• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00180
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: June 1969
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00180
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14-15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Back Cover
        Page 28
Full Text





T-A-













































J'une The Florida Architect










































Construction


Industry


Foundation


Formed




The Construction Industry Founda-
tion, the first organization to repre-
sent all segments of the overall
construction industry, was formed in
Washington, May 27-28, under spon-
sorship of the American Institute of
Architects.
Representatives of 14 established asso-
ciations attended the foundation's


organizational meeting at AIA head-
quarters. They represent architects,
engineers, building product manufac-
turers, contractors, subcontractors,
home builders, bank loan officers,
building owners and managers, insur-
ance companies, and credit managers.
The foundation will be operated as a
non-profit, educational organization.
Its broad purpose is to deal with busi-
ness-management, financial, and legal
problems and abuses that damage the
industry, reduce the quality of con-
struction and increase building costs.
Robert G. Cerny, FAIA, The Cernmy
Associates, Minneapolis architectural
firm, was elected president of the
foundation. The CIF was Mr. Cerny's
"brainchild," and he has been active
during the past year in winning sup-
port for it. Robert F. Cushman, Cush-
man & Obert, Philadelphia, will be
legal counsel and interim executive
director.
Until a permanent staff is formed,
CIF headquarters will be in Cushman
& Obert's offices, 2426 Fidelity Build-
ing, 123 South Broad Street, Philadel-
phia 19109. Permanent headquarters
will be in Washington or New York.
The annual operating budget is ex-
pected to be $500,000. Membership
dues are $1,000 per year. "Any in-
dividual, partnership, association, or
corporation engaged in business, fi-
nancial or professional activities and
interested in the welfare of the con-
struction industry" is eligible to join.
The foundation's method of operation
will be to retain experts to analyze
problems and recommend solutions.
Promising solutions will be reviewed
by CIF committees and discussed
with professional and trade associa-
tions. After a proposed solution has
been adopted by CIF membership,
the foundation will put it into effect
by endorsement and action of CIF
members.
At the Washington meeting, four
problems were agreed upon for im-
mediate action. They are:

1. Financial order and reform, par-
ticularly the system of payments to
contractors, subcontractors, mater-
ial suppliers, and manufacturers.

2. Bidding reforms and qualification
of bidders, including bonding
problems and bid-shopping.
3. Establishing standards for plans
and specifications.


4. Product performance and guaran-
tees.

According to a statement of problems
prepared by CIF organizers, the pres-
ent withholding system of payments
is "antiquated and subject to abuse
and hazards. The general contractor
may prudently withhold more than is
necessary to guarantee performance by
a subcontractor. Conversely, a sub-
contractor without the discipline of
substantial withholding may refuse
his responsibility . The owner must
agree to pay a penalty for delayed
payment, and the Federal government
must discipline itself to a reasonable
compensation pattern. Perhaps the
retainage system must be reformed,
possibly with escrow funds invested,
interest accruing to the contractors."
Bidding reform was defined to in-
clude the problem of unenforceable
completion dates. It was pointed out
also that while a bidder's bond is re-
quired on public work there is no
qualification based upon experience
or competence and that there should
be a reasonable ratio between the face
value of a bond and the contractor's
assets.
In regard to the need for a standard
for plans and specifications, the state-
ment of problems said: "The industry
suffers from flagrantly incomplete
plans and specifications. This is par-
ticularly true of FHA apartment
buildings and plans prepared for de-
velopment contractors. These plans
are bid at a hazard . Bidders are
subject to growing liability for per-
formance based upon interpretation of
vague plans."
In establishing standards, the CIF ex-
pects to work with representatives of
Builders Exchanges and the FHA.

Problems associated with product per-
formance and guarantees include the
growing tendency in "third party"
lawsuits to hold architects, engineers,
and contractors responsible for ma-
terial failures, the 'or equal' syn-
drome" in specifications, and the dif-
ficulty of determining whether a
building material or its application is
at fault when a failure occurs.

