<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 Enviromental bonds and recreation...
 Lands for you
 1972 Architectural awards
 Small office practice handbook
 Architectural education at Miami...
 Advertisers
 Cartoon: All in a days work
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00203
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: September 1972
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00203
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Advertising
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Enviromental bonds and recreation bonds
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Lands for you
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    1972 Architectural awards
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Small office practice handbook
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Architectural education at Miami Dade Junior College
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Advertisers
        Page 71
    Cartoon: All in a days work
        Page 72
    Back Cover
        Page 73
        Page 74
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.
















m! n i











T I~i


: :tF




THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE-
OF ARCHITECTS
FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1972
Richard E. Pryor, AIA, President
1320 Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904) 356-9491
Thomas H. Daniels, AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
425 Oak Avenue
Panama City, Florida 32401
(904) 763-3053
James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, Secretary
2901 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
(305) 443-7758
(305) 443-1164
Frank R. Mudano, AIA, Treasurer
1189 N.E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 33515
(813) 446-1041
1972 BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ellis W. Bullock
Arnold F. Butt
John W. Dyal
John T. Dye
Rudolph J. Fletcher
Robert G. Graf
Stanley Glasgow
Robert B. Greenbaum
Donald R. Hampton
Oscar A. Handle
A. Reese Harvey
Thurston Hatcher
James B. Holliday
Walter Keller
C Frasuer Knight
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Howarth L. Lewis, Jr.
James D. McGinley, Jr.
Wiley M. Parker
Roy L. Ricks
Ted P. Pappas
Nils M. Schweizer, FAIA
Frank D. Shumer
Kenardon M. Spina
Tollyn Twitchell
William R. Upthegrove
Francis R. Walton, FAIA
Robert L. Woodward
DIRECTOR
Florida Region,
American Institute of Architects
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., FAIA
1123 Crestwood Boulevard, Lake Worth
(305) 585-6448
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos
7100 N. Kendall Drive
(305) 661-8947
GENERAL COUNSEL
Smith, Moore & Huey
P.O. Box 1169
Tallahassee, Florida 32302
(904) 222-5510
PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Ted P. Pappas
Charles E. Pattillo III
Richard J. Veenstra
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty / Assistant Editor
Kurt Waldmann / Photography


COVER: "The Vital Dimension" Theme of the 58th
Annual FAAIA Convention and Building Products
Exhibit, October 26-29 at the Marco Beach Hotel,
Marco Island.



5/72

CONTENTS
7 58th Annual Convention and Building Products Exhibit
16 Environmental Bonds and Recreation Bonds
19 Lands For You
23 1972 Architectural Awards
JURY: JOHN DESMOND, FAIA, NEW ORLEANS
CHARLES COLBERT, FAIA, NEW ORLEANS
NATHANIEL C. CURTIS, JR., FAIA, NEW ORLEANS

31 Small Office Practice Handbook
61 Architectural Education at
Miami Dade Junior College
DOREEN STILES
72 Cartoon: All In A Days Work
72 Advertisers





The


Florida


Architect


September


October


Volume 22


Number 5

THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal of the Florida Associa-
tion of the American Institute of Architects, Inc., Is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published bi-monthly at the Executive Office of the Association, 7100
N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Florida 33156. Telephone: 661-8947
(area code 305). Opinions expressed by contributors are not neces-
sarily those of the Editor or the Florida Association of the AIA.
Editorial material may be reprinted provided full credit is given to the
author and to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT and copy is sent to pub-
lisher's office. Controlled circulation postage paid at Miami, Florida.
Single Copies, 75 cents, subscription, $6.50 per year. 1971 Member
Roster available at $10.00 per copy. 1971 Directory of Architectural
Building Products & Services available at $1.50 per copy.


FA/3































AIA DOCUMENTS
CONTRACTS
AND ACCOUNTING FORMS
MAY BE PURCHASED
FROM FAAIA
BY MAIL OR PHONE


7100 N. KENDALL DRIVE
MIAMI. FLORIDA R31RR
(305) 661-8947


FA/4


IBUP; 00 i rCMNbl
There's a world of new beauty in carpet design for areas where heavy traffic is constant.
It's Wellco's outstanding new collection displayed in BOOTH 105 at the FAAIA 58th
Annual Convention. For more information contact the people at Wellco.
POST OFFICE BOX 281 CALHOUN, GEORGIA 30701 PHONE 404-629-9276
Distributed By

Cain& Bultman, Inc.
JACKSONVILLE MIAMI TAMPA ORLANDO
Since 1924
TELEPHONE 356-4812
P.O. BOX 2815
DENNIS STREET AT COPELAND
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32203









Stress without strain


in a complete


wall system.

S- Contemporary Building Systems introduces
,'f=- B ~ in Florida a complete exterior, high-stress
curtain wall system* for mid-rise and high-rise
buildings. Called the S-C system, it's designed
and installed by National Building Systems.
Sm No strain on your construction budget.
S-C is competitively priced with other
S., Bexterior wall systems, even inferior ones.
*'i. Substantial savings are realized when
Compared with conventional, heavy
M, concrete, or masonry panels. Savings also
in pilings, foundations, and structural frame.
Y7-, Less strain putting them up.
t .Panels sized up to 4 by 12 feet are
,-- as a lightweight, fast, and easy to install. Weigh
as little as six pounds per square foot plus
.r1 the exterior finish. Windows, sliding glass
r- l doors, and other components are all
4.k- l keyed into a complete panel system.
Sr m* More stress with strength.
The strength and stiffness of the S-C
L. system will sustain up to 200 miles an hour
wind-loading. High insulation value with
," U-factor as low as .08.
V t o* Stress on good looks.
All exterior surfaces are prefinished with
Textured coating or permanently bonded
A- f"," \ Y aggregate imbedded in epoxy matrix.
S Aggregates available in various sizes and
'' -- colors. Aluminum windows and doors
,* can be furnished in anodized colors.
S-' Glass is clear, greylite, or bronze.
.-._* '' :B If you're looking to put more stress on good
looks and quality construction, but less strain
on the budget and erection, then check into
the S-C system, a product of National
Please send me more facts about "Stress Without Strain." Building Systems, Orlando, Florida.
patent pending
NAME Manufactured and sold by:
P CONTEMPORARY
COMPANYBUIL ING
ADDRESS SYSTEMS, INC.
A subsidiary of Florida Gas Company
CITY STATE ZIP 11251 Gemini Blvd. Dept. A.
Orlando, Florida 32809
Tel. 851-6770






Florida is an entire state
of amusement.
And one marvelously
relaxing resort.


Florida can offer just about every-
thing for your family vacation. From
simulated moon shots, to a jungle full
of alligators, to a parade of cartoon
characters.
But after you've waited in all the lines.
And had your fill of hamburgers and
french fries, it's time for some
relaxation.
At the Marco Beach Hotel & Villas,
we'll give you just that.
You'll relax on three miles of white
powder beach covered with shells
instead of people.
You'll find an island full of nature-
where the herons, porpoises and
eagles are for real, not for display.
You'll enjoyall theamenities of a brand
new $18 million dollar hotel that's
alreadyone of America's great resorts.
And you won't spend much more than
you would in roadside motels.
For a complete list of family summer
vacation packages, accommodations
and a brochure, just write Mr. Roger
Everingham, Managing Director.
And relax.
For reservalons. see your travel agent or write Marco Beach Hotel.
S Dept A Marb i land. Florda 33937 Phone (813) 394-2511. A
nMaro poper h




Marco Beach Hotel &Villas


COMPUTER SERVICE CENTER FOR
RYDER SYSTEM, INC., COCONUT GROVE
JAMES DEEN, AIA, ARCHITECT -




FAAIA
58th
Annual
Convention
and
Building
Products
Exhibit
The

DimIesion


Marco
Marco


Beach Hotel
Island


October 26-29,1972


THE ARCHITECT/DEVELOPMENT TEAM
NATIONAL & STATE LAND USE PLAN


FA/7





















CHARLES LUCKMAN, FAIA JOHN C. PORTMAN, JR., FAL
Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer John Portman & Associates
Ogden Development Corporation Atlanta, Georgia


MAX O. URBAHN, FAIA
President, The American Institute of Architects


Convention Speakers


ARCHIBALD C. ROGERS, FAIA
First Vice President Elect
The American Institute of Architects
CHARLES COLBERT, FAIA
New Orleans, La.
Chairman, 1972 FAAIA Architectural Awards Jury








The




Dimension






Program

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26


7:45 a.m.- 1:00 p.m.


10:00 a.m. -
10:00 a.m. -
2:15 p.m. -
3:45 p.m. -
6:30 p.m. -


6:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m.


Evening


2nd Annual FAA Foundation Architects/Exhibitors
Golf Tournament
Registration (Convention Center)
Accreditation of Delegates (Convention Center)
FAAIA Board of Directors Meeting (Ballroom D)
FAAIA Business Session (Ballroom A & B)
Official Opening of Building Product Exhibits
Salute to Exhibitors Festive Cocktail Party
On your own (Convention Center)
Hospitality Suites will be open


FRIDAY, October 27
8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Registration (Convention Center)
8:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. Complimentary Bloody Mary/Coffee & Danish -
visit Building Product Exhibits (Convention Center)
8:30 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Balloting for FAAIA Officers (Convention Center)
10:00 a.m. 12:00 noon THEARCHITECT/DEVELOPMENTTEAM (Ballroom B, C, D)
Program Chairman: Ellis Bullock, AIA
Moderator: Max O. Urbahn, FAIA
Speaker: CHARLES LUCKMAN, FAIA
12:00 noon 2:30 p.m. Complimentary Buffet Luncheon/Beer visit
Building Product Exhibits
Informal Fashion Show by David William, Inc.
(Convention Center)
2:45 p.m. 5:00 p.m. THE ARCHITECT/DEVELOPMENT TEAM (Ballroom B, C, D)
Program Chairman: Ellis Bullock, AIA
Moderator: Max O. Urbahn, FAIA
Speaker: JOHN C. PORTMAN, FAIA
6:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Visit Building Product Exhibits Complimentary
Cocktail Party courtesy of Marco Beach Hotel,
(Convention Center)
8:00 p.m. Midnight 10,000 Islands Seafood EXTRAVAGANTE at pool side
with dance music
Introduction of 1973 FAAIA Officers
Hospitality Suites
CONTINUED


FA/9





















































FA/10


SPLENDID

COMPANY
620 NORTHEAST 40TH COURT
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA 33308

POST OFFICE BOX 24203
FORT LAUDERDALE. FLORIDA 33307
305/564-5496
POST OFFICE BOX 727
NAPLES. FLORIDA 33940
813/649-4227
POST OFFICE BOX 189
WINTER PARK, FLORIDA 32789
305/645-5144


ANNOUNCING
A NEW OFFICE DESIGN HISTORY IN
THE MAKING: Our
work for First Federal
of Miami in their 32 story
building at Flagler and
Third Ave. It will be one of
the distinguished design
"- projects of our time.
We look forward to its
2 completion so that
E you may see it
1 for yourself.
M4



8 RICHARD PLUMER
INTERIOR DESIGN
BUSINESS- RESIDENTIAL YACHTS
3704 N.E. 2ND AVE. MIAMI MIAMI PHONE 751-9775 BROWARD PHONE 525-4531







The





Dimension








Program

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28


8:15 a.m.
8:30 a.m. 12:00 noon
8:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m.

10:00 a.m. 12:00 noon




12:00 noon 1:00 p.m.


1:30 p.m.
1:15 p.m.- 2:45 p.m.


Breakfast-Fellows of the A.I.A. (Card room)
Registration (Convention Center)
Complimentary Bloody Mary/Coffee & Danish -
visit Building Product Exhibits (Convention Center)
NATIONAL & STATE LAND USE POLICY (Ballroom C, D)
Program Chairman: Wiley Parker, AIA
Panel: ARCHIBALD ROGERS, FAIA
SENATOR ROBERT GRAHAM
EARL STARNES, AIA
Complimentary Beer/Cash Bar & drawing of Exhibit Booth
Prizes visit Building Product Exhibits
(Convention Center)
Building Product Exhibits Close
ARCHITECTURAL AWARDS LUNCHEON (Ballroom A,B)
Produced & Directed by Audio-Visual Imagery, Inc.
Speaker: CHARLES COLBERT, FAIA


AFTERNOON SHORT COURSES


3:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

4:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.


5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m. Midnight


Florida State Board of Architecture Panel
discussion "Fictitious Names" (Ballroom D)
Environmental Education Program -
"Ten Minutes Til Midnight"
Program Chairman: Jack Stefany, AIA (Ballroom B)
"Red Flag Charette" film clip program
Program Chairman: Nils Schweizer, FAIA (Ballroom B)
Cocktails at Poolside
"ISLANDER'S LUAU" at Poolside, dancing to "Sounds
of Music" with Tommy Mason's combo, featuring Miss Kuu
who will provide surprise and exciting entertainment, and
introduce the latest imported fashions from the Waikiki
Shop of Naples and Pompano Beach


SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29
10:00 a.m. FAAIA Business Session (Ballroom B)
Board of Directors Meeting (Ballroom B)
Official Adjournment of 58th Annual Convention


FA/11






305 American Massage, Inc. 101
Post Office Box 5291
Lighthouse Point, Florida 33064
(305) 942-4125
Hand massagers, Thermopads,
Recliner Chairs with Heat and
Sonic Wave Motors

413 ASG Industries, Inc. 203
Post Office Box 929
Kingsport, Tennessee 37662
(615) 245-0211
Flat Glass

311 American Olean Tile Company 306
1000 Cannon Avenue 307
Lansdale, Pennsylvania 19446
(215) 855-1111
New Ceramic Tile Systems

405 Anning-Johnson Supply &
406 Manufacturing Company
7001 Lake Ellenor Drive
Orlando, Florida 32809 108
(305) 851-7810
Magna-Trac Partitions Systems,
PermaGrain Flooring, American
Modular Systems Design, DEK JUST,
Lok Products

107 Bradley Corporation
W142 N9101 Fountain Boulevard 109
Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin 53051
(414) 251-6000
Bradley Washroom Accessories

501 Building Materials International, Inc.
502 (formerly Mosaic Tile Company of Florida)
503 6454 N.E. Fourth Avenue
504 Miami, Florida 33138
(305) 751-7551 212
Ceramic materials of our own
manufacture plus imported items

204 Clearview Corporation
3318 S.W. Second Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33315
(305) 522-8526
Aluminum windows, Sun Control Louvers


111 Commercial Modernfold of Orlando, Inc.
2453 Carlton Road
Maitland, Florida 32751
(305) 834-4723

Commercial Modernfold of Jacksonville, Inc.
Post Office Box 8664
Jacksonville, Florida 32211
(904) 743-5222

Don Works Modernfold, Inc.
Post Office Box 23147
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33307
(305) 566-8466
Folding Partitions and Coiling Walls

