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AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00212
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: March 1974
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00212
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Advertisers
        Page 4
    Small office practice series
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Alexander Montessori School, Miami
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Legal notes
        Page 10
    Is an architect worth it?
        Page 11
    Residence, Jacksonville American Plywood Association honor award
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Page 15
        Page 16
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.




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6The Florida Architect
MARCH/APRIL 1974


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The Florida Architect
Volume 24 Number 2 March/April 1974


COVER
Alexander Montessori School In South Dade County
Architect John W. Totty, AIA. Photo by Jerry Cobb.


4
Advertisers

5
Small Office Practice Series
Lien Laws Are For Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA

7
Alexander Montessori School, Miami
John W. Totty, AIA, Architect


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS
FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1974

Frank R. Mudano, AIA, President
1189 N. E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 33515
(813) 446-1041

James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, Vice President
President Designate
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758
Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA, Secretary
P.O. Box 1120
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 647-0545

Arthur A. Frimet, AIA, Treasurer
208 South 28th Avenue
Hollywood, Florida 33020
(305) 981-0545

1974 BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Thor Amlie
James Anstis
John M. Barley, II
Howard Bochiardy
William Brainard
Ellis Bullock
Bill G. Eppes
Robert G. Graf
Mays Leroy Gray
Robert B. Greenbaum
James A. Greene
F. Jack Harden
Thurston Hatcher
Al G. Kemmerer
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Steven C. Little
Bryon G. Mclntyre
Robert A. Morris, Jr.
Roger Pierce
Henry A. Riccio
Roy L. Ricks
William L. Rivers
George L. Rumpel
Craig H. Salley
Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA
Donald I. Singer
Frank F. Smith
Francis R. Walton, FAIA


10
Legal Notes
J. Michael Huey
FAAIA General Counsel

11
Is An Architect Worth It?

12
Residence, Jacksonville
American Plywood Association
Honor Award
Peter Rumpel, AIA, Architect

DIRECTOR FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker
1000 N. Ashley Street, Suite 806
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-0381
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947
GENERAL COUNSEL
(Branch Office)
Mike Huey
1020 E. Lafayette St.
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
(904) 878-3158
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Frank Sheehy, Chairman
Lyle Fugelberg
Isaac Keith Reeves
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Editor
John W. Totty/Assistant Editor
Kurt Waldman/Photography


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida Associa-
tion of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published bi-monthly at the Executive Office of the Association, 7100
N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida 33156. Telephone (305) 661-8947.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor of the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material may
be reprinted provided full credit is given to the author and to
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and copy is sent to publisher's office.
Single Copies, 75 cents, subscription, $6.50 per year.


F/A 3







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F/A 4






H. Samuel Krus6, FAIA


Before the enactment of lien laws,
workmen often had to sue their
employers, if they had money owing
them. Few workmen had the time and
money needed to get satisfaction from
the courts, so not many workmen sued,
and thereby, many were cheated.

Lien laws were enacted to be sure that
workmen on construction projects got
paid. If an employer, who had a contract
with an owner to improve the owner's
property, failed to pay his workmem,
workmen could lien the property and
force the owner to pay the workmen.
Even if the owner had paid the employer
sums sufficient to pay the workmen,
under the lien laws, the owner was not
relieved of the responsibility for
non-payment by the contractor.

Over the years, lien laws were expanded
to cover not only workmen, but also
materialmen, subcontractors and
contractors.

With the expansion of the number of
people covered by lien laws, abuses of the
lien privilege became legion. Suppliers of
labor, services or materials for projects
soon learned that, if there was a claim or
lien against the owner's property, the
encumberance prevented him from
closing his mortgage arrangement at a
critical time. At a time when the owner
was paying the greatest payments on his
construction loan, when he had drawn
heavily on his cash on hand and when he
needed the mortgage money to make him
healthy again, workmen, suppliers and
subcontractors especially placed specious
claims against the property, knowing that
the owner would rather pay the money
claimed and get rid of the encumbrances
than to have long and costly court cases
fighting the false claims. This kind of
blackmail led to the revision of lien laws
for the protection for owners of
property, as well as workmen.