Other problems on the CIF's list of
those to be analyzed are the increasing
amount of litigation in the industry,
survey and soil exploration hazards,
cost estimating and quantity surveys,
respective responsibilities of architects
and engineers, performance standards,
and general terms and conditions of
construction contracts. E


2 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969





June 1969 / Volume 19 / Number 6



Construction Industry Foundation
Formed


World Secretariat, JCI
Coral Gables

Chamber of Commerce
Orlando

Munroe & Chambliss National
Bank
Ocala


Advertisers' Index


Newsnotes


Focus Now

FAAIA Legislative
Box Score


COVER:


Photograph by Kurt Waldmann
depicts the World Secretariat
Building of Junior Chamber In-
ternational, Coral Gables.


4


6




8



10


20


22



24


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Chapter
Donald I. Singer-Joseph T. Romano
Daytona Beach Chapter
David A. Leete-Carl Gerken
Florida Central Chapter
Jack McCandless- James R. Dry
I. Blount Wagner
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
Edward J. Seibert-Frank Folsom Smith
Florida North Chapter
Charles F. Harrington-James D. McGinley, Jr.
Florida North Central Chapter
Mays Leroy Gray Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Chapter
Thomas H. Daniels- Richard L. MacNeil
Florida South Chapter
Robert J. Boerema George F. Reed
Walter S. Klements
Jacksonville Chapter
Albert L. Smith Herschel E. Shepard
Charles E. Patillo, III
Mid-Florida Chapter
Wythe David Sims, II- Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach Chapter
Howarth L. Lewis-Rudolph M. Arsenicos
John B. Marion
Director, Florida Region, American
Institute of Architects
Hilliard T. Smith, Jr.
1123 Crestwood Blvd., Lake Worth


Executive Director, Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables
OFFICERS
H. Leslie Walker, President
706 Franklin St., Suite 1218
Tampa, Florida 33602
Harry E. Bums, Jr., Vice President/President
Designate
1114 Prudential Bldg.
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
James J. Jennewein, Secretary
Exchange National Bank Bldg., Suite 1020
Tampa, Florida 33602
Myrl J. Hanes, Treasurer
P. 0. Box 609
Gainesville, Florida 32601

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Charles E. Patillo, III
Russell J. Minardi
Wythe D. Sims, II
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty / Assistant Editor
Helen Bronson / Circulation
Howard Doehla / Advertising


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
Journal of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is
owned and published by the Association, a
Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published monthly at the Executive Office of
the Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distrib-
uted without charge of 4,669 registered archi-
tects, builders, contractors, designers, engineers
and members of allied fields throughout the
state of Florida-and to leading financial in-
stitutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are wel-
comed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA
publications, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT for prior use . Controlled circula-
tion postage paid at Miami, Florida. Single
copies, 75 cents, subscription, members $2.00
per year, industry and non-members $6.50 per
year. February Roster Issue, $10.00 . Mc-
Murray Printers.











I


at Coral Gables


The architectural design of the
new World Secretariat of Junior
Chamber International has at-
tempted to incorporate a feeling
for the bold dynamic and youth-
ful organization it houses. The
architects have endeavored to
give an international flavor to the
building while generally avoiding
any architectural style represent-
ing a particular country or period
of time.
If any countries were any more
influential in the design than
others, the architect has com-
mented, perhaps it would have
been the contemporary Japanese,
Italian, American or English. Na-
turally, the nature of the con-
struction material, reinforced con-
crete, had to be kept in mind.
On the first level a feeling of
openness and of general welcome
was desired as this area is to
eventually contain exhibits ac-
cessible to the general public.
The architect did not incorporate
any imposing doorways or col-
umns but created rather a flow-
through feeling. The circular
elevator shaft complements this
general concept. The over-all im-
pression of the exterior with its
"in, out, and back in again" floor
sequence, seeks to symbolize the
movement and action within
Junior Chamber International.


ARCHITECTS -
Morris Lapidus Associates
Architects/Interior Designers,
Miami Beach
Morris Lapidus, A.I.A. & Robert
Swedroe, A.I.A., Designers
Associate Architect, production,
Warren C. Wuertz, A.I.A.
Job Captain, Donald Seidler, R.A.
Interior Designer, Dorothy W.
Hinson, A.I.D.
CONSULTING ENGINEERS -
Oboler & Clarke Inc.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT-
James E. Voss
GENERAL CONTRACTOR -
Clark Construction Co., Inc.


