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 Front Cover
 President's message
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00194
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: March-April 1971
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00194
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    President's message
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
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        Page 15
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        Page 21
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        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
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        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
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        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Back Cover
        Page 41
        Page 42
Full Text


















Illllr









President's Message


We feel that these visits have been very beneficial, and we have
leanred a lot about how we can better assist each other. There
has been general acceptance and support of the legislation the
FAAIA is sponsoring this year ... the Advanced Project Analysis
Bill, which, incidentally, will be introduced by Representative
Vernon Holloway in the House and by Senator Robert Graham
in the Senate. We feel that this bill has a good chance for
passage in this session. We have also found in-our visits with the
chapters that there is enthusiastic concern about architectural
education in our State and we are suggesting that this concern
be channeled into our Guild organizations and fully expressed
and discussed there. Our chapter visits have also discussed the
several other activities to which we have given top priority this
year ... the insurance study of our Professional Practice
commission, the Professional Development Program being
handled by our Commission on Environment and Professional
Practice, the Public Relations program, as well as the efforts of
our standing Committees on Publications, Budget and Finance,
and the Small Office Task Force.

Fees also have been a specific topic which has been discussed at
some of our visits with chapters. As most of you know, the
FAAIA is now preparing a new fee schedule for you. This has
been in the works for several months and Jim Ferguson, AIA is
Chairman of the Committee now putting the final touches on
this study. Research has included an evaluation of fee schedules
currently in use throughout the country by architects and
engineers. We have been working closely with the Florida
Engineering Society and Consulting Engineers Council in
developing the new recommended fees. We also have recognized
that although percentage fees are used in some work and often
constitute a valuable guide in budgeting, there is a preference
for specific dollar fees (lump sum, or a fee based on volume,
etc.). We also realize that several clients and architects prefer a
fee which is based on an hourly rate in the programming stages
of the project, with the stipulation that a specific fee be applied
when the client's needs have been established.


ROBERT J. BOEREMA, AIA

One of the items we promised ourselves this year was improved
communications. The members of the Florida Association of
the American Institute of Architects agreed that an essential
step in accomplishing this was for the leadership of the
Association to visit with the chapters ... to learn how we at
State level can be more responsive to the needs of the chapter,
to identify the areas where the Association could be of specific
help, and to also advise the chapters of the Florida Association
programs currently underway. This visitation program will be
complete in a few weeks. Those who have joined me in these
visits to the chapters have been your Vice President/President-
Elect Dick Pryor, AIA, your Regional Director Hilliard T. smith,
FAIA, and your Executive Director, Fotis Karousatos. Your
Secretary, Jack Stefany AIA, and your Treasurer, Jack West
AIA have joined us in some visits also.


Recognizing this, the Committee envisions a fee schedule which
will have descriptive data regarding the architect's services and
the various stages of his performance clearly written, with
graphs or tables indicating fee structure for specific building
types on separate sheets to be used as inserts in the schedule
brochure.

We think this will accomplish what you have said you and your
clients need as a recommended fee schedule, and we hope to
have it ready soon. The Committee is planning to present its
final drafts to our Board of Directors meeting on June 4, in
Orlando.

In a few of our chapter visits and at the Professional
Development Program on March 27, some architect have
expressed concern about fee cutting (which has been and always
will be with us, in my opinion). The concern is real ... and
exhibits a frustration which we have all experienced. We hope
that with the "tool" which we are now developing, the new
recommended fee schedule, you will be able to clearly point out
to your prospective client that the issue is service. We feel that
the schedule of fees indicated will be recommended minimums
for a full and complete architectural service. With that "tool",
you ... the architect, will have to convince your client that you
are able to do the job and once you have convinced him, you
must actually perform. Not all of you can do this effectively ...
and each of us has the full realization that there is always a
registered architect available to do the job for less than the
recommended fee schedule. So the challenge is back in our lap
to be able to convince the client that the architectural fee is the
most important of the investments in his development project,
and then prove it in your performance on every project you do.
It takes self discipline ... it takes design sensitivity ... it takes
continual improvement ... and we all have to work at it. N





THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION
OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE'
OF ARCHITECTS
FAAIA OFFICERS FOR 1971
Robert J. Boerema, AIA, President
550 Brickell Avenue
Miami, Florida 33131
(305) 371-9781
Richard E. Pryor, AIA, Vice President/
President Designate
1320 Coast Line Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32202
(904) 356-9491
John Edgar Stefany, AIA, Secretary
Exchange National Bank Bldg., Suite 1020
610 No. Florida Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33602
(813) 229-6115
Jack West, AIA, Treasurer
P.O. Box 1539
Sarasota, Florida 33578
(813) 955-2341

1971 BOARD OF DIRECTORS E
Rudolph M. Arsenicos
Carl N. Atkinson, Jr.
Josh C. Bennett, Jr.
Thomas H. Daniels
John Wesley Dyal
Lyle P. Fugleberg
Stanley Glasgow
Robert G. Graf
Leonard A. Griffin
Martin G. Gundersen
Donald R. Hampton
Oscar A. Handle, Jr.
Walter S. Klements
C. Frasuer Knight
David A. Leete a
Robert H. Levison, FAIA
Ronald Joseph Masters
Richard E. Mauney __
James D. McGinley, Jr.
Frank Robert Mudano
James C. Padgett
Wiley Moore Parker
Roy L. Ricks
Craig Homer Salley
Frank D. Shumer'
Charles E. Toth C
William R. Upthegrove
Francis R. Walton

DIRECTOR C
Florida Region,
American Institute of Architects
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr., FAIA
1123 Crestwood Boulevard, Lake Worth

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos
1000 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Coral Gables J

GENERAL COUNSEL (
L. Grant Peeples
Peeples, Smith & Moore
P.O. Box 1169 4J
Tallahassee, Florida 32302 -





CU






PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE Q
Ted P. Pappas
Charles E. Pattillo III | |
Richard J. Veenstra
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT (1
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty / Assistant Editor
Howard Doehla / Advertising L
Kurt Waldmann / Photography


COVER: THE ARCHITECTS LOGO IN-
TRODUCTION TO A NEW PRACTICE PRO-
FILE SERIES. LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP TO
BOTTOM: ROBERT GRUNDMAN, ST.
PETERSBURG; LEE SCARFONE, TAMPA;
ISAAC SKLAR MIAMI BEACH; PEACOCK &
LEWIS, PALM BEACH; JEROME FILER,
CORAL GABLES; DONALD RITCHIE, FT.
LAUDERDALE; HUGH LEITCH, PENSA-
COLA; YAROS ASSOCIATES, MIAMI;
RANON, McINTOSH, BERNARDO AND
RADOS, TAMPA; WILLIS & VEENSTRA,
JACKSONVILLE; RUSSELL MINARDI,
TAMPA; WRAY SUCCOP, CORAL GABLES;
REYNOLDS SMITH AND HILLS JACKSON-
VILLE; ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN GROUP,
SCHWEIZER ASSOCIATES WINTER PARK;
HENDERSON AND BORTLES CLEAR-
WATER; DONALD VIZZA, MIAMI; FEREN-
DINO, GRAFTON SPILLIS CANDELA,
CORAL GABLES; BOUTERSE BORRELLI,
ALBAISA MIAMI; SMITH-SPIESSL, LAKE-
LAND; LEMON AND MEGGINSON, TITUS-
VILLE; McELVY, JENNEWEIN, STEFANY,
HOWARD, TAMIPA; BARRETT, DAFFIN,
FIGG, TALLAHASSEE; DONALD SINGER,
FT. LAUDERDALE; ALFONSO AND OLIVA,
TAMPA.


CONTENTS

2 PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
4 AN URBAN DEVELOPMENT
PLAN FOR FLORIDA
Senator D. Robert Graham
9 PRACTICE PROFILE:
REYNOLDS, SMITH & HILLS
18 ADVERTISERS
19 UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
GRADUATES
23 PRACTICE PROFILE:
BARRETT, DAFFIN & FIGG
27 PRACTICE PROFILE:
PEACOCK & LEWIS
33 PRACTICE PROFILE:
McELVY, JENNEWEIN,
STEFANY, HOWARD











THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official Journal
of the Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects, Inc., is owned and pub-
lished by the Association, a Florida Corpora-
tion not for profit. It is published bi-monthly at
the Executive Office of the Association, 1000
Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Florida
33134. Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305).
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AIA. Editorial material may
be reprinted provided full credit is given to the
author and to THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
and copy is sent to publisher's office. Con-
trolled circulation postage paid at Miami,
Florida. Single copies, 75 cents, subscription,
$6.50 per year. 1971 Member Roster available
at $10.00 per copy. 1970 Directory of Archi-
tectural Building Products & Services available
at $1.50 per copy.


FA /3




As we enter the last third of the twentieth century, no social
diagnosis is more widely accepted than that which says we have
an urban crisis. The general acknowledgment of this situation is
generated from the virtual impossibility of urban man escaping
some facet of the urban crisis during his daily life. From the
lowest-income family, crowded into a substandard apartment,
to the most affluent suburbanite, sweltering in a traffic jam, the
spectrum of social disorders which constitute the urban crisis
are a daily diet. One institution of our society, however,
generally has been able to ignore and avoid the urban crisis. The
role of state government in anticipating and moving decisively
to remedy urban ills has vacillated from negative to
non-existent. John Kilesar, Deputy Commissioner of the New
Jersey Department of Community Affairs, summarized the
states' position:

"The states' perception of the urban crisis has been
neither quick nor clear. Their initial perception was
to view the urban crisis as a series of problems
affecting a specific class of local governments. The
traditional response based on this perception was to
treat urban areas according to well-established
principles for meeting a problem in any other
distressed area: a little rechanneling of tax funds
here, a bit of expert assistance there, a dash of home
rule for one place, and a jigger of regional
coordination in another. With a little fine tuning,
the public and private mechanisms were supposed to
put things on the right course for the long haul.
Infinitesimal change was acceptable because infinite
amounts of time were available."

The consequences of state inaction have been fragmented and
dysfunctional approaches to urban problems. Moreover, as
states demonstrated their own impotence, there has been an
escalating decrease in their influence.