IN 1965 THE FLORIDA LIEN LAW
(FLORIDA STATUTES CHAPTER 84 -
MECHANICS LIEN LAW) WAS RE-
VISED TO ESTABLISH A UNIQUE
PROCEDURE FOR THE PROTECTION
OF ALL PERSONS INVOLVED IN THE


SMALL OFFICE PRACTICE SERIES

Lien Laws Are For Architects


IMPROVEMENT OF REAL PROPERTY.
THIS LAW PROTECTS THE OWNER
OF REAL PROPERTY, IF HE ABIDES
BY HIS OBLIGATIONS UNDER THE
LAW, IT PROVIDES LIEN RIGHTS TO
ALL PERSONS NOT IN PRIVITY, AS
WELL AS THOSE IN PRIVITY WITH
THE OWNER. (PERSONS WHO HAVE
A DIRECT CONTRACT WITH THE
OWNER TO FURNISH MATERIALS,
LABOR OR SERVICES, SUCH AS A
CONTRACTOR, ARE SAID TO BE IN
PRIVITY WITH THE OWNER.)

Persons, who are not in privity with the
owner (materialmen, or laborers or
subcontractors, who have no direct
contract with the owner but who furnish
materials or labor or services to a person
or persons who have a direct contract
with the owner to improve his real
property) may file leins against the
property improved for non-payment of
money owned them. However, before a
lein can be filed in the County Clerk's
Office, all lienors, except laborers, are
required to serve a notice on the owner
describing the nature of the services or
materials furnished before or within 45
days, from commencing to furnish
services or materials. This notice does not
constitute a lien, cloud or encumberance
on the real property, but does put the
owner on notice that, "If I don't get paid
my money from the guy who hired me to
improve your property, I'm looking to
you for the bread, man!" If liens are
filed, they must be filed in the office of
the County Clerk within 90 days after the
final performance, and action taken to
enforce the lien in a court of competent
jurisdiction within one year of filing.

The filing notices protects the owner.
The owner can collect the "Notices to the
Owner" (stock forms for notices are sold
in practically every stationery shop in
Florida now) and know that if these
potential lienors, who sent notices, are
paid and he has proof of their being paid
(waiver of lien for each notice), then no


lien can be filed to encumber his
property. No other materialmen and
subcontractors can encumber his
property with a claim of lien. However,
to earn this protection, the owner must at
the beginning of the work file in the
County Clerk's Office and post on the
site of the work, a "Notice of
Commencement," which shall include a
legal description of the property to be
improved, a general description of the
improvement, the name and address of
the owner, the contractor, the surety on
the payment bond (if any), and the
persons to whom "Notices to the Owner"
shall be sent by registered or certified
mail or by messenger.

Laborers need not serve notices to
owners. Neither do persons in privity
with the owner, (those like architects,
landscape architects, engineers, land
surveyors and contractors) have to send
notices to preserve lien rights. But liens
must be filed within 90 days of final
performance and action taken to enforce
the liens within one year of filing.

Under the Florida law, money owing to
professionals for their services to the
owner for the the improvement of the
owner's property is subject for liens,
regardless of whether such real property
is actually improved. (In many states
work must actually be started on the site
before a professional, as a laborer, has
lein rights.) This should hearten those
architects who have clients reluctant to
pay for professional service. The surveyor
and architect can always be the first
priority in a list of claimants, provided
that they can promptly file liens on their
clients' property and still serve the client.
This does, however, emphasize the
importance in having the real property
accurately described on site plans (or to
include the surveys in the drawings) and
having identical titles and terminology on
drawings, specifications and related
contract documents. If the architect takes
these precautions, then, if he has a client

F/A 5






LIEN LAWS


who says, "I'm not going to pay you
'cause the job ain't gonna be built," he
can counter, "I'll plank a lien on your
land and you can't sell it. And, if you
don't pay me in a hurry, I'll get the court
to sell your property and pay me!" This
is legal and a good last-resort method of
collection, but not much good for
establishing a clientel.

THE ARCHITECT'S REAL INTEREST
IN THE FLORIDA LIEN LAW IS NOT
FOR THE COLLECTION OF MONEY
OWING HIM. THE REAL INTEREST IS
THE PROTECTION (AND POTENTIAL
LIABILITIES) IT AFFORDS HIM IN
THE ADMINISTRATION OF CON-
STRUCTION.

