• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Miami Lakes: The beginnings
 Table of Contents
 Miami Lakes: The good life
 Miami Lakes: The plan
 Miami Lakes: Community facilit...
 Miami Lakes: Multi-living...
 Miami Lakes: Single living...
 Miami Lakes: The industrial...
 Convention news
 Back Cover






Title: Florida architect
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00183
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Series Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: September 1969
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00183
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Miami Lakes: The beginnings
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Miami Lakes: The good life
        Page 5
    Miami Lakes: The plan
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Miami Lakes: Community facilities
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Miami Lakes: Multi-living units
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Miami Lakes: Single living units
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Miami Lakes: The industrial park
        Page 17
    Convention news
        Page 18
    Back Cover
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text

W A A Flo


This- publication- is. copyrighted. by- the- Florida.
Association. of. the. American. Institute. of-
Architects- and- is- an- official- journal- of- the-
Association.

Limited permission to. digitize- and make this- electronic-
version available- has- been- granted- by the. Association-
to- the- University- of- Florida- on- behalf- of- the- State-
University- System* of F lorida.

Use- of- this- version- is- restricted- by. United- States-
Copyright- legislation- and- its- fair use- provisions.- Other-
uses- may- be- a vi olati on -of- copyright- protect ons.

Requests- for- permissions- should- be- directed to- the-
Florida- Association- of. the. American- Institute. of-
Architects.- Contact- information- is- available- at- the-
Association' sweb site.







September 1969


The Florida Architect


gap S


New Town Miami Lakes


Wei1






MIAMI LAKES: How is a new town born?
rhT B Sometimes perhaps not often
The beginnings enough-a town grows up around
.a precise plan. When the plan
is good enough, far-reaching
E1 enough, injected with enough vi-
gor and money and skill, then its
f" product earns .the community
planners' title of new town.
The New Town of Miami Lakes
started out in the mid '40s with
an unusual combination of oppor-
tunity, motivation and a definite
........ idea of creating something new
in a modern, planned community.

-The Graham family faced a de-
Scision on what to do with some
of the extensive acreage the late
State Sen. Ernest R. Graham, had
picked up for a song in the 1 920s.
But Miami was booming. Houses
were springing up north and west.
Obviously, choice acreage in what
now is the big bend of the Pal-
metto Expressway was not going
to stay pastureland for long.

1A" 'By the early 1950s, an idea had
begun to take form. With 3,000
.4 acres of high, dry land right
smack at the point where Dade
and Broward counties were rush-
ing to meet, there just might be
-'I ,.











a rare opportunity to build some-
thing that would avoid some of
the shortsightedness often de-
tected in other developments.

The first plan for a "dream town"
had everything a downtown
town center, landscaped residen-
tial areas, gracefully curved roads,
apartment and townhouse units,
recreation areas, golf courses and
water plenty of water.
Finger lakes, instead of rectan-
gular ones, were chosen after re-
jecting canals, with a number of
them dotting the community.
Thus came the name of the new
town: Miami Lakes. N
2 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / September 1969






September 1969 / Volume 19 / Number 9



Miami Lakes:
The Beginnings

The Good Life


The Plan


Community Facilities


Multi-living Units


Single Living Units


The Industrial Park


Convention News


Advertisers' Index


Urban living is a 20th Century
fact of life. By 1975, says the
National Planning Association, 73
of every 100 Americans will be
living in metropolitan-area com-
munities. Miami Lakes develop-
ers are proving fkat a new urban
center can be carefully--and
successfully- planned for peo-
ple.

The editorial content in this issue
is devoted to the story of Miami
Lakes, a new town on the fringes
of a fast growing urban area. The
cover depicts four facets of com-
munity life: religion, work, play
and home.


2


5


6


9


12


15


17


18


18


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Chapter
Donald I. Singer Joseph T. Romano
Daytona Beach Chapter
David A. Leete Carl Gerken
Florida Central Chapter
Jack McCandless-James R. Dry
I. Blount Wagner
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
Edward J. Seibert- Frank Folsom Smith
Florida North Chapter
Charles F. Harrington-James D. McGinley, Jr.
Florida North Central Chapter
Mays Leroy Gray Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Chapter
Thomas H. Daniels- Richard L. MacNeil
Florida South Chapter
Robert J. Boerema- George F. Reed
Walter S. Klements
Jacksonville Chapter
Albert L. Smith Herschel E. Shepard
Charles E. Patillo, III
Mid-Florida Chapter
Wythe David Sims, II Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach Chapter
Howarth L. Lewis Rudolph M. Arsenicos
John B. Marion
Director, Florida Region, American
Institute of Architects
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth


Executive Director, Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables
OFFICERS
H. Leslie Walker, President
706 Franklin St., Suite 1218
Tampa, Florida 33602
Harry E. Burns, Jr., Vice President/P
Designate
1114 Prudential Bldg.
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
James J. Jennewein, Secretary
Exchange National Bank Bldg., Suite 1020
Tampa, Florida 33602
Myrl J. Hanes, Treasurer
P. O. Box 609
Gainesville, Florida 32601

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Charles E. Patillo, III
Russell J. Minardi
Wythe D. Sims, II
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty / Assistant Editor
Helen Bronson / Circulation
Howard Doehla / Advertising
Kurt Waldmann/Photography


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
Journal of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is
owned and published by the Association, a
Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published monthly at the Executive Office of
the Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distrib-
uted without charge of 4,669 registered archi-
tects, builders, contractors, designers, engineers
and members of allied fields throughout the
state of Florida-and to leading financial in-
stitutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are wel-
comed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA
publications, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT for prior use Controlled circula-
tion postage paid at Miami, Florida. Single
copies, 75 cents, subscription, members $2.00
per year, industry and non-members $6.50 per
year. February Roster Issue, $10.00 Mc-
Murray Printers.


COVER:







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4 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / September 1969







MIAMI LAKES: The Good Life


E SIDEWALK BICYCLE PATHS



LAKES FOR SWIMMING AND FISHING


Too many people move to the
Sunshine State for recreation,
only to find crowded beaches,
crowded highways.and long lines
between them and just about
everything.


The lakes, with their sparkling
crystal waters, lure the swimmer
and sailor out of doors. The con-
venient location means more time
in the water and less time get-
ting to it.
The lakes are also for fishing.
Just stick a pole out of a town-
house kitchen and dinner is on
the line.

A lighted driving range and two
18-hole courses lure the golfer,
who can celebrate his score over
19th hole drinks in the elegant
Miami Lakes Country Club and
Inn, to which every Miami Lakes
resident automatically belongs.

The equestrian can stable his
beauty at the Miami Lakes Riding
Academy, which is all but in the
backyard.
A common sight on the many
residential lakes is the sailboat,
parked at the lakeside backdoor
but not in the driveway. All boats,
unless in the water, must be kept
in the garage to preserve the
neighborhood appearance. Power
boat fans and water-skiing buffs
enjoy Lake Ruth, a large body of
water in northwest Miami Lakes.
*







MIAMI LAKES: The Plan


"The most beautifully planned
'New Town' in America," that is
the flattering sobriquet applied
to Miami Lakes and it aptly de-
scribes the New Town develop-
ment that merits the accolade
given it by professional urban
planners.


This current master plan is the
result of constant planning and
updating which will keep the ul-
timate development of Miami
Lakes concurrent with the latest
trends and concepts of planning
and environmental design.
OWNER/DEVELOPER
Sengra Development Corp.


6 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / September 1969






















SHOPPING CENTER NOW IN THE PLANNING STAGES/
ARCHITECTS: DONN EMMONS, WAHL SNYDER, FAIA


Miami Lakes was planned very
carefully by Collins, Simonds &
Simonds for the finest in Florida
living.

Working closely with the METRO
Parks Department, Planning and
School Boards, theNew Town de-
velopers, with painstaking thor-
oughness, evolved a master plan
for Miami Lakes.

The master plan, guiding the de-
velopment of the area, provides
for complete community facilities,
superb landscaping and varied
home styles, to create an esthe-
tically pleasing community that is
functional and practical. The plan
provides for a "New Town" in its
entirety with shopping cen-
ters, recreational areas and activ-
ities, single and multi family
structures, parks, lakes, church
and school sites and an industrial
park. All streets wind and turn
to avoid monotonous "grid" pat-
terns and for greater safety.

The development is progressing
in increments "Areas," which
are pre-planned subcommunities
and a part of the master plan,
have been built and landscaped-
each more beautiful than its pre-
decessor.

Each area has its multi-fingered
lake, thereby giving residents pri-
vate moorings for their sailing
craft and sandy beach areas for
swimming, bathing and outdoor
cooking. U


THE FUTURE TOWN CENTER/
PLANNERS: COLLINS, SIMONDS & SIMONDS


THE NEXT APARTMENT DEVELOPMENT
ARCHITECT:
WURSTER, BERNARDI & EMMONS









styled in concrete...all the way up


For extra coolness and long life, even the roof
is concrete tile. In Florida's tropic climate,
concrete tile roofs have long demonstrated the
maximum in life expectancy. And provide
insulation that saves on air conditioning costs.
This handsome home is concrete throughout.
Floors, walks and drives were made with Lehigh
ready-mixed concrete. The walls are Lehigh
concrete block. And the Gory Concrete roof tiles
are made with Lehigh Cement. All are products
made in Florida by people who live here and
know the local conditions and requirements.
When you plan a new structure, check with
Lehigh for the finest materials and service. And
for full information on concrete and
concrete construction.
Owner: Frank Gory, Golden Isles, Hallandale, Fla.
Architect: Philip R. Braden, South Miami, Fla.
Contractor: Romar Construction, Inc., Hallandale, Fla.
Concrete Roof Tile: Gory Roof Tile Manufacturing Inc.,
No. Miami, Fla.
Ready-Mixed Concrete: Lehigh Portland Cement Company,
Miami, Fla.
Concrete Block: Lehigh Portland Cement Company,
Miami, Fla.