112 Concrete Promotion Council of Florida, Inc.
411 Park Avenue
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 644-8279
Tilt-up wall construction, high
rise load/bearing masonry and
precast and prestressed concrete
systems


FA/12


Construction Products Division,
W. R. Grace & Co.
62 Whittemore Avenue
Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140
(617) 876-1400
Roof decks, Masonry fill, fireproofing,
Dyfoam and Textured Products

Employee Benefit Plan Services, Inc.
2500 S.W. Third Avenue
Miami, Florida 33129
(305) 854-0430
FAAIA Group Insurance Plans

Florida Tile, Marble And
Terrazzo Institute
141 Sevilla Avenue
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 443-3223
Products of various ceramic tile
manufactures, marble and terrazzo
products/related products data sheets

Forest Products Corporation
Post Office Box 1341
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33302
(305) 522-8522
Shakertown panel products for Sidewalls
and roof Laminated beams, Lam Loc
Pecky Cedar Paneling, Misc. Lumber items

GemAluminum Products, Inc.
Subsidiary of Olshen Overseas, Inc.
715 Barnett Drive
Lake Worth, Florida 33460
(305) 582-1443
Aluminum doors and frames featuring
a Pre-Finished Plastic Laminate Door
Pre-Hung in an adjustable split frame

General Electric Company
5266 Highway Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida 32205
(904) 387-3571
Zoneline Air Conditioners General Electrii


207 Gory Roof Tile Manufacturing, Inc.
Box 490
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
(305) 399-5816
Concrete Roof Tile in Flat Bermuda,
Spanish "S", Cuban Barrel

302 Harris Paint Company
A Subsidiary of Grow Chemical Corp
1010- 26 North 19 Street
Tampa, Florida 33601
(813) 247-3161
New concept in color

402 Herman Miller, Inc.
515 Amberidge Trail, N.W.
Atlanta, Georgia 30328
(404) 255-8012
Slides, Action Office 2. Furniture,
Textiles, Signage, Software

401 Heywood-Wakefield Company
206 Central Street
Gardner, Massachusetts 01440
(617) 632-2300
Movable seating Systems, Fired
Seating Systems. Theatre and
Auditorium Seating

404 Hymar Stone Corporation
P.O. Box 484
Lakeland, Florida 33802
(813) 686-4296
Natural Stone Products (Rubble,
Stone & Slate)

102 Interpace Corporation
260 Cherry Hill Road
Parsippany, New Jersey
(201) 355-1111
Franciscan Tile Products
403 Kawneer/Amax
Post Office Box 516
Jonesboro, Georgia 30236
c (404) 478-8841
I Line


Building9

Products

Exhibits






408 Keeman Brick
Miami-Pompano Beach-West
Palm Beach-Orlando
1300 N.W. 13 Street
Pompano Beach, Florida 33061
(305) 972-3141
Brick, Natural stone, fireplaces,
Decorative concrete products and
Masonry supplies

312 Libbey-Owens-Ford Company
Toledo, Ohio
1819 Peachtree Road, N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30309
(404) 355-2410
New family of reflective glasses

409 Marlite Division of
Masonite Corporation
Dover, Ohio 44522
(216) 343-6621
Marlite plastic finished wall paneling

208 Modular Products Corporation
7001 Bradenton Road
Sarasota, Florida 33580
(813) 355-2961
Complete molded reinforced
fiberglass bathroom

104 Moen/Division of Stanadyne
377 Woodland Avenue
Elyria, Ohio 44035
(216) 323-3341
Moen faucets and valves

201 Mutschler Kitchens
202 Ocean Reef Club
North Key Largo, Florida 33037
(305) 247-1294
Kitchen Cabinetry and Vanities

Remmington Rand Home Products
Division
Post Office Box 171
Marietta, Ohio 45750
(614) 374-9300
Kitchen-triever

Gulf Central Corporation
Post Office Box 16348
Tampa, Florida 33617
(813) 626-1344
Sub-Zero Refrigeration, Thermador
Cooking Equipment, Jenn-Air Appliance.

304 PPG Industries, Inc.
One Gateway Center
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222
(412) 434-2891
PPG Performance Glasses Solarban,
LHR and Solarcool

205 Rolladen, Inc.
7955 West 20 Avenue
Hialeah, Florida 33014
(305) 821-3460
Roll-up Shutter

301 Roof Structures of Florida, Inc.
4540 N.E. Fifth Terrace
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33307
(305) 772-4114
Glue laminated arches, beams and
decking Permadeck Roof Decks


313 Safe-T-Lawn, Inc.
7800 N.W. 32 Street
Miami, Florida 33122
(305) 885-8671
Lawn and turn irrigation equipment


411 Schlage Lock Company
420 West 27 Street
Hialeah, Florida 33010
(305) 888-4584
Builders hardware new products

209 Snilom Corporation of Florida
3550 N.W. 36 Street
Miami, Florida 33142
(305) 633-8511

D'Angelo Plastering, Inc.
2050 N.E. 151 Street
North Miami, Florida 33162
(305) 945-7538
Maplexine Marble wall coating
Mono-flex seamless flooring
system

103 SoutheastLathing &
Plastering Bureau, Inc.
5532 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd., N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30342
(404) 252-3634
Veneer plaster, versatility of
Gypsum plaster, steel studs &
Stucco panels for exterior walls

412 Southern Sash Supply Company
Post Office Box 239
St. Petersburg, Florida 33701
(813) 826-3261
Kawneer Window, curtainwall
systems and carmel steel
sliding glass doors

407 Southern Vacuum Systems, Ltd.
1425 Central Avenue
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
(813) 898-8007

Bonsai Corporation
Commercial & residential vacuum
systems

210 Standard Dry Wall Products, Inc.
7800 N.W. 38 Street
s Miami, Florida 33166
(305) 887-7365
Thoroseal, thoroseal plaster mix-
cement based, waterproof, textured
finishes for concrete and masonry

303 Stanley-Berry, Division
of the Stanley Works,
2400 E. Lincoln
Birmingham, Michigan 48012
(313) 646-1100
Sta-Tru metal clad entrance systems
manufactured by Stanley-Berry, Div.
of the Stanley Works

206 Structural Waterproofing
Post Office Drawer E
Winter Park, Florida 32789
(305) 645-2021
Waterproofing materials sales and
applications protective coatings


211 Summitville Tiles, Inc. -
Summitville, Ohio
3369 Stonecrest Court
Atlanta, Georgia 30341
(404) 934-2022

Gulf Tile Distributors, Inc.
2714 North Armenia Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33607
(813) 251-1132

Gulf Tile Distributors, Inc.
408 South Saturn Avenue
Clearwater, Florida 33516
(813) 447-7612

Gulf Tile Distributors, Inc.
320 River Gulf Road
Port Ritchey, Floirda
(813) 842-3791
Tile Corporation of America
Box 801-Buena Vista Station
Miami, Florida 33137
(305)

110 T-Square Miami Blue Print Co.-
Keuffel & Esser Co.
635 S.W. First Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
(305) 379-4501
Architect supplies & equipment,
photographic reproductions,
Blue print machines Drafting
furniture

308 3M Company
Adhesives, Coatings & Sealers Division
3M Center 220-6E
St. Paul Minnesota 55101
(612) 733-4515
Scotch-Clad Deck Coating

106 U.S. Plywood
5510 N. Hesperides
Post Office Box 15337
Tampa, Florida 33614
(813) 884-2551
U.S. Plywood Building Products

213 Universal Building Specialties, Inc.
Post Office Box 1722
Lakeland, Florida 33802
(813) 688-7711
Wood products, Western Red Cedar-
Laminated beams- Tectum (fiber deck)

309 Warth Paint Company, Inc.
1923 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 448-8914
VIP fre retardant roofing
system and sealant.

105 Wellco Carpet Corporation
Post Office Box 281
Calhoun, Georgia 30701
(404) 629-9276
An outstanding collection
of Commercial Carpets

505 Wilk-Stone Products, Inc.
750 East Main Street
Somerville, New Jersey 08876
(201) 356-2303
Exposed aggregate systems


FA/13





SS TITUEtARCMTECTS
4 1785 Massachusetts enue. N.W. ashington. D.C. 20036





-U

nIW awinwoftbsfa frwk
Tlechildren ware working with a book we
hbpedlprepere. It's called "Our Man-Made
ironment," and uses paper construction
eurcises to develop an understanding
if visual and spatial relationships.
It's all partol environmental education.
msnt in your seventh-grade curriculum.
Or in any other classroom you sat in.
If it had been, we could all be living in a mor
liveable world. V* want today's child-
omorrow's voter, homeowner, concerned
mother, businessman-to be equipped to
udge and help iniluence the quality of his
environment. I want each child really to
e his world. His house. His street. His
IM want him to become aware that all
ese are related parts of his environment.
And to realize that how they fit together is
something hecan help decide.
vironmentaleducation-is already being taught
in more than 100 communities. In time, we
lope to reach every American child on every
grade level. If you could help influence your
oolboaird to include environmental i
awareness.instruction in your school
system, that time could be shortened.
This is essential, when you know
at the most important product of a
god visual environment is:
It is human dignity and pride.
0 mnde SIllnu asLh I,
olbl 1im mm
ffahoo Is khGUIN reldmewar
a AJ.A. bmssa O










b <4-






9"?:









*BI fIw Ii






I gI ghtAggrII


I brn nm a



INCLUDING SNOWDEN;m AND IT'S THE BEST
Many concrete producers are to the concrete producers, insurance rates.
still switching to Snowden'" they have freedom of We modestly proclaim to make
Lightweight Aggregate selectivity to maximize the best lightweight aggregate
because they have decided it their service to you. on the market, but ask that
improves their products and But we do request that you you not specify it by name even
simplifies their operations. We specify lightweight concrete if it means giving the
thank you for your cooperation productsfor reduced competition a break.
in not specifying Snowden construction costs, reduced
Lightweight Aggregate by heating and air conditioning SNOWDEN'T LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE
brand name. expenditures along withlow -another new product from
expenditures along with low Hercules incorporated.
By leaving the choice of brands maintenance and lower Hercules Incorporated.

SNOWDEN SALES OFFICE Tel. 703-299-4711
SNOWDEN, VA. 24591


SNOWDEN *ERC
LIGHTWEIGHT AGGREGATE


XL72-3A








Environmental Bonds and

Recreation Bonds


On November 7, 1972, Florida voters will have an oppor-
tunity to invest in the future of the Sunshine State by au-
thorizing the sale of bonds to acquire environmentally en-
dangered lands and outdoor recreation lands. Two questions
authorizing environmental bonds and recreation bonds will
appear on the ballot.
The first question proposes the issuance of no more than
$240 million in full faith and credit bonds, backed by gen-
eral revenue. Of this amount, up to $200 million may be
used to acquire environmentally endangered lands and up
to $40 million may be used to acquire or improve out-
door recreation lands.
The enabling statute defines "environmentally endangered
lands" to mean those areas of ecological significance whose
development would cause a deterioration of submerged lands,
inland or coastal waters, marshes or wilderness areas essential
to the environmental integrity of the area, or of adjacent
areas; those areas in which development would require reme-
dial public works projects to limit or correct environmental
damage; and beaches or beach areas within the state which
have been eroded or destroyed by natural forces or which
are threatened or potentially threatened by erosion or des-
truction by natural forces.
"Outdoor recreation lands" is also defined to include
parks and recreation areas, wildlife preserves, forest areas,
beaches, boating and navigational channels, submerged lands,
and historical and archaeological sites. To qualify as a recre-
ation land, of course, recreation must be the prime purpose
of the purchase or project.
The second question on the November ballot proposes an
amendment to the Constitution of Florida which would au-
thorize the issuance of bonds to raise the funds needed to
acquire additional recreation lands or to improve existing
parks and recreation areas. These bonds would be backed by
the Land Acquisition Trust Fund, which receives approxi-
mately $5 million each year from the documentary surtax on
land transactions. The maximum amount which could be
raised initially by selling bonds backed by the existing trust
fund is perhaps $30 million to $40 million, assuming the
state actually sold the maximum amount authorized during
the first year. New bonds, backed by new trust fund reve-
nues, could be issued in future years to finance a continuous
program of capital projects for recreation. Because these
bonds would be backed by a different revenue source than
the full faith and credit bonds, the. two bond programs com-
plement rather than duplicate each other.
Once the bond programs are passed and bonds are issued,
the selection of sites for acquisition will be made by the
Governor and the Cabinet, sitting as the head of the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources. In each case, the selections will
be guided by a comprehensive statewide plan prepared by
the Department's professional staff, with the consultation
and assistance of all other interested agencies of the state.
Any person can bring suggestions for projects to the atten-
tion of the Department of Natural Resources by writing a
letter explaining why he or she thinks the public should
acquire a particular piece of property. The Department will
investigate all new ideas for projects, and the comprehensive
plan will be updated accordingly. A proper geographic bal-
ance across the state can be achieved in purchases by a sys-
tematic selection of sites.


Although the environmental protection capital projects pro-
gram will be new to Florida, much of the policy and procedure
derived from the outdoor recreation program will be directly
applicable.
Not all of the authorized amount of bonds will be sold at
once, of course, and the money will not all be spent in one year.
The state will have the authority to issue bonds and spend the
money as needed. For example, the state might issue
bonds in increments of $50 million per year over a five year
period. Passage of both bond programs will give Florida the
means and the processes to establish a long-range and well-
planned environmental protection program.
To illustrate what can be done with these new funds for out-
door recreation and environmentally endangered lands, consider
what happened when the state floated a $20 million outdoor
recreation bond issue in 1968. The proceeds from the sale of
those bonds were used to acquire 11 major new parks and recre-
ation areas, comprising some 16,900 acres and including almost
10 miles of prime beach frontage. These projects were scattered
the length of the state from north to south, and property was
purchased in 12 different counties. Now that the proceeds of
that bond sale have been exhausted, the state's ability to acquire
more land for new sites or to develop the existing recreational
facilities is greatly impaired by its limited financing capability.
Why buy more land? The answer can be summed up in two
words GROWTH and INFLATION. Florida is the fastest
growing of all the large-population states in the nation. Between
1960 and 1970, the state's population grew from 4,951,560 to
6,789,443 a phenomenal increase of 37.1% in 10 years. Of
the six fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the nation, three
are located in Florida. Estimates of population growth for the
remaining 3 decades of this century promise no relief. By the
year 2000, a conservative estimate of the population of
peninsular Florida (excluding the Panhandle) is 12.8 million. A
less conservative estimate for peninsular Florida is 15.5 million
residents. This compares rather dramatically with the 1960 popu-
lation of 3.3 million residents. The Panhandle is expected to
join in the rapid growth of an urban strip along the Gulf Coast
between Baton Rouge and Fort Walton Beach. Even by the con-
servative estimate, the number of Floridians will have doubled by

Generally speaking, the comprehensive plan will be drawn
so as to accomplish the purposes of the legislation authorizing
the bond referendum. Where the $40 million for outdoor rec-
reation is concerned, a successful pattern is already well
established. The act provides that Chapter 375, Florida
Statutes, shall apply, and formal standards and guidelines are
available from the state comprehensive outdoor recreation
plan, now in its third edition since 1963. Under Chapter 375
and the state outdoor recreation plan, the Department of
Natural Resources has applied more than $54 million towards
the acquisition of some 99,091 acres of outdoor recreation
land through 72 land acquisition projects since passage of the
Outdoor Recreation and Conservation Act in 1963. The $40
million from the presently proposed bond issue will be used to
continue this established program. As contemplated by the
state outdoor recreation plan, emphasis will be placed on the
early acquisition of seashore areas and prime river and lake
frontage located as conveniently as possible for the using
public.
CONTINUED


FA/16

















fC
*' _.y"



















*G "- N



L" \',J I. ,
\ J




/'\L
*' ** SS"^S^1",-
**' i^ -^ .^ r








J ^ f *i F ^


'4


i-


V-


$4


-. 4
llL:-....


