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 Copyright
 Front Cover
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 Practice profile: Gutmann, Dragash...
 University of Flordia Design...
 Architects registered by count...
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00208
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: July 1973
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00208
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Advertisers
        Page 5
        Page 6
    OSHA documentation is protection
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Practice profile: Gutmann, Dragash and Matz Architects, Inc
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    University of Flordia Design Studio
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Architects registered by county
        Page 22
    Back Cover
        Page 23
        Page 24
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyri ght. protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.














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7P,


VAF F L 0 R I
ARCH I I EC I



JULY
AUGUS
'1973





















Jeffe G. Hoxie,AIA


FSBA




oint A SGovernor Askew has appointed Jeffe G. Hoxie,
p p o i AIA, and reappointed Harry Burns, AIA to the
Florida State Board of Architecture.
Hoxie practices architecture in Cocoa and Burns
maintains his office in Tallahassee.
The other members of the Board who continue
to serve are James Garland, AIA of Miami,
Stewart Morrison, AIA of Pensacola, and Car-
roll Peacock, AIA of Palm Beach.


Harry Burns, AIA








THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS
FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1973
Thomas H. Daniels, AIA, President
425 Oak Avenue
Panama City, Florida 32401
(904) 763-0381
Frank R. Mudano, AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
11189 N. E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 33515
(813) 446-1041
Rudolph M. Arsenicos, AIA, Secretary
321 Northlake Blvd.
North Palm Beach, Florida 33403
(305) 848-9661
James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, Treasurer
2901 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-7758

1973 BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Thor Amlie
James Anstis
George H. Bail
John M. Barley II
Elis W. Bullock
Rudolph J. Fletcher
Arthur A. Frimet
Stanley Galsgow
Robert G. Graf
Robert B. Greenbaum
James A. Greene
Jack F. Harden
Charles F. Harrington
A. Reese Harvey
Thurston Hatcher
James B. Holliday
Stephen C. Little
Byron G. Mclntyre
Roger A. Pierce
Ray Poynter
Hal T. Reid
Roy L Ricks
William K. Rinaman
Claude Shivers
Frank F. Smith
j Kenardon M. Spine
Francis R. Walton, FAIA
Robert L. Woodward
DIRECTOR FLORIDA REGION
American Institute of Architects
H. Leslie Walker
Citizens Building, Suite 1218
706 Franklin Street
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 223-2686
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 661-8947
GENERAL COUNSEL
Smith, Moore & Huey
P.O. Box 1169
Tallahasee, Florida 32302
(904) 222-5510
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Ted P. Pappas
SCharles E. Pattillo III
Richard J. Veenstra
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos/Editor
John W. Totty/Assistant Editor
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


Cover: A poster photographed by Robert Duncan Braun and
distributed at an open house by the Office of Environmental
Design Group, Inc., Winter Park. Also it has been given out to
schools, clubs, etc. How many other FAAIA members have
done anything of a similar nature for public awareness? If any,
contact the FAAIA office.


4/73 Volume 23 Number 4


Advertisers


OSHA Documentation Is Protection


Practice Profile:
Gutmann, Dragash and Matz Architects, Inc.


Interface 4
University of Florida Design Studio.

Architects Registered By County






























The

Florida

Architect

July

August


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida Associa-
tion of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published bi-monthly at the Executive Office of the Association, 7100
N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida 33156. Telephone: 661-8947 ( area
code 305 ). Opinions expressed by contributors are not necessarily those
of the Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be reprinted provided full credit is given to the author and to
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and copy is sent to publisher's office.
Controlled circulation postage paid at Miami, Florida.
Single Copies, 75 cents, subscription, $6.50 per year.