Unless he is a very unusual person, the
owner knows nothing about the lien law.
From the beginning of a project he
expects the architect to become his agent
in lien law matters. The architect will file
the Notice of Commencement for him in
his name and designate himself as well as
the owner as recipients of all Notices to
the Owner. The architect will be expected
to post the Notice of Commencement, to
obtain waivers of lien from all those who
sent Notice to the Owner before
authorizing payment to the contractor.
The architect will be expected to, and
will want to take advantage of all the
nuances of the lien law which protect the
prerogatives of the owner and makes the
administration of construction less risky
for the architect. The architect will do all
the things which the owner should do
under the law to make proper payments
to the contractor, but the architect will
also avoid doing those things that increase
his risk for liability as an agent of the
owner and that of his client.

According to the Florida lien law the
owner should not make a payment unless
it is a proper payment. A proper payment
is one which makes certain that all
persons who have given notice to the
owners and laborers are paid, if not by


the contractor, (and that the contractor is
not paid if he hasn't paid his employees
and suppliers.) This is done as the job
progresses by retaining 10 percent of the
payments to the contractor, checking his
payrolls to see that each name listed bears
a signature attesting to receipt of
payment, and receiving a waiver of lein
rights from each of the persons who have
given notice to the owner.

The list of precautions required by the
lien law for proper payment is a lot of
administrative work for the architect. But
the sad part is, that having scrupulously
done all the things described, the
architect cannot be certain that the
handful of waivers of lien he holds, the
payrolls checked, etc. are complete. If he
issues a certificate for payment he cannot
be certain that he might not be
authorizing an improper payment,
exposing the owner and himself to
liability. This is especially true with
regard to sub-contractors and
sub-suppliers to suppliers and dealers.

Fortunately the Florida lien law provides
an alternative to the cumbersome and
risky procedures. If the owner requires
the contractor to furnish a material/labor
payment bond equal to the full amount
or more of the contract to guarantee
payment of claims of non-payment, then
the owner's payments are proper
payments without detailed and complete
accounting of bills and waivers. The law
states that the bond must be with a
surety registered in Florida, furnished
before construction begins, and covering
all claims made in writing within 90 days
after delivery of materials or supplies or
labor has been completed (but not claims
made after one year). Every architect can
see the advantage of this option. Any
architect, who does not require
material/labor payment bonds for each of
their projects, likes to live dangerously.
Architects,have many things to worry
them, without adding avoidable lien law
risks.


ANOTHER PROTECTION FOR THE
OWNER BUILT INTO THE LIEN LAW
(PROTECTION ALSO FOR THE AR-
CHITECT, AS OWNER'S AGENT) IS
THAT FALSE CLAIMS SUBJECT
CLAIMANTS TO ACTION UNDER THE
CRIMINAL LAWS, NOT CIVIL LAWS.
A FAKER CAN BE PUT IN JAIL!

Having a surety in the building process,
does not eliminate all architect traps.
Sureties have a subtle way of acting like
owners, requesting from the owner
prognostigations, progress reports and
payment information. They also do not
hesitate to hold architects liable for
"misinformation," should
approximations be given without
accountancy accuracy on a project gone
sour. Sureties work for contractors; let
them go to contractors for counsel.
Nearly all agency roles are risky and
should not be taken unnecessarily,
certainly, not without compensation. An
agent does acts for others who for some
reason do not do those acts for which
they are responsible. In doing these acts,
the agent accepts the liability of the acts
he does for his client. Agency must be
carefully described and limited. An
architect serving the owner as an agent in
the matter of contract payments certainly
does not agree to accept all of the
owner's obligations. He should be careful
not to accept greater responsibility than
what is defined and paid for.

IF YOU ARE SUPPOSED TO KISS
YOUR WIFE EVERY NIGHT AND,
FOR SOME COGENT REASON, SE-
LECT ME TO BE YOUR AGENT IN
DISCHARGING THAT OBLIGATION, I
SHALL WANT TWO CONDITIONS: (1)
I WANT IT CLEARLY DEFINED THAT
MY ONLY AGENT OBLIGATION IS TO
KISS YOUR WIFE EVERY NIGHT BE-
TWEEN 7 PM AND 11 PM, AND (2) TO
BE VERY CERTAIN THAT I DO NO
MORE THAN KISS HER. THIS IS HOW
TROUBLE IS AVOIDED.


