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Title: Florida architect
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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00217
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January-February 1975
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00217
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text
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Architect: J. Stewart Stein, Phoenix Contractor: Ramada Development Company, Phoenix
Lumber Supplied by: Pinellas Lumber Company, St. Petersburg

Non-Com fire protected wood

is at work in some of
Florida's best resorts.


non

FIRE-PROTECTED WOOD


Produced by ...


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Ramada Inn .. .176 rooms .. .excellent
vacation and convention facilities .. .a
luxurious addition to Florida's list of fine
resort hotels.

Prior to construction, the decision was
made that nothing less than the best could
be good enough for this resort hotel. So
when wood was called for, Non-Com fire
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more than ordinary wood .. .and it's worth
it. Because Non-Com fire protected wood
is so effective against flame spread it
rates the Underwriters'Laboratories label.



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LUMBER & EXPORT COMPANY


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For more information about non-com Fire-Protected Wood, write Dantzler at Jacksonville, Headquarters


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The Florida Architect

Volume 25 Number 1 January/February 1975


CONTENTS

Letters ............................ 4



Advertisers ......................... 5



The Florida House ................... 6

Grassroots Reception



Survey of North Florida Courthouses .... 8

by F.W. Wiedenmann



The Villa Koehne in Palm Beach ........ 14


Reception at The Florida House 6


COVER PHOTO: Gilchrist County
Court House 1933, from the Survey
of North Florida Courthouses p. 8
NEXT ISSUE: Solar applications to
Florida Architecture


Villa Koehne in 1915 14


by Marta McBride Galicki

and Gunther Stamm



So You Want To Be A Principal ......... 17

by H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA



Architectural Products ................ 19



Professional Services ................. 22 To be a principal? 17


1975 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

James H. Anstis
Bruce Balk
John McKim Barley, II
William F. Bigoney
Howard Bochiardy
William Brainard
Ellis W. Bullock
Carl Gerken
Norman M. Giller
Martin Gundersen
Carl Gutmann, Jr.
William K. Harris
Jerome A. James
William Jollay
Walter L. Keller
Charles E. King
Bertram Y. Kinsey, Jr.
Robert H. Levison FAIA
Stephen Little
John McCormick
Harry G. Morris
Richard H. Morse
Robert F. Petersen
Richard T. Reep
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
Francis R. Walton FAIA
Jack West
Robert L. Woodward


FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1975

James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, President
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758

Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, Vice President
President Designate
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-4814

Ellis W. Bullock, Jr., AIA, Secretary
1823 North Ninth Avenue
Pensacola, Florida 32503
(904) 434-2551

James A. Greene, AIA, Treasurer
5020 Cypress Street, Suite 211
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 872-8407


DIRECTORS OF FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker, AIA
1000 N. Ashley Street, Suite 806
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-0381

Herbert R. Savage, AIA
P.O. Box 280
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 845-1414

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of The
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos, Hon. AIA
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947

GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
J. Michael Huey, Attorney at Law
1020 E. Lafayette, Suite 110
Tallahassee, Florida 32303
(940) 878-3158

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Lester C. Pancoast
Charles H. Pawley
Richard Schuster
Donald I. Singer
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Publisher
David E. Clavier/Editor
Jay Keenan/ Advertising Representative
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida Association of the American
institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and published by the Association, a Florida Corporation not
for profit. It Is published bi-monthly at the Executive Office of the Association, 7100 N. Kendall
Drive, Miami, Florida 33156. Telephone (305) 661-8947. Opinions expressed by contributors are
not necessarily hose of the Editor of the Florida Association ol the AIA. Editorial material may
be reprinted provided full credit is given to the author and to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and
copy is sent to publisher's office. Single Copies, 75 cents, subscription, S6.50 per year.


