• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 New officers
 Table of Contents
 "Woodsong" Parker residence
 Convention notes
 Convention awards
 News
 Convention resolutions
 Practice profile: Donald Singer,...
 New registration process
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00197
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September-October 1971
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00197
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    New officers
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    "Woodsong" Parker residence
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Convention notes
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Convention awards
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    News
        Page 18
    Convention resolutions
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Practice profile: Donald Singer, AIA
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    New registration process
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Back Cover
        Page 31
        Page 32
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.









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New Officers






The 57th Annual Convention of the FAAIA was a tremendous
Success which was indicative of the total success for the entire
year with respect to all programs.

D The convention was attended by 1,140 persons including
Ww hundreds of architectural students from the Universities of
u Miami and Florida and Miami-Dade Jr. College. It was pleasing
to see the students, the future professional, attend and mingle
Z" with the present architects and the representatives of the pro-
0d
W z duct manufacturers.
SThe convention, as always, ended with new members assuming
LU the leadership of the Association for the coming year. These
u gentlemen are presented to you on this page. They are devoting
u L themselves with effort and time away from their practice for the
LU z entire membership and the betterment of the profession in
< Florida. They alone cannot do the job that is required and lies
u. ahead. They, your elected leadership, need your assistance.
1972 Executive Committee L/R: Hilliard T. Smith Jr., FAIA,
AIA Regional Director; Richard E. Pryor, AIA, President; Frank
R. Mudano, AIA, Treasurer; Thomas H. Daniel, AIA, Vice Presi-
dent; James E. Ferguson Jr., AIA, Secretary; Robert J.
Boerema, AIA, Past President.
-- .m.a at insaa a*ii







THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE
OF ARCHITECTS
FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1972
Richard E. Pryor, AIA, President
1320 Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904) 356-9491
Thomas H. Daniels, AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
425 Oak Avenue
Panama City, Florida 32401
(904) 763-3053
James E. Ferguson, Jr., AIA, Secretary
4221 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
(305) 443-7758
(305) 443-1164
Frank R. Mudano, AIA, Treasurer
1189 N. E. Cleveland Street
Clearwater, Florida 33515
(813) 446-1041
1972 BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ellis W. Bullock
Arnold F. Butt
John W. Dyal
John T. Dye
Rudolph J. Fletcher
Robert G. Graf
Stanley Glasgow
Robert B. Greenbaum
Donald R. Hampton
Oscar A. Handle
A. Reese Harvey
Thurston Hatcher
James B. Holliday
Walter Keller
C. Frasuer Knight
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Howarth L. Lewis, Jr.
James D. McGinley, Jr.
Ted P. Pappas
Wiley M. Parker
Roy L. Ricks
Nils M. Schweizer
Frank D. Shumer
Kenardon M. Spina
Tollyn Twitchell
William R. Upthegrove
Francis R. Walton, FAIA
Robert L. Woodward
DIRECTOR
Florida Region,
American Institute of Architects
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., FAIA
1123 Crestwood Boulevard, Lake Worth


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos
1000 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables
GENERAL COUNSEL
Smith & Moore
P. O. Box 1169
Tallahassee, Florida 32302









PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Ted P. Pappas
Charles E. Pattillo III
Richard J. Veenstra
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty / Assistant Editor
Howard Doehla / Advertising
Kurt Waldmann / Photography


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COVER: COCONUT GROVE RESI-
DENCE OF ARCHITECT ALFRED
BROWNING PARKER, FAIA, IS THE
1971 WINNER OF THE ARCHITECTS
AWARD FROM THE FLORIDA CHAP-
TER, SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FOR-
ESTERS.


CONTENTS
2 NEW OFFICERS
4 "WOODSONG"PARKER RESIDENCE
9 CONVENTION NOTES
11 CONVENTION AWARDS
18 NEWS
18 ADVERTISERS
19 CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS
21 PRACTICE PROFILE: DONALD
SINGER,AIA
27 NEW REGISTRATION PROCESS
Arnold F. Butt, AIA


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal
of the Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Florida Corpora-
tion not for profit. It is published bi-monthly at
the Executive Office of the Association 1000
Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Florida
33134; Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305).
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AIA. Editorial material may
be reprinted provided full credit is given to the
author and to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
and copy is sent to publisher's office. Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at Miami,
Florida. Single copies, 75 cents, subscription,
$6.50 per year. 1971 Member Roster available
at $10.00 per copy. 1971 Directory of Archi-
tectural Building Products & Services available
at $1.50 per copy.


