• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Expo '70
 Table of Contents
 Editorial
 Newsnotes
 Man in balance with nature
 1970 FAAIA chapter offices
 Heritage trail
 Advertisers' index
 1970 FAAIA organization chart
 Environmental action
 Reflections from the University...
 Progress report from the University...
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00187
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: January-February 1970
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00187
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Expo '70
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Editorial
        Page 4
    Newsnotes
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Man in balance with nature
        Page 7
        Page 8
    1970 FAAIA chapter offices
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Heritage trail
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Advertisers' index
        Page 39
    1970 FAAIA organization chart
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Environmental action
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Reflections from the University of Florida
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Progress report from the University of Florida
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
Uni versity- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.






JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1970
The Florida
Architect





















EXPO '70 THEME: PROGRESS

AND HARMONY FOR MAN KIND

The 1970 World Exposition in Osaka Measuring 958 feet in length, 354
will be the most ambitious and large- feet wide and 32.8 feet in thickness,
scale enterprise ever attempted by any this transparent roof of inflatable
nation of the world, polyester film will be supported nearly
100 feet above the ground by groups
As evidenced in its theme, "Progress of steel pillars. Under this huge pro-
and Harmony for Mankind," it has tective covering will be the Theme
been conceived with progress in bet- Hall and the Festival Plaza.
terment of human life and harmony,
or peace, among mankind based on The Theme Hall centered at the
tolerance and understanding, which is Tower of the Sun will present a
the guiding spirit of Oriental philoso- graphic display of the progress made
phy. by man in the past, present and fu-
ture. The spacious Festival Plaza will
be the scene of colorful programs.
This huge World Exposition located During the morning hours, national
in the Senri Hill area of Osaka, Du celebrations and colorful folk
Japan's second largest city represents day celebrations and colorful folk
an investment of o $00, 0 dances of the participating nations
an investment of over $2,5 000 will be featured while in the evenings
when the 815 acres of pavilions, gar- the ative festivals of the various na-
dens, moving roads, monorail system, tions will be presented. Other enter-
plazas and other facilities as well as tainents: movie festival, fireworks
the related expenditures for roads, f the world, beauty contest, opera
railways, airport improvements and and ballet wll be offered at the oat-
other preparations are taken into cal- and ballet will be offered at the oat-
culation. Even the weather has been ing Stage erected over a man-made
considered and the entire exposition pond and Multi-Purpose Hall.
site will be air-conditioned. The Art Gallery will be a four-storied
ferro-concrete structure with a floor
The heart of the 1970 World Exposi- space of over 11,960 square yards and
tion is the Symbol Zone, 2,952 feet attached to it will be an outside gal-
long and 492 feet wide, divided by lery. The exhibits are being collected
the Main Gate into two areas. The from all over the world.
northern section will include such
ma or facilities as the Theme Hall Along with a host of foreign govern-
with the Tower of the Sun, Festival ments as well as a large number of
(Omatsuri) Plaza, Multi Purpose private organizations and firms, both
Hall, Floating Stage and Art Gallery. foreign and Japanese, which are parti-
The southern section will feature the cipatmg in the Exposition, the Japan-
Fire Plaza with its continually burning ese Government is also largely contrib-
seven-colored flame. Surrounding it uting toward making EXPO '70 an
will be the International Shopping unprecedented success.
Center, represented by leading stores
of the world. The FAAIA is sponsoring this tour to
Expo '70. A copy of the descriptive
The most outstanding and novel at- brochure of the Official FAAIA Expo
traction of the entire exposition is a '70 Tour has been mailed to every
gigantic roof which will cover most of member. For additional information,
the northern half of the Symbol Zone. call or write to FAAIA or write to
Hailed as the largest of its kind in the Lorraine Travel Bureau, Inc., 179
world, it was planned by Dr. Kenzo Giralda Avenue, Coral Gables, Florida
Tange, the world-famous architect. 33134. U
2 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970









"-The Florida

21 Architect


' ______


JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1970
VOLUME 20/NUMBER 1


2 Expo '70


4 Editorial

5 Newsnotes
7 Man In Balance With Nature
ALAN R. SANDLER
9 1970 FAAIA Chapter Officers
11-22 Heritage Trail
27-38 Heritage Trail
39 Advertisers' Index
39 Revised AIA Documents
40-41 1970 FAAIA Organization Chart
43 Environmental Action
44 Reflections From The University of Florida
STUDENTS PAGE
46 Progress Report/University of Florida
ARNOLD F. BUTT, AIA


Cer
Photo of Pilot's House, Northwest Chan-
nel, Key West vicinity. Part of Florida's
Heritage Trail.


PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Ted P. Pappas
Richard J. Veenstra
Co-Chairmen
Russell J. Minardi
James C. Padgett
Charles E. Pattillo III
Wythe D. Sims II
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty / Assistant Editor
Howard Doehla / Advertising
Kurt Waldmann / Photography


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
Journal of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is
owned and published by the Association,
a Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published bi-monthly at the Executive
Office of the Association, 1000 Ponce de
Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, Florida 33134.
Telephone: 444-5761 (area code 305).
Editorial contributions, including plans
and photographs, of architects' work, are
welcomed but publication cannot be
guaranteed. Opinions expressed by con-
tributors are not necessarily those of the
Editor or the Florida Association of the
AIA. Editorial material may be freely
reprinted (unless specifically restricted)
by other news media, provided full credit
is given to the author and to THE FLOR-
IDA ARCHITECT and copy is sent to
publisher's office ... Individuals or firms
may not reproduce any part without writ-
ten permission from the publisher ....
Controlled circulation postage paid at
Miami, Florida. Single copies, 75 cents,
subscription, members $2.00 per year,
industry and non-members $6.50 per
year. October Handbook & Directory of
Architectural Building Products & Serv-
ices, single copy $3.00 or $1.50 for
Directory only . McMurray Printers.
3







































Editorial
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT is
proud to present the most detailed
coverage ever published of Florida's
historical buildings. We readily admit
every building of historical value is
not contained in "Heritage Trail" but
some were demolished before photo-
graphs could be obtained.
The FAAIA Committee on Historic
Resources deserves the gratitude of
everyone for their work in accom-
plishing "Heritage Trail." The Com-
mittee alone cannot achieve con-
tinued progress in recording historic
buildings. The Committee requires
the support of every architect, organi-
zations and other iterested citizens.
Only through the efforts of many
not a few, can the history of Florida
be properly recorded.
The additional feature of our new
bimonthly publication is the sub-
mission of articles by the AIA Student
Chapter at the University of Florida,
the Chairman of the Department of
Architecture, and by the ASC/AIA
Regional Director.
The next issue will contain editorial
matter by the University of Miami
AIA Student Chapter and School of
Architecture. Such cooperation by the
Universities will allow the line of
communication to remain open for
the depression of thoughts by students
and the practitioner.
Editor
4 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF
THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF
ARCHITECTS
OFFICERS
HlE. Bum, Jr President
lf4 Prudential Building
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
Robert J. Boere Vi President/Pesident
2971 Coa Way
Miami, Florida 3145
Thomas H. Daniels, Secretary
425 Oak Avenue
Panama City, Florida 32401
Richard E. Pryor, Trasurr
1320 Coast Line Building
Jacksonvie Florida 3220
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Chapter
Josh C. Bennett, r.- Charles McAlpine, Jr.
Daytona Beach Chapter
Carl CGed.c-Fancis R. Walton
Florida Central Chapter
Frank R. Mndno-Archie G. Parish, FAIA
John Stefany
Floida Gull Cot Ch ldpter
ames C. Padgett-Edward J. Sart
Flodid North Chapter
Charles F. Harrington-Iames D. McGinley
FWoida North Central Chapter
Mays Leoy Coay- Forest R. Cozen
Flod Northwesrt Chapter
Thomas H. Daniels-Roy L. Ricks
Florida Sooth Chapter
C. Fraseur Knight-Walter S. Klements
eorge F. Reed
lacbonville Chapter
Howard B. Bochiardy-Charle E. Pattillo, III
Albert L Smith
Mid-Florida Chter
Donald R. Hampton-Wyte D. Sims, II
Palm Beach Chapter
Rudolph M. Arseicos-Robert E. Roll
Charles E. Toth
Director, Florida Region, American
Institute of Architects
Hillard T. Smith, Jr.
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth
Executive Director, Florida Assocition of the
American Institute of Architects
Fots N. Karo utos,
1000 Ponca de Leon Blvd., Coral Cabes