FA/3
























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NEWIm


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Calendar


CEP I Financial Management for Profit &
Growth in Architectural Firms
February 24 & 25 Orlando
February 27 & 28 Miami
Executive Committee Meeting
March 19 & 20 Tallahassee
April 18 Tampa
CEP II Creative Thinking & Leadership
March 21 Orlando
CEP III Negotiating with the Client/ Give &
Take
April 11 Orlando
CEP IV Planning Interview Strategies
April 22 Orlando
Danish Design Exhibit
February 28 March 16 Miami Art Center


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


Letter




Dear Editor,
Thank you very much for having
me on your mailing list to receive "The
Florida Architect" which I am reading
with interest
This is an extremely beautiful
magazine and very well put together. You
must have a good printer and art director.
I just wanted to be sure to be kept
on your mailing list.
Sincerely yours,

Margot A. Henkel
Executive Director
New York Society of Architects

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT encourages com-
munications from its readers and reserves the
right to edit for style and/or economy. We
assume that any letter, unless otherwise
stipulated, is free for publication in this journal.
Please address correspondence to: Editor, THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, 7100 N. Kendall Dr.
No. 203, Miami, Florida 33156.


Z

THE AMERICANIXATION OF


THE EUROPEAN KITCHEN !

Too many European Kitchen manufacturers
have come to the United States with the
attitude that architects should not only learn a
foreign language but that they should accept
foreign dimensions for Kitchen cabinets.
Murray Kitchens believes just the opposite.
Our aim is to work with the American
architect. We even became the first European
member of AIKD.
The only thing we have not totally American-
ized is the styling. It's beautifully contem-
porary. European, with fresh clean lines and
rich, rich colors.
For more information contact:

William T. Langohr, CKD
District Sales Manager
Fairway Oaks Villas No. 3212
M URRAY Amelia Island Plantation
_KITCHENS Amelia Island, Florida 32034
MIURRAY Kitchens for living in (904) 261-9284


FA/4







Advertisers


Architectural Products .................... 19


Caldwell-Scott Construction Co ............. 16


Dantzler Lumber & Export Co. (second cover) . 2


Dunan Brick Yard (third cover) .............. 23


List Industries ............


Murray Kitchens .....


. . . . . . . . . . 4


Pavlow Office Furniture ................... 22


Professional Services .


Walton Wholesale Corp. .....


. . . . . . . . 5


In Memoriam


This has been a sad time for The Florida
of The American Institute of Architects.


Association


Since the last publication of THE FLORIDA
ARCHITECT, three members of the Association have
passed away.
We regret the passing and feel the loss of:





Sumner Darling, AIA
Sarasota
Gene Mueller, AIA
Orlando
Mark Wilson, AIA
Winter Park


January/February 1975


FA/5















Florida


House
where Floridians are at home in the nation's capital





The idea for the Florida House was conceived by Senator and
Mrs. Lawton Chiles. The House was purchased in February,
1972, and opened to the public on October 26, 1973. The
House was built in 1887 and has been completely renovated.
The Florida House is governed by a Board of Trustees
and a paid Director. No Board member is salaried. The Board z'
is elected annually. Any person who contributes a minimum of
$10.00 a year is a voting member of the Florida House, Inc.
Since October, 1973, over 25,000 Floridians have visited
the Florida House and estimations are for that number to
double the second year.
Florida House is the first and only such project in the .
nation's capital. At the present time, 18 other states are
interested in a state house.
There are no State or Federal funds used to support
Florida House. It is totally supported through contributions.
All contributors have their names permanently placed in the
building on plaques.
The purpose of Florida House is threefold:
Educational To bring government closer to the people
of Florida which includes arranging speakers, seminars, etc.
Information To provide up-to-date information on
Washington and to assist every Floridian visiting the city which
includes planning tours, assisting with transportation informa-
tion, etc.
Hospitality A place where every Floridian is treated as
a V.I.P. Florida House is a place to meet friends, business
associates, hold meetings, etc. Florida House has a friendly,
expert staff to greet visitors and provide refreshments for their
use.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/6




