FA/3







Woodsong


A small 135' square site was planted with many fine palms from
all over the world. Over a period of years this palmetum was
carefully tended and it flourished. Several surveys located and
verified the position of each palm. On the only existing open
areas three small (20' square) buildings were erected: one for
living room and study; another for eating; and the third for
sleeping. To meet the space requirements of the family, two
buildings have mezzanines and the sleeping building has a total
of four levels.

Except for three base slabs of concrete the exterior walls,
interior walls, floors, stairs, terraces, decks and roofs are
completely constructed of wood. Plastic-coated plywood sheets
(Plyform) were used to form the three principal slabs. This
plywood was re-used to form the outside of the moat while
gunite concrete was sprayed. The plywood was ultimately used
a third time in the buildings as wall sheathing.

The concrete slabs are elevated a number of feet on block
columns to provide a base upon which to build the three
wooden buildings. Not only does this permit the wood to drain
properly but it also puts the interiors well above the debris and
insects of the jungle floor.

Exterior walls are 2" x 6" studs with three layers of wood
applied (exterior siding, exterior plywood sheathing and interior
paneling). These walls are further insulated with foil-faced fiber-
glass batts. The result has produced spaces that are easily cooled
or heated and that retain the desired temperatures.

All exterior walls are covered with a vertical siding. This wood
was milled with a deep rib from 6/4 stock in 3", 6" and 8"
widths. When milling some of the wide material one rib and two
ribs were dropped from the pattern to create variety. Placement


was random and allowed working to the openings and to the
corners. The design of the siding is intended to minimize
wasping and splitting and all boards were backed with grooves.
Aesthetically important were the considerations of the scale of
the siding for the small buildings and a harmonious relationship
with the palm fronds and their shadows on the walls.

Exterior corners are formed with a large quarter round to make
an easy transition with the siding and to relate better to the
trunks of the palms. Exterior vertical siding was fastened
through pre-drilled holes with stainless steel ring shank (annul-
lar) nails. The interior paneling was milled from 3/4" material in
random widths with a modified type of V-joint and blind nailed.

The floors and roof decking throughout are composed of 5" x
6" members, stress 2640 E 1.8 Douglas Fir/Larch face decora-
tive with striated pattern. The 5" nominal decking (3-13/16"
actual) was used to its design limit (spans up to but not ex-
ceeding 20') throughout the buildings and for the roof over the
pool. All other exposed material is Honduras mahongany.

The principal reason for selecting wood was simple the Owner
likes the material. It is warm to the touch, satisfying to the
sight, in harmony with the environment, suitable for the forms
required and durable for the tropical conditions. Wood is
pleasant to work and rewarding in use.

It is difficult to visualize how this home could be built in any-
thing other than wood. In the mini-jungle the home relates
directly to the environment. The construction is almost a tree in
one sense because it absorbs excess humidity during rainy
periods and gives up moisture in dry seasons. The vertical
hanging of the wood, the design of the siding, and its finish
facilitates this free flow.


COCONUT GROVE RESIDENCE OF ARCHITECT ALFRED BROWNING
PARKER, FAIA, IS THE 1971 WINNER OF THE ARCHITECTS AWARD
FROM THE FLORIDA CHAPTER, SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FOR-
ESTERS.








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Structural Strength-SOLITE lightweight aggregates and spe-
cially formulated mixes develop compressive strengths that are
considerably in excess of ASTM C-90 and C-145. Engineered
high strength masonry units in various strengths are suited
for load-bearing projects, including multi-story buildings.
Economical-Because its aggregates are expanded at 2300 F.
by a special rotary kiln process, SOLITE lightweight masonry
units weigh 1/1 to 1/ less than units with ordinary aggregates.
Lighter weight means savings in construction time, as well
as dead load.


High Rise Equals Fast Rise-With SOLITE masonry units,
high rise construction proceeds rapidly. Essentially it is a
series of one-story buildings in layers. When masons com-
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This speed means earlier occupancy and a quicker return on
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More Benefits-Test data prove the advantages of SOLITE
lightweight masonry units in fire resistance, high insulation
values, low sound transmission. Ask your SOLITE represent-
ative, or write for descriptive folders with full details.


Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
S.C.L. Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202











Woodsong


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Paolo Soleri


Set with the theme "The New Architect" the 1971 FAAIA convention pointed a
way to new and exciting vistas of practice for the architect. The personalities were
Sf diverse and interest of attendance varied in response to the futures represented by
each.


CneConvention Notes
Striding through life in the calm manner of the great visionary he is was Paola Soleri.
Soleri Playing to an overflow audience was a dazzling display of slides illustrating first pro-
jects of construction in earth forming under way at Soleri's school in Arizona and
ending with striking views of models of his visionary cities. The models were made
as to seem almost real and the thought processes so logical as to make one wonder
why these cities do not yet exist, or why they aren't being built. Perhaps because
man is not yet ready for them, but these visions can serve as a guide through the
evolution of social, economic and political processes necessary for their realization.
Bringing the architects focus to another scope of practice, visionary in its own
manner, was the Regional Development Program.
W i iam s In relation to what American society needs in order to survive, is the architect
W il iam s more a part of the problem then a part of the solution? Change is all about us
today and regional development represents one rearrangement in societies way of
oerceiving problems and solutions. This architect asked where we stand in the
midst of this change. Do we perceive what changes are taking place in societal in-
stitutions and can we, or do we want to, interpret the visual consequences of these
changes? Can the architect have a major role in the creation of the future?
G inn Regional planning is not new but has existed in various forms since the early
inn settlement of America. A brief history of regional planning was traced in a
slide presentation by the speaker up to the present day as we face the question
of how one plans in a multi-faceted democracy where planning is achieved by
laws, public and private financial practices, and politics. The answers will lie again,
partly, in what role the "New Architect" assumes in a changing society.
Velm In Houston, Texas an ecological planner is part of a developer team utilizing
Ve t n land analysis systems as developed by lan McHarg in planning a "New Town"
development on 20,000 acres of raw wooded property, the process and a result-
ing plan complete with new proposals of land preservation and sewerage treat-
ment were presented via slides. Land uses as suggested by ecological factors
were some times compromised by economic factors but nonetheless the fact
that the process is being employed by a developer offers exciting potential.
SSch eFinally, bringing regional planning home to Florida, Architect Schweizer and
C w z r team leaders outlined work done at the Oklahawa Charrette held last July at
Silver Springs and reported in F/A for July/August.

Fee Tying up the package, Institute First Vice President Ferebee spoke of the cross-
Fere e roads choice facing the architect today: Assume a role of leadership in society
while remaining as captain of the design team or accept the role of technician
while others lead. Crucial in bidding for a role of leadership he lists these fac-
tors: Architects must present a united front with practitioners in all walks of
practice working in common support; Architects must establish credibility,
speaking only to those subjects in which they have knowledge, training and
expertise; finally architects must avoid self serving activities. Their willingness
to step in and tackle problems of present and future will determine their position
of leader or technician.
S. Scott Ferebee, Jr., FAIA
First Vice President, AIA



























CATCHER PEOPLE IN FINISHING SCHOOL?
THAT'S RIGHT CONSTANT RE-SCHOOLING OF ALL PERSONNEL IS ONE OF THE FACTORS THAT GIVES FATHER PEOPLE
AN EDGE ... IN ALL PHASES OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR FINISHING. IN THE BUILDING INDUSTRY NEW TECHNIQUES
ARE DEVELOPED. NEW PRODUCTS ARE TO BE UNDERSTOOD AND USED. NEW PROCEDURES ARE PROVEN. AND GATHER
IS CONCERNED ENOUGH TO INVOLVE ALL FATHER PEOPLE IN A CONSTANT UPDATE OF KNOWLEDGE. ALL PERSONNEL,
FROM FOREMEN UP, ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONTINUE IN ADVANCED EDUCATION. IN COURSES RELATED TO CON-
STRUCTION, MANUFACTURING AND SUPERVISION. FATHER PEOPLE ARE BETTER TRAINED, FATHER TRAINED, TO DO A
BETTER JOB OF FINISHING. INSIDE AND OUT. WE MANUFACTURE AND INSTALL STEEL STUDS. WE INSTALL DRYWALL.
DESIGN, ENGINEER AND INSTALL SOUND RESIST SYSTEMS WHERE NECESSARY. WE EVEN STUCCO, PLASTER AND
PAINT AND ADD HARDWARE. FATHER DOES IT ALL BECAUSE CATCHER TRAINING IS CURRENT. NEXT PROJECT THAT
NEEDS FINISHING CALL FATHER, YOU'LL LEARN IT PAYS