Newsnotes
chool Wodushop To Tell
-Planning, Construction Help
Federal help in planning schools and
colleges plus new ways to improve
schools through citizen participation
will be examined in workshops at 10
cities this spring.
The American Institute of Architects
Committee on Architecture for Edu-
cation and the U.S. Office of Educa-
tion are offering the one-day sessions
in San Francisco, Seattle, Kansas
City, Denver, Chicago, Boston, New
York, Philadelphia Atlanta and Dal-
las.
The nation is now spending around
$8.5 billion a year for educational
facilities "practically all of this on
individual projects" with duplication
of planning explained Dr. William
W. Chase Deputy Director of the
Office of Education's Division of Fa-
cilities Development.
"At these 10 workshops we will be
outlining ways to unify information
so some of these steps don't have to
be duplicated over and over" he said.
The workshops, open to architects,
engineers, contractors, school officials,
and others, will also receive current
information on available help from
Federal agencies beside the Office of
Education. "A lot of people don't
know about these programs, reported
Chase.
How interdisciplinary teams of archi-
tects and other designers work with
educators to improve school design
will be related. And new experiments
in early citizen planning participation
- -called "charrettes" -will be out-
lined in most of the workshops. Citi-
zens who formed the charettes will
relate their findings and recommenda-
tions.
This is the second year for the work-
shop program. Around 1,500 educa-
tors, architects, engineers, planners,
school board members, and others are
expected to attend.
"A Child Went Forth," a film to be
released this spring by AIA, the Of-
fice of Education, and the Ford
Foundation's Educational Facilities
Laboratories, will be premiered at the
workshops.
Registration and information on the
meetings, including cost, will be avail-
able from the following AIA coordi-
nators:
March 10 workshop, San Francisco -
Ezra Ehrenkrantz, AIA, 120 Broad-
way, San Francisco, CA 94111.
March 12 workshop, Seattle-Donald
Burr, AIA, Lakewood Center, P.O.
Box 3403, Tacoma, WA 98499
March 26 workshop, Ksas City -
Richard Stahl, A. 614 South Ave-
nue, Springfield, MO 65806


March 31 workshop Denver John
B. Rogers, AIA, 1626 Stout Street,
Denver, CO 80202.
April 14 workshop, Chicago-Morton
artman, AIA, 1853 York Lane,
Highland Park, IL 60035.
April 21 workshop, Boston Herbert
Gallagher, AIA, The Architects Col-
laborative, 46 Brattle Street, Boston,
MA 02203.
April 23 workshop, New York City-
David Eggers, AIA, 100 East 42nd
Street, New York, NY 10017.
May 5 workshop, Philadelphia Ed-
ward Deissler, AIA, 21st and Ben
Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA
19103.
May 12 workshop, Atlanta Bernard
Rothschild, FAA 44 Broad Street,
Atlanta, GA 30303.
May 14 workshop, Dallas James
Clutts, AIA, 2020 Live Oak, #710,
Dallas, TX 75201.

New Revised AIA
Documents Announced
The following are the latest AIA Con-
tract Documents revised by the Insti-
tute:
Handbook of Professional Prac-
tice-Chapters 2, 11, 14, 17 &
19 A 305-Contractors Quali-
fication Statement
The above Chapters for the Hand-
book and the new document may be
ordered from the FAAIA office at
50c and 20c each respectively, For
orders under $5.00 there is a 50c
postage and handling charge and
$1.00 for over a $5.00 order.
The FAAIA serves as a distribution
point for all AIA documents (except
the F Series). Orders may be placed
by phone or mail.
If you are purchasing documents from
blueprinters or stationery stores be
sure you are informed as to the date
of the current edition. FAAIA has re-
ceived numerous complaints from sev-
eral locations in the state concerning
the out-of-date documents being sold.
AIA Professional Development
Program
The AIA has announced its 1970
PDP with the initial series of pro-
grams taking place at the Harvard
Graduate School of Design, Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts on the follow-
ing dates:


MARCH 6 7


MARCH 20 21

APRIL 3-4


Building Program-
ming & Schematic
Design
Design Development
& Applications
Schematic & Con-
struction Cost Ap-
plications


APRIL 17- 18


Contract Document
Applications (Auto-
mation of Specifica-
tions)


This series will be repeated in Chi-
cago, San Francisco, and Atlanta start-
ing m May, August and October.
Each one and a half day session is
completely self contained. You may
attend any or all. No one session is a
prerequisite to any other. The fee is
100.00 for AIA members and
$150.00 for non-members per session.
The Institute has mailed additional
information to the members which
included an application form for the
series at Cambridge.
Singer to Speak
Architect Donald I. Singer, AIA, Ft.
Lauderdale has been invited by the
School of Architecture, University of
Houston, to participate in their visit-
ing lecture series. He will lecture on
April 6 and serve as critic to two de-
sign seminars on April 7. The series is
planned this year to bring to the uni-
versity young architects actively en-
gaged in professional practice.

Apartment Builder/Developer
Conference
Over 100 seminar speakers and panel-
ists will discuss a multitude of sub-
jects at the 2nd Annual Apartment
Builder/Developer Conference on
April 14-16 at the Miami Beach
Convention Center. Information on
the program ma be obtained by writ-
ing to National Expositions Co., Inc.,
14'West 40th Street, New York,
N. Y. 10018.
PSBA Elects New Officers
PRESIDENT: Mr. Herbert Coons,
Jr., A.I.A.; Jacksonville, Florida.
VICE PRESIDENT: Mr. Ralph P.
Lovelock, A.I.A.; Winter Park, Flor-
ida.
SECRETARY-TREASURER: M r.
Tames E. Garland, A.I.A.; Miami,
Florida.
ASSISTANT SECRETARY: Mr.
lames Jennewein, A.I.A.; Tampa,
Florida.
MEMBER: Mr. Harry E. Burns, Jr.,
A.I.A.; Jacksonville, Florida.
Necrology
Dr. William C. Knopf, Dean of the
School of Engineering, University of
Miami, (which includes, the Depart-
ment of Architecture) passed away on
February 6, 1970. He became Dean
of the School in 1965.
Contributions may be made to. a
memorial fund to be established in his
name at the School of Architecture.
Condtnued page 39 M-
5


- `ImJl































We'd love

to show you the Orient.
And you'll love seeing the Orient. Especially when you make
the trip with a Far East expert Northwest Orient.
We span the Pacific with 100 flights a week. Combined
they link Hawaii and seven cities in the Orient Tokyo, Osaka,
Seoul, Okinawa, Taipei, Manila, Hong Kong with our gateway
cities of Anchotage, Seattle, Portland and San Francisco.
With our rew routes via Hawaii, plus the North Pacific routes
we've flown for 22 years, you can fly out one Northwest way
and fly home another Northwest way. Or spend a few days
along the way under Hawaii's sun there's no extra charge
for a stopover in Hawaii!
We'll take care of your flight reservations; arrange your
travel itinerary and hotel accommodations, too! Just call your
travel agent, or Northwest Orient.

S.FLY NORTHWEST ORIENT
The Orient would love to see you.
6 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970



















Now is the time for all good men to
come to the aid of their planet.
Time: Nov. 14, 1969
Man has lost the capacity to foresee
and fostall. He will end by destroying
the earth.
Albert Schweitzer
The environment, its decay and death
have become the issue of this new
decade. Over populated cities, under-
fed humanity, pollution of air and
water are being discussed in every
living room across the country. In
Florida, we have had the problems
brought home by controversy on the
Cross-Florida Barge Canal and the
Everglades Jetport. The AIA Board
of Directors set as one of their priori-
ties in public policy the solution of
the problems of ecology for a viable
human environment.
At the Florida Association Conven-
tion in West End we heard Ian Mc-
Harg and S. P. R. Charter tell about
these problems. More and more the
well-fed minority are waking up to the
problems of this Spaceship Earth.
We architects, present and future,
must work together now to improve
our environment. If we are to be the
"designers" of tomorrow, we must
insure that there be a tomorrow.
To secure this tomorrow, we must
make all the World and in particular
the United States, aware of the prob-
lems. In an effort to do this, April 22
has been designated as a nationwide
Teach-In on the Environment. Origi-
nally proposed by Senator Gaylord
Nelson, of Wisconsin, the Teach-In
is designed to alert the country to our
environmentall chaos and to seek ways
of improving it. The Teach-In will
center on the college campus's around
the country.
* w-t * -T *L -t -- .-_*a_


Man In Balance With Nature

Report From Regional Director ASC/AIA


But a Teach-In can only go so far as
to point out the problems. Action
must follow up rhetoric. Our profes-
sion must be a leader in the commu-
nity. As planners we must plan a
future free of pollution and its related
problems. We must educate our
clients in the advantages of the most
efficient methods available to obtain
ecological balance. We must work
with other civic groups to clean up
our communities. We must work
with politicians to see that the proper
laws are passed and the money prop-
erly spent to make our cities decent
places to raise our children. We must
use our expertise to design a better
America, a better World.
Further information and buttons on
the Teach-In win be available shortly.
Write to me, Alan Sander, in care of
the Department of Architecture, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville, and I
will supply you with all the help I
can. Together we will alert the world,
and together we will solve its prob-
lems. rn the words of Adlai Steven-
son; "We travel together, passengers
on a little space ship; dependent on
its vulnerable reserves of air and soil;
all committed for our safety to its
security and peace; preserved from an-
nihiliation only by the care, the work
and . the love we give our fragile
craft."