F/A 6





F/A 7


MIAMI


MONTESSORI SCHOOL
NESTLES SEVEN
"CHILDREN'S HOUSES"
IN A WOODED PARK

Architects usually build for
other people. They see their
efforts realized, they walk in
them, touch them, are some-
times praised for them; but,
they seldom utilize them.

John Totty is a happy except-
ion with his design for the
Alexander Montessori School
on Old Cutler Road in Miami.
His children are now learning
in the building their father
designed.

Based on extensive observa-
tion, by the owners, of the
school facilities in this country
and abroad, the plan consists
of seven "children's houses"
with an administration build-
ing which rounds out the com-
plex. Two of the "children's
houses" are separated by
sound-proof folding doors
which, when opened, provide
a large meeting room. The
school, as well as teaching 210
two to six year olds, also
serves as a training facility for
Montessori teachers. The key
to its versatile success is a
tightly-structured plan which
allows maximum freedom and
utilization of space. Each
"children's house" is a self-
contained classroom for thirty
children. Each 36' x 40' space
features floor to ceiling win-
dows and sliding glass doors
on all four sides to allow for
natural light and ventilation.
More natural light pours down
from clearstory windows. In
this sunny atmosphere, the
teacher has complete visibility
of all inside and outside areas.
Areas and facilities have been
provided for the teaching sta-
tions necessary in the Montes-
sori method, from the "learn-
ing lines" on the floor to a
child-sized counter with sink,
for home life activities.





Each house has its own en-
closed patio featuring a variety
of materials; trees, rocks,
gravel, room for the children
to grow their own plants. Dur-
ing clement weather the patios
provide open-air extensions of
the classrooms.
The houses are arranged
around a lushly landscaped cen-
tral court, an area designed for
meeting and relaxing where a
reflecting pool and a fountain
provide natural music. Group-
ed around the courtyard are
the seven similar houses; all
alike, except for their brilliant-
ly-hued doors. Thus, the archi-
tect saved construction costs
and provided complete equal-
ity of facilities for teachers
and students.

The school is in a residential
neighborhood nestled into a
wooded two-acre site, flanked
on two sides by heavily-traf-
ficked roads. Great effort has
been made to save all possible
greenery. As well as providing
its own beauty, vegetation
provides natural sound baffles
for children at play. Greenery
that had to be removed is
presently being filled in with
careful plantings. As a result,
the building and site are nearly
one with the school main-
taining a definite residential
character greatly pleasing to
its neighbors.

It is a school that works for its
students, that is respected and
welcomed by its neighbors, a
school that fulfills the needs
of its teacher and staff in a
well-designed, flexible admini-
stration building.

John Totty knows it works.
He watches his children learn
in an environment formulated
for them. He talks to their
teachers on Parent's Night,
walks in the quiet, wooded
neighborhood. And he has the
singular pleasure of enjoying
the Alexander Montessori
School both as its architect
and as the father of Jay, Jan,
Celeste, Joel and Jeffery.
KATHY RAMSEY/PAT MORTON


ARCHITECT: John W. Totty, AIA
Henderson Rosenberg Totty
OWNER: Mr. & Mrs. James McGhee
CONTRACTOR: Clark Construction
LANDSCAPING: Oak Forest Landscaping Corp.


F/A 8







































































































F/A 9


W dbI


I














The Supreme Court of Florida recently
answered certain questions of law of great
significance to practicing architects in
Florida. In mid 1971, the United States
Court of Appeals, 5th Circuit, certified
the following questions of law to the
Florida Supreme Court.

I. Under Florida Law, may a gener-
al contractor maintain a direct action
against the supervising Architect or
Engineer or both, for the general
contractor's damages proximately
caused by the negligence of the Archi-
tect or Engineer, or both for said
building project, where there is an
absence of direct privity of contract
between the parties.

II. Would the answer to Question I
be the same if any one or all of the
following circumstances were present:


(a) The Architect or Engineer,
or both were negligent in the
preparation of the plans and spec-
ifications.

(b) The Architect or Engineer,
or both, negligently caused delays
in preparation of corrected plans
and specifications.