Senator D. Robert Graham


An Urban Development Plan For Florida


The economist, Barbara Ward, has stated that what is lacking in
attacking our urban woes is the unifying vision of the whole
urban order as a proper field of coordinated inquiry and action.
In no place is the absence of the unifying vision more graphic
than in state government. Of all the examples which are
available, state transportation policy is the most dramatic.
Through a myopic focus on the automobile, to the exclusion of
all other forms of transportation, the states have encouraged
urban sprawl and created the non-city the core of many of
the nation's most difficult urban problems. Decisions on the
location, design and function of expressways have been made
without consideration of community, environmental, or
planning implications the single objective was to move the
most automobiles at the highest speed.

Another example in shortsightedness of state government which
is basic to a state's urban reform, is its tax policy. Not only does
the tax system of a state fix the ability of the state and its local
governments to generate the funds required to meet urban
problems, but the specifics of the tax policy direct private
action. Arbitrary state limitations on local government taxing
powers render the cities with the most severe problems
incapable of responding to them. Traditional property tax,
programs discourage new private investment in the ghetto or
rehabilitation of existing housing.

When the state does determine to act, it has too often acted
without clear objectives in mind. Without functional goals, a
melange of state directives have battered down upon local
officials who are then held responsible for the consequent
breakdowns in urban systems. Not a typical is the position of a
medium size south Florida city. In the early 1960's, at the
insistence of the State Board of Health, the city installed a
sanitary sewer system to be serviced by an ocean outfall. Ten
years later, the same ocean outfall system was required to be
abandoned or substantially modified and improved at

FA /4


considerable cost. Rather than assist the local government
through financial grants, the state limited the city's ability to
raise funds by imposing a ceiling on property taxes and
restricting the interest on municipal bonds at a level below the
prevailing market.

The erosion of confidence among city officials towards the
states' desire and ability to assist in mitigating urban woes has
increasingly found focus on the proposal of federal revenue
sharing. While the states are mounting a coordinated campaign
to persuade Congress to provide them with additional revenue,
the ultimate confrontation may arise over who is the beneficiary
of any Congressional largesse. The Florida League of Cities, at
its 1970 convention, adopted a resolution advocating revenue
sharing with local governments, but made no reference to state
participation or coordination. In California, Senator John
Tunney campaigned on the issue that the states should be
by-passed by the federal government, with direct relationships
established between Washington and city hall. As the states
survey the field and find so few allies, they remind one of the
philosophy of Pogo: "We have met the enemy and he is us."

In the midst of this bleak scene, one fact stands out. The state
has the opportunity at least for the present to play a
pivotal role in substantive reform of many of the basic causes of
urban decline. A brief overview of the present situation in
Florida delineates this pivotal role.

All of the cities and counties of Florida, as in most other states,
are creatures of the state. The powers, jurisdiction, and the very
existence of every city, county, and special district, are granted
by the state legislature. The decisions as to form of local
government organization and its function were made in response
to historical and societal factors relevant at that prior time. In
many cases, these prior decisions have become impediments to
effective action today, as the nature of the problem requiring









































Four general land types: "A" represents coastal urban areas;
"B" agricultural sections; "C" publicly held park, recreation and
water conservation districts; "D" privately held land.


Represents Southward flow of water supply from Lake Okee-
chobee.


governmental response has changed. A city which was
established to provide local access streets may be incapable of
sustaining a metropolitan public transportation system. Thus, an
initial point of state reform should involve a review of existing
local governmental structures in terms of their capacity to
respond to contemporary and foreseeable problems.

In those activities in which the state is the primary actor, an
appreciation of the interrelation of governmental functions is
imperative. Transportation, water supply, and pollution
abatement policies have been twisted to confuse, fragment and
frustrate an effective urban response. The same functions can be
orchestrated into effective pieces of a coordinated program.
Similarly, the State of Florida has the power to undertake new
programs designed to mitigate existing urban problems and lay
the framework for orderly development. Fifteen states have
established state housing authorities, housing finance agencies,
or comprehensive urban development corporations. Other states
have recognized the importance of a state land policy, both as a
means of shaping urban growth and providing for future public
needs, through such techniques as the early acquisition of land
in anticipation of future public needs, and land assembly, to
encourage orderly development of the urban perimeter and the
rehabilitation of depressed areas.

The need to apply a comprehensive state urban development
program is paramount in South Florida. The region of Florida
south of the sub-tropical line represents a unique corner of the
world. The combination of sun and water, bustling activity and
remote solitude, has created an almost irrestible allure for
millions of people. The natural climatic attractions of the area
will continue to draw people to the region. To ignore this fact is
an unrealistic alternative in coping with future urban needs.


The growth of this sub-tropical area over the past twenty years,
projected to the end of this century, represents a doubling of
population approximately every fifteen years:


1950

1960


760,000

1,625,000


1970 2,500,000

2000 7,500,000
By comparison, Florida is doubling population every twenty-
three years and the United States every sixty-eight. This massive
population growth will be funneled into an area with two
dominant physical limitations: land type and water supply.

South Florida can be divided into four general land types. On
the east coast, stretching over 100 miles, is a thin layer of urban
coastal development which presently contains 90% of the
population of the region. A similar coastal urban areas 50 miles
in length flanks the western portion of the peninsula. In the
interior, a large agricultural section occupies the area
immediately south of Lake Okeechobee and another at the
southern tip of the peninsula. Abutting the eastern coastal and
the agricultural areas are large publicly held park, recreation and
water conservation districts. Between these districts and the
western coastal strip is privately held land, generally limited
agricultural or undeveloped.

These land types have a major influence on the second physical
constraint, water supply. The principal water supply for South
Florida is the southward flow from Lake Okeechobee.
CONTINUED

FA /5






Urban Development Plan, continued


The adequacy of this water -supply for the immediate
population of South Florida is in question. In 1968, the United
States House of Representatives, Committee on Public Works
reported:

Current demands for water already exceed those
projected for the year 2020 in the original planning
of the Central and Southern Florida Project.
Population projections for the east coast area in the
year 2000 are now almost triple those first
predicted. Current estimates of 2020 demands,
including park estimates of needs, are now more
than double the original estimates. There are
impending shortages of water to meet projected
demands fully at all times. The days of plentiful
water and indiscriminate use cannot be sustained.

If protected, this single water supply will be adequate to meet
the population projections for the year 2000. A protective'
policy will have the corollary result of preserving the principal
open-space area of the southern peninsula.

Appling the policy alternatives available to Florida for the
particular circumstances of South Florida, a basic strategy of
state action emerges. The development of South Florida must
be channelled so that the Everglades and its water flow is
preserved and that the urban areas are discreetly located to
protect the water supply and other environmental factors. To
implement this total strategy, the following state action is
required.

1. Public Ownership, Or At Least Effective Public Control,
Must Be Secured Over The Western Everglades.

Since the end of World War II, the federal and state
governments have acquired over 1,000,000 acres of the eastern
and southern Everglades. Although not without controversy,
this program of water management has stabilized and rationed
the water supply for the region and prevented destructive
development of the eastern Everglades. Similar public control
must be attained over the western Everglades; specifically, the
Fahkahatchee Strand and the area between the Strand and
conservation area three of the Central and Southern Florida
Flood Control District, commonly referred to as The Big
Cypress. The development of a detailed plan, defining the areas
to be secured and the legal and financial procedures to be
employed, is of the highest priority for the region. When the
plan is completed, the State of Florida should be the prime
mover for its implementation.

2. The Development Of A State New Town Policy As The
Principal Focus Of Urban Development In South Florida For
The Balance Of This Century.

For thirty years, England and Sweden have utilized the new
town concept as a primary tactic in the direction of urban
growth. The European new towns are located and planned to
promote orderly and controlled urban development through the
creation of additional nuclei in a metropolitan region. Each of
these nuclei contain all the elements required for urban living: a
variety of architectural and economic residential units;
industrial and commercial enterprises normally employing a
substantial portion of the new town's population; recreational
and cultural facilities; and land reserved for open space and
other land uses.

FA /6


Represents possible development of 25 new towns in Florida by
year 2000. Each black circle is equal to 8 square miles.


In the United States, over thirty new towns are under
development. The Federal Housing Acts of 1968 and 1970
recognized this movement and instituted a program of loans and
loan guarantees for new towns. With a projected increase of
population of 5,000,000 for the next three decades, a state
program to encourage the location of half of this increase in 25
new towns would make a significant contribution to the
attainment of the strategy of Everglades preservation and
rational urban development. The state's involvement in this
program will be through its use of existing direct action
programs, such as transportation. A critical new area of state
activity is assistance in appropriate land assembly, so that new
town areas will be available for development, already having
been located and sized to conform to a regional plan. A housing
and urban development agency, modeled after the New York
Urban Development Corporation, should be the catalyst for a
Florida new town program.

3. Transportation, Water Supply And Pollution Abatement
Policies Must Be Focused On Facilitating Orderly Urban
Development.

Automobiles, septic tanks, and individual water wells have
encouraged fragmented urban development. State government
has unconsciously reinforced this movement by an affirmative
highway policy and lax pollution standards. The interrelation of
these decisions on urban growth patterns must be recognized
and focused to achieve metropolitan objectives. Actions at the
1970 legislature, such as the authorization to use up to $5
million of gas tax funds for planning mass transit systems and
state financial assistance to local sewage systems, are indications
of the type of state programs and orientations which are
required.



















4. Land For Future Public Needs Should Be Designated And
Brought Under Public Control.

For the last thirty years, south Florida has been the beneficiary
of an "accidental" land bank. Prior to and during World War Ii,
the United States military established numerous training
facilities in the region, especially air fields. These military bases
had the attributes of close proximity to urban areas, large scale,
relatively low intensity use, and short term need. In most
instances, these facilities have now been converted to public
uses: schools, colleges and universities, hospitals, and parks.

No similar "accidental" land bank is on the horizon for the
balance of this century. The failure to undertake a positive
program of land banking will impose a great burden on the
region by the year 2000. A prime example of future needs will
be coastal parks and recreation areas on the southwest Florida
coast. Early in the twenty-first century, over 2,000,000 people
will live on the coast and in the plains interior area south of the
Caloosahatchee River. This population will require extensive
access to beach areas, provisions for which must be made now.

The state's role in land banking is two fold. First, the state
should establish the framework for the designation of
appropriate sites, the procedure for their commitment to an
interim use and conversion to a final public use, and provide a
substantial portion of the cost of acquisition. Second, the state
should give express authorization to use legal tools such as
development rights, which would allow designated land to be
limited to its present use prior to final public acquisition.