In rFonaa, me university or ronaa
and the University of Miami Teach- (Ed. Note: ASC/AIA are the initials
In's will be co-sponsored by the stu- for the Architectural Student Chap-
dent AIA chapters at these schools ters/Aericnnstitute of Architects.)
The button (reprinted on this page)l A
is the'symbol or this Tea-In. IDirector
signifies man in balance with natureer
(If only it were so). South Atlantic Region, ASC/AIA


.. r* l 5 >


'~r






fire fighter


W All combustible materials have already been burned out of Solite. Its lightweight
aggregates are fired and expanded at 2200' F. in a carefully-controlled rotary kiln
process. Solite meets all fire resistance requirements of Underwriters' Laboratories,
Inc., which has made tests on 8-in. walls from two to four hours. Results and ratings
are available from Solite. Ask our representatives for test data on insulation values,
structural strength, sound transmission and other superior qualities of
ee our catalog In Swet's 0



Lightweight Masonry Units and Structural Concrete
Seaboard Coast Line Building, Jacksonville, Florida 32202
8 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970






1970 CH-APTER OFFICERS
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


.BROWARD COUNTY
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Osar A. Handle, Jr.
VICE PRESIDENT
John T. Dye
SECRETARY
Thor Amnl
TREASURER
Arthur A. Frimet

DAYTONA BEACH
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Carl Gerken
VICE PRESIDENT
David A. Lat
SECRETARY/TREASURER
Rudolph J. Fletcher

FLORIDA CENTRAL
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
John Edgar Stefany
VICE PRESIDENT
Frank R. Mudano
SECRETARY
Forrst L Watson, Jr.
TREASURER
A. Reee Harvey
TAMPA SECTION
PRESIDENT
Robert L Dykes
VICE PRESIDENT
J. Bnton Stewart
SECRETARY/TREASURER
R Daniel Hamly
CLEARWATER SECTION
PRESIDENT
For.mt Watson, Jr.
VICE PRESIDENT
Melvin F. Schultz
SECRETARY
Frank H. Morris
POLK COUNTY SECTION
PRESIDENT
Warren H. Smith
VICE PRESIDENT
A. Ernest Straughn
SECRETARY/TREASURER
James Dry
ST. PETERSBURG
SECTION
PRESIDENT
Robert B. Greenhaum


VICE PRESIDENT
Donald G. ParisL
SECRETARY
Lesr N. Merwin
TREASURER
William F. Weber, Jr.

FLORIDA GULF COAST
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
James Padgett
VICE PRESIDENT
Leonard A. Griffi
SECRETARY
Sumner E. Darling
TREASURER
Jaes Carl Abbott, Jr.
SOUTHERN SECTION
PRESIDENT
Martin G. Gunderson
VICE PRESIDENT
Wiley M. Parker
SECRETARY/TREASURER
William L Rivers

FLORIDA NORTH
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Sadi S. Kor
VICE PRESIDENT
Chars F. Harrington
SECRETARY
Bertram Y. Kinsey, Jr.
TREASURER
Craig H. Seller

FLORIDA NORTH
CENTRAL CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Richard L Maney
VICE PRESIDENT
Warren Dixon
SECRETARY
Robe Woodward
TREASURER
Charges T. Manamu

FLORIDA' NORTH-
WEST CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
James Kendrick
VICE PRESIDENT
Richard L MacNeil
SECRETARY
Henry L Nichois, Jr.
TREASURER
James L Stokes


FLORIDA SOUTH
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Stanley Glahow
VICE PRESIDENT
Thurston Hatcher
SECRETARY
G orge C. Hudson
TREASURER
Theodore GottfHi

JACKSONVILLE ,
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Robert F. Darby
VICE PRESIDENT
Herschel L Sheprd, Jr.
SECRETARY
rank D. Shumer
TREASURER
William K. Riaman

MID-FLORIDA
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Lyle P. Fugleor
VICE PRESIDENT
Nib M. Schwmizer
SECRETARY
Eoghan N. Kelley
TREASURER
John A. Hllifleld
BREVARD COUNTY
SECTION
PRESIDENT
Clyde Allen
VICE PRESIDENT
Al Dope
SECRETARY
Henry D'Amnco
TREASURER
Ron German

PALM BEACH
CHAPTER
PRESIDENT
Charges L Toth
VICE PRESIDENT
Willim R.L pthgrove
SECRETARY
Keiardon M. Spina
TREASURER
Dwight L Baber
SOUTH SECTION
PRESIDENT
Robert E. Roll
VICE PRESIDENT
Roy M. Simon
SECRETARY/TREASURER
Paul A. McKinley


9,....
a.'':
















N




A Windshield Survey o Florida's Historic ArchITecture
TRAIL
A Windshield Survey of Florida'e Historic Architecture
























STALLAHASSEE


FERNANDINA

kCKSONVILLE


GAINESVILLE

CROSS CREEK


SLAKELAND
PA LAKE WALES


Q PA BEACH
FORT MYERS




MIAMI







KEY WEST

Florida's Heritage Trail










Florida's historic architecture. . from Pensacola to
Fernandina to Key West. .. faithfully records the
building efforts of colonials, frontiersmen, soldiers,
merchants, politicians, millionaires, all of the citizenry
who filled their roles in the development of this constantly
changing state. Each structure, in its own place and time,
presents the best that its owner, architect and builder
could achieve under the limitations of technology,
prevailing style and economic means. This architecture,
from aboriginal construction to contemporary work,
represents many design concepts, conflicts in philosophy,
and a few innovations of perhaps questionable origins.
The composite results therefore may lack definition but
certainly not diversity

Floridlans have not always been aware of their archi-
tectural heritage. At best they recognize only the most
outstanding examples. While striving to meet the demands
of the present and estimating the needs of the future,
Floridians have carelessly razed many buildings now
impossible to accurately recall, admire or to adapt to
contemporary functions. Florida has not compiled an
inventory of what significant architecture remains, nor
prepared what must logically follow -- a systematic plan
for historic preservation.

No one is to blame, really. As a frontier state there was
not time for much thought of the past except to bemoan or
praise the passing of an epoch which could have been
represented by a building or two.

Now there is no excuse. In 1968, federal laws created the
means for preservation at state and local levels, providing
matching funds for inventories, surveys, preservation
and rehabilitation of sites, buildings, and neighborhoods.
In this state the Florida Board of Archives and History
was legislated into existence with its director authorized
to serve in liaison with the National Register, The
Historic American Buildings Survey and other federal
agencies. Architects, historians, archeologists and
other professionals were asked to serve as advisors to
the Board, charged with preparing an essay of Florida's
historic heritage. If the state, stimulated by the avail-
ibility of federal money, will authorize expenditure, the
goals of architectural inventory, documentation and
preservation can be realized. This will require the
influence of an informed and motivated public, and of
private and professional groups. If Floridians want
it, the means to a systematic plan for historic
preservation is available.

The Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects, in an effort to meet this challenge, has
reshaped its organization to include a Preservation
Coordinator and four advisors who work with public
and private groups at state and local levels. They
also represent the preservation officers serving eleven
chapters throughout the state. With sympathetic
support of the profession, these officers can provide
expert advice in preservation affairs, help shape
public and private programs in preservation, fulfill
their own obligations and enable Florida's architects
to carefully preserve the best of the past as they
prepare for the future.

What follows is a sampling of Florida's architecture,
valuable for its historic significance or architectural
quality. Some examples are well-known, some less
familiar. Some are safe, at least for the present.
Others are in danger, suffering from misuse, careless
maintenance, and subject to destruction or thoughtless F. Blair Reeves, ALA
rehabilitation. All are a graphic reminder of what is Chairman, FAAIA Historic Resources Committee
ours only temporarily, what in truth belongs to the Professor of Architecture
future. University of Florida







Pensacola
Pensacola's architecture reflects the long and varied history of that
west Florida city. It is dominated by buildings conceived to meet the
opulence of the post Civil War period --- commercial, institutional,
and residential in gingerbread, Spanish and Classic revivals.


1 PENSACOLA HISTORIC DISTRICT
The heart of Spanish and British
Pensacola centers around Seville
Square and Plaza Ferdinand VII, an
area characterized by simple cottages
represented by the Desiderto Quina,
Walton and Troullet Houses, the
George W. Barkley House, St. Michaels
Episcopal Church (Pensacola Historical
Museum) and the Clara Barkley Dorr
House. (Limited Access)
1 -. "


3 .L _.


2 FORT BARRANCAS
U. S. Naval Air Station
The United States Army constructed Fort
Barrancas during 1833 44. An irregular
polygon in plan, the fort is composed of
rifleman's galleries and gun casemates
in the counter scarp, a dry ditch on two
sides, rampart, magazines and terreplein.
Construction is of brick bearing walls,
arches and vaults. (Limited Access)
Fort Redoubt, a fortified strongpoint to
the north and west is Inaccessible.