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Use of concrete throughout offers longevity, low maintenance costs,
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8 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / September 1969



























ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
ARCHITECT:
GMIAMI LAKES: Community Facilities

Facilities specifically designed to
create a community are one thing
CATHOLIC CHURCH/MURRAY BLAIR WRIGHT, AIA which sets a new town apart from
suburban sprawl. In Miami Lakes
these facilities are being built in
step with the master plan. One
shopping plaza is built and serv-
ing for small daily needs. Another
is in planning stages and will be
ready when population growth can
support it.

Several congregations have al-
ready built churches and sites are
set aside for others. The first
elementary school is being readi-
ed for occupancy soon and a new
senior high school is under con-
struction immediately outside the
town limits. In addition, co-oper-
ative planning with Dade County
Schools and Parks departments
,will see established the first real
'" "school-park" for joint use of
land for educational and recrea-
tional purposes. U


LAKE PATRICIA SHOPPING PLAZA/
ARCHITECTS: MARION MANLEY, FAIA; ROBERT M. LITTLE, FAIA

















































































10 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / September 1969










Look at

oven cleaning

the wa a

woman does.
On your knees, that is. And up to your elbows in grease and grime. Not a pleas-
ant view, is it?
That's why one of today's most popular appliances is the electric range with
self-cleaning oven. With the setting of one simple control, it takes over the home-
maker's most unpleasant and tedious chore.
You know how modern electric appliances can sell a kitchen. And how a
modern electric kitchen can sell a home.
That's why successful builders recognize the woman's point
of view. And why they are installing this much-preferred
electric range.
HnFlorida's .
s Electric "^ii
Companies T
Flda Power & Light Company/Tampa Electric Comaxpany/Floridg,a Power Corstorration/Gulf Power Company




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APARTMENTS


MIAMI LAKES:
Multi-Unit Living


CrRANAr)A VIII A,/AoCwITFrT- WAWIl IZJVnFD PAIA


12 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / September 1969






Townhouses and villas, distinctive
architecture with distinctive com-
fort, are the newest addition to
the Miami Lakes dream of a well-
planned, total community.

Like a European village, the town-
houses and villas snuggle togeth-
er for secure and convenient liv-
ing, making the most of the land
while becoming part of the land-
scape themselves.

Privacy is achieved through air-
conditioning, double walls be-
tween units and rear gardens
backing up on spacious lakes or
hidden behind attractive head-
high wooden fences.

The townhouses and the slightly
larger and more elegant villas
have many of the same extras
found in the Miami Lakes homes
construction, like walk-in closets,
master baths. Kitchens are com-
pact units with everything--dish-
washer, garbage disposal, washer-
dryer-close at hand. The count-
ers have an inlaid wooden cut-
ting board.

Landscaping outside at least one
townhouse bedroom is the sug-
gestive greenery favored by the
East. Nature steps into the bed-
room just by pulling a drape.

And the lighted executive par-
three golf course is a next-door
neighbor. I


VENETIAN VILLAS/ARCHITECT WAHL SNYDER, FAIA































Tod


ay's


system


Modern gas heating.
Fresh, clean, economical
heating. Old fashioned
comfort in a contempo-
rary package.
Gas heating puts it all
together. Compact de-
sign. The dependability


of fewer moving parts.
And the lowest cost of
any method of heating.
Your local Gas Utility
representative has some
facts and figures that
will warm your heart.
He's in the Yellow Pages.


FLORIDA
GAS
TRANSMISSION COMPANY
Winter Park, Florida


ms






Isr ,i


ARCHITECT:
JOEL MEYER


MIAMI LAKES:

Single Unit Living



Instead of plunking down a home
in the middle of a grassy acre,
good mostly for exercising the
lawn mower, Miami Lakes puts
the acreage where it counts most
-into lakes and pocket parks for
both recreation and privacy.

Individual lots are spacious-they
are what a family can effectively
use, no useless stretch of sod on
which to pay additional taxes.

Floor plans for Miami Lakes
homes vary with a combination
available for every family size.
The excellence of design through-
out won the Good Housekeeping
Award three years in a row.

Miami Lakes homes are for liv-
ing, with family rooms off the
kitchen, sometimes separated by
a serivceable bar including handy
sink.