5. The Governmental Structure of South Florida Should Be
Revised To Facilitate A Regional Response.

The existing regional planning agency, the South Florida
Everglades Area Planning Council, should be expanded to
include all of the relevant counties, at least: Palm Beach,
Broward, Dade, Monroe, Collier, Lee and Hendry. This, and
other regional planning agencies in Florida, should be
strengthened through the provision of state funds for their
administration and the requirement of regional approval prior to
state participation in projects which will have regional
implications. For example, approval by the regional authority
should be required before the state participates financially in
sewer and other forms of pollution control. Where necessary,
new governmental agencies must be established to relate to
problems which transcend the existing local government
boundaries. An effective mass transportation system for
southern Florida is an obvious candidate for a regional agency.

Any governmental function which is regionalized must be
related to and coordinated by a multi-purpose regional agency
to avoid the danger that the present, lamentedly narrowly
focused state functions, not be replicated on a regional level.

The outlined program presents a sharp wrench from the
tradition of state government. Although the focus has been on
sub-tropical Florida, the same basic elements are applicable to
the other urbanizing regions of Florida. At the core of the The Author: Senator D. Robert Graham was elected to the
Florida urban program is a belief that the state can and should Florida House in 1966 and now represents the 48th Senatorial
direct and reinforce private and local governmental actions to District. He is an attorney and Vice President of Sengra Develop-
attain a goal which is in the general public interest today and ment Corporation, developers of new town Miami Lakes in Dade
imperative for our regional survival in the future. County.


FA/7





















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I





CNA Building, with 19 stories,
is Orlando's tallest. Designing architect was
Walter J. Stanton of RS&H Tampa Office.
Project officer was William J. Webber.

























REYNOLDS, SMITH AND HILLS
BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ivan H. Smith. FAIA. Chairman
James F. Shivles, Jr., NSPE
A. N. Lande
Walter B. Schultz, AIA
Paul M. Huddleston. ASCE
Ralph W. Helm, NSPE
Norman L. Bryan. NSPE
William J. Webber, AIA
Robert F. Darby, AIA
Bob Alligood. AIIE

OFFICERS

James F. Shivler, Jr.
President and Chief Executive Officer
Ivan H. Smith, Executive Vice President
Regional Offices and Chairman of the Board
Walter B. Schultz, Executive Vice President
Architecture and Planning
Paul M. Huddleston, Executive Vice President
Engineering
A. N. Lande, Senior Vice President
Finance and Administration
Ralph W. Heim, Senior Vice President
Engineering
Norman L. Bryan, Senior Vice President
Orlando
William J. Webber, Senior Vice President
Tampa
Robert F. Darby. Senior Vice President
Architecture
Bob Alligood, Senior Vice President, Marketing
George Hovorka, Vice President, Power
K. N. Henderson, Vice President, Marketing
Charles C. Space, Vice President, Engineering
J. B. McCullough, Vice President, Marketing



RS&H directors (from left):
Heim, Lande (standing), Huddleston, Bryan,
Schultz, Darby, Smith, Webber,
Alligood (standing), Shivler.


FA /10


-1





"What counts ultimately is that the design is good architecture,
that it works and that it satisfies the client's needs."


If Reynolds, Smith and Hills has followed one
underlying principle throughout its 30-year
history it has been to provide its clients with a
complete range of professional services.

It was true in 1941 when Architect Ivan H.
Smith and Engineers George B. Hills and John F.
Reynolds formed the Jacksonville-based A-E
partnership.

It remains true today with the architectural and
engineering services augmented in 1968 by a full
spectrum of planning capabilities.

"We look upon ourselves as a single source,
where a client can obtain everything from market
analyses, economic feasibility studies, and master
land planning through architectural and engineer-
ing services to monitoring of construction," said
Robert F. Darby, senior vice president respon-
sible for the firm's Architectural Division.

If the company (officially Reynolds, Smith and
Hills Architects-Engineers-Planners, Incorpo-
rated) has a second unwritten precept it is that
the needs of the client are all important.

"Our task is to satisfy his requirements," said
Ivan Smith, who was made chairman of the
board of directors following incorporation of the
firm in 1970. "Our completed design must work.
We can't go off on Cloud Nine if it doesn't fulfill
the program requirements. We want the client to
work with us. We want him on the project team.
We want him involved in decision making. What
counts ultimately is that the design is good archi-
tecture, that it works and that it satisfies the cli-
ent's needs."

It is difficult to fault the company's success in
following these twin tenets of total service capa-
bility and client satisfaction.

LARGEST IN SOUTHEAST
In 1969, the most recent year for which Engi-
neering News-Record magazine compiled a com-
parative study of the billings of A-E firms, Reyn-
olds, Smith and Hills ranked 46th in the nation -
but first in Florida and first in the Southeast -
on billings of $7.6 million.

Comparative figures for 1970 have not been pub-
lished, but James F. Shivier Jr., company presi-
dent and chief executive officer, reported billings
for 1970 exceeded $8.6 million. The construc-
tion dollar volume on all projects architectural
and engineering topped $143 million, up from
$127 million in 1969 and $93 million five years
earlier. Architectural projects account for ap-
proximately 40 percent of the construction
values. Not included is the value of improve-
ments to property resulting from the company's
planning efforts.

"We have never pushed growth for growth's
sake," Mr. Shivler said. "Our growth has been
steady but not spectacular. We've never experi-
enced a year with a startling increase in billings.
But we've never had a year with a sharp drop
either."


At the end of 1970, the firm employed 446 per-
sons and had an annual payroll of $5.5 million.
Of the employees, 350 were in the home office
in Jacksonville with the remainder in regional of-
fices at Orlando, Tampa, Hollywood and Merritt
Island. William J. Webber, senior vice president
responsible for the Tampa Office, directs the ar-
chitectural operation in the Tampa and Orlando
offices that in itself is capable of handling proj-
ects as large as the $9 million CNA Building in
Orlando.

AFFILIATED FIRMS
In addition to regional offices, the RS&H full-
service capability is amplified by its two affili-
ates, Environmental Engineering, Inc., located in
Gainesville, and Southern Nuclear Engineering,
Inc., with offices in Dunedin, Florida, and
Bethesda, Maryland.

RS&H owns its office buildings in Jacksonville,
Orlando and Tampa and leases office space at
Hollywood and Merritt Island. The 42,000-
square-foot main office in Jacksonville, located
in Boulevard Center, has been outgrown in less
than 10 years and 20,000 square feet in portions
of three other buildings in the executive center
are rented.

Not the least of the reasons for RS&H growth
has been its ability to keep pace with technolo-
gical advancements over the years.

The company was in the forefront of computer
applications to engineering and more recently to
architecture and master planning. It has had its
own in-house computer since 1958. In addition,
three minicomputers are available for direct use
by project personnel.


The company was the first AEP firm to employ a
Magnetic Tape Selectric Typewriter for preparing
specifications.

Most printing is done in-house. In addition to
ammonia-process printing and electrostatic repro-
duction machines, the firm has two offset presses
for multicolor reproduction.

The firm also has its own Graphics Department
which provides photographic services and art-
work for use in client presentations and prepara-
tion of brochures, proposals and reports.

In communications, facsimile-type machines are
used to connect the main office with two of its
prime clients: WED Enterprises, Inc., located at
Walt Disney World (near Orlando) and Glendale,
California, and GAC Properties Inc. in Miami.

TEAM CONCEPTS
The growth and present size of Reynolds, Smith
and Hills has not been without problems.

"We want clients to know we're large enough to
handle all of their requirements in-house," Mr.
Darby said, "but we don't want to be a mass of
faces without names.
CONTINUED


FA /11






1. CORPORATE ORGANIZATION OF REYNOLDS,
SMITH AND HILLS.


3. DESIGN TEAM ORGANIZATION USED ON
LARGE. MULTIDISCIPLINE PROJECTS.


2. ARCHITECTURAL DIVISION FRAMEWORK.


O~iCh C.0.


hi C


f lM'-:JE rL
DE*i f1 I


PPajCi. r


I.A~~~AI I ,nis. wc IIS~ClCi~f


4. ARCHITECTURAL TEAM USED EITHER AS
PART OF LARGER DESIGN TEAM (see Chart 3)
OR BY ITSELF ON ARCHITECTURAL PROJECTS.


"We don't want to be a mass of faces without names."


"To overcome this we employ the team concept
almost exclusively on our projects. A team func-
tions similar to a small design firm and the client
gets to know the team members on a first name
basis, while at the same time having the knowl-
edge that the team is backed by the collective ex-
perience and expertise of the entire company and
its affiliates."

RS&H teams vary depending on the size, com-
plexity and type of project. On large, multidisci-
pline types of projects, the team is headed by a
project director, who may be an architect, engi-
neer or planner.

Henry Luke, an engineer, for instance is project
director for the firm's work on a luxury resort
complex on the island of Eleuthera in the Baha-
mas for GAC Properties. RS&H is responsible for
market research, a complete master plan, engi-
neering studies, architectural concepts and final
architecture and engineering plans.

To accomplish this, Luke heads a team that in-
cludes land use planners, economic planners, ar-
chitects, engineers, geologists, hydrologists, ecol-

FA /12


ogists, marine biologists and a golf course archi-
tect. All of these are RS&H or affiliate staff
members except the golf course architect.

The same team approach is used on architectural
projects, with the team headed by one of the Ar-
chitectural Division's 10 project managers. Nor-
mally on a team are representatives of the divi-
sion's site and landscaping department; architec-
tural department (usually both an architectural
designer and a project architect); structural de-
partment; heating, ventilating and air-condi-
tioning department; plumbing department; elec-
trical department, and interior design.

If a project calls for other specialized talent, Ar-
chitectural Division Manager Howard Bochiardy
can turn to the company's nine other operating
divisions in engineering and planning.

Heading each team is one of the company's exec-
utives who serves as officer in charge and who
maintains a close personal contact with the client
throughout the life of a project.