5

7

9

19

22


FA/3









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* Diazo Papers

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Ir
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Wanted
COST ENGINEER
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establishing a Florida office. We are looking for
a capable detailed estimator to work closely
with A/E's on schematics doing design
interpretation and listing, cost consulting and
value engineering. Our exclusive
computer-based takeoff technology and unit
price data base make this an exciting
opportunity for the right individual. Reply -
FAAIA 100-B, 7100 N. Kendall Dr. Miami,
Florida 33156






Roster
Latest 1973 Membership Roster of FAAIA.
Available from FAAIA Suite 203 7100 N.
Kendall Dr. Miami Florida 33156.
Cost $15.00:







Advertisers
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Left to Right: Dr. Bruce Mitchell, Florida State Board of Regents staff; Thomas J. Sedge-
wick, outgoing President of the National Council of Architectural Boards; James E. Gar-
land, Director of the Southern Region of NCARB; Arnold Butt, head of the School of
Architecture at the University of Florida; Herb Coons, Jr., Secretary of the Florida State
Board of Architecture at the recently held national meeting of NCARB in Atlanta.


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OSOHA Documntti


Document everything. That is a lawyer's
advice to architects and engineers who are
trying to assess their responsibility and
potential liability under the Occupa-
tional Safety and Health Act of 1970.

The lawyer was Gerald W. Farquhar, a
speaker at the AIA-sponsored confer-
ence, "The Architect, the Engineer, and
OSHA," held recently in Washington D.C.

Under OSHA, the design professional has
three areas of responsibility, according to
conference speaker David Golemon, a
professional engineer, of Framingham,
Mass. These areas involve him as an
employer whose workplace must conform
to OSHA standards; as an employer who
sends employees to building sites; and as
the designer for a client whose building
must comply with the Act.

It is the last two which are most likely to
cause problems problems, Farquhar
said, which can be largely avoided by
thorough documentation of attempts to
comply with OSHA in the design and
construction phases of projects.

Farquhar is consulting attorney to the
Office of Professional Liability Research
for Victor O. Schinnerer and Co. Inc., the
national underwriting managers for the
AIA and NSPE sponsored professional
liability insurance program. He advised
designers to communicate fully with cli-
ents to determine the final use of the
building. They should do this for clients
who will use the building for their own
employees; where the client intends to
lease the building the designer should
determine the tenants' uses as well as he
can. In this way the designer can do as
much as possible to make the building
free of OSHA violations. Should viola-
tions later be alleged or cited, the de-
signer will be able to demonstrate his
efforts to design a complying building,
thus decreasing his chances of being held
liable. In addition, very early in the
project the designer should notify clients
of his and their own responsibilities un-
der: OSHA and advise clients of possible
costs involved in OSHA compliance.
Every transaction should be documented
in writing and filed.


To avoid possible liability for an OSHA
violation on the job site, the designer
should make his own employees fully
aware of OSHA provisions. (The design-
er's responsibility to become fully fami-
liar with OSHA provisions was stressed
throughout the conference.)

If an architect's or engineer's represen-
tative observes a possible on-site violation
by the contractor (by law and contract
the party responsible for safety and
health on the building site) he should
immediately note the violation, relay this
information to the job superintendent
and leave the site. The client should then
be informed of these actions. In almost
every case the client should insist that the
contractor correct the violation.

These actions also should be fully docu-
mented, and the procedure should be
followed for every job on which OSHA
standards apply.

The significance of Farquhar's remarks
lie, of course, in OSHA's complexity,
Also, as Jasper Hawkins, chariman of the
AIA Codes and Standards Committee,
pointed out, design professionals encoun-
ter problems with OSHA's retroactive
provisions, its language and interpre-
tation, its appeals and consultation prece-
dures, its provisions for establishing state
occupational and occupant safety. These
factors make it hard for the design
professional to exercise his judgement to
come up with the best results, Hawkins
said.

AIA, the engineering societies, and other
groups in the construction industry are
working with legislators and with the
Occupational Safety and Health Admin-
istration to alleviate the problems. The
need for "continuing dialogue" in this
area was stressed by Alan Burch, director
of the Department of Safety of the
International Union of Operating Engine-
ers, and by most of the speakers from the
Occuptional Safety and Health Adminis-
tration.