Houses range in price from about
$20,000 to $150,000, but what-
ever the price tag on the home,
the residents participate equally
in country club activities and the
several dozen service and special
interests clubs which have grown
with the town.

Throughout each home are the
touches of elegance and easy liv-
ing: walk-in closets, eye-level
ovens, dishwashers, linen closets.
All Miami Lakes homes have tile
roofs in order to maintain a uni-
formity of beauty and quality
through out the community. All
construction plans must be ap-
proved by the Architectural Con-
trol Committee-and no tempo-
rary structures, like tents or
trailers, are allowed at any time.
N





Braniff International
chose the enduring eloquence of
Portland Cement Terrazzo.





Miami Lakes Industrial Park,
situated adjacent to the Miami
Lakes housing and golfing com-
plex, is situated on 510 acres
of land set aside for that use.
Paved streets, large off-street
parking areas and landscaped
grounds provide a setting for
modern buildings housing a vari-
ety of nationally and locally-
oriented manufacturers and dis-
tributors.

Shielded from residential areas by
a terraced greenway, the indus-
trial park has been carefully plan-
ned and surveyed as a model de-
velopment for clean, light indus-
try that will complement the rest
of Miami Lakes at the same time
it offers employment to thou-
sands in Dade County.

The industrial park is taking
shape initially in a 17-acre "mo-
del block" that features complete
landscaping, underground wiring,
wide streets, 50-foot setbacks and
auxiliary roads to "hidden" park-
ing and loading areas.

The result is'an open, airy, tree-
shaded development that looks
more like a college campus than
a factory zone. W


MIAMI LAKES: The Industrial Park


COPYSTATICS/ARCHITECT: JAMES DEEN, AIA


MINNESOTA (3M) EXPORT. INC.






The Florida Association of The American Institute of
Architects 55th Annual Convention and
Building Products Exhibit / October 24, 25, 26, 27,
West End, Grand Bahama

HOW TO SHAPE MAN TO EARTH'S NEEDS
"How to Shape Man to Earth's Need is a theme both
splendid and challenging. Indeed, it is the singular
challenge of our time.
"This Man-Earth complexity is intimately inter-
related and even indivisible with the mind-body
internal complexity. When both these human eco-
logical factors are recognized by creative minds of
those who are, in some measure, the controllers
of Human Ecology, there is hope that technological
promise can be uncoupled from technological threat.
"The FAAIA is to be congratulated for choosing
such a theme; it should be of profound concern for
all architects and allied professional individuals of
awareness and creativity."
The above statement was written by Dr. S. P. R.
Charter in his letter of acceptance to our invitation
to speak before the FAAIA Annual Convention.
Alfred Browning Parker, FAIA
Robert B. Browne, AIA
Mark Hampton, FAIA
Convention Committee

Dr. S. P. R. Charter is Editor-Publisher of MAN-ON-EARTH, 1
a periodical of writings on Human Ecology, and is a physicist
who has devoted himself since 1945 to the overall area of
Human Ecology.
For the past four years he has been visiting professor at San
Jose State College's School of Engineering in the course
"Cybernation and Man," which he helped establish there;
he remains as Consultant to the Dean of Engineering and
the School.
Dr. Charter is senior consultant to the Research and Design
Institute of Rhode Island and to several international busi-
ness complexes.

lan L. McHarg is Professor and Chairman, Department of
Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania and a partner in the firm of Wallace,
McHarg, Roberts and Todd (Architects, Landscape Archi-
tects, Regional Planners) of Philadelphia.
He is a graduate of Harvard with BLA, MLA, and MCP
degrees. He has written a newly published book "Design
With Nature." In addition, Mr. McHarg has written several
articles for national publications such as Ecology of the City,
The Functions of Open Space in Housing, Ecological De-
terminism, Blight or a Noble City, and Man and Environ-
ment.


Dr. Granville C. Fisher is on the staff of the Psychology
Department at the University of Miami. He is or has been
a manual laborer, prize fighter, artist, architect, preacher,
lecturer, actor, theatrical director and impresario, teacher,
criminal court expert, consulting psychologist, and sportsman.
The Editors of Who's Who in America assessed this extra-
ordinary man in these words: "In the history of the world,
a very large part of what has been achieved can be traced '
to the work or the influence of a relatively small handful
of men men who were dedicated, enterprising, curious
and able to a degree which sets them apart from their con-
temporaries. In a real sense the story of their lives is the
history of the world. Granville Fisher is among those men
whose civic pride and professional skill have contributed to
the progress of American life. He is one of the great men
of our time."


SMALL Se'A.LE


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This is an angle photograph of an actual panel 17' wide.


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THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
..Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulati
Publication at Miami, Fla.

WORLD SECRETARIAT OF JUNIOR CHAMBER
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MORRIS LAPIDUS ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS


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