The sale of merchandise and services to the business and
industrial community requires salesmanship that is skill-
ful and sophisticated. Your product is, of course, useful
but the standards of your company are equally significant
to the astute and prudent buyer.
Gables Offset visually presents your product or service
through the best possible printed media... Excellence in




GABLES OFFSET


the printed word to sell your company as well as your
product or service.
The results will be "back talk", the kind of back talk that
gets sales results from your printed advertising. Critical
requirements are our speciality. Call us today at (305)
446-8151.


Gables Offset Inc.
158 Valencia Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida 33134
For the finest in art, annual reports, company magazines,
brochures, catalogues, direct mail and interim reports.


L
I '


jrr







Bonds,cont.


the year 2000. This incredible estimate staggers the imagination -
it means all of the existing housing and service facilities will have
to be duplicated to accommodate the new arrivals. A second Miami,
a second Tampa, a second Jacksonville, even a second Sopchoppy
will have to be constructed within the next 30 years! Or, the
population density of each city and town will double during the
same time span.
At the same time, property prices are rising astronomically.
The average annual rate of inflation in the price of land across
the state is currently at 18%. In some sections of the state, the
rate is even higher. In Southeast Florida, inflation in the price
of land has been estimated at 30% annually, while in the Or-
lando area, the rate has been estimated at 50 to 60% annually
in recent years. At these rates, the future increase in land
values will more than equal the interest and principal of the
bonds sold to buy conservation and recreation lands at today's
prices. If the state is ever going to set aside sufficient space to
provide room to relax, fish, and enjoy Florida's distinctive
natural beauty, if future generations of Floridians and their
guests are to learn to appreciate the state's irreplaceable envi-
ronmental, historical and archaeological heritage, and if wildlife,
unpolluted water sources and clean rivers and lakes are to be
preserved, the time to act is now.
Why sell bonds? If bonds are sold now to raise the funds to
acquire new land and water resources and to preserve them for
future generations, the debts will be paid off over a period of
perhaps 20 to 30 years by the people who will be here to enjoy
the benefits of the land acquisition program by present Flori-
dians, by their children, and by the several million new Flori-
dians who will double our population by the end of the century.
These are the people who will demand additional swimming and
boating areas, hunting and fishing areas, and adequate and salt-
free drinking water. Land purchases require large amounts of
money at the time of purchase, and a bond sale is the only
practical way by which the state can raise the necessary cash.
The prices to be paid by the state for acquisition of con-
servation and recreation lands will be arrived at through open
negotiation, based on fair market value and existing market
conditions. Private property rights will be protected. There will
be no maximum price placed arbitrarily on any single land ac-
quisition project although, from a practical standpoint, the
scope of each individual project will have to be in keeping with
a balanced statewide program
No new state taxes are tied to either bond program. The
bonds which are sold will be paid off from the general revenue
fund or from the Land Acquisition Trust Fund, both of which
will grow as the state's population and economy grow. The
annual cost of paying off the bond obligation will be a small
fraction of the overall state budget. Last year, for example,
the state collected $2.5 billion in taxes, and that was before
the corporate profits tax became effective. The bond debt
will be a fixed amount each year regardless of future inflation,
and the annual cost will become a smaller and smaller fraction
of the overall state budget in later years.
The effect of the land acquisition program on local tax
structures should be negligible, if any. Land purchased by the
state as environmentally endangered or recreational lands will
be removed from the local tax bases; however, local govern-
ments will be freed from the obligation to provide services to
future developments to the same extent that land is removed


from the tax roll. A number of other variables will also affect
local property taxes in the near future, such as increased state
aid to local school financing and other local services; federal
sharing programs, rapid inflation in the values of remaining
nonexempt real estate; population growth; and continuing
efforts to reach the goal of full-value tax assessments. From
the statewide perspective, if a full $240 million worth of land
is removed from local tax rolls, the total value of all non-
exempt real property in the state will be reduced from $35.355
billion to $35.115 billion. The reduction in local tax bases will
be a fraction of 1 percent, statewide. This statewide nonexempt
property value is based on county assessments as of January 1,
1971; intervening inflation and the estimate that tax assess-
ments average only 85% of fair market values mean that the
net reduction in local tax bases will be even less than the
figures indicate.
Even if a taxpayer could attribute some small increase in
his taxes to the environmental and recreational land acquisition
program, the benefits of conserving his state's natural beauty,
fresh water sources, and outdoor recreation areas at today's
prices make his small cost one of the best investments he
could imagine. His grandchildren will say he had foresight.
Once land is purchased, the management of the land will be
in the hands of the state agency appropriate to the purposes
which the land is to serve. The Game and Fresh Water Com-
mission may administer some areas for wildlife purposes; the
Division of Forestry may lease some for forestry management;
and some areas will undoubtedly be placed under the juris-
diction of the Division of Recreation and Parks to serve out-
door recreation needs. Some areas may be maintained as wilder-
ness. Appropriate public use will be permitted on all lands
acquired, although the type and degree of use will depend
upon the nature of the land and the primary purpose it is to
serve.
One additional benefit gained by Florida voters upon
approval of the full faith and credit bond referendum ques-
tion is that an important element of the Florida Environmen-
tal Land and Water Management Act of 1972 becomes effec-
tive. This act, which has been described as the most significant
environmental protection law ever enacted in the state's his-
tory, provides that areas having a significant impact upon
archaeological, environmental, natural or historical resources
of regional or statewide importance may be designated as areas
of critical state concern. Certain other areas may also be desig-
nated as areas of critical state concern even if the bond refer-
endum question fails in November, but the overall significance
of the Management Act will be greatly diminished and the
state's ability to insure some regulation in the future growth
will be impaired as a result.
Before any of these things can happen, before the irreplace-
able scenic and historical places of Florida can be preserved
for future enjoyment, the electorate of Florida must approve
both of the environmental and recreational bond questions on
November 7. If they are approved, the state can take positive
steps to protect the quality of life for future Floridians for
many years to come.



*


FA/18





Two questions on the November 7 ballot are vital to the envi-
ronment of Florida. They will be numbered 1 and 2, and a
YES vote on both questions will permit public investment in
Florida's natural heritage. Question 1 allows the state to ac-
quire ENVIRONMENTALLY ENDANGERED LANDS and
OUTDOOR RECREATION LANDS through the sale of bonds.
Question 2 also allows the acquisition and improvement of
OUTDOOR RECREATION LANDS through an amendment
to the State Constitution A YES vote for Question 1 also makes
effective a critical section of the most significant conservation
law ever enacted in Florida's history, the Florida Environmental
Land and Water Management Act of 1972. 1 + 2 = LANDS
FOR YOU!
Q. What are environmentally endangered lands?
A. Lands which are unique and irreplaceable and whose development
would damage or destroy the environment. These include submerged
lands, inland or coastal waters, beaches, marshes, watersheds or
wilderness areas.
Q. Why should we protect them?
A. These lands should be bought to save Florida's natural beauty for
the enjoyment of people today and generations to come. The pro-
tection of such lands would permanently assure the people of
Florida that they will have clean streams, rivers and lakes, adequate
and unpolluted water to drink and use, plenty of wildlife and forests,
and places for our fish to spawn.
0. Why do we need money for outdoor recreational lands?
A. Florida's rapid growth is eating up good beach areas, wilderness and
unspoiled lakes each year. Even within the next three or four years,
we will need more outdoor areas for people to swim, fish, hunt, or
just enjoy the clean fresh air and sunshine.
Q. What is the amount of bonds we will be voting for?
A. Question 1 will let the state sell up to $40 million in bonds for
OUTDOOR RECREATION lands, and up to $200 million for
ENVIRONMENTALLY ENDANGERED lands. Question 2 will
allow the state to sell bonds for the purchase of OUTDOOR RECRE-
ATION lands in an amount limited to how much the state already
collects from documentary stamps on the sale of property; the first
issue might be for approximately $30 million.
Q. Where is the money coming from to repay the bonds?
A. The money to repay the bonds sold as the result of Question 1, will
come from the state's general revenue. Money to repay the bonds
sold as the result of Question 2, will come from the documentary
stamp collections.
Q. Does this mean more State taxes?
A. No new state taxes are tied to these bonds. The state tax on profits
of corporations now going into general revenue is more than enough
to offset the cost of these bonds each year. Florida's continued
growth and development will also increase the state's general revenue,
and out of this general fund, it will cost each citizen less than a
penny a day to pay off these bonds.
Q. Will this affect local property taxes?
A. This is very unlikely, for two reasons. First, the amount of land
that could be removed from local tax rolls by these bond purchases
is less than 1% of the total taxable property in the state. Secondly,
local tax-supported services such as schools, law enforcement, and
fire protection would be unnecessary for the areas purchased.
Q. Why does this need to be done NOW?
A. The answer can be summed up in two words GROWTH and IN-
FLATION. A comparison of property values now with what they
were twenty years ago will give some appreciation of what land may
sell for in another twenty or thirty years, when the state's popula-
tion has doubled. INFLATION is raising the price of land about 18%
each year statewide even 30% to 60% a year in some sections of
Florida.
Q. Who decides what lands should be acquired?
A. The Governor and the Cabinet, acting as the head of the Depart-
ment of Natural Resources, are the only ones who can approve lands
to be purchased. Their selections will be based on a continuing
statewide plan drawn up by qualified state agencies. However,
anyone can recommend lands to be considered.

Q. Have we ever done anything like this before?
A. Yes. In 1968 the state approved a $20 million outdoor recreation
bond issue. The money was used to buy 11 major new parks and
recreation areas, including almost 10 miles of prime beach frontage.
These areas consist of 16,900 acres that are located in 12 different
counties around the state. These bonds were sold under the old
State Constitution; Question 2 will restore the state's authority to
sell such bonds for outdoor recreation.


Lands For You









LIMITED ISSUE OF

FLORIDA LAND CONSERVATION

COMMEMORATIVE STAMPS


This unique set of 1+2 stamps is being issued in
support of retaining the natural areas of our state for
the enjoyment of our people today and generations
to come.
The residents of Florida are being asked to vote
"yes" on questions 1 and 2 on the November 7 ballot.
Send for your sheets of these beautiful full-color
commemorative stamp sets and help protect our
irreplaceable wildlife and natural beauty... keep our
lands free from man-made alterations and pre-
serve our many feature areas for recreation, historical
education and scientific study.

ililI I MiNIM I limililiiNII

LANDS FOR YOU, INC.
Room 229, Dorian Bldg.
319 S. Monroe Street
STallahassee, Florida 32304
Please send me sheets of full-color Lands
For You Stamps (16 sets to a sheet) @ $5.00 for 2
sheets, or $10.00 for 5 sheets. I enclose check or
money order for my donation of $
which includes both postage and handling. _
5 Name 5
SAddress Z
City/State Zip__ -
I U
IEIIIEIEIIIIEIEI IEIGIEI






Koger Executive Center in Tampa

combines esthetics

with sound business sense.


That's why it's all-electric.


Koger management believes very strongly in John
Ruskin's words that the creation of art, or beauty,
should be a natural and inherent part of our daily lives.
And they have put this concept into action throughout
the 14 existing buildings in the Tampa complex, creating
a total business environment.
They realize, too, the value in not just designing good
looking office buildings, but serving well the business
goals of the Company. From experience gained through
seventy years of general contracting and in building for
its own account, Koger Properties chose to go all-electric


in the Tampa Executive Center. Their primary reason
was that all-electric would offer them not only a lower
overall first cost, but that their annual operating costs
would be lower, too. A further advantage was that all-
electric required less housing and no central plant.
Further features of cleanliness, convenience and safety
are tenant-pleasing aspects, as is the Koger practice of
planning the exterior lighting as an integral part of the
overall design in its office parks located in the Southeast
and Southwest.


TE CO
Tampa Electric Company



















tiitfP1
:TI iljldli


GEM
ALUMINUM
PRODU CTS


I


111 11








































BUILDING


LAMINATED WOOD PRODUCTS
WOOD & FIBER DECKING
WESTERN RED CEDAR


SPECIALTIES


P.O. BOX 1722
PHONE: 813/688-7711
LAKELAND, FLORIDA 33802


UNIVERSAL

















-11


Ikl l II k'


4;
Ar


.r .J1&


I 'T -


1 1


Ew T


r Ir6T I I ~i







Honiioi Aiwat ii
The Stanley Switlik Elementary School

McCoy-Severud-Knight-Boerema, Architects


JURY COMMENTS
"The Committee selected this elementary school as
having that quality that raised it above any of the
other projects submitted. It was described as a
complete work of art because the ingenuity in which
the plan is arranged, the relationships with the
outdoors, the use of the systems approach which in-
tegrates the structure with mechanical, electrical and
air-conditioning, and also the selection and expression
of the materials of which the building is constructed.
The colors and furnishing are carefully thought out
and the building looks even better with the children
in it."
ARCHITECTS: McCoy-Severud-Knight-Boerema, Architects
Miami and Key West, Florida
Glenn Allen Buff, A.I.A., Partner In Charge of Design
STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS: McGlinchy & Pundt
MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS: Cook-Sloan-Lowe Associates
OWNER: Monroe County School Board
CONTRACTOR: Fryd Construction Corporation


The building's design utilizes a concrete systems approach to
school design that was developed by the architects and used
previously on private schools in the area. The use of this
system was part of the program requirement. This system
integrates the air-conditioning equipment, supply ducts,
return-air ducts and lighting with the concrete structure. The
major element of the system is a concrete channel.
Two of these channels welded together form the columns for
the building. A steel door frame is cast into the non-working
leg of one channel so the column can be used to house the
air-conditioning equipment. This same channel enverted
provides the girder that carries the concrete roof and floor
joist. The air-conditioning supply-air duct runs inside this
girder. The girder itself is used for return-air. Holopane's
single tube lighting fixtures were used between each leg of
the twin tee floor and roof units to provide a low glare high
contrast type of lighting throughout. A special white
concrete composition panel was used in its natural finish for
the enclosure walls.









































VI


*- r. .<**-.







llerit Awar I
John D. MacDonald Residence
Edward J. Seibert, A. I.A. Architect


-.- y~C
-*
*tr-
r
I., I rqS

t
rr


JURY COMMENTS
"This house, the Committee felt, did do justice to a
very lovely site. It is arranged in plan and detailed and
enclosed in a shelter which truly belongs in Florida. It
is a big house but it still has been able to achieve
warmth and residential scale."