Another to stress this point was Rep.
William A. Steiger (R.-Wis.), co-author of


the Act. Input from the design pro-
fessions is needed badly, he said, to
improve the law; he pointed out also the
"special responsibility of the design pro-
fessional to know what it means to have a
safe work-place," one free from structual
hazards, toxic substances, damaging
noise, and the like.

Meanwhile, however, Steiger told the
audience, OSHA is "here to stay," and
while it will certainly be amended, it
"will not be significantly changed."

In addition, the architect/engineer can
expect "more inspectors and inspections,
greater probability of random inspection,
and more state inspectors with stronger
enforcement authority," according to
Thomas C. Brown, director of Federal
and State Operations of the Occupational
Safety and Health Administration.

Brown was one of a group of speakers
from OSHA who described the law and
its administration the standards them-
selves, the structure of OSHA, state
OSHA programs, target programs and
inspection priorities, variance procedures,
training, consultation and appeal mechan-
isms, and the like. In addition, the func-
tions of the Occupational Safety and
Health Review Commission, and indepen-
dent adjudication group established under
the Act, were described by Richard Wise,
executive director.
The chief among the OSHA contingent
was Chain Robbins, deputy assistant
Secretary of Labor and administrator of
OSHA. He introduced an international
note to the proceedings by describing a
recent trip to Japan during which he and
other Labor Department representatives
studied the new Japanese occupational
safety and health act. Robbins and the
group also invited a number of industries
to see the Japanese law in action.
In addition to the AIA, the conference
was sponsored by the American Society
of Civil Engineers, the Consulting Engine-
ers Council of the U.S. (as of July 1, the
American Consulting Engineers Council,
and the National Society of Professional
Engineers). More than 300 architects and
engineers attended. U


FA/7








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i





CONTROLLED USE OF MODERN TECHNIQUES
ALLOWS LARGE PROJECTS TO BE HANDLED
WITH SMALL OFFICE INFORMALITY....


GUTMANN
DRAGASH
andMATZ
ARCHITECTS INC


4.~
ixs io 1*
V~


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C3S s


Gutmann, Dragash & Matz, Architects Inc., based in
Sanford, Florida, has been in existence 212 years
since taking over the professional responsibilities of
John A. Burton, A.I.A. following his death in 1970. In
this brief time, Carl Gutmann, John Dragash and Rich-
ard Matz, together with Charles Hendrick (partner
in charge of office management) have been able to
build a reputation for handling large projects with ef-
ficiency and imagination.
The philosophy for office growth as well as project.
planning is based on one underlying concept: careful
planning with maximum input from all those affected
whether client, consultant or employee.
"By maintaining an air of easy two-way communi-
cation within the office, employees are better able to
understand what is expected of them and make their
own decisions. Job captains are encouraged to par-
ticipate in client meetings. With a greater understand-
ing of deadlines and scheduling, they are better
equipped to get the job done and justly feel that they
are an important part of the architectural process."


1 ... Joh Drgs Diec or of prdcin 10 i .- Proucton

3. Rihr Mat Dieco of desgn 12 DebeW ge Sec00 ary
4 Fra Sha 0rdcin 13. 0il Kram- er Jo catan
5. Keing.k Prdutin 14 00k .0.tesn ereay
6. Di 0 Schffe 0 Jo catan 15 Rihr Prjc -rciet
7. Chre Hedrc 00 Dircto ofm ng m n.1.Vci- o eetoit

8. Ho ar Drve Prdutin 17 Jim 0arg Spciiatos.
9.B .W ne -iel rersettie














Little importance is placed upon personnel titles
thin the office since individuals are allowed to take
much responsibility as they can handle and develop
)mselves in many areas.
"The administrative aspect of architecture must be
rried out with the utmost efficiency to allow the
native aspect of architecture to flourish. We try to
lintain an architectural organization flexible enough
meet any design challenge by eliminating unneces-
ry organizational constraints."
There are no barriers at GDM between principles
d staff. Gutmann, Dragash & Matz are not far re-
wed from the problems faced by their staff (the
erage age in the firm is thirty-three) and thus there
a good rapport between them.
rhe latest equipment and methods are employed to
ndle repetitive and non-creative work leaving archi-
:tural teams free to treat each project as unique
d solve its problems accordingly. CONTINUED















0 OWi





















































































SEMINOLE COUNTY COURTHOUSE. top incorporates heat
absorbing dark-tinted glass screens outside the building skin.
bottom one of two large courtrooms.
















































TWIN TOWERS OFFICE PARK AND APARTMENTS, Orlando, Florida.