(c) The Architect or Engineer,
or both, were negligent in prepar-
ing and supervising corrected
plans and specifications.

(d) The Architect or Engineer,
or both, were negligent in failing
and refusing to provide the gen-
eral contractor with final accep-
tance of the building project in
the form of an Architect Certifi-
cate upon the completion of the
building.

(e) The Architect or Engineer,
or both, undertook to exercise
control and supervision over the
general contractor in the perfor-
mance of his duties to construct
the building project.

(f) The Architect or Engineer,
or both, negligently exercised
control and supervision over the
general contractor.


LEGAL NOTES

by J. Michael Huey
FAAIA General Counsel






III. Under the Florida Law, may a
general contractor enjoy the status of
a creditor or donee beneficiary, or
both, of a contract between the owner
and the designing and supervising
Architect or Engineer, or both, where
the general contractor, under his con-
tract with the owner, is obligated to
construct the building project in
accordance with the Architects-
Engineers plans and specifications.

Basically, the facts upon which the
Florida Supreme Court was to base its
option were as follows:

On this particular construction project,
the supervising architect or engineer was
negligent in the preparation and presenta-
tion of plans, designs and specifications.
This negligence was the proximate cause
of economic damages sustained by the
general contractor; there was no direct
privity of contract between the super-
vising architect or engineer and the
general contractor.

The Supreme Court, on the basis of the
facts synoposized above, answered certi-
fied questions I, II (a) (b) (c) and (f) all in
the affirmative and answered question III
in the negative. Prior to this opinion, it
was generally felt that there was a basic
distinction between the liability of a
professional for economic damages suffer-
ed by a third party with whom he was
not in privity of contract and the liability
of a manufacturer for economic damages
sustained by such a third party. The latter
of these two established a body of case
law generally known as "products liabil-
ity". In such cases, the requirement of
privity of contract between the ultimate
buyer of the product and the manufac-
turer of same has been eliminated in
Florida. However, it was generally be-
lieved that a contractual relationship had


to exist between one rendering a profes-
sional service and another party for that
party to have a cause of action against the
professional for economic damages.

The Supreme Court of Florida, in its
opinion, indicates that privity of contract
is no longer a necessary requirement in
order to hold a professional lible for
economic damages. This represents a sub-
stantial extension of the law and Florida
architects must now be prepared to with-
stand actions brought directly against
them by general contractors claiming
economic damages due to the architect's
omissions or negligence.


There was a dissenting opinion by one
member of the Court. The dissenting
opinion stated that questions I, II, and III
should have been answered in the nega-
tive because to extend professional liabil-
ity generally beyond the one who con-
tracts, pays for and receives and relies
upon that professional skill is a dangerous
enlargement of the law and is unsound.
The last paragraph of the dissenting opin-
ion is as follows:

The liability of the architect should
follow logical and mutually agreed
or reasonably implied lines of re-
sponsibility between contractor and
architect, within which framework
an architect's failures can then be
asserted in a proper claim. Moreover,
such claims can, of course, be pur-
sued by the owner against the archi-
tect where the contractor has suc-
cessfully asserted the claim or de-
fense against the owner. Bonds are
also traditionally provided for such
contingencies. Neglect to agree in
advance on responsibilities or to
take available precautions should
not be the basis for corrupting estab-
lished and well founded principles of
liability.

The above paragraph is a perfect synopsis
of the brief which was prepared on behalf
of the Florida Association of American
Institute of Architects and was filed with
the Florida Supreme Court prior to the
rendering of its opinion in this case.
Unfortunately, for architects in Florida, a
majority of the Court did not adopt this
position. z


F/A 10




"SO I GO TO AN ARCHITECT
AND GET A FANCY BUILDING.
IT TAKES FOREVER TO PUT UP,
IT COSTS ME A FORTUNE, AND
WHAT DO I GET? A FANCY
BUILDING.