FAAIA Sponsors Grassroots Reception


Florida chapter and section officers of The American Institute
of Architects discovered that Florida House is truly a home for
Floridians in the nation's capital.
For the first time the Florida Grassroots program was
held in Washington, D.C. immediately before the Institute's
National Grassroots Program. The Florida Association of The
American Institute of Architects used this opportunity to
sponsor a reception in the honor of the Florida Congressional
Delegation.
Attending the reception where Florida Senators and
Representatives, General Services Administration officials,
officers and staff of The American Institute of Architects,
officers of the Florida chapters and sections of the AIA and
members and staff of the Florida Association.
The warm atmosphere and beautiful view of Florida
House offered an exciting change from the brisk winter air of
Washington, D.C.. Florida architects had the opportunity to
meet their congressmen and to discuss mutual needs and
directions for the state of Florida.
The Florida House staff offered interesting insights into
the history behind the House. The Florida House is totally
supported through voluntary contributions from individuals,
civic groups, schools, corporations, associations and other
similar groups. All those at the reception agreed that Florida
House is an important function for the people of Florida.
The Florida Association feels that the House is a
worthwhile cause. The Association's Executive Committee has
approved a contribution for the maintenance of Florida
House. We urge every Floridian to visit Florida House and to
make a contribution no matter what the amount.


Florida Senator, Lawton Chiles speaks
with Florida South Chapter President,
Glenn Buff.


CONTINUED ON PAGE 20


January/February 1975


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North Florida Survey \DIXIE / L _. j. ^--l \\ \
by F.W. Wiedenmann o ", \ n.ii
Instructor, F. Blair Reeves E 0 |. | \\\
LEVY ..J O 1 L--. \
The North Florida survey conducted by o LV J I O \
F.W. Wiedenmann included 18 existing MARION
courthouse structures in the State. .... D J nd
Data for this survey was gathered by voLuSIA
visitation and through recorded descrip- OT.---
tions.
Wiedenmann wishes to express his ap- o LAKE
preciation to all the county officials, o j j
especially county clerks and citizens for
their aid and interest in compiling this L.----.J\j
report.






NORTH FLORIDA



COURTHOUSE SURVEY





BRADFORD COUNTY
Old Bradford County Courthouse; Starke, Florida, Smith
and Blackburn, Architects and Builders from Montgomery,
Alabama. Construction cost $12,500. Original specifications in
commissioner's minutes November 5, 1901; rear addition 1930
W.P.A.; Four-sided symmetrical tower, original vaults with
iron doors, red brick and limestone masonry walls, arched
vestibule entrance, structure recently turned over to Bradford
County Historical Board of Trustees for renovation and
restoration for use as office and museum space; Historic
American Buildings Survey, (H.A.B.S.) drawings presently
underway at U. of F.; recently nominated to the National
Bradford County, 1902. Register of Historic Places.


January/February 1975


FA/9












4

I,_ 5L..amL.


Baker County, 1908.


BAKER COUNTY
Baker County Courthouse, Macclenny, Florida, 1941;
Work Projects Administration (W.P.A.) Project. Old Baker
County Courthouse, Macclenny, Florida, 1908; Architect and
Contractor unknown; Cross Hall Plan with octagonal corner
rooms; four-sided tin-clad clock cupola with works; metal
cornice; minor interior renovation; presently used by the
Baker County Public Library and Health Department.


Columbia County, 1901.


COLUMBIA COUNTY
Columbia County Courthouse, Lake City, Florida, 1901;
Architect Frank P. Milburn, Columbia, South Carolina,
Contractor Henry W. Otis, Kingston, New York; Structure
remodeled and enlarged in 1959.


Clay County, 1889.


CLAY COUNTY
Old Clay County Courthouse, Green Cove Springs,
Florida, 1889; Architect A.E. McClure, Contractor W.A.
McDuff; later additions on east and west facades, building still
remains in its original state; exterior originally brick-covered
with stucco in 1950's; Note: Metal cornice and decorative
metal gable, tri-arched entrance supported by cast iron
columns. Presently used as office space by the Clay County
School Board, Family Planning Service and State Welfare
Agency.


Duval County, 1915.


DUVAL COUNTY
Former Duval County Courthouse, Jacksonville, Florida,
1915; presently owned and used by the Southeast First Bank.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/10












L
"i *' 4


Flagler County, 1926.


FLAGLER COUNTY
Flagler County Courthouse, Bunnell, Florida, 1926;
Architects Talley, Buckley, Talley; Contractor O.P.
Woodcock Co.




GILCHRIST COUNTY COVER PHOTO
Gilchrist County Courthouse, Trenton, Florida, 1933;
Smith Holborn, Dozer Architects and Engineers. Extensive
interior remodeling along with side additions.


Lafayette County, 1908.