A computer system is utilized for purposes of identi-
fying all direct project costs. All phases of each proj-
ect are compared to the time budget allotted and, if
required, the necessary adjustments are made. Office
personnel are kept informed as to the cost status as
it relates to the individual assignments. The objective
is to computerize as many bookkeeping operations as
is practicable for a seventeen member firm.
All engineering is accomplished through consul-
tants. GDM is currently working with consultants as
far away as Cleveland by means of the Telecopier
which transmits drawings instantaneously between
architect and consultant. This process not only allows
maximum tailoring of design-team to project and ex-
posure to new ideas but simplifies the basic office
organization allowing architects more time to spend
on architecture.


"We consider the interplay of ideas between archi-
tect and consultants or joint-venture associates to be
healthy for the profession as well as for the project."
By streamlining the communication process between
architect and consultant, the right consultant is
matched to each project wherever he may be without
hindering rapid transfer of ideas.
Partners are thus able to spend a greater percent-
age of their time as part of the team rather than ad-
ministrators.
As with employees, clients are allowed to take an
active part in any process which affects them.
"We like to get clients more involved in the pro-
gramming and schematic design phases of large proj-
ects and, because of this, have been able to minimize
some of the problems inherent in working with com-
mittees." CONTINUED






































LONGWOOD BRANCH, FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF SEMINOLE COUNTY.


GUTMANN
DRAAS A
and MAT
ARCHITECTS INC.


GDM has followed the philosophy that the more par-
ticipation in programming by the future users of the
building, the more likely the building will be used in
the way for which it was designed.
As in the case of Redbug Elementary School, the
first meetings were held with all department heads
to determine major functional requirements. These
people were encouraged to participate in trial and
error diagramming of possible building relationships.
GDM did not strictly impose it's concept of what it
thought the school should be, nor did it accept the
school board's written "program" as gospel. Rather,
it attempted to function as a moderator and interpre-
tor for actual user ideas. When, with the help of the
architect, the basic functional relationships were de-
cided upon, this process was repeated with each de-
partment and its staff.
A final design arrived at through this method is a
definite product of client input and architect guidance
and expertise. While this process is time-consuming
for the architect in the early stages, it eliminates many
of the changes and most of the "second guessing"
which normally ensues in large projects.
Upon completion of the project, the users find few
unfortunate suprises. The orientation and adaptation
period is greatly reduced because of their key role in
the design process. At Redbug Elementary School
there was a more conscious attempt by the teachers to
use the building in the way it was designed to function
because of their sharing in its creation. CONTINUED



































REDBUG ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, Seminole County, Florida. The
unusual functional arrangement arrived at through client/architect
programming was integrated into a standard rectangular grid
system with no free-standing columns in the classroom areas.

MEDIA CENTER, REDBUG ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.


9-~Paa9P-ryzp". II





































NIAGARA FALLS PLAZA COMPETITION. Designed in association with Foster, Herbert and Associates, Landscape Architects.



GDM uses study models extensively as both a de-
sign and presentation tool.

This process has been used successfully on other
projects such as First Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
_- ciation of Seminole County and Seminole Junior Col-
lege which was planned in association with John A.
Burton, A.I.A.
"Our initial goal at GDM was to organize an architec-
tural staff small enough to allow flexibility without un-
wieldy organization but geared to handle large proj-
ects. Now that we have accomplished this, we are
looking forward to building our own office building
through our recently organized GDM Development
Corporation."


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN TURNER
i iu .* ,,; .... .