CATCHER
INDUSTRIES
EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 145 SO. MAGNOLIA AVENUE, SUITE 435 ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32801
Catcher Industries. Ilcj. / Fernt Park 305l B31-230.0 / Ft. L.aidcrdai. i:W5ol :8-240 I St Potersburc (813) 522-?102 / Sarasotl 18131 959-3493
j a W Plastlfng Co / Orlandu (305) 831-7575 ; & L Pall Co i FT Linocllal 1305) 584-2452 a Florida Roiling M.ils 2 Supply Co. / Miam (305) 377- 722


:- *- T ,-- -- 'r I





The 1972 President of FAAIA Richard
E. Pryor of Jacksonville receives the Gavel
from outgoing President Robert J.
Boerema of Miami during the festivities
of the Annual Banquet.


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Robert H. Levison, FAIA of Clearwater
receives from newly elected President
Richard Pryor the Association's highest
Award the "Gold Medal". Levison is the
fifth member in 57th years of the Associ-
ation to receive this Award for his dis-
tinquished leadership and service to the
State Association over a period of many
years


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Convention Award


President Boerema presents to "Hap"
Lewis, AIA of Palm Beach the 1971
Anthony L. Pullara Memorial State
Member Award for his service to the
profession during the year.


FA/11


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kWhat's so

S- new about

"systems"

Constructionn!


- V -A N ON,
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The aura of mystery which some people have
recently attached to the word "systems" is
often misleading. It means nothing more
than prefabrication. The Florida concrete
industry has long been a pioneer and a leader
in this field.
The new Vanguard High School in Ocala is
a good example of the "systems" method
which has been used for years by Florida's
prestressed and precast concrete industries.
In this school building, prestressed concrete
served multiple purposes. It reduced time of


Vanguard High School, Ocala. Architect -
Berry J. C. Walker, Ocala; general
contractor Drake Construction Company,
Ocala; prestressed concrete supplier -
Dura-Stress, Inc., Leesburg; concrete
masonry units Cummer, Inc., Kendrick.

construction, permitted space saving design,
cut the cost of air conditioning and provided
added fire and public shelter protection. Lo-
cal technique, knowledge and products were
utilized to the fullest. All at the low cost of
only $13.56 a square foot.
The use of prestressed, precast, prefabri-
cated concrete components provides fast,
simplified construction. No other method or
material can equal concrete for low insurance
premiums, low maintenance costs, durability
and flexibility of design.


FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
Division of
General Portland Cement Company
PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI


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SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA
CEMENTS, MANUFACTURED IN
FLORIDA FOR OVER 40 YEARS




Roy Simon, AIA of Delray Beach re-
ceives the Architect Community Service
Award from President Boerema. Simon
was cited for his active leadership in
community activity and service.


W. J. Bowen, President of the Florida
Gas Company, Winter Park, is presented
the 1971 "Award of Merit" by President
Boerema. Bowen was selected for this
award for his interest, activity and concern
with the profession of architecture which
has advanced the cause of good planning
and design.

Convention Awards


____


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The Architects Award from the Florida
Chapter, Society of American Foresters
is presented to Alfred Browning Parker,
FAIA by H.S. Friensehner for the out-
standing design and use of wood for the
"Woodsong" residence.


Receiving the 1971 Anthony L. Pullara
Memorial State Chapter Award from
President Boerema is Thurston Hatcher,
AIA President of Florida South Chapter
and Stanley Glasgow, Past President of
the Chapter.


FA/13


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1905 Northwest 115th Street. Miami, Florida 33167 Tel. (305) 685-2898









The 8th Annual Craftsman of the Year
Award is received by Herman Maleika
from President Boerema. Maleika was
cited for outstanding execution of lime-
stone masonry performed on the Cum-
mings Memorial Chapel Addition, St.
Johns Cathedral in Jacksonville. The
Jacksonville Chapter nominated Maleika
and the architectural design was per-
formed by the firm Kemp, Bunch &
Jackson.