BATER1A DE SAN ANTONIO, FUERTE
SAN CARLOS DE BARRANCAS
U. S. Naval Air Station

Spain erected the Bateria in 1797 as a
shore battery and outer works of Fuerte
San Carlos de Barrancas. It is a semi-
circular masonry structure typical of late
18th century fortification consisting of a
dry ditch, terreplein, bombproof, and a
stairway to ramparts and covered way
above the bombproof. A postern and
tunnel extend through the north wall into
the ramparts of Fort Barrancas. The
south wall of the bombproof has collapsed
making the fort unsafe for tourists.
(Limited Access)


12
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A.A
4 ; IQ


3 FORT PICKElN
Santa Rosa Island
The United States selected Pensacola as its principal
naval depot on the Gulf of Mexico, then began its
fortification in 1829 with the construction of Fort Pickens.
The fort is a pentagonal bastion plan and built of brick,
designed for one tier of 250 guns. Although extensively
modified by new work and related demolition during the
Spanish-American and World Wars, much of the
original fabric is intact. (Accessible)

4 PENSACOLA LIGHTHOUSE
U. S. Naval Air Station
This 210' high lighthouse was built in 1826 and 1858, a brick
masonry complex of tower and keepers' quarters. Damage
from bombardment during the Civil War is evidenced in the
tower walls and broken cast iron stair treads. A tunnel,
now closed, once connected the complex to Forts Barrancas
or Redoubt. (Limited Access)









1 "t Quincy
JUDGE P. W. WHITE -
METHODIST PARSONAGE
212 N. Madison Street
This is a large two-story frame house with
four-column porticos front and rear, built
about 1830-40 and was occupied by Judge P. W.
White, a Commissary Commissioner and Judge
of the Second Judicial Court of Florida during
the Confederacy. (Private dwelling)


Mariana

2 FRANCIS R. ELY J.M. CRIGLAR HOUSE
S242 West Lafayette Street
The Ely-Criglar House is an exceptionally
fine Greek revival house of handmade brick
bearing walls, wood trim of textbook
accuracy, built about 1840. The original
house consisted of the two-storied masonry
building with a one story frame wing at each
side. (Private dwelling)


Apalachicola
3 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Gorle Square
This church was built for the Diocese of Florida,
financed by the purchase of pews and by
subscriptions. A pre-framed building, mortise
and tenon with tree nail fasteners, was
purchased in New York and shipped to
Apalachicols in 1837 or 1838. (Accessible


-.
4" a- *bb










Tallahassee
Florida's capitol city is a treasure house of
19th century architecture. Calhoun Street,
the center of the historic zone, is complemented
by the Princess Murat House and the Frontier
Farm at the Children's Museum, a variety of
institutional buildings and governmental
architecture.


1 JAMES KIRKSEY NETTIE CLARA BOWEN HOUSE THE BANK OF FLORIDA
325 N. Calhoun Street 106 Adams Street
This straight-forward house was prefabricated in New England, This structure, built in 1828 housed the Bank of Florida, the
shipped to St. Marks via New Orleans, and hauled to first bank chartered by the State. Local tradition holds that
Tallahassee by ox team. It was purchased in 1885 by Newton Federal troops occupying Tallahassee after the War used
Marion Bowen, pioneer Tallahassee newspaper man. this building as a powder magazine. (Inaccessible)
(Private dwelling)
3 THOMAS RANDALL HOUSE
S434 N. Calhoun Street
George Proctor, a free Negro from the West Indies, built
this house in 1830 for Thomas Randall, one of Florida's
federal Judges. This city's first bathtub with plumbing
supplied by a windmill was installed here in 1880.
(Private dwelling)








2


5p..


1 ROBERT BUTLER MILLARD F. CALDWELL HOUSE
3502 Old Bainbrldge Road
This structure was built in 1820 by Robert Butler, Jackson's
Quartermaster General, Florida's first Surveyor General
and first Grand Master of Masons. It is presently the home
of Millard F. Caldwell, Governor of Florida 1945 1949.
(Private dwelling)


U r


2 THE GROVE
North Adams Street at First Avenue
The Grove was built In the early 1820's by Richard Keith Call,
twice territorial governor of Florida. (Inaccessible)

SGOODWOOD PLANTATION
Miccosukee Road
Goodwood was built during the 1840's by Bryan Croom,
territorial planter, as a plantation bome. It became the
subject of a controversial law suit when a subsequent owner,
Hardy Croom, and his entire family were lost off Cape
Hatteras. (Private dwelling)







Montiel Io1 REV. ADAM WIRICK THOMAS SIMMONS HOUSE
M onJefferson at Pearl Street
This two story wood frame Greek revival house and
appendage is easily identified by its two four-columned
porticos with pediments, balconies, and elaborate
wood cornice. (Accessible as a museum)
2 COL. J. W. BAILEY HOUSE "LYNDHURST"
T. Sunpter Mays Farm
Built in 1850 by CoL Bailey, the house was the center
of a self-sufficient plantation. The first level walls
of Lyndhurst are of dark brick manufactured on the
site, timbers were hewn from local pine. Interior
finish is excellent. Modifications include reworking
of front porches and ells at the rear.
(Private dwelling)
SMADISON CHANDLER HOLMES SMITH HOUSE
103 N. Washington Street
The Smith House was built in 1846 by William A.
Hammerly, architect from Virginia, for Benjamin
Franklin Wardlaw. It was purchased by C. H. Smith
before its completion. The elaborate classic trim
Sand porches were added in 1900 by Alex Smith.
(Private residence)





























Cedar Key
1SEA HORSE LIGHT HOUSE
Sea Horse Key
This light, built in 1855 under the
supervision of Lt. George Meade (later
of Gettysburg fame) was a Confederate
strong point, captured by a Federal
fleet and is now used as a marine biology
center. (Limited access by boat)

2 ISLAND HOTEL
Built of tabby in 1850 as a general store
for Parson and Hale, the Island Hotel is
now a tourist delight for good food and a
peaceful retreat.


Galnesville
3 MAJOR JAMES BAILEY HOUSE
N. W. Sixth Street
Built in 1850, the Bailey House is
Galnesville's oldest residence, a simple
Greek revival house constructed of wood
frame and coquina brought from St.
Augustine. (Inaccessible)


02


,... ,







1


cross Creek
1 MARJORIE INNAN RAWLINS HOUSE
Miss Rawlings, winner of the Pulitzer Prize
for literature in 1939 for her book, "The
Yearling", moved to her Cross Creek bouse
In 1928. The building is a typical "cracker"
Florida farm house of the late 19th century.
(Accessible)


Macclenny
2 THE BURNSED BLOCKHOUSE
State Road 125
This structure was built in 1837 as a frontier
farmhouse, a skillful and precise example of
broad axe and adze construction. (Inaccessible)


Fernandina
3 FORT CLINCH
Amelia Island
Because Fernandina began to show promise as
a port, the Federal government began to
fortify the town in 1847 with the construction of
Fort Clinch. The fort, noted especially for its
fine brick masonry, was immediately obsolete
at its completion in 1867 due to the invention of
the rifled cannon. It is presently maintained by
the State Parks System.














t ht
A.~s.: .~~

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011Ir


3




Jacksonville
Although first platted in 1822, Jacksonville's development began
during Reconstruction days as a winter resort. Bolstered by rail
and water traffic and the Spanish-American War, the city was almost
obliterated by the fire of 1901. This catastrophe and rapid develop-
ment since World War II has all but eliminated Jacksonville's early
architecture. A few outstanding eclectic examples and buildings
reflecting the "Chicago School" remain.


- e
1 COHN BROTHERS STORE
The post-fire architecture of Jacksonville
is best represented by the works of Henry
John lutho. Born in Illinois, he was
educated In St. Louis and New York and
moved to Jacksonville in time to help
rebuild the city. Cohen Brother's Store
and Office Building is an excellent
example of his work.
2 KLUTHO APARTMENTS
Between 8th and 9th Street on Main
"Design is of paramount importance . .
A project should be so designed as to
indicate its function. . to harmonize
with its environment, were to the extent
of altering the environment where
practical to produce the harmonious
whole." J. Klutho

3 MOROCCO TEMPLE
Newman Street
This flamboyant and bombastic building,
also by Klutho, recalls the days when
architecture could be whimsical a wild
combination of Egyptian and Sullivanise
decor.








































2 Jacksonville
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH
King and Park Street
This building was erected in 1925, Addison
Mizner the architect. Unlike most of
Mizner's work, the church is in a
Byzantine motif with only a suggestion
of Spanish influence.


The reconstruction of Fort Caroline recalls
France's short-lived attempt to compete
with Spain in colonizing Florida. Built by
Laudonnisre in 1564, the Fort was captured
in 1565 by troops from St. Augustine.

3 KINGSLEY PLANTATION AND
ANNA MADEGIGINE JArS HOUSE
This house and outbuildings is all that
remains of Zephaniah Kingsley's plantation
begun about 1820 and continued operative
until 1868. To the rear of the Plantation
House is the house of Ma'am Anna married
to Kingsley when he was purchasing slaves
in Africa.