Fire


Protected


Wood
...and you've got
yourself a built-in
fire extinguisher


When you're in business to build buildings,
you're faced with a lot of safety codes and
regulations. Guidelines that are as important
to your reputation as safety is to your client's
pocketbook.
So when regulations call for fire-protected
wood, specify NON-COM fire retardant treated
wood. It's gained Code acceptance from coast
to coast and its use often results
in lower insurance rates.
Because NON-COM wood
is pressure-treated with


hl


chemicals that diminish flame spread, cut
down on smoke density and eliminate smol-
dering after-effects, you'll have reliable protec-
tion inside as well as the fire trucks outside.
At Dantzler we like to call it the built-in fire
extinguisher, because NON-COM works to
retard fire. This safety component
has helped NON-COM earn the
Underwriters' Laboratory Label.
Specify NON-COM.
For safety's sake.


FE NW1


FIRE PROTECTED WOOD


NON-COM IS PRODUCED BY DANTZLER LUMBER & EXPORT COMPANY
P.O. Box 6340, Jacksonville, Florida 32205 Telephone: (904) 786-0424 or 781-1853 P.O. Box 1419, Pompano Beach. Florida 33061
For more information about non-com Fire-Protected Wood, write Dantzler at Jacksonville Headquarters








MEET PAGE ATKINS AND GET

HIS REFLECTIONS ON GLASS


Aetna Insurance Co., Regional Office, Jacksonville, Florida


"The problem we solved for the
Aetna Insurance Company was
how to take advantage of a mag-
nificent view and subdue a boiling
sun," reflects Page. "LOF's golden
Vari-Tran was the answer."
As District Representative,
Architectural Construction for LOF,
A. Page Atkins has up-to-the minute
knowledge on meeting the chal-
lenges of various designs and
locales with our most suitable glass.


Page puts it this way, "With the
ever-changing technology in con-
struction materials, specialized
assistance is more necessary than
ever. I am prepared to give archi-
tects accurate information and
show them which of our products
would be best for their clients'
interests."
There's a lot of experience be-
hind that offer. Page was our Dallas
field representative and a District
Representative out of Memphis be-
fore he moved to Atlanta. He has
long been a member of the Pro-


ducers' Council and C. S. I. In 1971
and '72 he was First Vice-Chairman
of the Memphis Producers' Council.
He is now serving not only the
Atlanta area, but also the states of
Florida, Alabama, Louisiana,
Mississippi, and Tennessee.
Give him a call on (404) 355-
2410 or write him at Libbey-Owens-
Ford, 1819 Peachtree Road, N.E.,
Atlanta, Georgia, 30309.


Owners: Aetna Insurance Company, Inc., of Hartford. Architect: Saxelbye, Powell, Roberts & Ponder, Jacksonville, Florida. General
Contractor: Batson-Cook Co., Jacksonville, Florida. Glazing Contractor: Florida Glass & Mirror, Jacksonville, Florida.


---- r






















U IN TR AC E 4 Interface 4 is designing a new city for the
UFINTERFA CE hundreds of thousands expected to
migrate to the Walt Disney World area.

Interface 4 is a student-managed design
studio in the University of Florida's De-
partment of Architecture and was formed
to study the "Disney World Impact Area."

Taking into consideration ecological,
mineral and soil systems as well as socio-
economic and transportation problems of
the expected residents, the students be-
gan studying the area best suited for
development of a new residential com-
plex, said Isam Aljabori, a recent master's
degree graduate and director of the stu-
dio.

"We initiated work in search of proper
criteria on which to base planning
development and architectural decisions
for the area around Disney World," Alja-
bori said.

"The work of the Interface 4 studio is
not the sterotyped theoretical exercise of
students but a useful accumulation of
knowledge and sound considerations."
Harry C. Merritt chairman of graduate
design, said.

Importance of the study and its recom-
mendations are intensified not only by
expected growth but also by ecological
factors and their effect on the southern
part of Florida.