"I GO TO, A BUILDER AND I
GET A PLAIN, SIMPLE BUILD-
ING. FOUR WALLS AND A
ROOF. IT'S CHEAP, IT GOES UP
FAST, AND IT DOES THE JOB.
LOOK, I'VE GOT A BUSINESS
TO THINK OF. CAN I AFFORD
TO WASTE MONEY ON A FAN-
CY BUILDING WHEN THE PLAIN
ONE WILL DO JUST AS WELL?


flow and made it a magnet for the banks'
customers who naturally park and shop
on that side of the bank. Is it successful?
The bank thinks so. And so do its
clientele.
DIFFERENT PROBLEM

In the Cities Service Building, in Tulsa,
Oklahoma, architects Stevens and Wilkin-
son had a very different problem. How to
design a 30 story building in which 85 per
cent of the gross area must be usable
space, at a cost not to exceed $23 per
square foot. The architects solved the
problem by utilizing the firm's capabili-
ties in construction management to
start construction on the building during
the time final working drawings were
being prepared. Now, the owner is one of
America's largest contractors, the Henry


Is An Architect Worth It?


A fair enough question, and one that a lot
of businessmen are asking these days. It is
a difficult question too for an architect to
answer since, simply because he is an
architect, his arguments are obviously
suspect. However, there are figures to
prove that engaging an architect does not
necessarily mean that a building will cost
more, or take longer to build. But there
are no figures to prove how much a
building designed by a qualified architect
can do for a business. Or that a well
designed building that does cost more
than a plain four walls and a roof is
actually a good investment.
To fill in this information void, and
incidentally explain some of the lesser
known services provided by architects,
the American Institute of Architects has
compiled a series of ten case histories,
written by the clients themselves, which
illustrate some of the fringe benefits to be
obtained through competent design.

This is no ordinary promotional bro-
chure. The businesses represented are of
all sizes and varieties. There is even one
governmental client, included on the
theory that at the local level at least,
government and industry share many
problems. Let's take a look.
CASE HISTORY
The first example is the North Carolina
National Bank, in Charlotte, N.C., de-
signed by Wolf Associates. Located on a
corner site in a shopping center, with a
natural pedestrian way cutting across the
corner, the architect designed the bank as
a triangle in plan, with the open side and
the entrances facing the interior of the
property rather than the street, just op-
posite of the usual solution, but so right
for the site. By designing a little mini-
park on the shopping center side, he
reinforced the natural pedestrian traffic


C. Beck Company, and very cost con-
scious.

According to their estimates, they saved
approximately $1 million over conven-
tional construction with the truss design
and an additional $1.2 million by finish-
ing the building approximately eight
months ahead of schedule. And that
figure does not include the added income
from eight months extra rentals. A very
worthwhile savings by anybody's stand-
ards.

But, you say, these are all big examples.
What can the architect do for the little
business? The answer is, the same thing,
only on a smaller scale, as the owner of
the Clover Farms Dairy in Norwalk,
Conn., found out, to his profit and
surprise.

The owner of a home-delivery dairy
business, he faced the problem of com-
petition from supermarkets and other
stores selling milk at a price he couldn't
meet on a home delivery basis. Taking the
problem to the firm of Richard Berg-
mann, Architects, he found an ally who
didn't just design him a building. The
architect helped him to devise a whole
new way of merchandising. Together they
visited dairies around the country, pick-
ing up ideas. Together, they went into the
profit and loss picture. The result of their
joint research was to abandon the home
delivery idea altogether and design a
combined production and sales building
for milk and related products.

The final design was an efficient, auto-
mated dairy plant and a store designed to
move customers in and out quickly. The
plant has a balcony around it, so that
customers, particularly the kids, can
quickly see the milk being.processed. The
architect assisted the owner in finding the


site, one on a major highway, with
22,000 cars per day passing the store. He
designed the building to look the part,
like a farm building, complete with silo.
The result? His business has increased 5
times over the home delivery days and he
is now selling a greater volume of milk
and milk products than any other single
store in New England.
Sometimes, the architect's solutions are
of a technical nature. When the Lexing-
ton, Ky., water company retained Chris-
man-Miller-Wallace, Architects, they
planned to build two buildings a quarter
of a mile apart. One was to house the
administrative and engineering staff. The
other was for the maintenance depart-
ment, which had traditionally been in a
separate facility, because it was dirty,
greasy work, with lots of trucks and
trailers scattered around in various stages
of disassembly.