LAFAYETTE COUNTY
Lafayette County Courthouse, Mayo, Florida, 1908; E.
C. Hosford and Company; Atlanta, Georgia, Architects;
Mutual Construction Company, Louisville, Kentucky -
contractors, cost of construction $46,950; exterior walls of
Indian limestone, columned portico entrance porches,
combination bell-clock tower, site of two previous court-
houses. Additions and alterations 1967.
Old Lafayette County Courthouse, Mayo, Florida, 1894;
plans submitted by W. T. Dees, sketches of plans and brief
specifications in commissioners' minutes of October 30, 1894.
Presently used for apartments. Exterior porches and
ornamentation added by private owner.


U


Jefferson County, 1909.


Lake County, 1890.


JEFFERSON COUNTY
Jefferson County Courthouse, Monticello, Florida,
1909; E. C. Hosford and Co. Architects, Mutual
Construction Co. Contractors; Masonry construction,
columned porticones on four sides, metal clad clock and bell
cupola, cupolas interior framing shows evidence of near fire
destruction; Built on courthouse square after removal of
county's first courthouse.


LAKE COUNTY
Old Lake County Courthouse, "Pioneer Building"
Tavares, Florida, 1890; assumed architect Jaber Sears;
original brick masonry now stucco moved off site when
present courthouse was built. Present plans call for demolition,
in order to make room for new courthouse annex.


January/February 1975


FA/11




















Nassau County, 1891.


Levy County, 1937.


LEVY COUNTY
Levy County Courthouse, Bronson, Florida, 1937;
Henry L. Taylor Architect, O.P. Woodcock Contractor;
side additions 1963.


NASSAU COUNTY
Nassau County Courthouse, Fernandina Beach, Florida,
1891, McClure Architect, W. H. Mann Contractor,
construction cost $20,614; building remains in original
condition, except for addition on west side; masonry
construction with sheet metal cornice; metal clad clock tower.
Decorative brick arched entrances with cast iron columns -
H.A.B.S. description; recently nominated to the National
Register of Historic Places.
U.S. Government Post Office, Custom House, and
Courthouse, Fernandina Beach, Florida, 1909; original
working drawings found in basement; H.A.B.S. description.


Madison County, 1913-14.


Putnam County, 1909.


MADISON COUNTY
Madison County Courthouse, Madison, Florida,
1913-1914; Bishop and Greer Architects, J. C. Crouse -
Contractor; building remains in original design; masonry
construction with sandstone trim; pressed tin ceiling; central
clock cupola; ornate sheet metal roofs at corners; cast iron
drinking fountain on S.W. corner of courthouse square.


PUTMAN COUNTY
Putnam County Courthouse, Palatka, Florida, 1909;
Robinson and Reidy Architects, C.D. Smith Contractor,
Construction cost $34,606. Building completely renovated
along with removal of original cupola, additions 1963-64;
columned portico only remains of original design.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/12


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St. Johns County, 1834.


ST. JOHNS COUNTY
St. Johns County Courthouse, St. Augustine, Florida,
1888; Franklin W. Smith, Boston Architect, originally the
Cordova Hotel, acquired by St. Johns County for use as
courthouse in 1962; after renovation structure contains over
70,000 square feet of office space with yearly revenue of
$50,000 from ground floor stores.
Government House, St. Augustine, Florida, in 1834;
Spanish Governor's residence was remodeled and enlarged by
the United States Government as a Territorial Court Building.
It retained this use until 1877. Presently structure houses the
St. Augustine Historical Commission.


Union County, 1936.


UNION COUNTY
Union County Courthouse, Lake Butler, Florida; 1936;
W.P.A. project, John E. Pearson, Gainesville Architect;
additions and alterations, 1967.
Old Union County Courthouse, Lake Butler, Florida,
1921-23; Structure moved from site of present courthouse,
interior stairwell and courtroom intact; presently houses the
Union County Health Department.


41 -


Volusia County, 1926.


Suwannee County, 1904.


SUWANNEE COUNTY
Suwannee County Courthouse, Live Oak, Florida; 1904;
Benjamin B. Smith, Montgomery, Alabama Architect; R.
Hugger Bro's Contractor; construction cost $41,300;
Masonry clock tower with copper roof. Stairwell and
courtroom decor original. Alterations and additions, 1964.