Convention


Awards
On behalf of the Mosaic Tile Co. and
Interpace Corporation, Allen Kern re-
ceives from President Boerema the Build-
ing Product Exhibitor Award for Educa-
tional Value.


President Boerema presenting to John
Custer of Roof Structures of Florida, Inc.
the Annual Award to the Building Product
Exhibitor for Display Excellence.


FA/15

























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"Comfortable.

"We are very proud of our new Port of Miami Passenger Terminal,"
says Port Director Admiral Irvin J. Stephens (Ret.).
Located on Miami's Dodge Island, this ultra-modern seaport serves nine
luxury cruise ships (almost twice the number ever based in Miami at one
time). The facility-described by many as "the most beautiful port in the
world" is a bold concept in architectural design. As well as offering greater
freedom in the design, electricity plays a major part in the terminal's
operation.
Says Adm. Stephens: "This unique building is well lighted. And the all-
electric air conditioning in the waiting rooms provides a comfortable envi-
ronment for the passengers, regardless of outside temperatures."
Electricity is the electricity can be substi-
cleanest type of energy tuted for other energies,
known. Its use produces the cleaner our environ-
no pollution so the more ment will be.











Florida's
o Electric
Companies
Florida Power & Light Company / Ta pa E electric Company / Florida Powne
Florida Power & Light Company I Tampa Electric Company I Florida Power Corporation I Gulf Power Company





Urbahn and Slayton To Attend
Florida Grassroots Conference

The President of the American Institute
of Architects, Max O. Urbahn, FAIA and
William L. Slayton, Executive Vice Presi-
dent will be in Tampa, Florida on Decem-
ber 10, at the Hawaiian Village for the
Annual FAAIA "Florida Grassroots"
conference.

The purpose of this annual conference is
to have the AIA leadership present and
explain the upcoming national AIA pro-
grams. The conference allows the local
AIA Chapter leaders to become acquaint-
ed with the national programs and to
have the opportunity to ask specific
questions.

The "Grassroots" meeting is attended by
the 12 Florida Chapter Presidents and
their officers, the leaders of the State
Association and other Board of Directors.
Interested members may also attend as
the conference is open.


Cather Industries 10
Dantzler Lumber & Export Co. 28
Dunan Brick Yards, Inc. (Third Cover) 31
Florida Gas-CBS Panel Division 20
Florida Investor Owned Electric Utilities 16-17
Florida Portland Cement Division 12
Georgian Art Lighting Designs Inc. 14
Sollte Corporation 8
United States Steel Corp./Homes Division 26
w. R. Grace & Co. Construction
Products Division 30
Kurt Waldmann, Architectural Photographer 14

Advertisers













News


An Introduction To A Program In Our Man-Made Environment
The FAAIA Committee on Environmental
Education will conduct an Environmental Educa-
tion seminar for the AIA Florida Chapters on
December 11, at the Hawaiian Village in Tampa.
This first, broadbase seminar, is also open to
school administrators.


The Committee during the coming year plans to
encourage environmental education in Florida
public schools by following a four part strategy,
namely:

a. self-education
b. opening communication with educators
c. assisting in the establishment of specific
programs
d. continuing support.

During August-October 1972 five regional work-
shops will be held throughout the state at which
school systems will receive a one or two day
initiation in the concept of environmental educa-
tion.
What is this program Our Man-Made Environment all
about? or, to take the easier path what isn't it?

It isn't a technical complexity
It isn't a book or a curricula
It isn't a clearly established body of material
It isn't a Science program or Social Studies program or
Art or English or Math program
It isn't a lower school, middle school or high school
program
It isn't an expensive program or a controversial program
It isn't an open classroom, traditional classroom, labora-
tory school or free school


What is it then?