A point of land exposed to the gulf: A strong house built
high above storm tides was required. Broad porch protects
glass from sun and rain. This is an adaptation of "cracker"
design for use by a writer whose wife is a pointer.


ARCHITECT & ASSOCIATE: B. Richmond
ENGINEER: Ebaugh & Goethe
CONTRACTOR: Frank S. Thyne, Inc.






Alerit Awai1 I
Oceanfront Residence Northeast Florida
William Morgan Architects


U


JURY COMMENTS
"A clean, crisp, almost sculptural solution respecting
and taking advantage of an interesting site with its
views toward the sea. The Committee was also in-
trigued by the materials used and the method of pre-
fabricating the parts "


The residence is designed for eight prefabricated boxes each
12' x 25'-4" to be set on concrete pilings and fiberglass
encapsulated in place.
Concrete pilings are cast integrally with the foundation slab
to resist hurricane winds. Fiberglass is applied to all exterior
surfaces, eliminating conventional roofing, gravel stops,
facias, window stops, siding, etc. The encapsulation
technique is similar to the method of coating wooded boat
hulls.


ENGINEER: Haley W. Keister, P.E.
CONTRACTOR: W. H. Coleman
FIBERGLASS: Tom's Fiberglass







































































































r - ---- - - -






























F


SECOND PLOONI PLAN















-d. 7
< < ** -

--^ '"


* 7;11


PHOTOS: G. WADE SWICORD


upper floor


I


1


";"""9;"3;-~~t-r=KIU~
''''1


main floor


1s


4 8 t6







imlelit Aw11dii
Jacaranda Country Club
Donald Singer, Architect


JURY COMMENTS
"Selected for its subtle arrangement for large assem-
blies The building looks equally good in daylight and
at night"


PHOTO: ALEXANDRE GEORGES


The golf course that surrounds the site is a series of softly
rolling curves ... quiet and gentle. The building very
naturally settled into those curves providing a man made hard
edge as opposed to nature's own impressionist soft edge, but
taking from the very strong horizontal of the open field and
emanating it. The building was to sit surrounded by activity
on all sides ... no room for a back porch ... and vistas and
circulation patterns emanating from all directions.


FEATURED IN "THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT", MAY/JUNE 1972
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER: Gaston de Zarraga Associates
MECHANICAL ENGINEER: Louis J. Aguirre Associates
.CONTRACTOR: Caldwell Scott Construction Co.
INTERIOR: Terry Rowe Associates


iiL1-




















SMLk O fI kDA I Ii(*b )V









A A- A







_0 02-
INFORMATIO IN OULIFFO M O
US IN S.LA IG T I O A






A me.n
T6e OfficA
Th Sorc of Wor



















INTRODUCTION


For the past five years, the Florida Association, The American
Institute of Architects has been involved with the needs of the
architectural small office practitioner (nicknamed SOP) and
how the Association can best help satisfy these needs in a
dynamic society.

Under the able leadership of Francis R. Walton, FAIA, as
chairman, the Small Office Task Force Committee, FA AIA
initiated a study and survey on small office needs and desires,
and tested the results against the experiences and opinions of
the Task Force of practitioners. A report of this study to the
1971 FA AIA Convention led to the "Small Office Practice
Handbook", again an undertaking led by Francis R. Walton,
FAIA.

The Handbook is not intended to supplant the "Architects"
Handbook of Professional Practice" published by The Ameri-
can Institute of Architects. It is intended to supplement this
excellent publication with suggestions that could help the
SOP with the nasty, nitty-gritty problems, which every
practitioner is supposed to know how to solve, but few
SOP's find the time to discover and to exploit the resources
for these solutions without some help.

Of course, the small office practice is as diverse as the diversity
of community characteristics, of people and of design con-
cepts. None of the comments and suggestions in the Handbook
are universally adaptable and all of it runs the risk of becoming
obsolescent before it is disseminated. It is the hope of the Task
Force that what is found herein will in some way be useful in
making the SOPs' practice (1) less burdensome for creating
wholesome environments during our dynamically transient
time, and (2) much more profitable.

DEFINITION

The SOP, as we have approached it, is the small firm consisting
of from one to seven persons with two or three principals. This
view incorporates the idea that these will be architects and
that engineers will be consultants or in some way related to
this architectural organization by association.





THE COMMITTEE: Francis R. Walton, FAIA, Chairman
H. Samuel Kruse', FAIA
Herschel E. Shepard, Jr., AIA
Robert L. Woodward, AIA
1972



























MA~All*FICPII~


I'RAI"BYIEE


XaruALL -- -- -


HANlIIIMI0K


OFFICE ECONOMICS:
INDIRECT COSTS: Not all of these will apply to all offices.


GOALS:

The goals of practice may be defined as personal fulfillment,
exercise of social responsibility, achievement of aesthetic and
individual expression and reaching people. The means of accom-
plishment of these goals is, of course, the acquisition of projects
on which to serve; the maintenance of communications with a
complete spectrum of job-related people including workmen;
careful attention to the quality of service and its economic de-
tails and implications of practice and collecting. The larger
firms find it necessary to have members to concentrate on
elements of this array of activities and purposes to the ex-
clusion of others. In the small office everyone is to some degree
related to, or familiar with, all parts. In fact, the process takes
on such a unity, it appears to have no parts. This illusion must
be resisted for the sake of control and management, and a con-
sciousness of different roles and jobs performed is required.
This discipline must be conscious and planned, including the
maintenance or the achievement of the goals will be lost. It
is almost a truism that the more grim the financial situation,
the less likely goals will be retained. Frank Lloyd Wright is
said to have starved and clung to his goals. Many practitioners
begin without goals and like the child who plays with the box
the toy comes in, they get lost in the means and methods.
Some of us are limited by personal factors and must find
satisfaction in a part of the method. Large firms are populated
with people who have made this choice. The SOP requires real
broad skills and this document seeks to aid in the organization
of these.


(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
(11)
(12)
(13)
(14)

(15)
(16)
(17)
(18)
(19)
(20)


Nontechnical (secretary-bookkeeper)
Office supplies (All consumable supplies)
Auto expenses
Dues and subscriptions
Entertainment
Interest on business-related debt
Pictures and prints
Professional seminars and conventions
Rent and utilities, office maintenance
Taxes and licenses
Telephone answering service and telephone
Travel
Business promotion, visual aids, brochures (7)
Maintenance of home or studio if used partially for work
(proportional to use by area and time)
Accountants and legal fees, tax consultant
Depreciation
Professional insurance
Principal's salary placed as a planned item of overhead
Fringe benefits
Time spent on office chores by anybody not classified
under item (1)


The tax people and accountants have all this in hand and a close
look at these reveals no great subtleties with a few exceptions.

(1) When you have developed the maximum output of a
single secretary-record keeper and more output is re-
quired, it is probably more practical to purchase or
lease machines and gadgets, or send work out, to in-
crease the output rather than put on another person.
Reason: Two do less work than twice as much as one
since cooperation and relationship consumes time. It
would be better to automate something and have it done
part time by a technical employee.




























tKEIII


(2) Drafting and office supplies, chargeable to specific jobs
and recovered as a reimbursible, would not really be an
indirect cost in cost accounting analysis, but would
certainly show on tax accounting and offsets the in-
come from reimbursement.

(7) Pictures and Prints has fringe benefits and also can be
made to support activities of business promotion.

(8) Professional Seminars and Conventions are to some men
a partially paid vacation and this relates to item 12 (travel).

(16) Equipment investments appear as a yearly depreciation
over a reasonable life expectancy of the items.

(18) This is related to management, not item 20 chores
which may be done by other technical personnel. This
item may be expressed in terms of a percentage of the
principal's salary rather than a total item.

(19) Should be looked at in close focus. The real cost of
a productive worked hour of an employee's time is
not the hourly pay rate of the person. Conduct an
analysis of the following type of each individual
and if you work on a reimbursible time charge fee
basis, this item will be offset as an indirect cost. For
example: 40 x 52 = 2080. This is what you will pay
for, but this is not what you get.


Take out: 2 weeks vacation
1 day sick leave per month
5 national holidays
Voting and seeing about things


Hrs. 80
96
40
'" 4
Hrs. 220


2080
220
1860 actual time worked.
If you are paying 5 dollars an hour for this person,
your real cost per hour is
2080 x 5 = 5.591 dollars
1860


If you add to this the per hour cost, using the actual
work time, of group insurance, health insurance and
the like, you will arrive at the real per hour cost of the
person for use in charged time accounts. For example:
5x 2% = 12.50
5.6 x 2% = 14.00
Three such employees in a year's time could put an
additional 6370 dollars in the till if on reimbursible
accounts at 2% times time and your indirect cost
shrinks.

(20) Filing, salesmen, sorting data and mail which is not
specifically assigned to project production.


OTHER RECORDS THAT NEED TO BE KEPT:
Keep by the job, preferably in a separate notebook or ledger,
a complete record of all consultants' fees paid, time charges,
prints, long distance telephone calls, travel, amounts of bill-
ing and payments received, complete with dates. Even
though you may work on flat fees, unit fees or percentage
fees, these cost records afford a useful tool for the following:
(1) Comparison of cost to return by jobs.
(2) Evidence in case a job is terminated for any reason
and settlement or suit develops. This record is proof
positive of costs involved and quickly available.
(3) Comparison of various items of cost over a series of
jobs.
(4) Clear understanding and appraisal of time elapse and
work progress.

In addition to these records, a personnel record should be
kept for each person in the total work force, including
principals.










































The accountant will require a record be kept of equipment pur-
chased, with dates and original costs, together with a life ex-
pectancy estimate. Many expensive books go through periodic
revision and have therefore a definite depreciation date. Some
items use up so fast they fall in the business expense class
and do not need to be charted. Sometimes this file is headed
"Equipment".

Separation of job files is important. The Institute is currently
working on a number system for files which will hopefully
make possible quick access to the same piece of data on each
job for comparative reference.

It has been found undersirable for work files containing cer-
tain intimate information to float around the office, so a
system of segregation that works well is to color code file
as follows:

Red label All letters to client re fees and privileged infor-
mation on his project, income, etc. Contract: Owner-Architect,
billings to owner, payments received, etc. Kept by principal or
secreatry in his file.

Blue label Project data and study material during the develop-
ment of the project to the bid period.

Green label The first document in this file is the Contract,
Owner-Contractor; and all records, requisitions, job inspec-
tion reports and shop drawings, etc., accumulate in this file.


Another valuable file or notebook is the case of characters
book on jobs. This notebook should have a fresh page
started for each new job and it stays on the secretary's
desk. This covers proper name and address of project, own-
er's or his representative's name, address, telephone and
rank; cover trade names or fictitious names or title used on
project, contractors, major suppliers, subs, consulting eng-
ineers, even the superintendent or manager. This reduces
error and oversight in covering copies in correspondence
and the like; saves time also. This page of job information
can be expanded on the back side by entering bid data, unit
cost per square foot and other reference material for quick
reference in the design and construction phases.

The card file is most important. If all jobs are recorded as
they develop on a card bearing a file number, matching
the job number, it can become a quick reference for all
sorts of data such as area, cost, fee, etc. In order to make
this worable, you need a cross index file by alphabetical
means for every possible reference clue the project may
have; for instance, a man may have a corporation, build
for a tenant company in another town and the job number
you give it might be 72-672. Ten years from now, you
want to look it up and all you can remember is one of the
series of bits of information, but not the file number where
all data is stored. The strange part is that a repeat client may
fill up cards under his name of various jobs that all have dif-
ferent other filing characteristics. This system resembles the
library catalog systems.


4SOP





FILE SYSTEMS:
This need has been aired greatly by the CSI Uniform System
for Construction Specifications, data filing and cost account-
ing, and the index of key words. You should be using it.

One of the oldest job numbering systems is the one using the
last two numbers of the year (72) as the first numbers of the
file and then consecutively numbering jobs as they develop,
either on a yearly basis like 1 to 50, or endlessly from first
job and consecutively numbered as years go on. Carefully
developing this file system and the cross reference card sys-
tem can be quite rewarding. The concentration of summary
data on the basic card can also be rewarding and an aid to
future judgments.

The new language for this topic is "Data Storage and Retrieval
Systems" and this, of course, includes the computer. The
keeping of drawings, specifications and job records is really
not part of the catalog and reference material storage thing;
however, changes are on the way.

This whole problem is being automated (and made more
costly) by the use of microfilm and the reader-printer hard-
ware that goes with it. The I DAC System is available which
is a service providing catalog data files and building type pro-
grams on microfische. You would have to have your papers
sent out for recording on film to put them into the system.
Since we are limited to the SOP in this discussion, the justi-
fication of this system change from simple filing is not pre-
sented here. The time may come when it is economical, or
even mandatory.

The maintenance and storage of data as referred to above is
becoming a very large part of the architect's problem of
office operation and sophisticated systems being what they
are and costing what they do, it is possible that in this case
and the one below, a pool of services for more than one
architect would represent a real savings and a real improve-
ment in quality of material maintained. Collecting data in
cooperation with other architects could be a very important
improvement in common practice as we know it. The devel-
opment of the data files and reference center might well be


a feature that would be attractive to contractors and sub-
contractors in the community, since the keeping of source
material is such an important element of both the design
and construction practice.


IN COLLECTING SOURCE INFORMATION FOR
PRODUCTS:
The SOP has a special problem in that the manufacturers
can't afford any longer to flood you with traveling repre-
sentatives. In collecting source information for products
you have to go after your own data on the things you
specify. Catalogs get out of date. Another problem is
volume and pricing. Since it is likely that some of your
work will not be large enough to get large volume sales
consideration you can get caught with the highest prices.
The suppliers, subs and distributors nearest your market
are a good starting point. What do they want to sell? You
can't afford to be the only salesman for a product. (The
Dodge Construction pricing manual has average costs and
labor cost nonspecific.) Someone has to want it sold for
normal motivations. Questioning representatives and home
office people about prices gets to be a tightrope act. The
volume price breaks are important and also variations in
what the factory does to get the goods to your job. From
the producer of custom terra cotta trim who puts it on a
straw-covered truck and drives it to your job site, to the
air conditioning equipment maker who has a 650 dollar
setup charge to make, one or 100 cataloged items made
only on order is a big spread in policies and you need to
know in every case. This condition has produced the new
construction management system under which each part
of the work (subs) and their selection of brands, etc., is
subjected to the three questions comparison test covering
quality, cost, and time of completion. This makes a tight
specification a thing of the past and puts the SOP right in
position to deliver good service. It affects detailing since
some products don't just plug into the space of others but
require special considerations. It creates a condition under
which parts of the working papers are being worked on all
during the construction period.







































EQUIPMENT AND DEVICES:
From the most rudimentary board, T-square and triangle to
the most completely mechanized drafting devices, is a big
spread and the key to the choice is attitude. Most SOP archi-
tects communicate with their staff or clients through drawings
they make. The use of professional draftsmen as compared
with architect produced drafting makes a difference. The
method of evaluating drawings production is complex.