CONTINUED


I


RE F=-J-]











0)

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0~












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SOME RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS

ARCHITECTURAL
University Hospital, Jacksonville. Florida
Landside/Airside Terminal Complex,
Tampa International Airport
(Consulting Engineer J. E. Greiner Co., Inc.)
CNA Building, Orlando, Florida
AT&T Building, Ojus (Miami), Florida
Capitol Center, Tallahassee, Florida
(In association with
Edward Durell Stone and Associates)
ENGINEERING
300 MW Addition (Unit 2) and
550 MW Addition (Unit 3)
Northside Generating Station.
Jacksonville, Florida
Water Improvement Program,
Jacksonville. Florida
Interstate 95. Palm Beach County, Florida
Modifications of Apollo-Saturn V Launch
Complex for Saturn I-B Vehicles,
Kennedy Space Center, Florida
Brevard County (Florida)
Waste Disposal System
(In association with
Leonard S. Wegman Co., Inc.)

PLANNING
Community Planning for 100,000 Acres,
ITT Levitt Development Corp.,
Flagler and St. Johns counties, Florida
Operation Breakthrough,
Prototype Site Design for 50 acres. HUD,
Macon, Georgia
Resort Complex Comprehensive Land
Development Plan for 5,500 acres,
GAC Properties, Inc.. Eleuthera, Bahamas
Comprehensive Land Development Plan for
Major Center, Major Realty Co.,
Orlando, Florida
Detailed Site Planning and Development,
5,800 acres, Land Corporation of America,
Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida


$19,000,000


38,000,000
9,000,000
5,000,000


10,000,000




60,500,000

7,700,000
14,000,000


1,000,000



10,000,000


N/A


N/A


9
~0 (V
0 0
0,,-
.0
0,
a) 0


SOME OTHER NOTABLE PROJECTS
Jucli .:Ornville International Airport
S 50-. Ton Chemical Recovery Boiler, Alton Box Board Co.,
o Jacks.onville, Florida
Apolio Saturn V Mobile Launchers,
Kenned, Space Center, Florida
Federal Building, Jacksonville, Florida
Gold Key Inn, Orlando, Florida
S Atllan tc Undersea Test and Evaluation Center,
0 Brit,;.h West Indies
.ion association with Thomas B. Bourne Associates, Inc.)
Pirevie Center, Walt Disney World, Florida
I Space Sciences Research Building, University of Florida
I DestioVer Slips, Mayport (Florida) Naval Station
City H3ll, Jacksonville, Florida
ra Jacksoinvrlle Expressway System (partial)

FA /13


A.,


i~l~tJIYAI~H





"The project manager is the key. To the client he IS
RS&H. To the RS&H team he IS the client."


PROJECT MANAGER
"But the project manager is the key," Mr.
Bochiardy said. "He is picked by the officer in
charge and the division manager with prime con-
sideration given to his ability and experience
with the type of project at hand and for his com-
patibility with the temperament of the client.
From that point on, the project manager IS
Reynolds, Smith and Hills to the client. To the
Reynolds, Smith and Hills team he IS the client."

"It's a heavy burden of responsibility. The proj-
ect manager is the prime decision maker. He is
responsible for the project budget and for billing.
He handles all correspondence with the client
and anyone else connected with the project. And
he is the team leader and motivator of its mem-
bers."

The various Architectural Division department
heads assign their own representatives to a team.
Since there may be 15 or 20 teams functioning at
the same time, any one person may serve on two
or three teams. The success of the team depends
on the project manager's leadership and motiva-
tional qualities.

Working with all of the teams are the Architec-
tural Division's two directors of design, Robert
E. Boardman and Robert C. Goodwin, described
by Mr. Bochiardy as "two of the most outstand-
ing designers in the country."
"Their role is to maintain the continuity of archi-
tectural design by serving as advisors to the
teams. We also rely on them for leading and de-
veloping our architectural design talent toward
our full commitment to excellence of design."

Also serving as consultant to all teams is the Cost
Control Department headed by Joseph E.
Lindsey. The department exercises surveillance
over project costs to insure a project being con-
structed within a client's budget. The department
also provides data used in selecting materials and
coordinates and compiles progress cost estimates
required by a client.

The Bible of the division is a 32-page manual ti-
tled "Project Development Procedures." Every
member of the division has a copy and uses it.

Based on the AIA B-131 Owner-Architect Con-
tract, the manual formalizes procedures in three
areas:
- It describes the organizational structure of a
project team and pinpoints individual responsibi-
lities.
- It outlines in detail the requirements of the
three phases of a project schematics; design de-
velopment, and contract documents.
- It further breaks down the project schedule
into greater detail. This is accomplished by dates
being assigned to a listing of events. An event
takes place when a team member furnishes a re-
quired item of work to another team member.

REVIEW MEETINGS
Two of the most important events in the life of a


contract are the project review meetings held just
before the end of the schematic stage and again
just before the completion of design develop-
ment.

"The project review meeting is one to which the
client is not invited," Mr. Bochiardy said. "In-
stead we have one of our own people not pre-
viously involved with the project take the role of
the client.

"We present our solution to him as we would to
the client and he's expected to challenge it,
punch holes in it, and rip it to shreds if it's not
what he thinks fulfills the program requirements.
The key question always is: 'Is this the best pos-
sible answer to the client's needs?'

"More than once we've come out of a project re-
view and completely discarded our solution and
started over. But when we finally do present our
solution to the owner, we not only pretty well
can anticipate any questions he might have, but
we also are confident we are presenting him with
the best possible solution to his requirements.

"By the end of design development, we hope we
have wrung out 98 percent of the problems. Up
to that point everything has been in soft form.
When we put the design seal on a project and go
into the contract documents phase, we don't
want any more design changes."

Coordinating the Architectural Division's 15 to
20 simultaneous projects and keeping them on
schedule is the job of Division Coordinator Mario
Albano, a 24-year veteran of the Architectural
Division.

Albano converts projects into production man-
hours available and how they are to be com-
mitted and allowed to each project. He keeps
abreast of the over-all status of projects, makes
sure all lines of communication are kept open,
monitors team meetings and is sort of a one-man
trouble-shooter and right-hand man to the divi-
sion manager. From his input, a computer is used
weekly to plot a graph of the projected manhour
requirements for the next three months against
the manhours available and the actual manhours
expended the previous three weeks.

The emphasis on professional posture and rela-
tionship with the client that underlies the entire
architectural discipline of the company is Ivan
Smith's trademark.

A 1929 graduate of the University of Florida
with a bachelor of science degree in architecture,
Mr. Smith engaged in private practice in Jackson-
ville until helping to found RS&H in 1941.

He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Ar-
chitects and has been president of the Florida
North Chapter and director, vice president and /
president of the Jacksonville Chapter. He was a
member of the AIA National Committee on Uni-
fication and an advisory member of the AIA Na-
tional Committee on Building Codes. He also has


FA /14





"The future will see more and more clients looking for complete
services from firms that have put together expertise in many areas."


been a director of the Florida Association of Ar-
chitects and chairman of its Commission on Pro-
fessional Practice for three terms. He holds a cer-
tificate from the National Council of Architec-
tural Registration Boards and is a registered ar-
chitect in Florida and 12 other states.

"Ivan is the complete architect," said Walter B.
Schultz, executive vice president of architecture
and planning and the man who knows Mr. Smith
best. "Everything he does revolves around archi-
tecture. He has always set the pace at the office
in hard work and when he is the officer in charge
of a project he's in it right up to his elbows. The
Capitol Center project in Tallahassee is the latest.
example.

"Ivan has an innate ability to pinpoint priority
items on a project," Mr. Schultz said. "While
everyone else is digesting the broad parameters of
a new job, Ivan has selected and scoped the prob-
lem areas. By the time everyone else has arrived
at the problems, Ivan has moved ahead and is
representing the client as sort of a devil's advo-
cate to make sure the answers are going to fill the
bill."

THE FUTURE
Where does Reynolds, Smith and Hills go from
here?

"We can't stand still," Mr. Schultz said. "We
need to move ahead as we did when we created
the Planning Division. We saw the need for it
coming and we were ready. Today the Planning


Division has 30 people and has proved a success
by leading us to new clients and into new areas
of work and by expanding our range of services.

"For instance, it was largely because of our plan-
ning capabilities that we were one of eight firms
throughout the country selected by HUD for
'Operation Breakthrough,' a program aimed at
'breaking through' the nation's housing prob-
lems. We're responsible for the overall site plan
and for coordinating that plan with actual site
design at the prototype community in Macon,
Georgia, one of eight such sites in the nation.

"It's all part of our being involved in the total
environment of a project." Mr. Schultz said. "We
look forward to design-build, but we are con-
cerned about losing our professional identity and
integrity if we place ourselves in the position of
both contracting and guaranteeing costs. The an-
swer would seem to be in employing an outside
contractor so that we can maintain our profes-
sional stance with the client.

"Over-all, I would say that the future will see
more and more clients looking for complete serv-
ices from firms that have put together expertise
in many areas. We can't continue to practice the
way we did. Clients must come to realize that
their proposed building cannot be isolated and
will not be successful unless all aspects of its en-
vironment are satisfied. The day and age of doing
one building at a time is rapidly vanishing. The
future belongs to those who are prepared to look
at the total scope of a project." 0


RS&H PLANNING DIVISION, WORKING WITH OTHER DISCIPLINES, WON A NATIONAL
MERIT AWARD FROM THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS FOR ITS
MASTER PLAN FOR MAJOR CENTER, A COMMUNITY OF 100,000 NOW UNDER CONSTRUC-
TION IN SOUTHWEST ORLANDO.




























UNIVERSITY OF WEST FLORIDA STUDENT RESIDENCE HALL. Architect: R. Daniel Hart, A IA. Pensacola.
in association with Forrest M. Kelly. Jr., architect to Florida Board of Regents Constructed by: D & A Con-
struction Co., Pensacola. Florida. Lumber supplied by: Pensacola Builders Supply Company, Inc.