A program built upon the teachers' and students' own
living experiences in their own environment their home,
school, neighborhood and city.
A program concentrating on the built environment the
man-made world in which we all spend most of our lives.
A program aimed at long-range goals for developing a
society equipped and interested in having some control
over the world they live in.
A program which can unite different subjects or serve one
at a time.
A program which begins at any age and goes on through-
out one's life.
A program which demonstrates the creative skills of a
teacher in any classroom, in any school, within any educa-
tional philosophy.
It is above anything else a new perspective into the
familiar, a new attitude about man and his world the
why, the how, and the who for.
It is about one component of our total environment the
man-made physical environment which offers a relevant
lead into the other aspects of our surroundings the
economic, social, psychological, natural, etc.
There are no pretensions about it's relative importance -
only a belief in its immediacy arid thus its potential as a
learning experience....


FA/18





WHEREAS it is increasingly apparent that it is necessary
for government to husband its resources care-
fully and skillfully using the most sophisticated
of management techniques; and,

WHEREAS the State of Florida is without legislation
authorizing the long range planning and devel-
opment of the capital requirements for essen-
tial state programs; and,

WHEREAS for the consecutive legislative sessions the
need for legislation authorizing capital outlay
according to long term needs determined by
advanced project analysis and the best of busi-
ness management methods was very apparent;
now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED that the Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects proposes that legisla-
tion be prepared by the appropriate legislative
service agency and supports the enactment of
such legislation in the next session of the
Legislature.



Convention Resolutions





SWHEREAS the balance of the State's ecological systems
are threatened by the density and quality of
constructed environment; and,


WHEREAS the Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects believes that the pro-
tection of the ecological balance is the basis of
l l l life itself and must become a first priority of
M E public policy; now, therefore, be it

WHEREAS the State of Florida has commissioned com- RESOLVED that the Florida Association of the American
petent architects to design the new capitol Institute of Architects encourages and sup-
center by using an unbiased process that ports the implementation by the State Gov-
assured selection of the best available pro- ernment of a major State Land-Use Plan
fessional talent; and, having the force of law and a part of a nation-
al land-use policy; and, further be it resolved
WHEREAS criticism of the work of the commissioned that the Florida Association of the American
firms is being publicized by persons using Institute of Architects pledges its voluntary
methods of questionable validity; and, professional guidance to the drafting of para-
meters for such a plan and provide leadership
WHEREAS the criticism has diverted the talented and to activating multi-disciplinary teams for
competent effort of the commissioned firms those public and private agencies who are
to a speedy and professional resolution of a equally concerned as the association in this
complex program; now, therefore, be it effort.


RESOLVED that the Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects communicate to the
Capitol Center Planning Committee (charged
to work with the State's commissioned archi-
tects as the State's representatives) that the
Florida Association of the American Institute
of Architects deplores the character and
methods of current criticism of the proposed
design for the Capitol Center; and urges the
continuation of the planning according to the
previously approved designs without further
delay.


FA/19





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FA/21





















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Last July at the national convention of the National Council
of Architectural Registration Boards in San Francisco, the
membership approved a new system of registration procedures
which seem certain to have significant effects on those who will
enter the architectural profession. Changes in examination
procedures have caught most of the attention in the proposed
new registration system. This is understandable since the
examination procedure is locked in the minds of many regis-
tered architects as the last door that had to be opened to enter
the profession. It was an ordeal, an endurance contest, for most
which they remember well. However, the changes in the total
process of registration have wider implications which may be
evident from this description of the meeting in San Francisco.
Although sixteen resolutions were brought to the floor of the
convention, interest centered on Resolution No. 6 which reads
as follows:
RESOLUTION NO. 6

Whereas, the purpose of registration is health, safety of
public welfare, and

Whereas, public welfare demands a workable and satis-
factorily built environment, and

Whereas, competent architects are needed to meet this
goal, and

Whereas, registration is a professional competence identi-
fying process, and

Whereas, this process measures educational, training and
examination evidence, and

Whereas, this evidence must be related to the wisdom and
knowledge of the time,

Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved, that the recom-
mendations of the Examination Development Committee
for revising the registration process, as detailed below, be
accepted:
1.PURPOSE

To phase out the present 36 hour, 7 part
Examination for Architectural License
Candidates. To implement, as soon as practicable,
the new Professional Examination for candidates
holding NAAB Accredited Professional
Architectural Degrees and a Qualifying
Examination for candidates without NAAP
Accredited Degrees and/or with combinations of
education and experience in accordance with
NCARB equivalencies.
2. PREREQUISITES FOR NEW PROFESSIONAL
EXAMINATIONS

A professional Architectural degree from a school
accredited by the National Architectural
Accrediting Board to be required for entrance to
the new Professional Examination beginning in
June, 1973 or a passing grade in the Qualifying
Examination to be first offered in December,
1972.