(1) If the highest paid man in the place has to make draw-
ings, then anything toward making the process more
efficient will pay off in time saved and results gained.
A look at the place of work of a dentist will indicate
about the ultimate extension of this principle which
we might emulate.

(2) If all principals in a firm make sketchy notations on
drawings carried out always by draftsmen, then the
expenditure on equipment must be justified on cost
to produce the end product.

(3) The Kodak publications on photo-aided drafting have
been explored and the bottleneck is the expensive equip-
ment. The SOP would have to find a service he could
use by the sheet. These large cameras are limited to
major cities and unless a group of architects organized
a central supply for the service it is not for the isolated
SOP. Shipping work to the city is all there is left.

(4) Use of Standards is the most potent aid for the SOP.
Collecting typical details, systems, diagrams and the
like can make a big savings in production cost. Here
again the microfilm reader-printer can be a help.


(5) General list of drafting equipment available:
a. Adjustable (rising, lowering and tilting) mechanized
tables
b. Traveling straight edges
c. Drafting machines
d. New development in glareless high intensity lights
e. Implement racks or caddies (developed originally
for the artists)
f. Erasing machines
g. Drafting film, new inks and pens, and fine lead
mechanical pencils have made the dirty, time-
consuming, pencil pointer obsolete.

(6) Office Machines:
Electric calculators
Auto typers
Computer terminals (rental $100 a month, plus
wire service $65)
Copying machines and printers that can produce
second originals







A note here on things we have not:

The SOP specifications reproduction is conceivably the
most uneconomical of printing tasks. A document with 75
to 100 pages reproduced and bound in 20 copies or less is
expensive. A relief for some small work is the use of typed
material on tracing paper strips, taped together in large sheets
the size of the drawings. It can be a fully reimbursible cost
and extra copies come easy. Here standard material could be
assembled and put on sheets by the Kodak method. The
absolutely cheapest method is the old ditto master and run
by hand crank. It also looks cheapest and some client groups
will not permit it.


1SOP




























5OI'P


THE OFFICE OR WORK ENVIRONMENT:
The ideal would be compatible, well-motivated epople in a
stimulating and complementary environment. Some rudi-
mentary questions to ask will clew you to your needs:

What do workers see when they look up from work?
Are sound levels in the office high?
Is glare present?
Is illumination at the level to make maximum and rapid
recognition of material on surface?
Is the workday made up of large, unbroken chunks of time,
or is it decimated into 15-minute stop and start sessions?
Is everyone able to work at his own pace and intensity with-
out impinging on others?

Since the time of the small staff of the SOP is his only ex-
ploitable resource, great care needs to be exercised in making
it count.

How many clients entered your office in the last year? How
many did you see at their place?
Do the people who work there think if it as a swell place to
spend time?
How many persons have to know where your office is and
ever see it? When they see or experience it, will they think
of it as an aid to the results they will get from you, or as a
burden to you?

The answers to these self-questionings will, of course, relate
to the practice. It will be hard to determine whether the
office type and expression resulted from the practice or the
reverse. The "Peter Principle and Parkinson's Law" combine
to indicate that the perfectly planned and organized office is
ready to collapse. Growth makes change and change defeats
planning as well as organization charts. Another and more
basic ethnic expression is "Jes time you git all fix up den
you die". Not all growth concerns size change, but it cer-
tainly concerns attitude change.


Many successful firms operate in characterless loft space and
do quite well. The other extreme is the masterpiece of show-
manship developed by some fine firms as a demonstration of
their prowess. Office space in a good office building can be
had at from 5 to 7 dollars a foot per year with utilities furn-
ished. The location, the building tells the public something
about stability. Our figure of the tent under the shady tree
is an expression of an extreme, but an all too evident ex-
ample of the temporariness of some offices on the way into
practice. We have searched for a yardstick but found none
to judge the amount you should spend on space needs. Rent
and utilities, Item 9 of the list of indirect costs, can run as low
as 10 per cent of the indirect package and reasonably as high
as 30 per cent. Once established, the office cost is quite in-
flexible. As stated above, many practitioners go to the client,
and their own work space has greater value for its contribution
to the workers. A dentist replied to my question about the
way his patients would react to the garden views from the
operatories, "I want to enjoy spending the day there and if
I cheerful the patients will feel better."

THE SOURCE OF WORK:
The source of work is a good topic for evaluation. Older
SOP firms indicate that repeat business is the bulk of it
and right behind that in quantity comes the recommenda-
tion of previous clients. "Project generators" are not always
the client, but they are the important ingredient. Some gen-
erators find the need for a building and develop the financing
or turn to a developer. Some, however, merely find a space
that almost meets the need and requires some modification
to make it do. In some cases this is the indirect client or
tenant. Some project generators are strictly tenants and the
landlord is the client. This frequently adds to the sensitivity
of the situation when the architect represents the landlord.
Another important project generator springs from the vast
array of entrepreneurial, financial opportunities which draw
the eager promoters to the architect.

Sometimes the architect seeks the sponsor to carry what he
knows to be the opportunity if properly handled. The ex-
pertise is well managed by some firms. The possibility for
a new type consultant for the architect is right here.



























SOP


NEW FORMS OF PRACTICE:
From this grows another opportunity that of the archi-
tect to become part of the development team, not merely a
professional adviser. As professional adviser to the commer-
cial, non-federal development, the architect has need for
caution to keep his natural motivation to make the building
serve best the ultimate user or occupant from conflict with
the quick gain motivation of the developer. This same tor-
ment rides with the architect in the development posture.


Some outstanding examples exist of architectural participa-
tion in these operations as entrepreneur and builder. High
style, high budget projects are viewed by developers as
blunders. Not all architects can wear the client suit with
grace. Marketing architectural services has been the topic
of a piece by Bradford Perkins in the Architectural Record
April, 1972.




LEGAL:
Good lawyers won't resent the use of AIA documents. They
will realize these have been wrapped around established, and
often reasonable, trade and industry habits and customs to
which we are all trained to conform. New rules require train-
ing. Tremendous insight is required to see all the import of
apparently slight changes in the mass of custom. When the
situation or a client demands change in the AIA documents
don't play lawyer; get help or refer the whole thing. We just
don't have time to retrain a whole construction work force to
suit each owner's attorney that appears on the scene. We have
to take the work force as it is and encourage and inspire it to
perform above its natural level. Playing games with it can get
you mashed. All states have some laws that affect these docu-
ments. Florida has an Arbitration Law that some lawyers
think is more facile than the one referred to. If the SOP in-
corporates he will want to stay close to his attorney. The
trick is to know when. Any "screwy deal" should be referred
to a lawyer, carefully selected for type of practice not golf
scores. Lawyers do develop special areas of interest.


PUBLIC RELATIONS:
Public Relations for the firm grows readily out of this topic
and needs broad consideration. The AIA convention in
1964 offered seminars of this subject. Three divergent pres-
entations were made which can be capsulized as follows:
(1) Talk architecture with enthusiasm to any group available
from a Sunday School class to a convention of client types.
(2) Develop a deep and abiding interest in the problems and
operations of a client type and become conversant with
every manager in the field selected.
(3) Develop with visual aids an overwhelming demonstration
program showing how well fitted you are to do your
work and how detailed and thoroughly you carry out
each detail and then show this off to prospects far and
wide.

In recent years, this has been elaborated into a big pitch when
boards of directors and public bodies need to go through the
motions of selecting a firm for a project under their jurisdiction.
The display and marketing costs are high in this method. One
question is posed. Can the SOP afford to invest this much (for
form 3) in a specific presentation when the cost must surely
come out of either the job production when obtained or other
clients' work when failure to acquire takes place. Only in vast
projects can such expenditures be absorbed without loss to the
client's work and even then it is debatable. A reused presenta-
tion can be an investment.




























1SODI


PUBLIC SERVICE:
Another form of Public Relations is exposure in the commun-
ity. Not all are equipped for this. Some advocate the architect
taking part in fund drives and other local causes to prove he is
human. Another approach is to accept only those volunteer
activities which could use the special viewpoint of the architect.
If a shoe store manager can do it as well, don't take it. Some
advocate the architect join all country clubs and spread himself
around. Others advocate only participation that will read as
sincere and interested and fitting. Exposure through the media
is sought by some. The professionals in media are quick to
spot the phony and are skilled in letting him come through in
his true light. Don't fight them. Speak from knowledge and
commitment and identify opinions as such, granting tacitly
that there may be others. The best rule here is the group ex-
posure where several persons question and one answers. The
architect can play either role with little strain. Longer time
or greater space exposure is safer than compressed bits.

Serving on boards and commissions of public nature is good
for the profession but may not be fully good for the profession-
al involved. No one ever served without making enemies or mal-
contents. The acceptance by the community must be weighed
against the odds. Taking pot shots at one of our own serving
in this capacity is a real no no.




KEEPING UP:

Keeping up with the developments in business, construction,
the profession is a serious process. The book, "Future Shock"
by Alvin Toffler, surfaces some problems in this area. A rapid
run-through will serve to clue you to developments:
(1) Transience The rapid turnover of different kinds of
relationships in life.
(2) Development of project management, task force opera-
tions, short-lived work relationships, horizontal re-
lationships replacing organizational charts and
hierarchy.


(3) Self-renewal Cleaning the attic.
(4) The spreading need of professionalism combined with
teaming of varied skills. The word multidisciplinary
grew out of this real need.
(5) Coping with rapid change.
(6) New everything and novelty.
(7) Multichoice with pressing need for decision.
(8) Cultural diversity and freed time.
(9) When learning looks backward reality is now, survival is
the only future. Lifelong learning is the need and the
answer.
(10) So far as technology is concerned, no one is in charge.

The "Whole" architect, trained to plan for a complex pro-
cess requiring many months to produce a real physical ex-
pression in permanent material using diverse skills, is equipped
to adjust to the future if anyone is.

A list of a few areas demanding the architect's attention may
challenge you to evaluate your own program for staying abreast
(1) The development of management techniques in building
making a 4-person team: client, contractor, manager,
architect.
(2) The new fast track systems of construction in which not
all the decisions are made and put on the "final" plans.
(3) Systems building already threatened by the above, yet
incorporating some of its features.
(4) The vanishing bidding contractor.
(5) The computer programs available to construction and
design analysis.
(6) The implications on design and costs of systems choices.
(7) The high value of time in today's world and the disrup-
tive quality of real study.




























b01'S


SERVICE TO THE PROFESSION:

What contribution can you make to maintenance of the profes-
sion that was here when you arrived? Are you a planter and
cultivator or only a harvester? Those who serve the AIA on
the National Board give from 1/4 to 1/3 of their time to this
cause, depending on how rapidly they can read and keep up
with it. Someone or some organization has to be able to afford
this much contribution. Down at the regional and chapter
level participation for effective contribution diminishes.
Spreading the load makes it lighter for all and gets more done.
No one has ever established the value or rewards in this to
the individual. Many who get the greatest sense of complete-
ness from their daily tasks are unmotivated to this work. It
is apparent that some who feel some personal lack do gain con-
siderable reassurance from the organization work. Someone
has said that at least part of our opinion of ourselves is made
up of the opinion others have of us. The conviction that some-
thing needs doing, and that you can be the one to do it, is
our great and abiding organizational need. No SOP should con-
sider himself complete without some contribution regularly
made. Few can afford the great sacrifice of 1/3 of his time if
he really needs to practice to meet the expenses.

SATISFACTION FROM PRACTICE:

The question of satisfaction or sense of accomplishment from
practice is a deeply philosophical area, but something needs
saying. We are primarily motivated by our needs to develop
and actualize our fullest potentialities and capacities, if we
are at all healthy. The question of satisfaction may be taken
care of merely by variety and avoidance of boredom. Many
SOP firms develop a completely mindless acceptance of what-
ever comes in. The number of firms in the SOP class who
have positive programs to shepherd into the office particular
types of projects in which they wish to specialize are rare in-
deed. Between these two extremes live the most of us. Those
who develop a following in a special field are not the problem
whether they are trying to break into other areas or not On
occasion it would be prudent to seek help from another
architect with considerable experience of a kind rather than
learn all the pitfalls doing your first job of that sort. It is most


important that each SOP review his experience and determine
his strength and his blank spots. Following this should come a
process of self-revealing in the practice area and some under-
standings developed for cooperative or support systems of
practice. The so-called joint venture sounds costly, confusing
and fraught with traps. The sound of consultation and aid
rings better. The idea of consultation can be as simple as a
telephone call, or as complicated as a series of conferences
and concentrated working together. By joint venture is not
indicated that the client would change architects or become
involved with two architects. One architect may retain the
status with the client and the other architect might be his
support facilities for parts or sections of the work. This can
be negotiated and if it is to be carried out practically there is
a very strong need for some definite standards of the relation-
ship between the practitioners and the kind of fees and fee
charges that will be involved. If the practitioners are main-
taining a complete system of records and know what each
item of service costs to produce, then a means of reimburse-
ment will be readily worked out for returning to either
architect the proper fee for cooperating with the other.
The reader is referred to the Architect's Handbook of Pro-
fessional Practice, Chapter 9, published by The American
Institute of Architects, which contains considerable discussion
of the various types of owner-architect agreements and applies
to this portion of the subject.

VARIATIONS OF PRACTICE:

Variations of practice are extensive. If you read the schedule
of payments in Article 6 and add the subject of front end ser-
vices or talking paper, you will find 6 stages of service. Many
firms never do all of these steps for any project and some con-
fine their service to two of the stages on most of their work.
Services generally group into the following as to fees:
(1) The full scope and percentage fee.
(2) Unit pricing (per room or per apartment) on multiple
unit work.
(3) Square foot appraisal (fee per square foot of rental area).
(4) Lump sum fee for stipulated services and extent of
project.
(5) Reimbursible cost and time multiple charge.




























SOPD


Some generalizations can be offered on Items (2) and (3). You
had better not take one of these at the going market price in
the industry involved unless you did one last week or are pre-
pared to pay for a college course in learning the business.
Item (4) calls for considerable insight and experience in the
establishing of the cost of production of the services. Item (5)
is perhaps best for learning the ropes and guarantees solvency.