VOLUSIA COUNTY
Volusia County Courthouse, Deland, Florida; 1926-30;
W. D. Harper and Company, Daytona Beach Architect,
James Peterson Construction Company and T. K. Apgar,
Daytona Beach Contractors, construction cost $359,958;
north and south facade columned porticoes, columned
rotunda with stained glass skylights surrounded by balcony,
exterior of dome encased in copper and masonry. Later
renovations and additions.


January/February 1975


FA/13





















A Masterpiece of Early Modern Architecture
in Florida Destroyed

by Marta McBride Galicki and
Gunther Stamm, Florida State University

S' With the demolition of the former Villa Koehne in Palm Beach
S in Fall 1974 Florida has lost one of its few examples of
progressive architecture prior to World War I. The sacrifice of
this building for commercial purposes and financial interests
underlines dramatically the need for a more active and
comprehensive preservation effort with respect to genuine
landmarks of advanced modern architecture in this region. The
following notes summarize the architectural history and
artistic importance of the structure.
On January 25, 1914, the Palm Beach Daily News
briefly noted the arrival of Mrs. William Koehne, who first
.r -i took up seasonal residence in her "daringly modern home"
That winter. Those who came annually to the exclusive resort
-!-J | town had commenced, by 1900, to build villas in a variety of
S- 1 A eclectic styles, which reflected the economic status of their
.' ,i| | AID owners and at the same time an obvious lack of architectural
5V!IC taste. However, the prevailing historicist vocabulary was
temporarily uprooted with the construction of the "Villa and
Studio William Louis Koehne" on the oceanfront.
"f g .' 'Palm Beach legend maintains that the building was a
-- ,, product of Frank Lloyd Wright's Chicago office and William
.. and Zila Koehne always contended that it was designed by
SWright himself. Koehne, a prominent Chicago photographer,
resided prior to 1910 in the same vicinity as Wright's firm and
S, jZila Koehne established an initial contact with Wright through
her cousin Louis Sullivan. Nevertheless, a study of the original
drawings in the Griffin Archive, Northwestern University, and
related material in the Flagler Museum, Palm Beach, makes
Wright's authorship highly improbable. The authors have
argued in detail elsewhere that the Villa Koehne was designed
__ _-_ '_,_''_ in the years 1910-1913 by Walter Burley Griffin in
collaboration with his wife Marion Mahony Griffin.
V_ Construction began in 1913 and was carried out under
the supervision of Cooper Lightbaum of Palm Beach. The
L-shaped plan provided direct entry into the living room from
the south. The interior space, spanning the length of the villa,
was interrupted only by the double fireplace. Red brickwork
was combined with a simple concrete mantel and further
accented in stucco with redwood trim. Along the north side
the continuation of the one story living room provided a


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


1915 plans.


FA/14





- -


Oceanview of The Villa Koehne, 1915.

Oceanview of The Villa Koehne, 1915.


climatic contrast to the open two story photography studio.
The continuous glass sheathing of the studio wall enhanced the
convincing simplicity of the villa. The distinctive Prairie Style
roofline included a spacious walk-out terrace with a
breathtaking view of the Atlantic.
With the death of Zila Patterson Koehne in 1932,
William Koehne moved into a bungalow on the western
portion of his oceanside property and finally sold the villa in
.1945. Guests who had rented the Villa Koehne prior to 1945
included such notables as Flo Ziegfield and Billie Burke. John
Jacob Astor's young son had vivid impressions of the building
and is quoted by James Noble Gifford in his 1931 edition of
Caviar for Breakfast.
The structure was bought in 1945 by Phillip Reid, a New
York businessman, and by 1947 the new owner had initiated
action to transform the two story oceanside residence into a
1940's motor hotel, called "Shorwinds". A local architect,
Belford Shoumate, subdivided the interior flowing space into
pine paneled guest rooms and his additions let the Villa.
Koehne collapse into a butchered U-shape structure. Double
hung sash windows eventually replaced all wooden casements
except for those on the observation area. The altered windows
were further shortened, transformed into entranceways or
totally eliminated. Additional changes in the exterior with
respect to color, triangular roof overhangs and balconies
stripped the villa of its essential stylistic qualities and simple
grandeur so evident in the 1915 photographs. Shoumate's
alterations showed a complete disrespect for the original
intentions.
"Shorwinds," located at 364 South Ocean Boulevard,
continued to operate as a hotel for the wealthy until June
1974, when Philip Reid sold his property to contractors
Michael Burrows and Harold Kaplan. The building was
demolished in the Fall of 1974 to make way for a "luxurious"
six story condominium, perhaps "inspired" by Edward Durell
Stone's apartment complex adjacent to the former Villa
Koehne.
The Villa Koehne, designed by Walter Burley Griffin and
Marion Mahony in the years 1910-1913, represented a
masterful example of Griffin's mature architectural oeuvre in
this country, conceived at a time when the Griffins had finally


