.

CEP V Cost-Based Compensation
May 29 Orlando Hyatt House
May 30 Miami

South Florida Producers Council
May 22 Georgia-Pacific Corp.

Jacksonville Chapter Meeting
May 28 Tribute to Mellen C. Greeley


A swimming pool, such as the one above at the
new home of Mr. and Mrs. John Weller of Miami,
is engineered, designed and constructed by Aqua-
tech specifications to provide a place to relax...
a place for fun with friends... a place for family
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Each pool is planned to fit the landscaping, the
atmosphere and the owner's requirements...for a
swimming pool should be a personal affair, a love
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March/April 1975


FA/25







































































OFFICE FURNITURE, INC.
2801 S.W. 31st AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133
444-8221


-IE FICEFRIUEFO NEIR


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
FA/26








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