ENGINEER CONSULTANTS:

This is such a large subject it is worth a complete study. Here
is included only the slightest warning. It is not possible for a
Second Lieutenant to coordinate the actions of two Generals
with separate armies. When consulting firms get quite large and
develop high paid, strong-minded, or even willful head men,
the SOP will encounter problems in coordinating, controlling,
or even compromising systems, quality and type to keep with-
in the budget, unless he can get one of the Indians in the
engineer staffs to work at his level. Your project may end up
with the absolutely finest systems that can be designed and
with the absolutely greatest cost that hog the budget to the
point of destruction of the feasibility of the project The
purist who is remote from job level considerations is scarey
also. The very standard mass-produced solution which strips
away the need for almost scientific level job supervision and
layout efforts may turn out to save job time and money with-
out any deleterious effect on usefulness, building-life and
ownership costs.


STRUCTURE:

The SOP office as we have defined it would not support much
executive activity. Like a squad, everybody knows what all the
others are about most all the time. This may be the source of
the limitations, but it is also the source of its great strength
and efficiency. Each party needs to know at once what to do
in all cases and to get on with it. Communication gets basic
and almost intuitive. A knowledge of the semantic difference
between communication by words and drawings is important
A drawing is an abstraction of reality much closer to the
scientific truth than any possible word structure and admits of
less interpretation. The drawing is the firmer communication.
No one in a squad is ever far from the possible use of all the
tools of the unit and so in the SOP office. Passing with facility
from one role to another is required. Those who can't hit the
dirt won't survive. The enthusiasm of the squad leader can
rub off on the others and cause them to perform above their
own standards. The leader who behaves like a commanding
officer may cease to lead. It is doubtful that the SOP will
train leadership in administrative operations since the ability
to judge the performance of others comes from selecting per-
sons to go out and work away from the group and observing
the results obtained.

Keeping the roles fluid and open, moving from person to per-
son, may be the generative force that has made SOP offices
the best training ground for new architects. Any attempt to
still this flow tends to stop the growth of all the staff. The
failure to communicate upward in hierarchical situations has
been noted and the horizontal communication in the task force
is its greatest source of power.

Attempts to despersonalize the architect's contact and work
with the construction phase people has been going on for
some time but it appears to be counter to the current move
toward team systems in construction.



























SOPD

It is frequently stated that the architect working on home
ground, within his turf so to speak, could write his specifica-
tions on the back of an envelope if he could select the sub-
contractors. The desire of subs and trades to please or win
acceptance by the architect is in evidence daily. Deperson-
alizing this relationship is not necessary or desirable within
good ethical limitations. Professional arm's length respect can
be maintained within the direct contact. The surest destruc-
tive force is the professional inspector who has to prove he is
working by finding fault, voicing criticism and putting people
down. The best inspector encourages all to work for the best
results with the end product and who can do this better than
the architect whose reward and standing are based on posi-
tive goals? Another by-product of the job relationship is
learning about limitations within trade skills, product
shortcomings, undesirable operators and, in general, where
lies good intentions and no intentions, and where resides
ineptitudes in the office as well as in the job force. Some men
are mistake-factories and must be planned around if they per-
sist in the work force.


A definite drive to reduce volume of communicative detail is a
constant need. Recall that no process is done on a job that is
not already an established skill with someone. We just can't
economically create new skills on a job with drawings and speci-
fications.
An outstanding example of the contrary was Richard Neutras's
practice in the 30's when he used wealthy Hollywood clientele
to develop, at great cost and for prestige reasons, what we now
accept as prefab windows, sliding glass doors, and panelized
steelconstruction. Who can afford this and who has the trade
to stand it? There are few Wrights and Rudolphs with clients
unconscious of budgets, or who can count the architect's
presence as such a valuable factor in his advertising program
that he need not make the result prove out on a standard
feasibility analysis.

One of our members in the original SOP study strongly hinted
at a future in which large offices would appear as managed
collections of small offices with all the freedom of task force
methods. Others dreamed of small offices banding together to
employ consultants and to set up service organizations for
their betterment.


BIBLIOGRAPHY
The following bibliography of books and magazine articles in-
dicates the breadth of material available on these topics. It is
not claimed that all of the committee read all of this material.
It is probable that most all of it was read by someone among
us This report is not a research of this material but is the views
and comments of the committee. The researcher will find con-
flicting views among these writers or at least variance in points
of reference and emphasis:














BOOKS
Anderson, Arthur, Financial Management for Architectural Firms, The
American Institue of Architects, Washington, D.C., 1970; $9.60
Glossary of Construction Industry Terms, The American Institute of
Architects, Washington, D.C., 1970; $1.00
Architect's Handbook of Professional Practice, The American Institute
of Architects, Washington, D.C., 1971; $14.50
A loose-leaf binder with 21 chapters describing in detail every rela-
tionship normal to architectural practice. It includes the AIA standard
documents of the owner-contractor A Series, owner-architect B -
Series, architect-consultant C Series, and architect-industry D -
Series, as well as such helpful chapters as Insurance and Bonds of Sure-
tyship, Construction Cost Analysis and Legal Concerns. A valuable tool
for any architectural office.
Uniform Systems for Construction Specification, Data Filing and Cost
Accounting, Council of Mechanical Specialty Contracting Industries,
Inc., The Construction Specification Institute, Inc., Associated Gen-
eral Contractors of America, Inc., and The American Institute of
Architects, Washington, D.C., 1966; $5.00
A joint effort to coordinate specifications with a filing system of
preclassified product literature and identification symbols along with
contractor's cost accounting.
Case and Company, Inc., The Economics of Architectural Practice, The
American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C. 1968; $4.80
This publication is filled with details about the costs of performing
competent architectural services in today's ever tightening profit
squeeze. The material, given in easy to understand graphs and charts of
every aspect of architectural service by offices of all sizes, illustrates the
need for better management of practices. The publication shows how
mismanagement, coupled with increasing demands of the architect's
time and professional skills, many times guarantees financial losses,
diminishing public, professional and self-respect.
Case and Company, Inc., Profit Planning in Architectural Practice, The
American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C., 1968; $4.00
This publication describes the technique which the architect can use
in reaching sound decision regarding the adequacy of his proposed com-
pensation. Using the data in The Economics of Architectural Practice, it
begins with the elementary concept of profit planning and continues
with specific examples applied to an architectural firm. Although the
book is intended for practitioners not conversant with profit planning
and control procedures, its content is organized and presented in such a
way that it is applicable to architectural firms of all sizes and all levels
of sophistication.
Case and Company, Inc., Methods of Compensation for Architectural
Services, The American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C.,
1969; $6.40
Using the useful costs and income data from The Economics of
Architectural Practice, and the planning techniques for adequacy of
proposed compensation described in Profit Planning in Architectural
Practice, this manual reviews and updates the compensation methods
used by many architects to price their services and describes some
unusual methods. The common methods are given guidelines for select-
ing the method best suited for the variables in commission. Numerous
examples and exhibits are included and the ideas given are applicable to
all size firms, whether very small or large.
McCue, Gerald M., Ewald, William R., Jr., and the Midwest Research
Institute, Creating the Human Environment, a report of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects, University of Illinois Press, Urbana,
1970; $4.95 (Soft cover).
The book predicts the future of society as a whole and the building
industry in particular. Its evaluations and proposals are divided into
three parts: Part I the social influences upon the future of physical
environment; Part II an examination of the effects of technical im-
provements in building materials and technological innovations in the
management of the building industry; and Part III by Mr. McCue,
Chairman of AIA Committee on the Future of the Profession, the
imperative changes in the professional societies, educational institu-
tions, and the individual professional to enable architecture to play a
leading role in creating the human environment. A great tool for the
practitioner's long-range planning.


Wheeler, C. Herbert, Jr., Emerging Techniques of Architectural Prac-
tice, The American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C., 1966;
$4.00
The book describes emerging techniques and technologies being em-
ployed in architectural practice in increased efficiency of practice and
permit improved quality of architectural services. The study is in four
areas: Management of the Single Project, Production Management, Man-
agement of Practice and Business Management.
Evans, Benjamin H. and Wheeler, C Herbert, Jr., Emerging Techniques
2. Architectural Programming, The American Institute of Architects,
Washington, D.C., 1967-68; $4.00
This study gives four general parts of the programming process:
Client Philosophy and Objectives Establish the clients' goals, atti-
tudes, aspirations and characteristics; Functional Relationship between
administration, departments, services, equipment, process, community,
public, etc.; Facility Space Requirements development of require-
ments based on activity programs, equipment needs, traffic movement
and personnel projections; and Client Background and Research -
studies to determine community characteristics, economic base, indus-
trial base, labor market, population distribution, and growth pro-
jections.
Hunt, William Dudley, Jr., Editor, Comprehensive Architectural Ser-
vices General Principles and Practice, The American Institute of
Architects, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1966; $8.00
This book introduces the expanding requirements that have led to
concept of comprehensive architectural services and to the legal, ethi-
cal, educational and other problems involved. It shows architects how
to market their services to today's and tomorrow's clients and how to
perform these services in a manner that meets the requirements of both
clients and the general public. The book discusses the architectural
services that preced architectural design, such as feasibility, analysis of
finance, real estate, etc.
Foxhall, William B., Professional Construction Management and Project
Administration, published jointly by the American Institute of
Architects and Architectural Record, New York, 1972; $15.00
This book describes the professional approach to management of
the whole building process starting with the decisions to build and to
what purpose, scope and size; the design of the building, and the deliv-
ery (construction) of the building. It sets up the new ground rules for
common sense, the organization for professional construction manage-
ment and how it fits the essential series of events that comprise the
anatomy of projects. In chapter 5 Clients: Public and private exam-
ples are given showing some of the ways in which to approach the
corporation, the school board, the hospital board, the public bureau,
etc., to sustain the one-to-one architect-client relationship. Suggested
contracts and proposals are given for establishing the relationship and
computer uses for providing quality to management. Its last chapter
describes participating options of small professional firms.
Toffler, Alvin, Future Shock, Random House, Inc., New York, 1970;
also paperback Bantam Books, New York, 1971; $1.95
A must book for all people who, as architects must look to the
future during the evolving dynamic civilization. The book is about what
happens to people when they are overwhelmed by change drastic
change, formerly the result of centuries of evolution, but now com-
pressed into a time-frame of a single lifetime. It is about the way in
which people adapt, or fail to adapt, to the roaring current of change.
The book is organized into six parts: (1) the death of permanence, (2)
transience, (3) novelty, (4) diversity, (5) the limits of adaptability and
(6) strategies for survival.
Coxe, Weld, Marketing Architectural and Engineering Services, Van
Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, 1971; about $10.00
This book attempts to lift the veil of mystery surrounding the pro-
motion and new business development practices of architects and simi-
lar professionals. The author was Director of Business Development and
Communications for Vincent G Kling and Associates and is thoroughly
experienced in the hang-ups that design professionals suffer when trying
to develop new clients. The book has three sections. The first section
discusses the rules of the game, the principles and ethics of profession-
als; the second section defines the business development process; and
the third section explains the tools frequently used in support of mar-
keting effort.

















































MAGAZINE ARTICLES.

"Changes for the Good," C. Herbert Wheeler, Jr., AIA, CS May '72
"Planning for Growth: Managing Change," Office Management
"Developments and Trends in Construction and Management," Gerald
McKee, Jr., CS May '72
"Amid Controversy, Construction Management Blossoms," Building
Design & Construction, February, 1972
"Office Machines That Do More Than Type", James Swackhamer, AIA,
AIA Journal, January/70
"Construction Liability," Stephan D'Amico, CSI, CS June'70
"Organization for Professional Practice," Bradford Perkins, Vice Pres.,
O'Dorsey Hurst & Co., Inc., a division of McKee-Berger-Mansueto,
Inc.
"Marketing Architectural Services," Bradford Perkins, Vice Pres.,
O'Dorsey Hurst & Co., Inc., a division of McKee-Berger-Mansueto,
Inc.
"Financial Management of the Professional Firm," Bradford Perkins,
Vice Pres., O'Dorsey Hurst & Co., Inc., a division of McKee-Berger-
Mansueto, Inc.
"Basic Real Estate Financing," Paul B. Farrell, Jr., AIA Journal 4/72
"Economics," Ned H. Abrams, AIA, AIA Journal 12/71
"The ABC and Why of Development Building," C.W. Griffin, Jr., AIA
Journal 4/72
"The Domain and Practice of CPM," Prof. Byron M. Radcliffe, PE,
Specifier 9/68
"Technology," James Baker, Forum 4/72
"Materials Evaluation," Robert E. Vansant, CSI, Specifier 3/69
"Short Cuts for Specifications Writing," Warren C. Wachs, CSI, Speci-
fier 3/69
"The Small Office Practitioner," H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA, FA/16
"Is Architecture Unfair to Architects," Progressive Architecture 6/72








































































FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS
7100 North Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156



Additional copies of
SOP HANDBOOK available
at $1.00 each.







Aieit Atvairi n
Lemon Tree Village Condominium
Charles Harrison Pawley, Architect PHOTO: WRAYSTUE


JURY COMMENTS
"This well-designed condominium-duplex develop-
ment was singled out for its adaption to the site and
preservation of the natural environment The spaces
between the buildings come off very nicely and this
project of high density offers privacy, intimacy and
warmth. "


The ten-duplex buildings, joined by covered parking spaces
for each unit, are placed in a random pattern among the more
than thirty large oak and banyan trees. Economy was
achieved by the use of basically-alike units, but an unlimited
variety of visual effects and living qualities are created by
varying the size and shape of the walled garden-patios, by the
interplay of shade and shadow on the undulating surfaces,
and by the additional interest imposed by the many huge
trees set in garden spaces that are created by random spacing
of the units


FEATURED IN "THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT", MAY/JUNE 1972
ENGINEERS: McGlinchy and Pundt
CONTRACTOR: Polizzi Construction Co.
INTERIORS: Dennis Jenkins
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT: Jim Tally








Ho IIHi ira e Aleniitin
Broward Community College, North Campus
Abraben, John, Perkins & Will, Architects, Inc.


JURY COMMENTS
"The Committee describes this building as zestful
confusion distinctly with an ingenious structural
solution."









OWNER: Board of Trustees, Broward Community College
ENGINEER: P & W Engineers, Inc., Chicago
CONTRACTOR: Frank J. Rooney, Inc.