Because the site was on a hillside, the
architect came up with the idea of a
building with entrances on two sides, at
two different levels. The lower level is the
public entrance, for rate payers and
administrative activities. Out of sight,
behind the building, the machine shop
operates, unseen and unheard. The advan-
tage in coordinating the two activities is
incalculable. As an added bonus, the
company now has space to double its
staff before becoming overcrowded,
which could not have been done with the
original proposal.

These are but a few examples. There are
many more. Like the architect who saved
his client $60,000 by suggesting a differ-
ent way to mount a machine shop crane.
Or the architect who designed a 20,000
square foot building with no interior
columns, so that the owner could shift his
manufacturing process at will without
structural interference.














It is an interesting brochure for anyone
contemplating a new business or indus-
trial construction. Copies may be ob-
tained by writing: The American Institute
of Architects, 1735 New York Avenue,
N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006. Ask for
"10 Businessmen Talk About Their
Architects." It's free. a


F/A 11





JACKSONVILLE








ARCHITECT'S OWN HOME
TAKES TOP HONORS IN
AMERICAN PLYWOOD
ASSOCIATION DESIGN
AWARDS PROGRAM

Peter Rumpel, of Freedman/
Clements/Rumpel Architects/
Planners, Inc., used innovative
design, respect for the enviorn-
ment of a difficult site, and a
marriage of large windows to
rough sawn plywood siding to
win first place in the Residen-
tial/Single family category.

Taking a swampy site in an
older established neighbor-
hood near downtown Jackson-
ville that had long been con-
sidered unbuildable, over half
of the site was covered by six
inches to three feet of water
and muck, the architect-owner
created a pastoral % acre pond
by selectively deepening the
low areas of the swamp and
leaving most of the natural
vegetation. To conserve the
remaining land area and trees,
Rumpel elevated the three-
story house and its 1,700 sq.
ft. of air conditioned area high
enough to take advantage of
the view.

"Plywood was chosen for the
exterior to achieve the added
lateral stability needed in a
three-story house and to
emphasize the sculptural qual-
ity of the glass and plywood
skin," Rumpel said.

Jury Comment: "This highly
individualized plywood house
seems to take advantage of the
natural appeal of a very chal-
langing Florida site. The house
is imaginative, yet simply
executed." a


PHOTOS: BELTON S. WALL


















10 5 0 BR-2 '

FL*2L l


10 5 0
****. *

FL-1








EL


DINING DECK COURT
I -


F/A 13











q


Florida's Executive Director
Honorary Member of AIA


Elected


Fotis N. Karousatos, Executive Director of the
Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects for the past eleven years, has been elected
to Honorary Membership of the American Institute
of Architects.
Only ten persons outside the architectural profession
are elected annually for distinguished service to the
profession of architecture.
Karousatos will receive his membership during the
national AIA convention in May, at Washington, D.C.


F/A 14





LOo< F!OR -


ON NORTH EAST 1ORTIETH STR'E-T


WE ARE IN A JOINT VENTURE
TILE COMPANY Or PALM BEACH
ZSHOWROOM OF MASONRtI


Wrr-I LA PALAPA
CIAZAN&r A
SU1IFRACE5 -


IN LoS ANtELEZ INTREISTADO TILE rRlOM
INTEIRSTA7E 1h4 SALT LAKE CITY CAST TILE
AND CLAY PAVERS FROM TERRA MRMA
IN HOUSTON PAVERS AND FAlIN- UNITSf PROM
PEE DEE AND PLANT CITY MEXICAN CLAY
TILE FROM SALTILLO -
IN OUR VIA AND PATIO WE DISPLAY CAST
COBBLE STONES AND SOME OP TRE SEVERAL BRICK
A ND TILE WE RECOMMEND POR EXTERIOR PAVING-
WE ALSO SHOW SOME OP THE PACING STORES
THAT ARE AVAILABLE -
rTHEE PLOOR DISPLAYS ARE ENHANCED 1Y
PURNITLURE ARRANGE -MENTS PROM
COMPLETELY CASUAL OF IIAALEAH


s4OwRwM


:84 N.
(SOS)


E. 40+h TEE.T- MIAMI
567S-40oq


LAKE WORTH
1tI1 7+h AVE. NORTH
(05os) 51L- 57o0


I hIU


BRICK


WIALEAR
1001 S E- I I*h W.
305) $17-1526 *








THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Florida


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institute r


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