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Non-Com lumber rates the Underwriters Laboratories label,
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FA /18


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Cather Industries 8
Dantzler Lumber and Export Co. 16
Dunan Brick Yards 3rd Cover 41
Florida Gas-CBS Panel Division 17
Florida Investor Owned Electric Utilities 20-21
Florida Portland Cement Division 31
Georgian Art Lighting Designs Inc. 18
RVA Solar Controls Corp. 32
Walton Wholesale Corp. 18
W. R. Grace & Co. Construction,
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Kurt Waldmann, Architectural Photography 22






e rs y oef Siam i ra lat s This is the June graduating class of the Depart-
U university of M iam iment of Architecture. These graduates are seeking
WILLIAM JOSEPH AMOROSO employment with firms in Florida unless other-
Deree : Bachelor of Architecture wise noted. Interested firms are asked to call the
Experience : 2 years with Transplan Inc. Department of Architecture, University of Miami,
Aviational Architecture Coral Gables (305-284-3438). FAAIA sincerely
Activities : ASC/AIA 2 years hopes these graduates will remain here in Florida.
Personal: Birth Date: November 21, 1947
Marital Status: Single HARVEY MCKNIGHT MANSS II
Draft Status: 25 Degree : Bachelor Architecture
Preference to Location: Miami Experience : 2 years with Jan Hochstim Freelance Rendering
Activities : PHI ETA SIGMA Honorary
ISAAC BEHAR Personal : Birth Date: June 18, 1946
Degree : Bachelor of Architecture Marital Status: Married, one child
Experience : Has worked for Phil Braden Draft Status: IA #346
Herbert Johnson Preference to Location: Orlando
Abele & Forfar
William Blair Wright NED CHARLES MARKS
Presently with Ferguson and Glasgow Degree : Bachelor Architecture
Activities : TAU BETA PI Honorary Experience : 2 summers Construction Draftsman for
ASC/AIA 2 years Gilbert Fein, Scott Arnold
Personal : Birth Date: October 8, 1946 Activities : ASC/AIA 1 year
Marital Status: Married Personal : Birth Date: July 22, 1946
Draft Status: IA f/284 Marital Status: Married, one child
Draft Status: 25
ROBERT CHARLES BIGHAM Preference to Location: South Florida
Degree : Bachelor of Architecture
Experience : 2 years Assistant Director of ARTHUR JAMES MILES
Student Employment Degree : Bachelor Architecture
1 year Public Relations for Pepsi Cola Experience : Secretary to Board of Urban Workshop Inc.
Activities : Member MRHA Activities : ASC/AIA 3 years
Rush Chairman for LAMDA CHI ALPHA Personal : Birth Date: June 26, 1915
Personal : Birth Date: October 27, 1947 Marital Status: Married, two children
Marital Status: Married, one child Draft Status: Honorable Discharge
Draft Status: IA #247 Planning graduate Work in urban affairs at University of Miami
Preference to Location: Miami, Ft. Lauderdale or
anywhere in Florida LEONARDO MONSERRAT
Degree : Bachelor Architecture
ALEXANDER MICHAEL BUKHAIR Experience : 2 years with Jaime Monserrat
Degree : Bachelor of Architecture 2 years with Gerome Filer
Experience : 2 years Editor-in-Chief of IBIS yearbook 6 months with William Cooke Murphy
1 year Business Manager IBIS Activities : ASC/AIA 1 year
Activities : 3 years LAMDA CHI ALPHA Personal : Birth Date: July 30, 1948
Orange Key Honorary Marital Status: Married
Personal : Birth Date: October 1, 1947 Draft Status: 1A #285
Marital Status: Married Preference to Location: Anywhere in Florida
Draft Status: IA
Preference to Location: Miami, Ft. Lauderdale ARTHUR GLENN PYLE
Degree : Associate degree in Architectural design and
RALPH KENNETH CAPPOLA Building construction, Temple Univ. June 1968
Degree : Assoc. Degree in Architectural Engineering from Bachelor Architecture
Wenworth Institute, Boston, June 1968 Experience : 4 summers with Sanders & Thomas Phila.
Bachelor Architecture 6 months with Julian Garcia
Experience : 2 years Ken Parry Association Boston Presently with Yaros Assoc.
Activities : Student Council President Personal : Birth Date: July 16, 1947
Intramurals Marital Status: Single
Personal : Birth Date: May 12, 1948 Draft Status: 25
Marital Status: Married
Draft Status: IA#f133 PEDRO ARTURO RAIMUNDEZ
Degree : Bachelor Architecture
JOHN GEORGE DI NISIO Experience : 21/2 years and presently with Robert Hutcheson
Degree : Assoc. Degree in Architectural Design and Assoc.
Building construction from Temple University, 1 year with Gerome Filer
June 1968 Activities : 3 years Cuban Student's Federation
Bachelor Architecture 1 year Student Council Rep.
Experience : 4 years with D'Anastasio, Lisiewsky and Tarquini, Personal : Birth Date: April 13, 1944
Camden, N.J. Marital Status: Single
Activities : ASC/AIA 5 years Draft Status: not applicable
Bowling Preference to Location: Miami
Personal : Birth Date: January 28, 1946
Marital Status: Single EDWARD CLIFTON SMALL
Draft Status: IA ff77 Degree : Associate Degree Architectural Engineering
Preference to Location: Miami from Wentworth Inst. Boston 1967
Activities : ASC/AIA 3 years
JUAN GERARD GONZALEZ Personal : Birth Date: October 26, 1946
Degree : Bachelor Arch. Engineering, June '70 Marital Status: Single
Bachelor Architecture Draft Status: I Y
Experience : 2 years Drafting in Miami area Preference to Location: Gold Coast
2 months Draftsman for Building Design
Partnership, Guildford, England. MICHAEL EDWARD SOTTOLANO
Activities : TAU BETA PI Honorary Degree : Bachelor Architecture
ASC/AIA 1 year Experience : Summer with Bob Brown
Personal : Birth Date: December 17, 1947 Activities : ASC/AIA 2 years
Marital Status: Married Personal : Birth Date: December 6, 1948
Draft Status: IA #304 Marital Status: Single
Preference to Location: Anywhere Draft Status: 25
DOUGLAS GUS JORGE LEON ROBERT VINCENT
Degree : Bachelor of Architecture Degree : Bachelor Architecture
Experience : 21/2 years with Prestressed Systems B. Architectural Engineering '72
Summer with Coca Cola Interamerican Corp. Experience : Summer with Master Vibrator
Activities : Band Activities : Engineering Library 2 years
ASC/AIA 3 years ASC/AIA Member 3 years
Personal : Birth Date: October 7, 1948 Personal : Birth Date: December 3, 1945
Marital Status: Single Marital Status: Single
Draft Status: IA #234 Draft Status: 1 Y
Preference to Location: Miami, Europe Preference to Location: Miami










The shape

of things to

come.
Electricity is the power with a promise. Its time has only begun. Color TV,
self-cleaning ovens and no-frost refrigerator freezers will be followed by marvels
just unimaginable today as these were a few brief years ago. But imagination will
create them. And electricity will power them. Which is one reason why ample electric
service must be a constant concern to you. A lot of people count on you to make
their needs for tomorrow a part of your plan today.








Florida's
SElectric
Companies
Taxpaying, Investor-Owned
Florida Power & Light Company / Tampa Electric Company / Florida Power Corporation / Gulf Power Company





If Heny had only specified
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only have paid for itself...but the building too!
Today, Zonolite frequently pays for itself within
two or three heating seasons. And it will probably
make possible a lower investment in heating and
cooling equipment.


Just say


I BI i It's also economical to install.
II I A lightweight, free-flowing,
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And it's permanently water-repellent.
Get the complete savings story from your Zonolite
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FA /22








; .; -:r ,
;; -


SBARRET

DAFFIN

SFIGG Architects, EngineersPlanners


-"We are dedicated to producing
an end product which is totally
functional and aesthetic, wherein
all of the forces have been
considered and the solution is
completely satisfying for
the user. "


FA /23




The preceding words form the philosophy of the four principals
of Barrett Daffin and Figg Inc. and the key word is "we."

Pearce Barrett, AIA; Ernest Daffin, AIA; Eugene Figg, P.E.; and
Henry Hanson, P.E., are a unique team of professionals who in-
tegrate their skills, talents and experience to achieve an unusual
unity in which each shares equally in all phases of operation,
from concept to completion.

This coalescence of creativity has resulted in imaginative and
contrasting forms developed from a firm-wide knowledge of
methods and means. The carefully considered extrapolation of
innovation from one member's knowledge to another's brings
about quality solutions to well defined problems.

Through their strength in unity, BDF has clearly demonstrated
it knows where it is going and how it will get there. Winner of
the FAAIA Honor Award two years in a row, the firm has com-
pleted with distinction such diversified projects as public build-
ings, airports, industrial and institutional structures, military
standard design, highways & bridges, housing and many other
special facilities such as water & sewerage facilities, banking and
financial institutions, and educational complexes.

Formed 15 years ago by Barrett and Daffin, the firm has grown
to become the largest architectural-engineering-planning firm in
northwest Florida, with a normal personnel strength of 30, and
an annual project value well into eight figures. The firm plans
continued expansion to become a major operation in the South-
eastern United States, not because size in itself is so important,
but that so much more can be accomplished.

With present concentration mainly on regional projects, the firm
feels the location of its office in Florida's capital city is a defi-
nite asset in fulfilling its wide variety of work. The firm estab-


lished itself in Tallahassee because it feels this section is a major
growth area, with every indication that it must continue to
grow.

BDF has an outstanding professional staff to carry out its diver-
sified programs, based on the belief that quality performance
can be produced quickly by qualified people. By combining
engineering with architecture, the client has a broader field of
expertise from which to draw. More professional services are
available from one source.

This multi-discipline approach carries through to the organiza-
tional chart, which intertwines all disciplines on the same level.
Operating in both a vertical and horizontal manner within its
corporate framework, the four principals make up the loard of
directors, the policy-making body, then spin off to work to-
gether on the directive level.

As the board of directors, the interchanges of appraisal of all
projects among the partners is at its highest degree of operation,
culminating in complete control of design adequacy and tech-
nical competence. Agreement on all points of procedure is
reached through evaluation and review of the firm's output, in-
suring regulation of basic scheduling and cost estimates, assign-
ment of sufficient qualified personnel to maintain scheduled
progress, and quality solutions.

Projects are initiated by BDF as a result of a variety of client
presentations, including personal contact, letters, audio-visual
materials and brochures. All of these new programs come to the
board for the preliminary decisions based on the expertise they
will require, then the board assigns one of the principals as di-
rector-in-charge of that particular project.