Although the second and third
floors are presently leased they
are the anticipated expansion
areas of JCI as the organization
continues to grow. It was in-
tended that ultimately, the sec-
ond and fifth floors would be the
meeting, reference and historical
type of areas while the third and
fourth floors would be the spe-
cific areas for the day-to-day
work of Junior Chamber.
Another distinctive feature of the
building is an unusual and in-
spiring exterior lighting effect for
night time. The design lends it-
self particularly well to creating
the impression of an entirely dif-
ferent building by night than by
day. N
4 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969


World Secretariat of

Junior Chamber International













































I











MPP
i P@
U,,









C
m







0.
-'





Chamber of Commerce

at Orlando


The problem of housing an ac-
tive Chamber of Commerce in a
growing community is one which
defies definition. In an area where
the influx of people and the re-
quirements of a community are
expanding and changing at vir-
tually unpredictable rates, few
people, if any, are qualified to
speak of the needs of such a fa-
cility as it relates to the future.
It was out of such a concern for
the needs of the future that this
building achieved its form. A
completely flexible mechanical
system, lighting system, interior
partitioning system and exterior
enclosure system simplify the re-
quirements of change.

The site selected for this build-
ing is directly adjacent to a major
state-wide traffic artery within
the outskirts of the Greater Or-
lando Business Area. It was the
intent to provide the Chamber of
Commerce with a viable and sub-
stantial building whose contem-
porary quality would not be the
victim of fad and fashion in arch-
itecture but would instead be-
come an undated statement of the
community's integrity. To this
end, the selection of a simple
form seemed to be essential. The
basic building materials are com-
posed of brick and exposed steel.
The four corner columns support
major plate girders spanning be-
tween them at the building peri-
meter, thereby opening up a
large plaza area beneath the
building. Many interesting views
of Lake Ivanhoe to the north-
east and the rest of the surround-
ing city are available from each
of the perimeter office spaces.
To minimize the problem of solar
gain through large glass areas,
vertical sun screens of steel are
used about the perimeter. The
building also has an area on the
roof which provides an impressive
view of the surrounding area and
is intended to be used for various
Chamber functions such as re-
ception of dignitaries, etc. U


ARCH ITECT -
Schweizer Associates
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS -
Tilden Denson Associates
LANDSCAPE -
William King
CONTRACTOR -
Geiger Jones Construction Co., Inc.


6 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969


























Photos: Robert Duncan Braun







Munroe and Chambliss Nation;


Bank of East Ocala

at Ocala


ARCHITECT -
Hal Thomas Reid, A.I.A.
INTERIOR DESIGNER -
Eric Powell
STRUCTURAL ENGINEER -
M. H. Johnson
MECHANICAL ENGINEER -
Atkin, Conner &r Turknett Co.
CONTRACTOR -
J. Carlyle Ausley, Jr.
The Munroe & Chambliss Na-
tional Bank of East Ocala, is an
affiliate bank of Munroe &
Chambliss National Bank of Oca-
la, the downtown bank. The Bank
is located in a growing residential
and commercial area east of the
central business district.

The design of the bank was to
present a relaxed atmosphere
with the stature and permanence
of a banking institution. The
formality of banking was to be
reduced to a minimum with book-
keeping to be done by the par-
ent bank.

At the request of the Architect
and Interior Designer the bank
8 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969


directors agreed to sponsor a
state wide art show (first art
show for Ocala), to obtain fine
art works for the new bank and
establish a cultural image within
the community. The show was so
successful that the bank has
made the art show on the site
a permanent institution. The win-
ners of the first year now hang
as permanent art works in the
bank.

Load bearing brick masonry walls
are used throughout with steel
beams and bar joist completing
the roof structure. Allowance has
been made to add two more drive-
in teller units at a later date
without destroying the amenities
of the site. E































































t
t.
r
91


Photos: b. Wade bwicord


"
";tJr
"e?. Y(;
?r










M F~ ON I


COOK & PRUITT

MASONRY CONTRACTORS, INC.