The former Villa Koehne as photographed in 1974.


disrobed the Wrightian cloak they had worn since the early
years of the century. As. an almost unique expression of the
"Prairie Style" in Florida, as far as the artistic quality and
architectural consequence of the structure is concerned, the
Villa Koehne marked the beginning of a new architectural era
in Florida and the South in general. It is for these reasons that
one has to regret deeply the premature demolition of this
building. *


January/February 1975


Q.


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osai


FA/15





































Who raised the roof?
Who took this big bank and made it bigger? Without an aesthetic ripple.
Without compromising the original architectural design. Without
interruption of any banking business. Without inconvenience to customers
or personnel. Without water damage to top-floor tenants when the roof
was raised.
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So You Want To




Be A Principal!


H. Samuel Kruse, FA IA
Small Office Practice Series


Being a principal of a firm carries with it
obligations of leadership as well as fiscal
responsibility and professional com-
petence. Leadership requires the recogni-
tion of what motivates people, both those
who lead as well as those who are led and
the ability to relate to the motivations for
achieving desirable objectives.
So you want to be a principal!
How well are you prepared for the
leadership role? What can a person do to
prepare himself for this complex role as
principal, leader of people?
If you as a principal in a firm can
understand and predict human behavior,
less of your energy will be spent
untangling difficulties and in frustration
over inability to "sell" new ideas; more
energy will be available for architectural
creativity, overall effectiveness, and
professional development.
Transactional analysis (TA, as
transactional analysis is abbreviated) is an
innovative approach to learning human
behavior. It was developed by the late Dr.
Eric Berne and outlined in such books as
Games People Play, I'm OK You're OK,
and What Do You Say After You Say
Hello? Dr. Berne's approach is not the
last word on human behavior, but it can
help resolve some of the recurring human
behavior problems that crop up in
conducting an architectural practice. TA
can help understand human relationships,
can not only help in resolving current
problems, but also in analyzing past
problems, a process fundamental to
adjusting for better performance.


TA describes the human personality
as a composite of three types of
activities: Parent, Adult, Child.
Dr. Berne describes the Parent part
of the personality as a "tape" in the
human computer giving the "input"
information learned in the formative, first
five years of growing, when a person
learns such real things as: "If I cut
myself, it hurts," "If I touch hot things,
I'll burn," "If I don't obey my parents,
I'll get spanked," etc. Other things too
are learned: roles played by members of
the family, our country and patriotism,
and religious concepts.
This stored information forms
much of the unconscious part of the
mind and, although consisting of ex-
periences long since forgotten continues
to affect attitudes in many ways. The
Parent part of personality sometimes
causes problems, when the information
on the "Parent tape" is a backlog of
"input" prejudicial, inaccurate or incom-
plete.
The Child part of the human
personality is the emotional part develop-
ed by those things related to the child's
early life. It is the "feel" part of us: fear,
hate, love, anxiety, frustration, joy, etc.
The child part is a very influential and
essential ingredient of human behavior.
The Adult part of the human
personality is the thinking part. In this
part, the 10 to 13 billion brain cells with
which to think are used to collect,
readjust, and retrieve data from the
Parent and Child "tapes" of the human