Within the framework of a traditional academic program, the
following criteria were stated and became the formative
elements of the design solution:
1. FLEXIBILITY OF USE. Since the full academic
program was not defined and would in any case be
subject to change, blocks of space subject to flexible
use must be provided. Also because of a large night
program, partial use of the campus would be desirable.
2. FELXIBILITY OF CONSTRUCTION. Space must be
furnished in blocks small enough to respond to
incremental funding by the state which is based on
student enrollment. Spaces must also be of such size
and character as to be constructed quickly.
3. RESPONSE TO CLIMATE. Special emphasis was
placed on the need for covered or enclosed passage
between enclosed spaces due to heavy wind-driven
rains during hurricane season.
4. CHARACTER. It was desired to maintain an intimate
scale and avoid the institutional look of their present
central campus.
5. PARKING. There is no public transportation in the
area so this commuter campus is served by the
automobile only. A large part of the site consideration
was to provide parking for 4,000 cars.
































































PHOTOS: BILL HEDRICH HEDRICH-BLESSING





HENi1 ira-le Aileitiol
Isabella Ambrosey Berczeli Residence
Bouterse Borrelli Albaisa Architects


JURY COMMENTS
"Another crisp well-arranged and detailed residence
respecting a very beautiful oak tree. The materials,
textures, colors and, particularly, the interior furnish-
ings and art work are outstanding "


The hou was designed around existing oak trees in order to
preserve them. Designed to serve as contemporary setting to
display Owner's antique collection and paintings.


STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS: De Zarrag & Donnell, Inc.
MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS: Martinez & Fraga, Inc.


~dp~

~1-1


















































































































FIPT FLOOR PAN


SECOND FLOOR PLAN


* L J -






How to convince a client that

the glass you want is the glass he needs.


Get a Building Cost Analysis from
your PPG Architectural Rep. This
free computerized study deter-
mines the effect of different types
of glass on total building costs.
On many projects, the more
sophisticated glass will prove to"
be the most economical for your
client-by cutting his initial in-
vestment and operating costs for
mechanical systems.
A Building Cibt Analysis can,
in black and white, demonstrate
these facizto 6 client.'
Be sure you start taking advan-








Mr J. -. aln I,-
Aag:



A Suory oIr ca.,
i.-Ai~'go, J ilo -,"*^-


tage of this timesaving service
early in the design stage. Contact
a PPG Architectural Rep. He'll'
get data input sheets into your
hands. And with the aid of PPG
technical specialists, he'll make
sure you feed our computer the
information it needs.
Call your PPG rep. The earlier
the better. Or write for complete
information to Mr. D. C. Hegnes,
Manager, Architectural and Con-
struction Services, PPG Industries,
Inc., One Gateway Center, Pitts-
burgh, Pa. 15222. fW


PPG: a Concern for the Future


0 *


Buildimg Ce'-.5
rr



ANCHtITCT. fo Di vL ,;* V 4'
ELOIfis, John TAyor -
.L


*m 4 al


F wariT U "1 ?ILa wflDv NWL iL
00* **-* /~ I / On fU rruu


me4


S -rim m_


































,. .
now


070'"* *.


I














Tom Ward, CONSULTANT

Route 3 Box 273
S3 Miles South on US. 1
St. Augustine, Floridc
32084,
*S -. Telephone (904)824-3480
S." (904) 24-4539
" "" "* "" ~-, -"' "''


~A~
































Architect: J. Stewart Stein, Phoenix Contractor: Ramada Development Company, Phoenix
Lumber Supplied by: Pinellas Lumber Company, St. Petersburg

Non-Com fire protected wood
is at work in some of
Florida's best resorts.


St. Petersburg's new Breckenridge
Ramada Inn... 176 rooms.. .excellent
vacation and convention facilities.. .a
luxurious addition to Florida's list of fine
resort hotels.

Prior to construction, the decision was
made that nothing less than the best could
be good enough for this resort hotel. So
when wood was called for, Non-Com fire
protected wood was specified. It costs
more than ordinary wood.. .and it's worth
it. Because Non-Com fire protected wood
is so effective against flame spread it
rates the Underwriters'Laboratories label.



Dantzler
LUMBER & EXPORT COMPANY


Non-Com treatment puts fire resistance
deep into the wood itself...by applying
tremendous pressure for thorough pene-
tration, then kiln drying it for lasting pro-
tection.
And Non-Com is produced by Dantzler
Lumber and Export Company. Dantzler
recognizes the building industry's need
to have materials stockpiled for easy
accessibility.
So Dantzler has warehouses stocked to
the roof, ready for your "urgent" or "emer-
gency" call...at its Jacksonville head-
quarters or its Pompano Beach Branch
warehouse.


P. 0. Box 6340, Jacksonville, Florida 32205 Telephone: (904) 786-0424 or 781-1853 P. 0. Box 1419, Pompano Beach, Florida 33061
For more information about non-com@ Fire-Protected Wood, write Dantzler at Jacksonville, Headquarters


non

FIRE-PROTECTED WOOD


Produced by...






ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE TRADE


On July 17, 1972, Mosaic Tile Company of Florida, formerly Miami
Tile & Terrazzo, sold the bulk of its assets to:
Building Materials International, Inc.
Distribution of all Tile, Marble, Carpet, Vinyl Asbestos, Cultured
Marble, Dupont Corian, Cold Spring Granite and Allied Products shall
continue under the management of:


oQalur 9. &a...r
9o. pk (A. A iaono


efi,.ct e Gre
^RiLord e/6d 9olley


Assisted by the expert service minded representatives:


dtranly g~ ller
R1 l en.ilk
gorge Coaravia


Grisell acalloo
gred ,rosco
0?; ool
Yq1 Qfc/ain


rove .re,, fr.
gu... aumgardner
Ougene lassey


All the above wish to express their appreciation for the courtesies
and support extended in past years and keenly look forward to pleasant
and profitable future relationships.
Sincerely yours,
Building Materials International, Inc.
Barney B. Lee
President
SEE OUR DISPLAY AT THE FAAIA
CONVENTION BOOTH NOS. 501-504.












The first fully-tested 10- you like. Or applied in a white roofing systems. The savings
year-guaranteed ter-polymer reflective sheet, can be spectacular.
roof that covers a building It's fire-retardant, easy to The VIP roof has been
like a form-fitg u repair, and maintenance free. awarded both the Southern and
like a form-fttng umbrella. It makes roof cleaning and Dade County Building Code
The New VIP roof can be painting things of the past. approvals.
sprayed directly over any new (Imagine what that'll mean to For more information,
or existing roof. Concrete, your Florida clients.) If an visit our booth or give us a call.
asphalt shingles, wood, whatever, object ever breaks the shield, About the new roof that works
It goes on as a liquid; dries to VIP sealant can be applied to like no other roof
a permanent pliable bonded seal it again, ever has: with no
coat in less than a day. With Since VIP is sprayed on, seams, no nails and
no seams, no joints, no cracks, it obviously takes a lot less time no maintenance.
VIP can be tinted any color and money than conventional No kidding.

See us at Booth 309. And participate in the

drawing for a free Panasonic Digital Clock T.V.


Vp A division of Warth Paint Company 1923 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Fla.


FA/55


Ocaemy cj. oil
0Al/Jo dSfd/.,






SOUTHERN PRESTRESSED CONCRETE, INC.
A subsidiary of The Westinghouse Electric Corporation


PENSACOLA, FLORIDA 32503

P. O. BOX 2338 PHONE 476-6120


the largest and oldest exclusive manufacturer of

prestressed concrete in the South!


aclIVE IllStil
PRESTRESSE CONCRETEE INSTITITEr4 PCI
I


Plants located

Pensacola i Tallahassee Huntsville Montgomery


I'


AIR CONDITIONING,
REFRIGERATION,
HEATING AND SHEET METAL
INSTALLATION
SALES AND SERVICE


3156 LEON ROAD
P. O. BOX 16425
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32216
Wallace W. Stewart
Owner and President
TELEPHONE 641-2522
AIR CONDITIONING CONTRACTOR
FOR NORTHEAST FLORIDA
OCEANFRONT RESIDENCE


Compliments of



Fryd Construction Corp.

523 Michigan Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
(305) 673-2948

I. Fryd, President


CONTRACTOR FOR MARATHON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL


C~S


.4



























The mouse

that roared


Load/bearing masonry makes it to the top


Used to be, masonry was a mouse. Weak in
tension and shear, fine for the low rise, just
not up to high-rise specs. Until somebody
started looking for a better way to build a wall,
found it in reinforced concrete masonry, and
wound up with a better way to build a high-
rise. The process is simple.
Start with a little better block ... more cement
in the mortar... a few bars of steel ... and
a little grout. The steel adds resilience and
toughness to the wall ... the masonry block
stiffens the steel and protects it from fire.
Suddenly, you have a new structural animal.


No columns, no beams, no forming ... when
you finish the walls, the structural system is
complete. Firesafe maintenance free,
virtually indestructible, and inexpensive. High
rise construction was never better.
Which goes to show why masonry isn't a
mouse any more. When you have all of this
going for you, it's worth roaring about. For
more information, contact Masonry Marketing
Manager, General Portland Cement Company.
Sunshine Towers, Clearwater, Florida. J. Whitney
Dalzell, Architect; O. E. Olsen & Associates, Engineers;
Biltmore Construction Company, Contractors.
Florida & Signal Mountain Cements
General Portland Cement Company

L &=
Vi







































A BOOK TO GUIDE ARCHITECTS (AND
OTHER PROFESSIONALS) TO
SUCCESSFUL PROJECT
DEVELOPMENT.
Pioneering architects all over the United
States are expanding architectural ser-
vices into this new domain. Evolving be-
yond their traditional role as designers,
they are entering the decision and de-
livery stage of building-in some cases
as co-owners, in others as consultants
offering new client services in the crucial


decision-making processes which affect
a project's ultimate success.
The complexities of land acquisition,
mortgage financing, ethical implications,
liability insurance-author C. W. Griffin
explores them all in clear language. More
than a score of illustrations show graphic-
ally how the team approach works.

Retail $15.00, AIA Members $12.00. M-135. Order
from Document Dept., Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, 7100 N. Kendall Dr.,
Miami, Florida 33156.





WHEN YOU WRITE A SPECIFICATION...


SPECIFY
PAINT PROTECTION
not just a paint


In the long run, the cheapest coatings
are the most expensive.
When you specify Sherwin Williams
coatings, you are assured of quality
coatings, manufactured by a reliable
company with experience and integrity.
We offer a complete line of top qual-
ity products ranging from convention-
al oils to zinc rich primers. They are
formulated and manufactured for use
by professional specifiers in craftman-
ship to give a specific performance,
on a specific substrate, under specific
conditions.


SHERWINJ WIIAMS

PROFESSIONAL COATINGS DIVISION
148 Cain Street-Suite 700
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
(404) 659-5660


HIGHEST QUALITY SINCE 1866


WE ARE PROUD
TO HAVE CREATIVELY
CONSTRUCTED SOME
OF FLORIDA'S FINEST
BUILDINGS.



WE ASSURE YOU AND YOUR
CLIENT THE HIGHEST
QUALITY AND MOST
EXPEDITIOUS CONSTRUCTION
OF ANY TYPE BUILDING.






SNEAD

CONSTRUCTION

CORPORATION
P.O. BOX 23068
3230 N.E. 12th AVENUE
FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA



TELEPHONES
FT. LAUDERDALE 566-8325
MIAMI 949-2291
TAMPA 933-2821
ST. PETERSBURG 896-7207





The new approved

CAI90 Ductldess Badtroom Fan

eliminates the need for 0

ductwork and exhaust ans.

Could save you thousands.

The new CA190 Ductless Bathroom Fan
effectively destroys odors, reduces bacteria, sani-
tizes air, prevents mildew. And it doesn't require
ductwork for venting.
No ductwork. That could save you money.
And a lot of it. And allow you more freedom of
design. You don't have to chop up the structure.
Especially in multi-unit construction.
The basis of the unit's operation is a new safe
chemical manufactured by Rush-Hampton Indus-
tries. It's CA 190. A safe citrus derivative.
CA I90 does not simply mask odors. It elimi-
nates them by inhibiting the growth of harmful
odor-causing bacteria. CA 190 does not need to con-
tact a surface in order to kill bacteria. It does the
job by air circulation. The unit contains a CA190
chemical ejector cartridge and
110 V outlet box
Single phase- a quiet electric dispersal fan
60 cycle which can be wired to a re -
SCA90 mote switch.
cartridge The fan pulls air into the
unit and through the ejector
cartridge. Bacteria is destroy-
ed and odor eliminated as the
air passes over the chemical.
Bathroom Fan removes the
danger of fire and smoke be-
ing transmitted through duct-
1/250 HP work. The unit is easy to in-
U.L approved stall. Easy to maintain. It
San motor gives you less design restriction.
i 1 .'- wall only
Swall only And, it could save you
SSide View thousands in construction
costs.

] Rush-Hampton Industries
Longwood Industrial Park, Longwood, Florida 32750
I'd like to know more about the Ductless Bath-
room Fan. And CA 190, the new chemical.
SOl Have a representative call me.
.I O Send me more information.
IName Title
I Company
I Address Zip
UL listed. Phone number
UL listed.





Architectural Education at Miami Dade Junior College


Miami-Dade Junior College has offered programs in Architec-
ture and allied fields since 1963. These programs have been
successful because of the adherence to four basic and realistic
objectives:
(1) Exploration of the imagination
(2) Development of awareness through visual study
(3) Creation of environment conductive to experimentation
with tools and materials
(4) Design solution of problems involving sequential systems
To assist in achieving these objectives, at the South Campus,
Assistant Professor Ching-Ning Lo has developed two basic
devices:
(1) Student Learning Gallery is a display of student work, so
arranged as to create an atmosphere synonymous to that of a
professional environment. Comments and constructive criticism
both original and informal, lead to new insights and innovative
ideas for faculty and students.
(2) The Architectural Design Research Laboratory is utilized
for further advanced research projects, Four projects from this
laboratory are now completed on South Campus. A WEATHER
INSTRUMENT SHELTER, described in other pages, shows an
intriguing experimental project in fulfillment of educational
purpose as well as functional need. The other three projects
named "LOVE, PEACE, AND TRANQUILITY" were colour-
fully constructed to full size mock-up in order to learn the
basic criteria of SCALE, SPACE, AND STRUCTURE. All of
these constructive work done by students were kept by the
College as a part of environmental elements.

THE PRE-PROFESSIONAL

The Junior College curricula include Pre-Professional and Tech-
nical Career Programs.

THE PRE-PROFESSIONAL

The Pre-Professional programs lead to an Associate in Arts de-
gree, and are designed to prepare students for transfer into the
third year of four-or-five-year institutions. The efforts of advi-
sory committees and professional groups have been particularly
helpful in facilitating effective co-ordination with Florida col-
leges and universities.

Four such University Parallel programs are:
(1) Pre-Architecture: satisfies the course requirements of the
first two years at the University of Miami and the Univer-
sity of Florida.