4240 S. W. 72nd AVE., P. O. BOX 7337
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33155
TELEPHONE 667-5551
223-1551


ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 33733
P. 0. BOX 10023
TELEPHONE 526-9007



Masonry Work on Junior Chamber International Building


MR. ARCHITECT:

Our "Architectural Program"
was
DESIGNED FOR YOU


Ask for:
Nap Pinkston
Bob Corell
Charles Wiggins
in the Architectural
Department



I W'alton building products, I nc.
4237 Aurora Street
Coral Gables, Florida
P.O. Box 170-33134

10 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969


ANNOUNCING

A Geological Find
Opaque-Translucent Gem
Quality White Quartz
Aggregate For
Architectural Decorative
and Accent Panels or a
Forty Story Building
One pound sample free




Distributor:
Mineral Sales
Corporation
1211 Broadway Box 4322
Macon, Georgia 31208
Phone AC 912 746-2781



Advertisers'

BELCIER OIL COMPANY... 19
CLARK CONSTRUCTION
COMPANY ..................... 12
CONCRETE PRODUCTS DIVI-
SION. W. R. GRACE & CO........ 20
COOK & PRUITT MASONRY
CONTRACTORS, INC. .......... 10
ELEVATOR SALES & SERVICE,
INC............... ...-...-. ...... 21
FLORIDA CATERPILLAR
DEALERS -............. .................. 11
FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION 13
FLORIDA INVESTOR OWNED
ELECTRIC UTILITIES.......... 14-15
FLORIDA NATURAL GAS
ASSOCIATION ............. ........ 17
FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
DIV ISION ....... ....... ................ 18
MINERAL SALES CORP.................. 10
PORTLAND CEMENT
ASSOCIATION ..... ... ...... .......... 16
RIVIERA TILE & TERRAZZO,
INC. ........_......................- ...... .. 21
TRI-CITY ELECTRIC CO., INC._ 21
U. S. PLASTERING CO. __ 21
WALTON BUILDING
PRODUCTS INC....-........... 10


DADE Call today
443-4661 for assistance
in specification
BROWARD writing, product
525-7255 information, pricing,
availability, etc.
































WHEN SERVICE IS YOUR BUSINESS.

CATERPILLAR TOTAL ENERGY

IS AT YOUR SERVICE


Walter Smith, Jr., knows the value of a Caterpillar
total energy system. His Pure City Truck Plaza has
operated on Cat Power, without a major failure, for
more than two and one-half years.
This year-after-year reliability wasn't an accident.
For every on-site Caterpillar generation system has
been engineered to fit the needs of the future ...
as well as the present.
The particular power needs of Pure City are typi-
cal of many large complexes. A Florida Caterpillar
Dealer recommended two natural gas, Cat G353's
to do the job. One engine was engineered to handle
the load in cases of emergency, while the other
generator was designed to supply day-to-day elec-


tricity. To this day, both engines are still doing their
job with efficiency and dependability.
This total energy system has proved to be a money
saver because of lower operating cost (as much as
20 percent compared to outside power) and less
required maintenance. It is also a money saver be-
cause of its capability to recover from the engines
heat that is used for steam cleaning and truck
washing.
If your business requires reliable service, whether
total energy or standby, your Florida Caterpillar
Dealer can engineer power to fit your needs. It's
just good business to go with CATERPILLAR
POWER.


YOUR FLORIDA CATERPILLAR DEALERS


Caterpillar, Cat and Traxcavtor are Registered Trademarks of caterpillar Tractor co.





General Contractor for World Secretariat Building of Junior Chamber International


Clark
Construction
Company










General Contractors
Industrial / Commercial / Residential
45 Giralda Avenue / Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone 446-1601


12 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969





































Today's

Gas air conditioning? It's now.
Ultra-efficient, trouble-free
cooling. Clean design. Simple,
economical operation.
The low operating costs of
gas air conditioning are mak-


systems

ing history, too. As much as
25% lower.
Look into gas air condition-
ing for your next project. Your
local Gas Utility has the cold
facts. Check the Yellow
Pages.


*"c-_^ li"-~- "

- -----
-- - . .. .. t .-- : ""'--:". .








For a free 11" x 14' print of the Otto Gas Engine. send your name and address
to Patent. Advertising Department, Florida Gas Company. P. O. Box 44, Winter Park. Florida 32789.


FLORDA

TRANSMISION COMPANY
Winer Park. Ford





Pages
14-15
missing
from
original










Concrete is0gooSd foryou


Pick a card. Any card.