One-fifth of a

brick wall is mortar


...choose it

carefully


In the new Houston Natural Gas Walls that are five-fifths white.
Building they wanted white And spectacularly beautiful.
exterior walls. So they used Trinity White Masonry Cement
1,500,000 specially made king- is pure white. Its purity of
size white bricks. That accounted color recommends it for every
for about four-fifths of the white mortar specification-
surface. The other fifth was the and for every tinted mortar
mortar. To get it white they as well. White accepts pig-
made it of Trinity White ment best. Literature free
Masonry Cement. Result: M on request.
A product of GENERAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY, RO. Box 324, Dallas, Texas 75221
Offices: Houston 'Tampa Miami Chattanooga Chicago Fort Wayne Kansas Cty. Kan.

CREDITS: Houston Natural Gas Building. Houston. Texas.Architect: Lloyd. Morgan & Jones-Archi-
tects. General Contractor: H. A. Lott. Inc. Sub-contractor: Herman L. May & Co.. Inc.

U., J1FI7A


MASONRY CEMENT


23





















































































24 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970











Shape
the plan
to the need.
Modern electric living is what today's home buyers and apartment renters -
need and want. And you have the power to see that they get it... year-round climate
control, efficient work-centers with electric appliances, entertainment centers, and
the housepower to serve them. Remember: the plan that people like is a
powerful plan.






Florida's
Electric
Companies
Taxpaying,mn estor idwned
Florida Power & Light Company / Tampa Electric Company / Florida Power Corporation / Gulf Power Company













THE

CATERPILLAR

DEALER

ADVANTAGE

There's a good reason for standardizing on Cat
machines, equipment and engines, and that's your
Florida Caterpillar Dealers.
Your Florida Caterpillar Dealer isn't in business just
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that out if you try to buy the wrong unit for your needs.
He's trained to match your needs to the right
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arrangements and configurations to choose from.
And after the sale, he never forgets you. He'll show
you how to use or to install your new unit. And how to
train your personnel. He'll also help your mechanics
set up an effective maintenance program.
There are still other ways your Florida Caterpillar
Dealers help you. They maintain and operate nine
service departments that are second to none,
equipped with trained personnel, time-saving special
tools and equipment, and conveniently located. Just
about 100% of the time your Florida Caterpillar Dealer
will have in his stock, for delivery over the counter,
the part you require and, if not, he can obtain it
from one of the nearby Caterpillar parts depots and
have it to you within a few hours.

YO R Your Caterpillar Dealer is part of the worldwide
Caterpillar Dealer organization, so it is to your
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Caterpillar, Cat, [ and Traxcavator are Registered Trademarks of Caterpillar Tractor Co.
26 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970








It all began here a little over four hundred as a military strong point, St. Augustine
years ago on a little bay on Florida's east reached its senith as a health resort in the
coast. Although important to the Spanish nineteen .


1 CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS
Spain began work on the Castillo during the fall of 1672 in
answer to British raids and the founding of Charleston. The
bastioned fort, built of coquina ferried from Anastasia Island,
was completed in 1696 in time to resist two British attacks
in 1702 and 1733. The Castillo is maintained by the National
Park Service.

2 ST. AUGUSTINE HISTORIC ZONE
The historic area of St. Augustine centers on St. George Street
south of the City Gateway, around the Plaza de la Constitucion
and southward to the State Arsenal and the Oldest House. Through
the efforts of many dedicated students of St. Augustine's history
and citizens proud of their heritage, many buildings in this area
are accessible, including Casa de Don Raymundo de Arriva,
Rodriguez-Avero-Sanchez House, Old Spanish Treasury and the
Old Spanish Inn.


3 HOTEL PONCE DE LEON
When Henry M. Flagler first visited St. Augustine in 1883-4,
he was quick to see the recreational possibilities of this unusual
city. In 1885 he returned with Thomas Hastings to design the
Ponce de Leon. Concrete walls of coquina and cement were
poured in place, materials and furnishings arrived by rail and
coastal schooners. Completed on May 30, 1887, the hotel was
formally opened January 10, 1888. The Ponce is now occupied
by a private school and is partly open to the visitor.
4 FORT MATANZAS
This strongpoint was necessary to protect the southern approach
to Spanish St. Augustine. Built about 1736 it is a coquina
structure about 40 feet square with a watch Lower and minimum
quarters. Fort Matanzas is maintained by the National Park
Service.



















































3 Marineland 1 MANELAND OF FLORIDA
Marineland of Florida, built in 1937, is the world's first oceanarium,
constructed to allow fish to be observed in their natural habitat.
(Accessible)



Bunnell 2 BULOW PLANTATION RUINS
The Bulow Plantation Ruins date from the Second Spanish Occupancy
of Florida and offer testimony of the violence of the Seminole Wars.
All that remain of a 6000 acre plantation and a self-sufficient community
are crumbling coquina walls. (Accessible)


tland 3 MAINLAND ART RESEARCH CENTER
SPackwood Avenue at Sybella Drive
The Maitland Art Research Center, founded in 1937 by Andre Smith,
architect, painter and sculptor, consists of an open chapel, galleries
and studios used by famous artists of that era. The Center is built
of concrete in a Mayan-Aztec motif. (Limited access)









Palm Beach
1 MAR-A-LAGO
1100 South Ocean Boulevard
Mar-A-Lago, the Palm Beach residence of
Marjorie Merriweather Post, was designed
by Joseph Urban of New York and Marion
Wyeth of Palm Beach, built under Mrs.
Post's close supervision In 1927. It is the
last great mansion occupied by its original
owner. (Inaccessible)

2 WHITEHALL
Whitehall Way
Carrere and Hastings designed Whitehall for
Henry M. Flagler. Completed in 1901, it
satisfied the client's challenge to his
architects to "build me the finest house you
can think of. (Accessible)
3 VIA MIZNER AND VIA PARIGI
Worth Avenue
Addison Mizner needs no introduction in
Florida. He dramatically captured the
imagination of Palm Beach Society and
designed clubs, mansions and shopping
centers. The most typical remaining
examples are Via Mizner and Via Parigi,
Memorial Fountain and Plaza and the
Everglades Club.


4 THE BREAKERS HOTEL
Built in 1925. The Breakers is a
$7,000,000.00 hotel of "Italian Renaissance"
mannerisms. Designed by Schultz and
Weaver it is the baroque center of winter
season activities. Nearby are shingled
cottages for guests desiring seclusion.
(Accessible)


r '"" i: ~~Ltl
r
.,
...









1 CAPE FLORIDA LIGHTHOUSE
This Isolated light has suffered hurricane weather and the
ravages of Indian wars and tourist invasions. Established
in 1825 and rebuilt after its burning by Indians, it was
abandoned in 1878. (Accessible)
2 VIZCAYA
3251 South Miami Avenue
Vizcaya, the James Deering Estate, was completed in 1916
at a cost of $15,000,000.00. A textbook of Venetian
architecture, art and landscapes, the Palazzo set the trend
for all Florida architecture of the twenties. It was designed
by Paul Chalfin and Burrell Hoffman, Jr. (Accessible)

3 THE PLYMOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Coconut Grove
Originally designed by Clinton MacKenzie and constructed
by a Spanish stonemason, this simple eclectic building has
been recently reatnred IAreaaihlatI


Miami

















4 THE VENETIAN POOL
Coral Gables
The Venetian Pool, often called the most beautiful
swimming hole in the world, was begun In 1923 by Denman
Fink and Phineas Paist for George Merrick. (Accessible)
5 6 LA PUERTA DEL SOL
a Douglas Road at S. W. 8th Avenue, Coral Gables
This impressive gateway, also designed by Fink and Paist,
has been rescued from certain destruction by preservation-
minded architects. (Accessible)


Ed








1 Key West 2



















1 U. COAST GUARD
HEADQUARTERS, KEY WEST
Whitehead and Front Streets
This was known as Navy Building
Number 1, used as a supply and
coaling station during the Civil War,
Spanish American War and World
Wars. There is beautiful truss
work in the loft. (Limited access)
2 CAPTAIN RICHARD ROBERTS
HOUSE
William Street
This house was moved from the
Bahamas to help solve housing
shortages in the early 19th century.
Next door, the John Bartlum house
reflects a common origin.
(Inaccessible)
3 ASA TIFT ERNEST
SHEMINGWAY HOUSE
Whitehead Street
4 B Built by Asa Tilt, this house
reflects the owner's occupancy
in New Orleans where be designed
gunboats for the Confederacy!
It is, of course, more familiar
because of its recent author-owner.
(Accessible)
GEIGER-AUDUBON HOUSE
Whitehead Street
This simple but elegant house is a
gentle reminder of the early days
of Key West, built by Captain John
Geiger about 1830 and restored in
1962 by the Mitchell Wolfson
Foundation. (Accessible)
CONVENT OF MARY IMMACULATE
STruman Avenue
Built of native stone quarried on Key
West, this building served as a
hospital during the Spanish American
1111 lll l War. (Limited Access)
.......... ......... 6 SAND KEY LIGHT
".. .... -"'""' 0--On an island south of Key West is
Sand Key Light, built in 1853 in a
modified space-frame of cast iron.
(Accessible by boat)








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DEALERS
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Jennewein to Represent FAAIA
James J. Jennewein, AIA, will repre-
sent the FAAIA at the Gulf of Mex-
ico Coastal Waters Seminar to be
held March 3-5 in Pensacola. Jennc-
wein is from Tampa, serves on the
Florida State Board of Architecture
and is a principal in the firm of
McElvy, Jennewein, S t e f a n y and
I toward.