computer. And as with a computer, the
judgments, decisions and solutions on the
"print-out" is only as good as the
information on the "tapes."
The human computer is, as the
mechanical computer is maniputable. The
Parent information in the mind can be
tested against reality and then updated
accordingly and put into the mind's "data
bank." The Child information also can be
tested and updated in the same way. An
example of the updating process is the
story of the long-feuding, Kentucky
Hatfields and McCoys. Suzie Hatfield was
told that all the McCoys were bad, but
upon meeting Jimmy McCoy, she allowed ,
"any man who can make me feel like
Jimmy does, can't be bad," and, thus
updated her information about the
McCoys.
Prejudices are formed and revised
similarly. Having been told at an early age
many opinionated things about sex,
ethics, race, religion, etc., the Adult part
of the personality test these early
opinions against reality and update them.
Many problems among people are the
result of people operating solely from
their Parent information. Such people
will not expose themselves to a new
concept which might conflict with
experience learned early in life.
The Adult aspect of the personality
acts like the executive director of the
personality, saying in effect, "Listen to
the Parent and Child parts of our being,
use that which is valid and reject that


January/February 1975


FA/17






which is not." The Adult part of the
personality uses the other two parts and
represents the highest order of rational-
ity.
It is easy to recognize the three
characteristics of the human personality,
but the understanding of these charac-
teristics breeds the confidence in the
principal set on a leadership role. The
ideal human relationship is one's person-
ality interacting with another in a broad
Adult level exchange, able to draw on the
strengths of both, tempered in past
experiences and present feelings un-
ashamed, but operating within the ra-
tionale of Adult guidance.
TA proposes the pairing of person-
ality characteristics, to accomplish this
ideal relationship. Anytime a stimulus is
met by a parallel response, communica-
tion can continue and a relationship
established. But anytime a stimulus is met
with a response that crosses the speaker's
line (as for instance, a Parent attitude met
by a Child attitude), communication
stops and conflict begins.
When an architect presents a design
concept to a client, he frequently assumes
an authoritian attitude: his voice has a
ring of authority, his head tosses
arrogantly, eyes squint, etc. This posture
could very well turn-off the client. This is
the Parent part dominating the relation-
ship and is characterized also by frequent
use of cliches and languages identified
with military orders and bureaucratic
bulletins.
Suppose the architect, who present-
ed his design in an authoritian way, was
speaking to an inexperienced client.
Throughout the presentation the client
nods affirmatively, but his questions
reveal that he doesn't understand. Even if
the conversation continues for a long
time, there is no true communication.
The architect has not stimulated a parallel
response, so the client does not under-
stand. Somehow the architect, or the
client must get their respective Adult
parts working on the same wave length.
The effective relationship requires that
the reasoning Adult part of one personali-
ty responds to the reasoning Adult part
of another personality.
This is not an easy task. Many
principals lapse into hackneyed phrases
and comments springing from their
professional authority (the Parent part of
their personalities) to establish client
approval, but fail. Professional jargon
turns-on nobody. Neither do "Keep up
the good work." "That's a nice job" and
similar comments stimulate employees


and colleagues. Attempts to motivate
people with clich6-ridden, repetitive
phrases will not satisfy the hunger people
have for recognition. The principal must
identify the other person's strengths so
that when the "teachable moment"
arrives, the person is ready "to learn" and
the principal "to teach." When the Adult
in a person operates, communication is
established using adaptable terminology,
creative in language, fresh in spirit and
appealing to the Adult in the listener for
an adult response.
Creativity is more likely to occur
when the Adult part of the personality is
open and receptive to the fun stuff of the
Child part. The Child part of a personali-
ty is the fun-loving part. A soft voice
usually indicates that the Child in a
person is in charge. This softness
frequently is more effective than the
stern and authoritian, for it suggests
concern, empathy, feeling and, when
combined with the reasoning from the
Adult part of a personality, establishes an
effective, pleasant relationship. The
creative person allows his Child part free
play in the creative process, for imagina-
tion and fantasy primarily spring from
that part. The common technique for
stimulating creativity is "brainstorming"
in a group, where the Child part of the
members is allowed to speak freely
without worry of Adult or Parent
criticism. After the "brainstorming" the
Adult evaluates the Child input for
application of ideas to real things. By
developing a sense of humor, the
principal keeps his Adult part open for
the creative input from the Child within
him and his staff.
The good client contact man
intuitively knows when to assure a
potential client with more pizzazz" or
more facts and figures. If a potential
client changes suddenly from enthusiastic
acceptance to analytical criticism, a good
principal will know that the prospective
client needs Adult input: factual reas-
surance of the firm's integrity, the firm's
success, and the soundness of its previous
innovations. He does this, but not at the
expense of the client's enthusiasm. He
simultaneously builds upon the Child part
of the client's personality by drawing
graphic and verbal images to keep his
enthusiasm alive.
The following five points will help
develop recognition and understanding of
human behavior, the bases for transac-
tional analysis:
1. Learn the individual strengths in