The waters of the Kissimmee River basin
form a major supply to Lake Okeecho-
bee, the Gold Coast and Everglades. Large
portions of the Central Florida area are
primary recharge land for aquifers and
disruption of the delicate balance would
create severe damage to most of the state,
Aljabori said.

Architects from the Orlando area have
been cooperating on the study and have
given invaluable assistance, he added.
Members of the Kingdom of Oz, a group
of landowners interested in proper
CONTINUED


FA/19


A mo(fel of tho loll, ( ltl
/or t I I o !"i It i :,ot I (I ) i") ract!i I I l isa I Allihor,,, Y 0oattst,,,, of F iorl(
llvcys I)restoto(f hy tht, llittrli(e? -/ stwho gnido.)ti? stmiew /,) o,,bltactwe )/?(/ c0
of t/),? Umilolsty of Floruf,)'s Doo,)Itment (ht-6,( tor of tho lotoll")cc 4 1)royut, gire
of /ochliectolo, Tho loil (Ioowty c/ty h.wAqt0wid ploselltitio! to
'WCOMMOd'ite bo 0001)62o govtrni,wnt olfwl,)ls in(l otliel mtorested
/)/r? )/I,/ is (It'sly1wd to cmse the 1?,ist ,)eo1)1r? tocoltly it V, ilt DIsi7ov ',Yor/d
,P,110illit Of e("ololow'd /o t1w oroi All,-Ihoo (//S(:(/Ss("(/ tho _`Xpected lnllmct of
i10 U's, 21 '1 otlo)(? the thoosiods of pooole, comiog Into the
16,Ch'ilgo xt?,l fol tho soutbe'ro 1mrt of tho 'irej mcl (.ofsl(lorlitlons for olxmlog a
stitc's )("wfol, (:I ty to 11ccommo(Lito thr'm,























UF.INTERFACE 4


development of their property, also are
supporting the work.

"A base of information now has been
collected and arranged in an array imme-
diately available for utilization. Basic
research also has been conducted to
produce information previously unavail-
able," Aljabori said.

Primary concern has been given to devel-
opment and refinement of a "working
methodology" to analyze and evaluate
natural and man-made systems.

"We feel the architect needs this method-
ology to perform successfully in a society
which rapidly is becoming dependent on
environmentally-sound planning and de-
velopment," Aljabori said.
Several months were spent mapping data
obtained through research at territorial
and regional scales to establish relation-
ships between various natural systems and
to examine them in relation to man-made
physical systems.

"Within nature, certain systems are close-
ly related to each other. For example, a
particular type of vegetation generally is
associated with a particular type of soil.
Similar examples of compatability be-
come evident at state and regional levels.

"These types of comparisons were a
prerequisite to evaluation," the graduate
student said.

It was assumed in making the analysis
natural systems have priority over others,
with food and water systems highest.

Dark-to-light areas representing critical
tolerance were produced as overlays of
area maps. The natural systems mapped
were water and vegetation land suitable
for urbanization, soil suitable for agricul-
ture and natural recharge areas. Overlays
of existing food systems, paved areas and
major planned developments also were
compiled.

The lightest area therefore the area


most tolerant to development was
near the intersection of Interstate 4 and
U.S. 27.

"Dark areas don't preclude urbaniza-
tion," Aljabori said, "but construction in
these areas is encroaching on national
systems and modifications would have to
be made."

He said validity of the overlay method
depends on accuracy and completeness of
existing information and the number of
conditions taken into consideration.

Development plans include areas of natu-
ral lands which should be conserved.
Aljabori said the open lands prevent
urban sprawl and encroachment of crit-
ical environmental areas.

Test models of the area were evaluated by
interdisciplinary planning terms. Energy
experts prepared analog computer models
to strengthen data validity.

Power supply, sewage disposal and water
supply were used to give some guidelines
of the carrying capacity of areas deter-
mined to be best suited for development.

Two concepts were developed. A low
density city of approximately 55,000
people could be "carried" as could a high
density city of nearly 125,000 people
with a two-tap water system (one potable
and the other for non-consumption pur-
poses).