Thus, the four combine to administer a highly efficient system


BDF PRINCIPLES (L TO R) ERNEST DAFFIN, AIA, PEARCE O
BARRETT, AIA, EUGENE FIGG, P.E., AND HENRY U
HANSON, P.E., PHOTOGRAPHED IN THE ENTRANCE OF
THEIR TALLAHASSEE OFFICE.

THE BARRETT DAFFIN FIGG OFFICE IS A CONTINUA-
TION OF THE BDF PHILOSOPHY: INTERPLAY OF SITE
AND STRUCTURE, BRINGING TOGETHER THE FORCES
OF NATURE AND MAN, TO CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT 0
WHERE THE REQUIREMENTS OF MAN CAN COEXIST o
WITH THOSE OF NATURE.

.




of effort. The entire management system is purposely kept
fluid, so that the firm's team approach to projects can remain
flexible. Each project is met with a fresh look.

Believing that design is a total effort of both architects and en-
gineers working together, the BDF principals pool ingenuity and
practicality to advance the best interests of each client, both
economically and creatively. Their philosophy is to continuously
create original solutions, through analyzation of all the forces in
effect and through utilization of new methods and materials.

They realize change is occurring in the user's demands, in con-
struction trends, in new techniques and materials and they
plan for it.

BDF especially is aware of the socio-ecological forces today.
Everything they do is a perpetual effort to allow people to live
among each other in comfort and health. All projects are mea-
sured to determine if they add to or subtract from the value of
the environment so that a rational balance can be achieved be-
tween the needs of nature and of man. For example, their work
with low-rent housing considers in advance all of the ecological
impact data necessary to determine the effects of the people
who will live there on each other and on the rest of the com-
munity.

The complexity of today's projects, together with the volume of
expertise required, underscores the wisdom of the team method.


At BDF, the principals are professionals first, then directors.
However, each is schooled in management procedures so that a
complete management structure is built into the organization to
assure that the needs of the clients are well-defined and satis-
fied.


It works this way: Barrett serves as director of professional rela-
tions, promoting both the firm and the architectural and engi-
neering professions. Daffin is the director of administration.

The director of architectural and structural production is Figg,
who programs the procedures for the completion of projects un-
dertaken by the firm. Figg has an assistant director, architect N.
Paul Anthony III, who works with him in architectural produc-
tion.

Henry Hanson is the director of engineering production. His
duties are basically the same as Figg's.

It is on the directive level that the firm operates horizontally,
for any architectural problem also becomes an engineering prob-
lem . one defines the parameter within which the other must
work.

The director-in-charge may be either an engineer or an architect,
depending on the project. He becomes the primary member of a
flexible team of in-house specialists who form according to the
demands of each phase of the project. This director leads and
coordinates 'all phases toward completion, maintaining liaison
with the client.

The next line of the organizational chart is the executive level.
Actually department heads, the executives cover professional re-
lations, the comptroller, construction administration, architec-
tural design, architectural working drawings, structural design,
specifications and cost estimating, transportation, pollution con-
trol and land development.

After this comes the staff level, which includes architectural and
engineering technicians, construction coordinators, delineators,
secretaries and clerks. CONTINUED

OFFICE REVENUE BY BUILDING TYPES

1967 1968 1969 1970


Elementary Secondary
Junior/Community
Housing
Highways & Bridges
Water & Sewerage
Government Buildings
U.S., State & Local
Military
Commercial and Industrial


MEDIA CENTER AND LEARNING AREA COMPLEX OF
FAIRVIEW MIDDLE SCHOOL, TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA,
AN 83,000 SQ..FT., $1.2 MILLION PROJECT.

KILLEARN COUNTRY CLUB CLUBHOUSE, TALLAHAS-
SEE, FLORIDA, NOTABLE FOR CONTEMPORARY FORM
AND SOPHISTICATED PREFABRICATED ASSEMBLY
SYSTEM.


21% 22% 20% 21%
20 21 16 9
12 10 10 8
7 3 8 8
9 4 9 5

15 12 12 18
4 8 9 12
12 20 16 19


100% 100% 100% 100%

The annual gross revenue of the Corporation
has doubled since 1967.

COVER PHOTO: G. WADE SWICORD


PHOTO: G. WADE SWICORD































|LATONS |ADMINISTRATION j|DRi |oRiGDRG DIGN |COSTESTIMATING CO[rrOL tt vEOrW3J
I -- I II -II I IIII"' III I
I ----------- I I I I -----I I---- -- I I------ -------------
ARCHITECTURAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNICIANS CONSTRUCTION COORDINATORS SECRETARIES CLERKS DE LINEATOR!


ORGANIZATION CHART if


BARRETT, DAFFIN & FIGG, continued
The firm includes seven registered architects and three registered
engineers. Outside associates and consultants are brought in,
when necessary, for such fields as mechanical engineering, light-
ing or accoustics.

This wide pool of talent is assembled into task-oriented teams in
which vital people come into the team during different times
and others go out, depending on which phase the project is in.

In keeping with BDF's emphasis on imaginative concepts, young
people joining the staff participate in different teams of a proj-
ect to gain wider experience in all phases of production. They
work in the area their training permits, then are free to establish
themselves in a speciality if they qualify.

Meeting program schedules of every phase of a project is essen-
tial at BDF. Quality is never sacrificed, but a top level of effi-
ciency must be maintained to the economic satisfaction of both
the firm and the.client.

The board critiques all projects at a conference each week. Di-
rectors and executives meet to discuss the active programs, and
a computer-produced analysis is reviewed once a month. Contin-
uous review keeps the multiplicity of firm projects moving to
the satisfaction of the entire board.

The firm has moved forward in its use of computers for engi-
neering calculations, as well as accounting and billing. An
Olivetti 1101 programmable calculator is used for in-house engi-
neering computations. Structural calculations are performed on
an IBM 1130 computer through a computer service. Specifica-
tions and repetitive correspondence are stored on an IBM
MT/ST, and are reproduced on a Xerox 3600. To assist with
specification writing and product selection, BDF subscribesrto
the "idac" system of microfilm storage of product and specifica-
tion information.

Compensation is based on use of the standard curves developed
by the Florida AIA and the Consulting Engineers of Florida.
Also, approximately 25 per cent of all services are provided on a
reimbursible basis, using a multiplier times direct salaries. Fees


are negotiated with government agencies, depending on the re-
quirements of the agency.

With its variety of action, BDF continues to demonstrate crea-
tive design. The award-winning Killearn Golf and Country Club,
located north of Tallahassee, is notable not only for its out-
standing contemporary form but for its sophisticated assembly
system which resulted in major economies and unusual speed of
construction. Significantly, the clubhouse was largely prefabri-
cated. This facility has been featured in several National publica-
tions.

A further expression of their philosophy is the design of BDF's
own office building, which emphasizes the interplay of site and
structure. Deep in a heavily-wooded section outside Tallahassee,
this striking, 10,000-square-foot structure makes use of standard
concrete pipes for columns, supporting pre-stressed concrete
bridge girders, that give the building an appearance of move-
ment into its scenic surroundings. Structural simplicity is char-
acterized throughout the interior. Functionally, the plan has
three primary areas: director-client, support, and production.
The director-client area is designed for idea exchange. The direc-
tors' offices have two parts, a work area for design-drawing, pro-
gramming, etc., and a conference area for up to four people.
Larger conferences are held in the board room.

The support area, which houses specifications, construction ad-
ministration, comptroller and secretarial staff, is between di-
rector and production, so it can serve both needs. The produc-
tion area is a column-free, partition-free space which allows an
open exchange of ideas essential to the team method of produc-
tion.

BDF constantly seeks new challenges. One of its current proj-
ects is design of a multi-purpose coliseum to serve the capital
city of Florida as a convention center, sports arena, and enter-
tainment auditorium.

This team-oriented firm finds it stimulating to contemplate the
future. Whatever the demands may be, BDF's solution will be
found in their philosophy of providing professionals to create a
balanced environment for people. a


FA /26







PC &

A

AR HT C SIC

co bie exeiec




July 31, 1961, the office of Peacock and Lewis had its begin-
ning with a large Palm Beach residence. It was to be 10,000 sq.
ft. in the Mediterranean style and so required much research as
both Peacock and Lewis were 1957 graduates of the U. of F.
and had no formal training in this type of architecture. How-
ever, the project proved to be a success and was later chosen as a
feature in one of the national magazines.

PERSONAL SERVICE MUST BE A KEYNOTE TO SUCCESS-
FUL ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE
Peacock and Lewis is now approaching its tenth year in business
and during this period has averaged 65 projects per year. The
firm has excelled in medical facilities, banks and loan institu-
tions, educational and commercial projects. Also, the Palm
Beach area has afforded the opportunity to design many large
residences. In 1970 Peacock and Lewis designed and supervised
construction of seven homes whose construction cost was above
$150,000. The firm enjoys this type of work in that a private
house is a very special problem much more difficult, more
detailed, more intimate, more individual than other architec-
tural projects.

Other projects have been designed in the Bahama Islands, North
Carolina and New York as well as in Florida. The firm's annual
dollar value in recent year has averaged $8,000,000 per year.

Since 1961 Peacock and Lewis has had a good steady growth. A
total of seven members are employed of which five are regis-
tered architects. It was found the firm functions more smoothly
with experienced members given freedom to operate within
their areas of responsibility.


THE 20TH CENTURY ARCHITECT IS IN DANGER OF
LOOSING HIS IDENTITY UNLESS HE STRIVES FOR PER-
FECTION IN THE FIELD OF HIS EXPERTISE.
The firm has a good balance of talent. The majority of prelimi-
nary design is handled by Carroll Peacock and associate Charles
Toner with partner "Hap" Lewis and associates Ark Kisko and
"Chuck" Wright being well versed in putting a structure togeth-
er. Lewis also writes all the specifications for each project.

In 1965, Art Kisko, the oldest member of the group, joined Pea-
cock and Lewis and has been a valuable member of the team.
His early years were spent with a large firm in the Detroit area.
He has had 25 years in the architectural field. Associate
"Chuck" Wright, the bachelor of the group, not only does beau-
tiful drawings but is a fine delineator as is Charlie Toner. Toner,
the newest member of the Peacock and Lewis team originally
worked for the firm while attending the U. of F. After two
years in Orlando he returned to Palm Beach and joined Peacock
and Lewis once again. The office is able to function smoothly
due to the effectiveness of Swedish secretary Gunilla Nocca.
Miss Nocca is not only the receptionist but also does all the
typing and bookkeeping.