For the holders of a Masters Degree in
Architecture, one year's acceptable experience in
the field to be required.

For the holders of a Bachelor of Architectural
Degree, the first professional degree, two (2) years
acceptable experience in the field to be required.


End of an Ordeal!

A New Registration Process
Arnold F. Butt, AIA
Chairman, Department of Architecture
University of Florida


The fifth "whereas" in the resolution pinpoints the process
of registration as measuring "educational, training, and examina-
tion evidence". To different degrees, each of the above elements
in the present process of registration was affected by the resolu-
tion. The most sweeping change will be made in examination
procedures. The development of the new examination has been
a subject of great interest to architectural faculty, students, and
recent graduates, not to mention some 4,000 persons around
the U.S. involved in taking the present examination. The
approved proposal reflects some of the criticisms and concern
which came out of regional meetings over the past year. The
tremendous effort put into the regional meetings was no doubt
responsible for the delegates being well informed and prepared
to act at the convention.

Educational Requirements

Support for the idea of requiring a professional education for
a professional registration is strong. There is, however, good
reason to consider that the educational path of a desirable
candidate may not necessarily be through an NAAB accredited
school. Therefore, the Qualifying (or Equivalency) Examination
will be used to measure the level of education of those without
the professional degree from NAAB accredited schools.

Some concern has been expressed about the possibilities for
registration of a person without formal education but with
extensive experience. The Qualifying Exam could be used to
measure the capabilities of these persons as well, if the board
members so desired. In a survey of examinees taken in 1969,
however, it was found that 40% had degrees from non-
accredited schools, and between 50% and 60% had accredited
degrees. The unknown factor including those with partial or no
formal education could not be more than 10%.

Training Requirements

The new system of registration procedures includes changes
in the length of time spent in training or internship after gradua-
tion. For graduates of accredited schools with the Masters
Degree in Architecture, the requirement would be one year. For
graduates of accredited schools with the Bachelor of Archi-
tecture Degree, the requirement would be two years. In either
case, the professional degree would permit the graduate to take
the Professional Exam.
CONTINUED


FA/27





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For others including those with non-professional degrees or
nonaccredited degrees, a total of eight years of combined educa-
tion and internship would be required prior to taking the
Qualifying Exam. On successful completion of that exam, the
candidate could then take the Professional Exam. The NCARB
proposal would also permit those with no education or partial
education to take the Qualifying Exam after eight years combined
training and education and to follow this with the Professional
Exam. Such procedure would require a change of the Rules of
the Florida State Board of Architecture which are presently
designed to rule out the non-degree persons unless they declared
their desire to take this route prior to July 1, 1970.

Amendments to Resolution No. 6 were presented by the
Western and New England Regions which would have required
three years experience before taking the Professional Examina-
tion. (Present requirements in these regions is three years).
Although the amendments were defeated, several points from
the debate are worth noting. First, there is some concern among
board members of some of the states about the educational
programs in their areas. The feeling seemed to be that while the
graduates might be better prepared for the future in the pro-
fession, they were not sufficiently prepared to meet the
problems of today. Strengthening the National Architectural
Accrediting Board toward setting a minimum set of school
standards was felt to be desirable. And, finally, it was agreed
that the office experience which graduates receive should be
made more meaningful.

In summary, the education and training requirements would


Education
Graduates with Masters
Degree in Architecture
(accredited school)

Graduates with Bachelor
of Architecture
(accredited school)

Others -
a. no or partial education
b. non-professional degrees
c. non-accredited degrees


Internship Exam
Professional
One year Exam


Professional
Two years Exam


Eight years
total educa-
tion and
internship


Qualifying
Exam and Pro-
fessional Exam


New Examinations

The qualifying (Equivalency) Examination will be a modifi-
cation of the present exam. A comparison of the two is
probably the best way to explain the new exam.