Further study will continue on interre-
lationships of people and their social and
economic effects on design.

Government planners and area developers
were given a presentation recently to
introduce them to the now methodology
of deciding where man should and
shouldn't build.

Preliminary acceptance by professionals
has been exceptional but only time will
tell the true significance of Interface 4
benefits.


FA/20








T-st om(lols of (:Itles to iccommo(k)to Ow
(1'\j)tCt6?(1 /Oh/A 0/ 01)0t-e th,11? /00,000
people Into the? 1,:Iilt DIstiev !otld Yrts)
oven, iiwdf? /), lbivorslql of Flood,) stii
oiews iii the llteitiice sttidio The deslgti
o" t17v mmlfl city took Iwo ')ccollnt
mt21"wtlol? of "i// phjs!s of xid
mx)-m,'Oo sptems. ThIs nodol Is ) h1gh
(if"ns1tv (/I/ Ialli'llng '/ doy/ t11)
S"SW "Il ooe t'1j,) i'or t"/')t(?1 )/I(/
1)170ther for all othor ourposes.








Architects Registered by County


TOTAL REGISTERED ARCHITECTS 3513
TOTAL RESIDING IN FLORIDA 1683


ALACHUA
BAKER
BAY
BRADFORD
BREVARD
BROWARD
CALHOUN
CHARLOTTE
CITRUS
CLAY
COLLIER
COLUMBIA
DADE
DESOTO
DIXIE
DUVAL
ESCAMBIA
FLAGLER
FRANKLIN
GADSDEN
GILCHRIST
GLADES
GULF
HAMILTON
HARDEE
HENDRY
HERNANDO
HIGHLANDS
HILLSBOROUGH
HOLMES
INDIAN RIVER
JACKSON
JEFFERSON
LAFAYETTE


LAKE
LEE
LEON
LEVY
LIBERTY
MADISON
MANATEE
MARION
MARTIN
MONROE
NASSAU
OKALOOSA
OKEECHOBEE
ORANGE
OSCEOLA
PALM BEACH
PASCO
PINELLAS
POLK
PUTNAM
SANTA ROSA
SARASOTA
SEMINOLE
ST JOHN
ST LUCIE
SUMTER
SUWANNEE
TAYLOR
UNION
VOLUSIA
WAKULLA
WALTON
WASHINGTON


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LOOK FolZ -


ON NORTH FAST PORTIETH STREET

VVE ARE IN A JOINT VENTURE WITHI- LA PALAPA
TILE COMPANY OF PALM E.ACH clREATING A
SI4OWROOM OP A-SONRY SURFACES-
46LAZED FLOOR AND WALL TILE FROM INTERPACE
IN LOS ANE0LE..S INTRIEsrIADO TILE P OM
INTEirTAT"E 11 SALT LAKE crrY CAST TILE
AND CLAY PAVERS FROM TERRA MRiMA
IN HOUSTO4 PAVERS AMD PFACINO' U.ITS PROM
PEE DEE AND PLANT' CITY MEXICAJ- CLAY
TILE FROM SALTILLO -
IN OUR VIA AND PATIO WE DISPLAY CAST
COBBLE 5TO1NE AND SOMiE oP TIE SEVEWAL BRICK
AND TILE WE RECOMMEND IFOR EXTERIOR PAVING-
WE ALSO SHOW SOkME oP THE PACIN STOM4E5
THAT ARJ AVAILABLE-
TI-ESE FLOOR DISPLAYS ARE ENI4ANCED MY
FURNITURE ARRANGE'MENTs P ROM
COMPLETELY CASUAL OF ~IALUAH
SMOWR\IM : S4 N.E. 40+h TREE.T- MIAMI
(So6) 571 409o


UiiNu I


LAKE WORTH
1818 7th AVE. NORTH
(305) 582-5760


BRICK

HIALEAH
1001 S.E. 11th ST.
(305) 887-1525





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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
Accepted As Controlled Circulati
Publication at Miami, Florida