In order to keep in touch and maintain the office on a personal
basis the group attempts to have weekly partnership luncheons.

As in all small firms, each member is a specialist in his area, yet
sufficiently versatile to adjust to the ever changing demands of a
progressive firm. It is not unusual, for instance, to find one of
the staff working one day in the field on an essential site investi-
gation; the next day he is to be called upon to give expert testi-
mony on a complicated master plan for a million dollar project
before the county commission.

Since the Peacock and Lewis formation, progress has'been the
key word. Making every effort to keep in tone with changing
techniques in construction and design is a major aim.

Many times the firm has consulted with other firms /
to give the client expert service in a particular area.
As an example, consultations were recently held with
Architects Collaborative on a complex school project.
Ideas were gleaned from their recent knowledge of


R. CARROLL PEACOCK
Graduate of University of Florida
Member of Gargoyle- honorary architectural fraternity
First place winner of G.E. kitchen design competition in 1957
First place winner of AGC house design competition in 1956
Member American Institute of Architects
Secretary Palm Beach Chapter American Institute of Architects
Past President West Palm Beach Kiwanis Club
Vice President Palm Beach County Unit of American
Cancer Society
Advisory Board Member of Bank of Palm Beach & Trust Co.
Deacon Memorial Presbyterian Church
Board of Director for downtown branch of YMCA
Board of Director for Boy Scouts of America
Director of Crippled Children Society of Palm Beach
Member of Planning Board for City of West Palm Beach

HOWARTH L. LEWIS, JR.
Marion Military Institute
Graduate University of Florida
Member American Institute of Architects
Member Construction Specifications Institute
Past President Palm Beach Chapter AIA
State Director FA/AIA
Chairman Commission on Environment FA/AIA
Former Chairman Palm Beach County Industry Licensing
Board
Chairman Fire Code Revision Committee City of West
Palm Beach
Past Chairman Beautification Study Committee
City of West Palm Beach
Sr. Warden Holy Trinity Episcopal Church
Board of Directors St. Andrews Residence West Palm Beach

THIS PROFESSION HAS BEEN
GOOD TO US; WE HOPE TO RE-
PAY IT IN PART BY SERVICE TO
IT AND OUR COMMUNITY


FA /28




I I


PALM BEACH MEDICAL GROUP


THE PHILOSOPHY THAT ALL THE
MEMBERS OF THE FIRM ARE AN
INTEGRAL PART OF THE DECISION
MAKING PROCESS WITHIN THE
OPERATION OF THE FIRM


__


flexible design of classroom space and audio visual techniques
available to today's students.
Our goal in all projects is to provide functional, imaginative and
economical solution for our clients. To this end we propose to
provide a maximum of personal service and the unqualified at-
tention of the principles to the clients' requirements and prob-
lems.
Normally, the member of the group who acts as project chief of
the job within the office supervises the construction phase with
r either one of the principals also making periodic stops at each
construction site.
THE CREATIVE PROCESS IS AN EVER CHANGING TEAM
EFFORT WITH THE ARCHITECT LEADING THE TEAM

The group is of sufficient size and experience to handle various
types of projects. The corporation does not have in-house engi-
neers, decorators or landscape architects. However, teams of ex-
perts in these fields are called on regularly whenever the project
will allow. Usually, the first step after the architect-owner agree-
ment is signed is to discuss with the owner the necessity of in-
corporating these related services in order to have a totally
designed package. Fortunately, there are many qualified allied
professionals in the area who understand contemporary design
and strive to produce it. The many different mechanical and
electrical devices, etc. which are available for use and demanded
in today's complicated building require the coordination of a
great many disciplines. CONTINUED


I*r






















THE PRACTICE OF ARCHITECTURE IS AN ENDLESS
LEARNING PROCESS FOR BOTH THE ARCHITECT AND
CLIENT
The technique used for client presentation is a simple one. After
two or three preliminary discussions are held with the client,
preliminary studies are begun. Many schematics may be pre-
pared for a particular job. However, the client will only see the
preliminary deemed the best by the group. Normally, a polished
set of preliminaries is provided the owner for his first viewing of
the job complete with necessary perspective studies and mock-
up models for three dimensional viewing. The office has found
that the more completely the story is told, the better chance of
selling the design. This eliminates preparation of several sets of
preliminaries.

In ten years the firm has completed and built over 200 projects.

The majority of our work is predicated on the FA/AIA fee
schedule using a percentage of the construction cost as our basis
for payment. During the past few years the firm has had some
occasions to work on a lump sum basis and on rare instances an
hourly charge has been employed. This latter form of compensa-
tion often leads to extensive book work and can become a
source of irritation both for the practitioner and the client.

Peacock and Lewis have been located on Royal Palm Way in the
heart of Palm Beach since its inception with only one move of a
city block during this time. Presently the firm rents 1200 feet
on the second floor of the 400 Building on the corner of Cocoa-
nut Row and Royal Palm Way. Since incorporation in May of
last year the hope is to build an office building to ad-
equately house the growing needs of the firm and to
provide rental space for professionals in allied fields.

The office does its own printing on all normal proj-
ects employing school age help to run the Bruning
white printer. On large projects it has been the prac-
tice to have outside companies bid for this work. The
average specifications are reproduced by a 3-M 209
copier which proves to be a versatile machine in the
daily operation of the practice. Offset press is used
when specifications exceed 200 pages of fifty copies.

Some of the projects of which the group is most
proud include the recently completed $1,600,000
Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center,
recognized nationally for its complete facilities and
unique design. Southern Bank, one of the fastest
growing banks in the country, incorporates a crisp,
neo classic design. Jack Nicklaus' new home is an in-....
formal stone and wood structure comfortably placed
on the northern cove of Little Lake Worth. Palm
Beach Junior College has grown to include three Pea-
cock and Lewis buildings, the last and largest of
which is a $700,000 Administration Building. /

It is the hope of Carroll Peacock and "Hap" Lewis
that hard work and good business practice will afford
their partnership continued growth and in turn aid
the progress of their chosen community. *


SOME RECENT AND CURRENT PROJECTS
Palm Beach County Community Mental Health Center -
Palm Beach County
Palm Beach County Hospital & General Care Facility -
Palm Beach County
First Presbyterian Church Coral Springs
Peoples Savings & Loan Assoc. Lake Worth
Lighthouse Art Gallery Tequesta
Palm Beach Medical Group Complex West Palm Beach
Comeau Office Building West Palm Beach
Everglades Club Additions Palm Beach
Florida Southern Bank Lake Worth
Ocean Towers Tequesta
Palm Beach Junior College Administration Building -
Lake Worth
Some large residences:
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Nicklaus- Lost Tree Village
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rich Palm Beach
Mr. and Mrs. Peter Blum Manalapan


OTHER NOTABLE PROJECTS
Palm Beach National Golf & Country Club
Palm Beach County
North Palm Beach Country Club North Palm Beach
Palm Beach Post Times West Palm Beach
Post Office Jupiter
Corps of Engineers Building Cape Kennedy
First Federal of Lake Worth Lake Worth
Melbourne Daily Times Melbourne
Houston Astro Baseball Stadium & Assoc. Facilities- Cocoa
Levitt Park Swim & Racquet Club Rockledge
Southern Bank of West Palm Beach West Palm Beach
Palm Beach Junior College Lake Worth
Technical Laboratories Palm Beach Junior College,
Lake Worth
Dental Education Bldg. Palm Beach Junior College,
Lake Worth
G.N.O. Research Plant Palm Beach County
Island House Apartment- Tequesta
1001 Apartment House West Palm Beach
Tequesta Country Club Tequesta
Freeport News Ltd. Freeport, Grand Bahamas
Forest Hill High School Learning Resources Center -
West Palm Beach
La Mar Condominium Tequesta


FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CORAL SPRINGS


COVER PHOTO: KURT WALDMANN




































Concrete runways and aprons at the new Tampa International Airport have a soil-cement sub-base for extra
strength. Engineering was by J. E. Greiner Co., Inc., Tampa; paving by Concrete Pavers, Inc., St. Petersburg.
Photo, courtesy of Hillsborough County Aviation Authority, shows a Braniff International 747 on a preview
visit. Airside B is shown in background.


Safety that's the big thing. Design
engineers prefer to specify concrete
for airports, big and small. Pilots of
any size aircraft prefer concrete. Con-
crete provides greater visibility and
better traction for takeoffs, landings
and brakings.

The same concrete advantages apply
to the highways you drive your car on.
Better visibility, especially at night.
Better traction for starts and stops,


SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA
CEMENTS. MANUFACTURED IN
FLORIDA FOR OVER 40 YEARS


especially in inclement weather. And
we all know that concrete is the most
economical in the long run it lasts
for years and years after other road
materials have fallen apart.

In addition, studies prove that the
cost of designed concrete roadways
can be the most economical initially.
If you don't believe it, write for more
concrete facts: Florida Portland Ce-
ment, Box 22348, Tampa, Fla. 33622.


FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
Division of
General Portland Cement Company
PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI






Full copies of these papers are available for
$1 from:
Don Conway, AIA
Director, Research Programs
American Institute of Architects
1785 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036

0092

"SYNTHETIC MATERIALS USED AS COM-
PLETE STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS: CORRELA-
TION BETWEEN RESEARCH AND PRACTI-
CAL APPLICATION". Lev Zetlin, Ph.D., P.E., F.
ASCE. Lev Zetlin & Associates, New York, N.Y.

Plastics and other new synthetics are now avail-
able both to replace traditional materials in struc-
tural components and to create whole new struc-
tural systems; the latter is the path of creativity
and innovation. The use of reinforced plastics in
such structures as theaters and airplane hangars
has proven that they are feasible for new con-
struction systems spanning large areas, while at
the same time maintaining a high degree of
strength. Progress is made only when architects
and those in related professions develop con-
struction systems compatible with the special
qualities of the new materials rather than try to
fit these materials into traditional systems. An
interchange of ideas between architects, struc-
tural engineers, manufacturers, and others will
increase awareness of the new materials and
hopefully start a creative chain reaction regarding
new applications.