(2) Pre-Building ConstruCtion: designed for the student
primarily interested in the construction and materials
aspects of building. Upon satisfactory completion of this
program, the student will be able to transfer as a junior
to the University of Florida.
(3) Pre-interior Design: meets the course requirements for
the first two years of under-graduate study at the Univer-
sity of Florida. The Interior Design area has developed a
rapport with professionals in the local interior design
field, allowing the student access to additional valuable
resources and materials. At this time, an interior design
apprenticeship program is being created in which the
qualified student will be able to work and study under
the guidance of a professional, while continuing his
education.
(4) Pre-Landscape: students graduating with satisfied require-
ments are transferable to the University of Florida.
THE TECHNICAL PROGRAMS

Technical programs lead to an Associate in Science degree, and
are offered for those who wish to complete a two-year college
program, in preparation for careers requiring specialized study.
These include:
(1) Architecture Technology
(2) Building Construction
(3) Landscape Development Technology
(4) Drafting Technology
(5) Interior Design Technology

The challenge of education in the Junior College is tremendous.
Miami-Dade has a particular responsibility because of its size
and the wide range of programs offered here. In sharing its ex-
perience with other Junior Colleges, Miami-Dade is actively
involved in helping make the Florida educational system one of
the finest available anywhere.


DOREEN STILES


CHING-NING LO


a;I


r"



I





*mmq


m3m
THIS
A-







-|


l10O ISA RESEARCH PAPER PREPARED AS A RESULT OF OUR TEAMWORK IN THE
*IITECTURAL DEBIGN REEARCH LABOI
AUTHOR AND ADVISOR CHINQ-NINO LO
PROJECT DESIGNERS VICHAI BATANONCHAI
MANUEL M. GONZALEZ


I


GRAPHICS ISABEL M. MUROA
RONALD W. WONG
TERRY 0. NICHOSON
HENRY R. DUCASBI
PHOTOGRAPHY HOWARD I. MAYER
TERRY 8. SIEGALL


1^


IN ADDITION TO EVERY MEMBER OF THE DESIGN CLASS


WEATHER INSTRUMENT SHELTER
OPEN SPACE
SlThe serenity of site is located at edge of the lake focusing at
the main entrance where by a 15 mph loop road around before
arriving to student or faculty parking areas.
Surrounding green areas are all sodded in contrast with the
ponciana trees colorful orange flowers- planted in the terrace
where people gather for many of their own activities.
Secluded ramps and walkways created a comfortable radio
of walking distance from Science Bldg to the shelter site
it aleo enhances harmoniously between natural elements.
*The vast undisturbed marsh land crossing highway from cam-
pus provides a natural landscape in comparison to the mas.
made urban campus.

E STUDY NOTES



1 01EnvIRonM


ILu.
000


1-.(j4
FOX
,.(Ae


JUF'
As
EVIE1
HEI
HE


&s AuA


L






t" to reoavE finIsht1 fruot%




S* I

- T151.&as I
1, -^. ; ir lbvb -


HYGROTHERMOGRAPH
MEASURES RELATIVE
HUMIDITY, AIR TEMPERATURE
SIZE:12xllx
WEIGHT: 9 I


WEIGHt Ibs


*TO TRAIN THE NEW GENERATION OF ARCHITECTS 18 NO LONGER POSSIBLE BY LOCKING THEM TO
DREAM THEIR FANTASY IN THE CUBICAL IVORY TOWERS.
STO FACE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THIS CHANGING PROFPMSION I TO CREATE A PULLY FUNCTIONING
PHYSICAL SYSTEM WHICH CONTAINS THE ENVIRONMENTAL BALANCE & EsUILIBRIUM THAT A SYSTEM
DEMAND WHETHER IT IB SMALL OR LARGE CALE. FOR THIS REASON WE SHOULD BE I MUBT IM
IREPONSIBLE TO THE PHYSICAL FORM OF OUR FUTURE ENVIRONMENT AS THE FRAMEWORK POR OUR
ECOLOGY AND ARCHITECTURE.
*THI REWARD OF ACCOMPLISHMENT IS OUR PRIDE WHICH HAS MSEN TESTED FROM LONG ANO PATIENT
EXPERIMENTS; AS WELL AS HARD WORK OF SEARCHING THE EXCELLENCE UNTIL THE PROJECT
WAS COMPLETED.
*STUDY NOTES


Shildren fishing in the
lake where the site
was selected ,,


TRAFFIC FLOW


STHE IONIFICANCIE o
' enPATIO Eur LAND USE
: ELTER USED LAND US
rrTUDENTS TO IN THI PROJECT PROVIOnS
RAT LUNCH. ST a NATURAL IMPLICATION
SICV 6T DP NEW CAMPUS




TE DOOR w
>>I PLACED FACING
V THE BUILDING FOR
EASY ACCESS


ECOLOGICALIMPLEMENTATION


,syiPAI






K r~-~---


tPa
!;!i


f-I--


oC
CL 12
0 0)0
OpO

o d to be

//3d to be t
44Zeeping out the rain
Stthe wind load forces


*
*

*

*o
s
0
0


k
''


'


N I 0 II 0 p6L4 6"1 tMo1LI





TECHNOLOGY OF CONSTRUCTION


THE SOLUTION OF DESIGN AND FINISH PRODUCT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEM 18 ALSO CONTROLLED BY ITS ACCESSORIES AND PARTS, SOMETIMES WILL BECOME A KIND OF
TEMPORAL, FREQUENT CHANGING AND THEY ARE MORE SUBJECTED TO CURRENT DEVELOPMENT. STYLE. AND MOVEMENT


constructu


L.* Z~?


ELEVATIONS
- L9A.E I". I10


SstudentI learning experience practiced in field work .......


~rc













ali
" .a
11

Ii


.B*
a*-
*f (
U
E .


^1^T ~gJr,vA~u


ISOMETRIC


_5


E9


STU


TH







DIAGNOSIS


OF


THE


STRUCTURE




r1AHllQ_


TTl~TA.6 m iLl ~ 4 ~


STUDENTS







dw I
aca
hardware: 1sd a(lV. com. nails, e2d 7


0m6r1 l 1 u. a,.



,,tU- 2. 1. Iasg
Puu*.TU-a r ha ------ "----l-* Ari, *



91 2 V. 1. .17
tel:im3 877*** Hll tIH7 M- ..U'7l 7 f tJ 67
-J .

^ITEM LIST .0 g

70oo 7 on 177u7HT Architecture Md Engineeri7677 7 Afpril 0, I "' w on

i6 ,z B, -* ,o6 .,, ..60



--------------
O 17r2 1 7 10.2 17 *14 14.77


7 -I I M M B-----------------------
----- 1 m>^ ______ -/ / / .


IMVOLVI IN PRACTICAL I*XPHIICI IS T USING
MACHINES, TOOLS & NAMNUS


010
I-


a.


00

tie
E




C

"C


o
o


FLAT MENDINW
IPL&TE


I -7"


710o I N\ 72.flW -
\--------- 0^ ----- --
^______________- lo'___________


mit" I






M NEW
All-steel operable
0 wall system
D It takes steel and mass-and a special
idea to control sound, sight and flames.

E


R

N

F

0

L

D


Acousti-Seal 900 is a family
of operable walls to meet
almost any requirement
in hotels, motels, schools,
restaurants, hospitals,
offices, convention centers...



On display At The Florida A.I.A Convention
Booth 111
Or
Contact Your Local Distributer
Commercial Modernfold of Jacksonville, Inc.
904-743-5222
Commercial Modernfold of Orlando, Inc.
305-834-4723
Don Works Modernfold, Inc., Ft. Lauderdale
305-772-2666


when your

commercial clients

need lots of hot water


RELY ON im
Rheem means hot water and plenty of it. And Interstate
Supply now has two locations stocking the full line
of Rheem GAS Waterheating products in Florida.
And you can rely on
Interstate Supply.
We are specialists in
the Gas commercial
water heating ) -
business. We can
assist you in sales,
engineering, design, .
layout, back-up
service and parts from
our two warehouses in i m,
Miami and Orlando.
Make your commercial lr
water heating team
Interstate Supply
and Rheem!
Hardwick Ranges
Dearborn Space Heaters
SGarland Commercial Cooking
Chiefs Pride Ranges
SCrown Gas Ranges
SRkeem Water Heaters Domestic and Commercial
SDunham-Bush, Inc. Heating and Air Conditioning
SArkla-Servel Gas Air Conditioning, Gas Ughts
and Gas Grills
INTERSTATE
SUPPLY CORPORATION
Headquarters:
P. 0. Box 17715 Orlando, Florida 32810
7215 Rose Avenue Phone: 295-6141 Area 305
South Florida Branch: Sunshine State Industrial Park
16411 N.W. 8th Avenue Miami, Florida 33169
Phone: 305-624-1341 Ils


FA/68








IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT
"Developed in Florida for Florida Conditions"


P200X Safe-T-Rain


GL-67 Pop-Up


Rise-N-Rain 655


GL-71 Pop-Up


T"QUALITY AND PERFORMANCE"

Safe-T-Lawn, Inc. 7800 N.W. 32nd St., Miami, Fla. 33122 (305) 592-0801


FA /69







CABINETRY

BY

MUTSCHLER
An American-Standard Company


Mutschler Kitchen Specialists are Prepared and Qualified to Assist You. From
coast to coast, representatives of the Mutschler factory and Mutschler kitchen
dealers, both thoroughly trained kitchen specialists groups, are prepared to assist
you. Whatever your design problem, they are equipped with complete styling,
product and technical material to help you solve it.


William T. Langohr, C.K.D.
Mutschler Regional Sales Mgr.
Ocean Reef Club
North Key Largo, Florida 33037
Phone 305-247-1294


REMINGTON KITCHEN-TRIEVER"

THE FANTASTIC NEW IDEA

FOR KITCHEN STORAGE.


Puts everything you need
at your Fingertips in seconds!
Remington Kitchen-Triever provides total storage in space previously wasted. For
20 years Remington has been constantly utilizing the concept of automated
storage in business and other environments. A touch of a button brings the desired
item to the operator in an average of 7 seconds.
Convenience plus savings in time, motion and space are advantages and benefits of
Kitchen-Triever now available to the homemaker as well as business.


Home Products Department
Elmer W. Blankmann
Manager

+SPERW RAND
REMINGTON RAND
Systems Division
P.O. Box 171, Marietta, Ohio 45750
Phone 614 / 374-9300


GULF CENTRAL

CORPORATION
P.O. Box 16348
Tampa, Florida 33617
Wholesale Distributers
Phone 813-626-1344
RONSON FOODMATIC
JENN-AIR
IN THE SCOTSMAN ICE CUBE MAKER
SUB-ZERO FREEZER CO., INC.
THERMADOR
WASTE KING UNIVERSAL


FA/70




.5
*' i. r


Advertisers

Building Materials International, Inc.
55
Ray Collins Landscape Architect
10
Commercial Modernfold of Orlando, Inc.
68
Dantzler Lumber & Export Company
54
Dunan Brick Yard, Inc.
73 (THIRD COVER)
Florida Gas-CBS Panel Division
5
Fryd Construction Corporation
56
Gables Offset, Inc.
17
Universal Building Specialties
22
General Portland, Inc.
57
Gulf Central Corporation
70
Hercules, Inc.
15
Interstate Supply Corporation
68
Kurt Waldman Architectural Photographer
6
Lambert Corporation of Florida
71
Lands For You, Inc.
19
Marco Beach Hotel and Villas
6
Mutschler Kitchens
70
Pavlow Office Furniture
74 (BACK COVER)
PPG Industries
52
Remmington Rand, Home Products Division
70
The Richard Plumer Company
10
Rush-Hampton Industries
60
Roof Structures of Florida
2 (SECOND COVER)
Safe-T-Lawn, Inc.
69
The Sherwin-Williams Company
59
Snead Construction Company
59
Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc.
56
Splendid Company
10
Stewart's Air Conditioning
56
Tampa Electric Company
20
Tom's Fiberglass
53
Gem Aluminum Products, Inc.
21
Warth Paint Company
55
Wellco Carpet Corporation
4


H r 'r-.


*1*.s


!.- ,- ..


-. '^ '*- 4<4& "w'/ '.' /
1- I -. C
i It ,
*- .\ k \ t. '"

S a- -
'I -? 4 5,*: \ **ia \. 4
** < k '^ \ ?



. .' a.. ^ -^ :/1
" ;i" e % '. ;
*v i .



* '.'. ,, I. :
^~~ ~ ~ a! W. :<:.:. ^ '*v .,-
r **' ~ /v -'^ i ~"




af'~~'. 4 r ta,., : ~
.s. *?-, *4 "

Z-, 2 -* ^ ^
:. .! -, 1 ': V 'j ` i,
r^i: ..." :I ft -


I.


a 'S



C a"
Ij -

.4 ~t;
'A r *i
qr' I





'p ;


'a'


flji


4.

Slt~ 2
,~ a- y.'


this is






a colorful and textured finish

for all fresh concrete floor surfaces

Developed in Lambert's Florida Laboratories, KEESTONE is a specially formulated
powder, containing properly graded aggregates, in a ready-to-use form. Applied to freshly
poured concrete floor slabs, by dust-on or broadcast method, KEESTONE is floated and
troweled into the surface to simulate the natural keystone. The entire operation is completed
while concrete is in a plastic state. E A KEESTONE finish assures you of a colorful and
textured surface that is slip-proof and glare-proof with uniformity of color over any size
area. The finish is permanently "fused" to become a monolithic part of the concrete floor.
* KEESTONE'S dramatic surface is ideal for concrete patios, swimming pool and deck
areas, showroom floors in fact, for any exterior or interior concrete floor surface where
a decorative, natural stone effect is desired. Resistant to heavy traffic and adverse weather
conditions, KEESTONE is a lasting complement to architectural design and landscape. 0
You will be assured of a durable and distinctive appearance when you specify all concrete
floor surfaces to be finished with KEESTONE. Write for dA1 File Brochure.

LAMBERT CORPORATION of FLORIDA
Plant and offices: 20 N. Coburn Street P.O. Box 2226 Orlando, Florida (305) 841-2940
Manufacturers of: Paints Lacquers Waterproofings Architectural Coatings
Plants in: Orlando, Fla. Little Rock, Ark. Grand Rapids, Mich. High Point, N.C.
Vancouver, Wash. Louisville, Ky.
A subsidiary of Guardsman Chemical Coatings, Inc.


FA/71





all
In



work. H.







AS TSI OWNEIIQUESTED MTr. AS THE AlkUTrECT tr3NED e i.


FA/72


AS THE ENGINEER DESIGNED TT.


AS THE, COONTRAOR B? IT.


AS THE CONTRACtIOR INGMALLED IT.













II BRICK





THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
7100 N. Kendall Drive
Miami, Florida 33156
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Florida


Archiit~czure anl A1l11I 1Ats lbrary
University of Florida
Gainsvll.cj Fla. 10
32601


PVYLiOW


FIN OFFICE IFURNITUR FOR INTER


OFFICE FURNITURE, INC.
2801 S.W. 31st AVENUE
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33133
444-8221