New PCA computer programs cut your design time on plain
or reinforced concrete, give you more design options, provide
an accurate check on your work.
You don't have to know too much about computers or computereze
to use them.
Simply select the program that covers your problem and contact
your PCA man. He will advise you on the computerized cards
that cover the program, plus input sheets and any explanations
you may need.
Then just send the input sheet to your favorite computer.
If you have none, your PCA man will furnish you a list of computer
service companies.
The computer will provide you with the answers you want
in minutes. The answers that it takes you days-perhaps
weeks-to calculate by hand. Another reason why
concrete is good for you.
Call your PCA man today.


1612 East Coluial Driv, Orlado, Florida 32803
PCA-IMPROVING AND EXTENDING THE USES OF CONCRETE


PORTLAND CEMENT
ASSOCIATION


16 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969





AS A FORMER I6-CITY
PENGUIN, LET ME CLUE YOU
ON SOME OF THE THINGS
YOUR PERIPATETIC
PROCLIUITIES Fl?2E
6ETTIN6 YOU INTO ..


JU(T WWAT I NEED.
TIMELY TIPS ON
TOPIC TOPICS...60
YOU'RE AN EYPERT ?


IG(- T... I WAS A CLIMATE CONTROL
CONSULTANT FOR THE NATURAL 6AS
AIR CONDITIONING fOLkV. IF THE
COMFORT LEVEL WA NOT RI6HT
I WAS TO QUAW V
..BUT 600' 1t WOR TONSILS
I !SELF-DETIZUCT?


NOT AT ALL...WITH AISORPTION COOL-
ING-NO HIGH SPEED COMPRESSOR TO
WEAR OUT... OR RATTLE...OR
6RIND, IT WAS SO QUIET I
SLEPT MOST
OF THE TIME... T






3.



FACED WITH FIVE DULL WEARS...Y'KNOW
THOSE 5-YEAR WARRANTIES...I ENTERED
SHOW BUSINESS. JOINED
THE ZOO. AH.
MY PUBLIC...
THOSE THIEE
DAILY MEALS OF
FROZEN FISH...
OUR COOL, COOL
PEN6UIN PALACE
...ALL GAS AIR
CONDITIONING
OF COURSE...
5.


WELL, O8RING... I DIDN'T EVEN GET
MUCH CHANCE TO TALK SHOP WITH THE
SERVICE MEN. ALMOST NOBODY EVER
CALLED THEM. AND THE
UNITS WERE OUTSIDE ANY-
HOW. WERENT EVEN DID THEY
?AD? ANY '"16H BILL" COM- EVER FILL
PLAINTS OR SERVICE R. JOB ?
INTERRUPTIONS TO
STIRTHINGS UP...



4.



MATTER OF PRINCIPLE
FREEDOM,A PRECIOUS
THING... M-M-M-- YOU
BUT TELL ME-...YOU ESCAPED AND CAME PSYCHIATRIST ?
BACK...WHY ?


FIORIDA
Zoo. INC.


6.


Natural gas is in plentiful supply in virtually all areas of Florida.
For details on natural gas service, contact your local natural gas utility
or Florida Natural Gas Association, P. O. Box 579, Ocala, Florida.
17









Florida Cements
FOR THE FLORIDA CONCRETE
AND PRODUCTS INDUSTRY


Independent ready-
mixed concrete and
concrete products pro-
ducers have plants lo-
cated in cities and towns throughout the
state. These local businesses contribute
millions of dollars annually to Florida's
economy through plant investments,
payrolls, taxes, operating expenditures
and material purchases.


Florida Portland Cement, with plants
in Tampa and Miami, is proud to be part
of this industry by manufacturing for
its use uniformly high quality Florida
Cements and Trinity White Cements.
Support your Florida industries.
Money spent on Florida-made products
helps keep Florida's economy growing
and benefits the state, your community
and you!


SPECIFY AND USE FLORIDA CEMENTS, MANUFACTURED IN FLORIDA FOR OVER 40 YEARS


FLORIDA PORTLAND CEMENT
Division of
General Portland Cement Company
L___ PLANTS AND OFFICES IN TAMPA AND MIAMI

18 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969


I






NEVER FOLLOW A BUM STEER...