Florida Architect Appointed to
GSA Advisory Unit
Warren H. Smith, AIA, of Lakeland
was one of four architects appointed
by the General Services Administra-
tion to the 7-State Region 4 Public
Advisory Panel on Architectural Scrv-
ices. The other three were: Bernard
B. Rothschild, Atlanta; Ioward G.
Love, Columbia, South Carolina; and
George NV. Colvin, Jr., Winston-
Salem, North Carolina.

Student Receives Award for
Architectural & Graphic Designs
Daniel Nieda, a senior at Coral Ga-
bles Senior High School, was awarded
a certificate of merit for his portfolio
of architectural and graphic designs
in the 1970 Florida Scholastic Art
Awards program. His portfolio will be
entered in the National High School
Art Exhibition in New York. Dan
works part-time for the architectural
firm of Boutcrse Borrelli Albaisa in
Miami.


MORTGAGE MONEY

AVAILABLE



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twenty-five years.



MID-AMERICA FINANCIAL CORP., INC.
1030 Terminal Tower
Cleveland, Ohio 44113 (1-216) 241-9525


AIA

Documents

are stocked at the FAAIA office
for architects, contractors, engi-
neers, builders and any other
persons affiliated with the con-
struction industry.

Recently revised documents are:

A305 Contractors Qualification
Statement (September 1969)
Handbook Chapter 2-"The Con-
struction Industry" (Septem-
ber 1969)
Handbook Chapter 7 "Insur-
ance and Bonds of Suretyship"
(January 1969)
Handbook Chapter 11-"Project
Procedures" (September 1969)
Handbook Chapter 14-"Specifi-
cations" (January 1969)
Handbook Chapter 17-"Owner-
Contractor and Contractor-
Subcontractor Agreements"
(September 1969)
Handbook Chapter 19 -"Arbi-
tration and Legal Concerns"
(September 1969)

Mail or telephone orders may be
placed:

Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects
Suite 210
1000 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
(305) 444-5761

Your order is mailed day of re-
ceipt.


ARCHITECT
To be employed with State of
Florida in Architect II position.
Must have Bachelor's Degree in
Architecture, three years expe-
rience in architectural designing
and be a registered architect in
Florida. Persons interested should
contact the Division of Personnel
and Retirement, Carlton Building,
Tallahassee, Florida 32304.






1970 FAAIA Organization Chart

Membership
N


Director Florida Region
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.


Executive Committee
Harry E. Bums, Jr. -............President
Robert 1. Boerema
Pres. Designate-V.P.
Thomas H. Daniels --..........Secretary
Richard E. Pryor .--- ..-..-----Treasurer
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr. -..Dir. Fla. Reg.
H. Leslie Walker -..-... Past Presiednt

Joint Cooperative Council
A-E Joint Committee
Florida Professional Council
Past Presidents Advisory Council
Evaluation Committee
Publications Committee
FAA Foundation
Finance & Budget


Board of Directors


President
Harry E. Burns, Jr.


Secretary
Thomas H. Daniels


Treasurer
Richard E. Pryor


President Designate
Vice President
Robert i. Boerema


Executive Director
Fotis N. Karousatos







Commission on the
Professional Society
Pearce L. Barrett _--- Chairman


Jack R. Jones


NVice Chairman


I
Commission on
Education and
SResearch
James E. Garland -.Chairman
I. Samuel Kruse, FAIA
Vice Chairman


Commission on
Professional Practice
James I. Jennewein _. Chairman
James E. Ferguson
Vice Chairman


Commission on
Environment
William J. \Webber _-Chairman
Howarth L. Lewis
Vice Chairman


Commission on
Public Affairs
John B. Marion ...--..Chairman
Jefferson N. Powell
Vice Chairman


Chapter Coordination
Jack Stefany ...............Chairman
Student Affairs-
Edward J. Seibert
Membership--ack R. Jones

Rules and Regulations
J. Arthur XWohlberg .. Chairman

Honors and Awards
Robert E. Darby ...-. Chairman

Convention
Jack West .................Chairman


Training
Charles Harrington ...Chairman

Professional Education
Toward B. Bochiardy..Chairman

Research
Donald I. Singer _......Chairman


Design
Norman II. Freedman
Chairman

Historic Resources
F. Blair Reeves
Ellis W. Bullock, Jr.
Co-Chairmen


Government Affairs
II. Leslie Walker ......-Chairman

Public Relations
Edward G. Grafton ....Chairman

International Relations
Lemuel Ramos ........Chairman


I


Administrative Office
Practice
1. Arthur Wohi\llxir
R. Daniel Hamly ..Co-Chairmen

Production Office
Procedures
Walter S. Klements
Robert E. Todd ....Co-Chairmen

Building Industry
Coordination
Francis R. Walton
John W. White ... Co-Chairmen

Porfessional Consultants
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA
Robert II. Levison, FAIA
Co-Chainnen

Documents Review
Roy L. Ricks .............Chairman

Construction Industry
Frank D. Shumer
Edward T. Seibert ..Co-Chairmen
Building Regulations
Roy M. Henderson ..Chairman


















-E

















MR. ARCHITECT:

Our "Architectural Program"
was
DESIGNED FOR YOU


Ask for:
Nap Pinkston
Bob Corell
Charles Wiggins
in the Architectural
Department



SW alton fl building Products, I nc.
A SUBSIDIARY OF LIFE OF FLORIDA CORPORATION
4237 Aurora Street
Coral Gables, Florida
P.O. Box 170-33134
42 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970


Environmental
Action
Editor's Note: April 22 is the day
scheduled for the nationwide En-
vironmental Teach-In to spotlight
perils to the American Environment.
The program is under the direction of
a committee headed by Senator Gay-
lord Nelson and Congressman Paul
N. McCloskey, and manned by a staff
in Washington. However, all indi-
vidual programs are to be directed
and controlled locally by those who
take the initiative in organizing them,
whether students, private citizens,
government leaders, or a local group.
Already many Teach-In programs are
scheduled at colleges and high
schools. Architects may make valuable
contributions to these programs, spe-
cifically by focusing attention on the
problems of the manmade environ-
ment. AIA members and chapters are
encouraged to contact announced or-
ganizers in their communities, or take
the lead in setting up a program if
one is not already planned. Additional
information is available from Linda
Billings, Environmental Teach-In,
Room 200, 2000 P Street N. W.,
Washington, D.C. 20036. The fol-
lowing provides basic facts to Teach-
In and a plan of action.

People recently picketing a smoke-
belching utility in the Northeast were
greeted by an executive proud of his
company's meager efforts to combat
air pollution. lie handed the group a
sheaf of supporting documents. Oine
picketer handed back the cardboard
cover. "Look, man, that's excess pack-
aging," he explained. "That's trees."
Environment is suddenly a big issue.
Politicians, bureaucrats, and business-
men arc leaping to record themselves
in favor of a cleaner environment.
But the record of achievements is
bleak. Ve have had too much rhet-
oric and too little understanding of
ecological problems-while the crisis
becomes steadily, perhaps irretriev-
ably, worse. Something more is need-
ed than a dose of American know-
how: something more profound than
sanitation is at stake. We boast of
our affluence while we choke on our
effluence. There is smog in Yosemite
Valley, sewage in the Hudson, DDT
in our food, and decay in our cities.
We put a man on the moon, but we
still put our garbage into our drinking
water. Our cities are unliveable, and
we are killing the countryside in the
name of progress.
To many of us, more of the same
won't do. To many, bigger now
means worse.


Call today
for assistance
in specification
writing, product
information, pricing,
availability, etc.