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


OFFICIALLY PRESENTS
A

"EUROPEAN HIGHLIGHTS"
TOUR
18 DAYS

PARIS
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AUGUST 9/26, 1971


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SPACE IS LIMITED. FOR DESCRIPTIVE BROCHURE, WRITE OR PHONE:
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C,)



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<-


bis LaK-'x
Better environmental control,
greater design flexibility.

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Clear polyester film with micro-
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peaks in "hot side" of buildings.

Reduce Air Conditioning
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Every 90 sq. ft. of sun exposed
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FA /32




















































































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McELVY.
JENNEWEIN,
STEFANY
& HOWARD































COVER: PENINSULAR BRANCH LIBRARY, TAMPA



ENGINEERING EXPANSION COMPLEX
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE


The architectural profession faces a bold challenge in this latter
half of the 20th century to provide a service which is both
aesthetic in character and practical in nature. The practice of
McElvy, Jennewein, Stefany and Howard is based on a philos-
ophy of comprehensive architectural services applied in direct
relationship to complex society requirements.
The firm was created nine years ago, by a merger of the Tampa
offices of George McElvy and Jim Jennewein. Today, 20 staff
members contribute their talents to a widely diversified archi-
tectural practice.
Notable for their divergent backgrounds and interests, the firm's
founding partners agree on an insistence on outstanding archi-
tecture.
George McElvy is a native Tampan and a graduate of the Univer-
sity of Florida, where he studied architecture for his bachelor's
degree and landscape design toward a master's degree. His expe-
rience includes service with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
A Syracuse graduate, Jim Jennewein was a Fulbright scholar to
Germany immediately following his U.S. Navy Service. After
four years' practice in New York, Jennewein moved to Tampa.


FA /34
























































John Stefany is also a Syracuse graduate and served four years
in tIe Navy Civil Engineer Corps in Japan. After six years' asso-
ciation with a central New York state firm, he moved to Florida
and joined the firm in 1965 and was named to the partnership
two years later.

Prentis Howard is an Auburn University graduate and a U.S. Air
Force veteran. Having practiced with major firms in the Tampa
Bay Area for several years, he joined McElvy et al in 1964 and
earned full partnership in 1968.


Organized as a corporation, the firm is set up on a profit-sharing
basis, with four principals. Among the 20 corporate employees
are: 4 general partners/architects, 2 associates (an architect and
an engineer), 3 architects, 2 graduate architects, 3 architectural
draftsmen, 2 structural draftsmen, 3 secretarial employees and a
field supervisor.

Structural engineering is performed within the firm; other con-
sultant engineering (mechanical, electrical, civil, acoustical, etc.)
is retained as required.
CONTINUED


FA /35





McELVY,
JENNEWEIN,
STEFANY
& HOWARD


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OPPOSITE PAGE:
TRAINING BUILDING,
NAVAL TRAINING CENTER, ORLANDO.
BELOW:
EXTENDED CARE FACILITY.
NATIONAL MEDICAL CARE, TAMPA.


The firm's offices are located in the heart of downtown Tampa,
for purely practical business purposes. Architecture is often a
result of decision-making processes by business center inhabi-
tants. Architects should place themselves in positions of influ-
ence, to help evolve an improved environment. Too often the
entire decision-making process is left to others and the architect
and his art are merely coincidental to other decisions.

The McElvy, Jennewein organization also recognizes that the
solitary resident genius in architecture is a spectre of the profes-
sion's past. Much of the progress we've witnessed in the recent
past and perhaps all of the progress we seek in the future -
relies on a team concept of balanced expertise.

The team approach begins with basics the office organization
and management itself. And it extends through every step in-
volved in the creation of an architectural project. This policy of
complete teamwork has given considerable impetus to the firm's
profit-sharing program, which in turn served to stimulate in-
volvement and continued growth.

Community and professional involvement are an integral part of
the firm's philosophy, and each principal serves where his inter-
ests lead him. McEIvy is a member of the Greater Tampa Cham-
ber of Commerce Committee of 100, chairman of the Arts
CONTINUED


FA /37





McELVY,
JENNEWEIN,
STEFANY
& HOWARD


OPHTHALMOLOGY
CLINIC, TAMPA.
AUDITORIUM, RE-
CRUIT IN PROCESS-
ING CENTER, NAVAL
TRAINING CENTER,
ORLANDO.
3U.S. POST OFFICE,
TAMPA, IN ASSOCIA-
TION WITH R. JAMES
ROBBINS, A.I.A.
MARINE BANK DATA
CENTER, TAMPA.


1

3


Council of Tampa and Past President of his Kiwanis Club.
Jennewein allots much of his time to AIA and the State Board
of Architecture. Stefany is active in the Florida Association of
the AIA, his Exchange Club and Tampa's Community Coordina-
ting Council. And Howard is a member of the Chamber of Com-
merce and Lions Club President elect.

Office organization is founded on communications as the basis
for all progress and growth. A meeting at 7:00 each Tuesday
morning assures that firm members are current on active proj-
ects. A computer printout details budgeted man hours as related
to present activities. This regular session serves well to establish
and review priorities and assignments.
Typically, two partners are assigned responsibility for each firm
project, with the added involvement of remaining partners in
checking major aspects of the project's progress. This concept
keeps open the communication lines between the client and at
least one knowledgeable principal.
The firm's basic framework also provides for the assignment of
specific "office duties" administration, employee relations,
office procedures and policy, project development, public and
professional relations to each of the four principals.
The list of the firm's architectural credits encompasses nearly
every building type. And "repeats" in each field testify to suc-
cessful design concepts. Recent major commissions have come
in the design of commercial, health and education facilities, re-
flecting closely the patterns in Florida building. a


2

4


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- -


PHOTO: G. WADE SWICORD


FA /38


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FA /39





McELVY
JENNEWEIN,
STEFANY
& HOWARD


REPRESENTATIONAL PROJECTS
EDUCATIONAL
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida,
Engineering Expansion Complex
Florida A & M University,
Tallahassee, Classroom Building;
Pharmacy College
Board of Public Instruction,
Hillsborough County, Florida
East Bay Senior High School
Angelo L. Greco Jr. High School
Morgan Woods Elementary School
Woodbridge Elementary School

MILITARY FACILITIES
MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa,
Airmen Dormitories; Dining
Complex; General and Colonel
Housing; Officers Club Alterations
and Additions
Howard Air Force Base,
Canal Zone, Panama,
Officers' Quarters (1967), (1970);
Airmen's Dormitories
U.S. Naval Projects, Canal Zone,
Panama
U.S. Naval Recruit Training Center,
Orlando, Training Building;
R.E.O.U. Building; Exchange Store
U.S. Naval Training Device Center,
Orlando, Master Plan; Production
Shop, 1st Increment, Production
Shop, 2nd Increment

COMMERCIAL AND
OFFICE BUILDINGS
Tampa Electric Company, Tampa,
Dispatch and Division Office
Free Press Publishing Company
Plant Facilities, Tampa, Florida
General Telephone Employees
Federal Credit Union, Tampa
Addressograph/Multigraph Office
Building, Springfield, Illinois
LaMonte Shimberg Corporation,
Tampa, Office Building


PUBLIC FACILITIES
Public Libraries, City of Tampa,
Tampa Public Library (In assoc.
with McLane, Ranon& Associates,
Arch.)
Temple Terrace Public Library,
Temple Terrace, Florida
Sebring Public Library, Sebring
Office of Civil Defense,
Emergency Operations Center,
Tampa, Florida
U.S. Post Office and Vehicle
Maintenance Center at Tampa
International Airport (In assoc.
with R. James Robbins, Architect)

INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS
Havatampa Cigar Corporation Plant,
Tampa, Florida
Pepsi Cola Bottling Company,
Tampa, Florida
Borden's Diary, Plants & Offices at
Ft. Pierce, Daytona Beach, Sebring,
Cocoa Beach, Miami, Lake Worth,
High Point, North Carolina, Macon,
Georgia
Hood's Milk Corporation,
St. Petersburg, Clearwater,
Avon Park
National Biscuit Company,
Branch Office and Warehouse,
Tampa, Florida
Atomic Energy Commission Plant,
Additions and Alterations,
St. Petersburg, Florida

BANKING FACILITIES
First National Bank, Plant City
The Bank of Pasco County,
Dade City, Florida
Marine Bank Data Processing Center
Tampa, Florida


MEDICAL FACILITIES
Hillsborough County Health
Department Building (In assoc.
with McLane, Ranon, Mclntosh &
Bernardo, Architects) Tampa
Anclote Manor Foundation,
Tarpon Springs, Florida
Extended Care Facility for National
Medical Care, Incorporated, Tampa
Ophthalmology Clinic, Tampa

RELIGIOUS FACILITIES
Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church,
Tampa, Florida
Peninsular Christian Church,
Tampa, Florida
First Methodist Church,
Tampa, Florida

RESIDENTIAL AND HOUSING
Florida State University,
Dormitories for Men, Tallahassee
LaMonte Shimberg Corporation,
Tampa, Florida
"La Plaza Del Sol" Apartments
"Spanish Oaks" Apartments


CONSTRUCTION
DOLLAR VOLUME
COMPLETED

'67 6,128,000
'68 11,209,000
'69 5,391,000
'70 7,582,000
'71 8,500,000
Estimated


SUMMARY OF PROJECTS BY TYPE



'67 '68 '69 '70 '71 Est.


Commercial/Industrial 32 34 33 24 27
Religious 4 3 2 3 2
Consulting 1 1 1 1 2
Health Facilities 27 28 31 24 22
College, University 20 15 14 15 11
Elem/Secondary 8 9 11 21 26
Housing 6 7 6 8 7
Residential 2 3 2 4 3


FA /40






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DUNANII




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Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
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University of Florida Libraries
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to mam twelve-year-oIds
more aware of their world.
The children are working with a book we
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It's all part ot environmental education.
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If it had been, we could all be living in a more
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We want him to become aware that all oft
these are related parts of his environment.
And to realize that how they fit together is
something he can help decide.
Environmental education is already being taut "
in more than 100 communities. In time, we
hope to reach every American child on every
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schoolboard to include environmental ':
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This is essential, when you kno '
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good visual environment is:
It is human dignity amnr i

O wr liMar d Ei rmn Book ,.
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Th .omup for Envi onmntl Eduallo.1
i. eallablhp to oolDboard memibsm
nd S dchol ninisltrators at 200 a opy
fronm ALJA., addrem abouv




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