PRESENT EXAM


Type of Exam
Building Equipment
Building Construction
Structures

Professional Administration


No.
Hours Questions
4 150
3 150
5 150
(135+15)
3 150


History/Theory
Planning
Design
Site Planning


Registration Process, Continued







QUALIFYING (EQUIVALENCY) EXAM
No.
Type of Exam Hours Questions
Construction 3 100
Theory 100
and 4 120
Practive 1 50


Architectural
Theory

Design/
Site Planning


TIME REQUIRED: TWO DAYS

For candidates who have passed a part of the present exam the
following is an explanation of how credit will be given for work
already passed:

To get credit for passing Construction Theory and Prac-
tice, the candidate would have had to pass Structures and
any two of the remaining three areas covered in the pre-
sent exam. If he has completed all other parts of the
examination, he would have satisfied the examination
requirements for registration.

To get credit for Architectural Theory and Design, a
candidate must have passed Design, History, Theory, and
Planning (but not Site Planning). If he has passed all other
parts of the present exam, he would have satisfied the
requirements for registration. If he has passed History,
Theory, and Site Planning, but not Design, he would have
to complete the Design section. If he has passed Design,
he would get credit for Design only, and if he had History,
Theory and Planning to take, he would take the Architec-
tural Theory section of the Qualifying Exam.

It would be possible for candidates to proceed to the
Professional Exam if they have partially completed the
present exam or to complete those minor parts of the
present examination to satisfy the requirements for
registration.

Professional Examination

The work done to date by the Education Testing Service
toward the design of the new Professional Examination was
presented to the Convention on slides with commentary. The
presentation was convincing but I'm certain its credibility can-
not be communicated without seeing the whole show. I will,
therefore, attempt to describe only the process of the new
Professional Exam with excerpts from the text of the Com-
mentary.

The Professional Exam is described as a test of knowledge
and judgement based upon the concept that an architect must
help build an improved environment. He must be an individual
who has the knowledge and judgement to move from where we
are to where we want to be in our environmental world.


TIME REQUIRED: FOUR DAYS


CONTINUED


FA/29






Registration Process, Continued
Secondly, the Professional Examination should coordinate the
prerequisites of the candidate's education and the examination
to insure that a level of competence exists. That is, it is not
necessary to re-examine a candidate for those aspects which he
should have covered in a professional school.
The Exam would cover four basic areas:


Environmental
Programming
Design/Technology
Construction


The first section of the exam would contain questions in four
areas of the Environmental Content: Public and Private Goals,
Environmental Facts, Implementation Capabilities, and Planning
Action.
In Programming, five areas cover question information: The
establishment for goals for the problem; the identification and
understanding of acts; the development of programmatic
concepts; the identification of needs; and the statement of the
problem.
In Design and Technology, the third section, there are the
following areas: Physical Relationships affinities and relation-
ships of spaces, buildings, and streets that develop among the
various design aspects of the problem; Design Alternatives the
identification of the most acceptable scheme; Development of
the scheme into a solution; and the application to the solution
of systems and materials which are appropriate.


In Construction, the need is to identify or evaluate the
candidates knowledge of contractual relationships, construction
techniques, quality control, cost control and time factors of
architectural practice.
Each candidate will be supplied with resource material
covering the above four areas which would furnish all the
necessary information about a given design project. On the basis
of information supplied, he would make decisions in response to
questions, choosing one of four possible answers to each
question. The test will probably take only one day, at the most
two, and will be completely machine graded.

The above report makes dry reading but it is factual. The
most interested persons will no doubt be those who are
presently taking the exam and recent graduates. If the report
does not answer all the questions such people have, I will be
glad to try to answer them by mail or phone if they will contact
me.

With changes in educational curricula and changes in the
examination process underway, it seems appropriate to get to
work on a more meaningful internship program. As a beginning,
the Southern Conference of NCARB will meet at the Depart-
ment of Architecture, University of Florida to see if some
progress can be made this year toward such a program.
Representatives of state registration boards and architectural
schools from ten states, from Texas to North Carolina, will
attend. The two-day meeting on November 11 and 12 will be
organized as a workshop with an action program as it's goal.
There is no good reason why we could not have some sound
recommendations for the next NCARB convention if this
program is a success. N


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FA/30












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1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
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Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


University of Florida Libraries
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Outdoor signs and billboards that are so grotesque, so poorly placed or spaced -so many miles
of ugly. We've learned to live with it. even laugh about it. Until, one day. it's our oak tree they're chop-
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