DADE
443-4661
BROWARD
525-7255





April 22 is a day of nationwide action.
Through activities, including teach-
ins, on campuses, in high schools, and
in local communities, people will
have a chance to examine the facts
about the environmental crises. They
can find out what, if anything, is
being done, and what must be done.
Now.
April 22 will be planned and organ-
ized at the local level, with local
people deciding for themselves the
issues upon which to focus, and the
activities which are most appropriate.
Local groups must determine what
will happen on April 22, and what
comes afterward.
Since last summer it has been ap-
parent that campuses and communi-
ties are increasingly determined to do
something about environmental prob-
lems. There have been symposia, new
courses, and new organizations at col-
leges and high schools across the
country, and demonstrations and legal
actions in many communities. In Sep-
tember, Senator Gaylord Nelson pro-
posed a national day of environmental
action, and the following month he
and Congressman Paul McCloskcy
suggested April 22.
Since then, April 22 has developed a
momentum of its own, as groups
around the country have begun de-
veloping p plans. Coordination has
been taken over by a student-run na-
tional office in Washington, D.C.
Environmental Teach-In Inc. has
been granted tax-exempt status. It is
entirely dependent on foundations
and inidvidual contributions for fi-
nancial support.
Facts and predictions-present world
population, 3.5 billion . 3.7 babies
born every second .. world popula-
tion in 30 years, 6 billion . 140
billion tons of carbon monoxide, soot,
other contaminants added to air each
year ... 8.2 million pounds of carbon
monoxide released by automobiles in
New York City eacl day . pollu-
tants from fossil fuel use expected
to double by 1980 . property dam-
age from air pollution in this coun-
try estimated at $13 billion a year . .
700,000,000 pounds of pesticides
used each year ... black Californians,
in one study have twice as much
DDT in their bodies as whites . .
DDT content .10 to .30 parts per
million in milk of nursing mothers,
2 to 6 times the amount allowed in
commercial sales of milk . 500
million pounds of solid waste pouring
into U.S. waterways each day . by
one estimate 400 acres of California
land paved over each day.
Organizing for April 22
* Office-- whether on campus or
off, most groups should open an
office as soon as possible, providing
a central phone number to which
interested people can be referred. If
you open such an office in your
area, please let us know immedi-
ately so we can pass on the address
and phone number.


* Fund-Raising-The national office
will have materials that local
groups may us in raising the money
to carry out their local planning-
for example, for fund-raising adver-
tisements in local papers. The of-
fice can also provide designs for
posters, bumper stickers and but-
tons.
Coordination among local groups-
The national office will have four
regional coordinators (West, Mid-
Vest, South and Gulf, and North-
cast) to keep track of the activities
of local groups. Names of other
interested people in your area will
be available through the national
office. In some areas, there have
already been joint planning confer-
ences among local groups.
Public Information-Many groups
have started their own newsletter,
and are establishing contacts with
local press and local affiliates of the
national press. The national office
will publish a newsletter for circu-
lation to all local groups and in-
terested individuals. The national
office will supply groups with a
press kit to help in local press
relations.
What Groups Are Doing Now
The following is a brief list of activi-
ties that a number of groups organiz-
ing for April 22 have suggested or
planned. It gives some idea of the
broad scope of activities in which
those groups supporting "Environ-
mental Day are now engaged.
Colleges
Establish seminars, independent
studies, adn courses on population
growth and environmental prob-
lems.
Present special awards to polluters.
Organize law student groups to
draft model legislation and anti-
pollution suits to develop courses
on environmental law.
Organize a speakers' bureau of fac-
ulty and other experts to address
on- and off-campus groups.
* Set up a university office of en-
vironmental planning to see that
the university is not a polluter, and
to monitor plans for university ex-
pansion.
* Establish a reascarcl and informa-
tion center for local groups and in-
dustries which need scientific ad-
vice on pollution control.
* Hold environmental marches and
rallies at pollution sites.
* Apply pressure on local and federal
agencies to implement environ-
mental controls.
* Aid local conservation groups in
their efforts to preserve the en-
vironment.
* Conduct an "Environmental Scav-
enger Iunt" to find visible evi-
dence of pollution and present it to
the appropriate source or regulatory
agency.
* Present an "Earth Concert,"


"Ecology Filmn Festival," or photo
display.
Write, distribute, and publicize re-
ports on local pollution problems.
Iold a mock funeral for an inter-
nal combusion engine.
Shine a large spotlight at night on
belching smokestacks.
Encourage universities to insert
pollution criteria in regulations for
cars on campus.
Assist high schools with April 22
organization and with developing
an environmental curriculum.
Display exhibits of local water,
dead fish, and other victims of pol-
lution that dramatize the danger.
High Schools
Organize participatory debates and
speaker-discussions; invite local pol-
luters to explain their policies.
Develop a "Pollution Track-Down"
for students to locate local pollut-
crs.
Establish an environmental curric-
ululm.
Create an environmental fair with
films, photographic displays, and
exhibits of polluted water, dead
fish, etc.
Build an environmental center
downtown to involve citizens in
discussion of ecological problems.
Distribute buttons, bumper stick-
ers, and posters.
Coordinate letter-writing campaigns
to private industry and legislators.
Hold mass phone-ins to industrial
polluters.
Encourage science projects on en-
vironmental problems.
Request the PTA to support anti-
pollution drives and involve parent
groups in April 22.
Community
Arrange an organizational meeting
of local action groups to coordinate
a common effort on the environ-
mcnt.
* Set up environmental hot-line to
which people can report pollution
offenses.
* Hold well-publicized Environmen-
tal Inventory Tours of local offend-
ers. For example, a caravan of
buses stopping at pollution sites.
* Schedule environmental experts to
speak at civic groups and social
clubs.
* Work closely with high school and
college groups.
* Prepare law suits against polluters.
* Appear on local radio, television in-
terviews and talk shows, and spon-
sor environmental "spots" on TV
and radio.
* Mobilize the city council and the
mayor's office to hold special pub-
lic sessions on specific environ-
mental problems.
* Organize an Environmental Sun-
day just prior to April 22 when all
religious denominations can focus
their services on the implications
of a deteriorating environment. 0







REFLECTIONS


FROM


THE


REFLECTIONS

ON

THE

PAST AND PRESENT


The Florida Association of the A.I.A.
has undergone a significant shift in
direction over the past several ears.
This change has created a vehicle for
the interaction of architecture stu-
dents with other students in related
fields. This is the value of a Univer-
sity environment.
Over the same period of time, the
National Association of Student
Chapters has emerged as an organiza-
tion with its own identity. The
A.S.C./A.I.A. has provided some new
direction for the Institute and is help-
ing to lead our profession toward a
new de f i n i t i o n of the architect's
broadening role in our changing soci-
etv. It is now time for the students
and the profession at large to respond
to the new challenges of today.
Our students must become commit-
ted to this new professional role of
social involvement. We h a v e too
many problems with too few people
involved. Todav's students feel that
they are more deeply committed to
public service than ever before. But
- until even' available person is com-
mitted, we cannot work as a strong
social force.

Ve must communicate our excite-
ment and involvement wtih our pro-
fession to these uncommitted people.
This can help form a strong base, not
just for the Institute, but for the total
profession.
Somehow, we must stimulate our stu-
dents and move them away from the
ideal of the "individualist-architect-
master builder-genius" toward the re-
ality of the future- collaborative ef-
fort involving many disciplines in the
field of environmental design.


The Past and Present
The University of Florida has one of
the oldest Student Chapters in the
Nation. As is true of all organizations
(especially those architectural), the
level of involvement varies from year
to year and group to group.
Fortunately, we are in a period of
steadily increasing momentum. Over
the past few vcars we have earned the
respect of the A.S.C./A.I.A. as well
as other student organizations here on
the campus. Several Department of
Architecture organizations have grown
into positions of prominence on cam-
pus and throughout the State with our
help.
Interact is the coordinating body for
student activities within the Depart-
ment. Acting much as the Institute's
Grassroots Program, Interact draws to-
gcther the leaders of the various stu-
dent organizations. The S t u d e n t
A.I.A. was one of the groups which
contributed to the formation of In-
teract over a two-year period.

The Department's Student Publica-
tions Committee began as a Chapter
activity designed to create a vehicle
for student thought and liaison with
the profession. The need for this pro-
gram has resulted in its growth to its
present status as a Department of
Architecture Committee. Through the
Newsletter series and Publications,
the Committee offers the latest in stu-
dent thought. Recognizing the need
for the architect to communicate ef-
fectively, Publications has also been
a tool of learning, for credit, for many
interested students. Student Publica-
tions is now capable of producing its
own material, due to strong profes-


sional uspport. Our first independent
and comprehensive Publication will
be distributed to the profession this
Spring.
Additionally, we organized and hosted
the South Atlantic Region's first an-
nual Student President's Conference
last year and elected a Florida student
as Regional Director.
Obviously, we are proud of our Chap-
ter's accomplishments.
The Future
The past participation of students in
State and National activities has gen-
crated a great deal of excitement in a
few people. The FAAIA'S decision to
support our budget for participation
at the State and National levels will
enable more students to become in-
volved in A.I.A. activities.
We must not become complacent
now! Our commitment m us t be
deeper than just financial support.
Time, effort, and action from both
the profession and students are
needed. The pressing social needs of
today demand priority over many of
our personal needs and desires. All
too often, groups with admirable goals
and great expectations fail to carry
through ideas of any significance. To
continue these ambitious programs,
the Student A.I.A. Chapters of today
must provide the leadership for to-
morrow.
This is our responsibility to each
other.
Vaughn B. Bomberger
Albert J. Marshall
Jonathan R. Toppe
David M. Jackson


44 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970


U1







FLORDA


Vaughn B. Bomberger is a fifth-year
student from Fort Walton Beach. lHe
is currently President of Tau Sigma
Delta, National Architectural Honor-
ary, and Chairman of Interact.