people, and let them know that you
know. Share this information with
others.
2. Give recognition at the time recogniz-
able acts occur. Give specific and
explicit recognition. Avoid cliches; say
exactly what you mean. Avoid qualify-
ing recognition ("Well, that's fine,
but. ."), and linking recognition with
request for further performance.
3. Help people establish attainable and
measurable goals; setting the stage for
future recognition.
4. Give people your full attention; listen
to what is said; ask questions that
stimulate peoples opinions and ideas;
and welcome people's opinions and
ideas.
5. Ask people for their help.
Notice that all five points places the
burden of a viable relationship upon the
actor; the relationship continues when all
parties to the relationship become sup-
porting actors.
The successful principal is a leader
who understands himself and others, but
more importantly, knows what must be
done to meet the needs of both himself
and others. *






INTRODUCING
A new feature of
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
The
ARCHITECTURAL PRODUCTS
& PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
sections .


FOR MORE INFORMATION
CONTACT-









Editor
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive, Suite 203
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


FA/18











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January/February 1975


FA/19






Florida
House


Continued from page 7


1. AIA Secretary, Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., FAIA,
talks with Florida Representative Paul G.
Rogers, AIA Vice President, Carl L. Bradley,
FAIA and AIA President William Marshall,
FAIA.

2. Brevard Section President, Clyde Allen
makes a point with Florida Representative
Claude Pepper.

3. Florida Representative Dante B. Fascell at
the FAAIA Congressional Reception.

4. Florida Association General Counsel, J.
Michael Huey greets Florida Representative
Don Fuqua as FAAIA Executive Director, Fotis
N. Karousatos watches.

5. Acting Commissioner of Public Buildings
with the General Services Administration,
Walter A. Meisen talks with AIA President,
William Marshall, FAIA, Florida Association
Treasurer, James A. Greene and his wife
Eleanor.

6. Florida Senator Lawton Chiles, Jr. enjoys
discussing Florida House with Miami Architect,
Ed Grafton and Walter A. Meisen.

7. Freshman Representative Richard Kelly gets
together at the reception with Representative
Claude Pepper.

8. Mid-Florida Chapter President, Henry Wal-
ten meets with Representative Paul G. Rogers.

9. Florida Association President, James E.
Ferguson, Jr. discusses the evening with AIA
Congressional Liaison, Nicole Gara, Representa-
tive Claude Pepper and AIA President, William
Marshall, FAIA.

Not shown but in attendance at the reception
was Florida Representative William Lehman.


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT


I


FA/20










































r 'i .,q
6


Florida State Board members left to right,
William S. Morrison, Jeffe G. Hoxie, R. Carroll
Peacock, James E. Garland, Harry E. Burns, Jr.


Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratories
(Ferendino/Grafton/Spillis/Candela)


H. Leslie Walker


Florida Regional Director, H. Leslie Walker,
AIA has been named by William Marshall, Jr.,
FAAIA, President of The American Institute of
Architects, to serve as Chairman of the
Governmental Affairs Commission of the
Institute.


New officers of the Florida State Board of
Architecture are R. Carroll Peacock Presi-
dent, Jeffe G. Hoxie Vice President, James E.
Garland Secretary, Treasurer, and Harry E.
Burns, Jr. National NCARB Director.


First Honor Awards in the Fourth Biennial
Naval Facilities Awards Program were given for
the Multipurpose Theater, Whiting Field Air
Station, Milton, Fla., (Barrett/Daffin/Figg) and
Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological
Laboratories, Virginia Key, Miami, Fla., (Feren-
dino/Grafton/Spillis/Candela)


January/February 1975


Newsnotes p L
H^ ^^H---- ^H ^


FA/21











































































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Copies of THE ECONOMICS OF 1
ARCHITECTURAL AND EN-
GINEERING PRACTICE IN
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from the FAAIA office:

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