Albert J. Marshall is President of the
Student Associate Chapter of the
A.I.A. at the University of Florida.
lie is the first fourth-year student to
hold this office..




Jonathan R. Toppe is in our Graduate
School. lie is the past President of
the Student Chapter and is Publisher
of the Department's Student Publi-
cations Committee.




David M. Jackson is a fifth-year stu-
dent from St. Petersburg. He is cur-
rently Treasurer of the Student Chap-
ter and Secretary of Interact.




Larry Freid is a third-year student
from Tampa. lie is currently the Re-
cording Secretary of the S t u d e n t
Chapter, and has had experience with
several architectural and construction
firms.


PREPARATION?
Larry Freid
As a student of architecture, I am
seriously concerned with the degree
of preparation I will possess as a
graduate on the doorstep of the pro-
rcssion. For some time, I have worried
about its inadequacy.
In working in the field during vaca-
tions, I have seen graduates who
lacked the necessary maturity to pro-
vide realistic solutions to today's prob-
lems. This is due to the fact that our
curriculum has been inner-directed,
showing disregard for related fields of
architectural technology. This has
robbed the student of the essential
and healthful interplay of disciplines
which is required in a professional ap-
proach to architecture.
Many large firms now incorporate
specialists in such fields as interior
design, landscape architecture, engi-
neering, and construction manage-
ment. This is also the probable future
of the architectural profession. But,
how does the University of Florida
prepare its students for this situation?
These problems were recognized by
our faculty in 1966, at which time the
six-year program was born. This pro-
gram is a solution to the problem of
student preparation for a position in
the future field of architecture. In
recognition of the team approach
from many disciplines working in col-
laboration for the solution of environ-
mental problems, our new program
will produce graduates of varying spe-
cialization to meet the needs of the
profession.
After four years, a student may obtain
a non-professional Bachelor's degree.
Though unqualified for registration as
an architect, he will be prepared to
fill such positions as architectural
draftsman, representative for manu-
facturers and material suppliers or
technologist.
lie also has the options to continue
in our graduate program, or transfer
to another graduate school. The six
year graduate, whilc working toward
a Master's degree may specialize in
environmental design, structural de-
sign, architectural history or technol-
ogy; or he could enter the study of
law, economics, ecology, or others.
These skills will make him a valuable
member of not only today's architec-
tural team, but also the team of the
future. N
45


ERSITY


OF






PROGRESS REPORT FROM THE

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


This is not the first opportunity I
have had to speak to the profession
through the pages of The Florida
Architect but it is the first of a new
series. I am pleased that in the
months to come I will be able to
bring you some information about the
school and some news of its programs.
The students of the school will have
the same opportunity to establish a
better contact with the profession and
I'm certain they will make the most
of the opportunity. I hope that you
will accept my invitation to ask ques-
tions, submit suggestions or criticisms,
and if possible stop by the school and
get to know us better.
Not long ago one of our faculty
rushed into my office with the news
that he had just received the annual
fact sheet from the American Colle-
giate Schools of Architecture and that
Florida had the largest enrollment of
any school in the nation. My first
reaction was to accept this as the ex-
planation of all the difficulties I had
been having in my new position. On
closer examination of the fact sheet
we found that in the category of "Pro-
fessional-Architecture Students", Flor-
ida does indeed have the largest en-
rollmnent of the 77 ACSA schools who
reported to the survey. There were 16
schools which had more than our total
enrollment of 379 full-time students
in 1968-1969, however. Our total en-
rollment has since gone well over the
400 mark and I suspect we arc still
the largest in terms of students com-
mitted to a program of study in archi-
tecture. Tlie explanation of the dif-
fcrence is in the enrollment of pro-
grams which are related to architecture,
i.e. interior design, landscape archi-
tecture, building science, which swell
the total enrollments of the schools
reporting to ACSA. My only reason
for relating the above is that the ques-
tion most asked of me in travels
around the state is, "How many stu-
dents do you have at Florida?" It is a
good opening question for a discus-
sion and usually leads to a brief
description of the school. I have
found it necessary to search out other
quantitative factors to answer ques-
tions which are often asked and some
of them may be worth repeating here.

In the first place, the Department of
only one of four departments within
the College of Architecture and Fine
Arts. The other departments are Art,
Building Construction, and Music.
The total College enrollment is ap-
proximately 1000 students or roughly
5% of the total university enrollment.
Many architects are surprised to learn
that the complex of three buildings in
the College houses only a portion of
the space of three departments. The


balance of the college space is in tem-
porary buildings scattered around the
campus. The Department of Archi-
tecture has 31,131 square feet (net
assignable) assigned to it for teaching,
faculty offices, and administration;
but 14,730 of this, or nearly half, is in
a temporary building. Additional
space including college offices, library,
auditoria, etc. are shared with other
departments in the college and uni-
versity. We are fortunate to have a
student/faculty ratio of about 12 to 1
so it seems safe to say that we can
still give at least as much individual
attention to students as any depart-
ment in this large university. Other
quantitative factors such as number
of library volumes/student, number of
dollars (total budget)/student, con-
tribute to the ranking of Florida in
the upper-middle third of the schools
listed with the National Architectural
Accrediting Board.

Approximately 45% of our present
student body entered the University
of Florida as freshmen. The other
55% are transfer students nearly all of
whom come from Florida's Junior
Colleges.

Like some 45 other schools of archi-
tecture in the nation, our school will
soon go to a six-year curriculum. Next
fall, entering freshmen will enroll in
the new six-year program leading to
the Master of Arts in Architecture
degree. Students presently enrolled in
architectural programs or prc-architcc-
tural programs ,either here or in Jun-
ior Colleges, will have the option of
the five-year program or the six-year
program. In the new program we will
award the degree, Bachelor of De-
sign, at the end of four years. Univer-
sity catalogues describing the new
programs are at the printers now and
will be available soon for distribution
to anyone who has an interest.

I hope the above information serves
as an introduction as it does when I
meet architects around the state. In
mv conversations with architects the
subject of numbers sometimes ends
under a volley of questions about cam-
pus unrest, computer courses, visiting
lecturers, continuing education, semi-
nars, the quarter system, etc. Quite
often the discussion turns to the qual-
ity of the educational program.

I have been associated with the Uni-
versitv of Florida for seventeen years
and a little more than four years with
the Department of Architecture. I am
familiar with what has taken place in
many other segments of this large
university to significantly improve the
quality of programs. In the past ten
years, the university has been supplied


Arnold F. Butt, AIA
Chairman
Department of Architecture
University of Florida

with increasingly better qualified be-
ginning students. Recently, 2800
freshmen were admitted from about
7000 applicants. 80% of those ac-
cepted were in the top 20% of their
freshmen class. In the last 10 years
the percentage of graduate students
scoring above the national median on
the Graduate Record Examination in-
creased from 35 per cent to 60 per
cent. The number of graduate stu-
dents has more than doubled in the
last seven years. When the student
enrollment topped 20,000, there were
more than 2,000 faculty. In general,
the quality of University programs
has increased significantly. In general,
the Department of Architecture has
shared in this upgrading. Measured
by the quality of its product the de-
partment has continued to help better
students to become a higher quality
product of what I firmly believe is a
better architectural education than
was available 10 or 15 years ago.

There is another measure of quality at
the University, however, in which I
suggest the Department of Architec-
ture has not had it's full measure of
success. The total university budget
in 1968 was over $80 million and
more than half of that sum came from
other than state tax sources. Since the
funds other than those from the state
were primarily from grants of various
types, and since most of these grants
were for some type of service to soci-
ety, I suggest that the Department of
Architecture has not been able to
demonstrate yet how to put its'
knowledge to use for the benefit of
society in the way in which other pro-
fessionals have done. I suggest further
that the architectural profession and
most individuals in it measure up in
about the same fashion. The students
know this well and many are doing
something about it as individuals. It
is a concern of the AIA and it will
continue to be the concern of the
department.
Some progress has been made to bring
the potential for service of our faculty
and students to the attention of those
segments of society which can benefit.
We expect further success from our
own efforts. It would be a much more
effective effort if we could have the
concerted support of a group of prac-
ticing architects in the state who
would be willing to serve in an ad-
visory capacity in the school. An in-
formal request for help in the creation
of such a group has recently been
made to the FAAIA and we look for
further discussion and action in the
near future. It may be that I can
report something further in two
months when I will again have an
opportunity to write in The Florida
Architect. E


46 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / January/February 1970






This Is Zyrian Stone...


This is an angle photograph of an actual panel 17' wide.

It began over 500 million years ago .. in a quarry outside Min-
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to any shape. Variety is infinite. No two slabs show the same color
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to reach such perfection of beauty and facility. It was worth the wait.


* i'i


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
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