... IT WILL COST YOU MONEY.
Like in M4iami Beach particularly, and Florida generally...
people planning and constructing new buildings, renovating
or replacing hot water and heating systems, were warned against
fuel oil equipment.
Sooner or later, they were given to understand, they would be forced
to the expense of replacing oil equipment with gas equipment.
Why? Because, they were told, fuel oil was polluting the air...
and the pollution control man was sure to get them.
Then, a few weeks ago, the Metro Pollution Control Board
reported exhaustive tests showed Miami Beach and Dade County
air among the three purest in America! As it also had been
reported three years earlier. No change. No pollution.
Sorry 'bout that... for those people who followed the bum steer.
It's going to cost them money.*
*Oil, in addition to being clean, safe and dependable, is so much cheaper.


E3 BELCHER OIL CO.

Oil-powered equipment and fuel oil for all uses
MIAMI PORT EVERGLADES WEST PALM BEACH
PORT CANAVERAL TAMPA SARASOTA
FT. MYERS NAPLES
FLORIDIANS SERVING FLORIDA SINCE 1915


19






























NOW PERMADECK"
ROOF DECKS
ARE CERTIFIED

Permadeck is made by forming long,
chemically treated mineralized wood fibers
with Portland Cement into planks, tile or
formboard possessing unique properties-
strength, water resistance, fire resistance,
insulation, high reflectivity and attractive
appearance.
And now Permadeck roof decks are
certified.
Certified Permadeck roof decks are ap-
plied only by Approved Permadeck Appli-
cators who have the proper experience and
equipment to asssure that architectural spec-
ifications are faithfully followed.
At the plants, a rigid testing program is
followed to assure that the Permadeck
equals or surpasses published standards.
Accurate job records concerning applica-
tions are kept by the Approved Permadeck
Applicator.
When the job is completed, we and
the applicator jointly certify that the
Permadeck was properly manufactured
and installed according to architectural
specifications.
All of which assures you of satisfactory
long term performance.
For complete information, call your
Permadeck or Zonolite representative or
write us.


Concrete Products Division
W. R. Grace a Co.
P.O. Box 130, Brunswick, Georgia 31520.
Phone (912) 265-6900
P.O. Box 338, Terry, Mississippi 39170.
Phone (601) 878-5565


Newsnotes

Student Summer
Survey of Buildings
A 4th year student in architecture
at the University of Miami has been
awarded a $250 grant by the National
Council on the Arts to survey Miami-
area buildings this summer.
Alexander Bukhair, 21, of Parma
Heights, Ohio, will take photographs
and draw sketches in a study of indi-
genous-type architecture and correct
use of materials. Similar grants have
been awarded to students in all schools
of architecture in the U.S.

Verner Johnson, AIA
Elected Bank Director
Noted architect, Verner Johnson,
AIA, was elected to the board of Bis-
cayne Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation, it was announced by E. Albert
Pallot, president and board chairman.
In Miami since 1946, and in partner-
ship with Igor Polevitzky, Mr. John-
son designed the original Golden
Strand Hotel, the Havana Riviera, the
outstanding and unique (circular)
Channel 6 Building at 1111 Brickell
Ave., among others.


20 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969


Z 0 0 I













Tri-City Electric Co., Inc.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS


2900 N. W. 7th Street, Miami, Florida 33125


Telephone


642-7822


642-4011


642-7451


These firms helped build World Secretariat Building,JCI


U. S. Plastering Co.

ORNAMENTAL PLASTERING
STUCCO, CAST STONE, LATHING
LIGHT IRON FURRING


1736 S. W. 6th Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Phone: 374-8115


Terrazzo Precast Sills Base Shower Receptors



Riviera Tile

& Terrazzo, Inc.

Telephone 235-7441
9980 S. W. 168th Terrace
Miami, Florida 33157


ELEVATOR SALES & SERVICE, INC.
133 GIRALDA AVENUE CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA 33134
PHONE 444-7641

Representing
ARMOR ELEVATOR COMPANY INC.
WOODSIDE, NEW YORK






The 1969 AIA/RAIC Convention and
Building Products Exhibit was held in
Chicago on June 22-26. Presented here-
with is a capsule of some happenings at
the convention.


Items

New AIA Officers
Rex Whitaker Allen, FAIA, of San
Francisco, was installed as President
of The American Institute of Archi-
tects.

Robert F. Hastings, FAIA, of Detroit
was elected First Vice President and
the three elected Vice Presidents
were: Francis D. Lethbridge, FAIA,
Washington, D. C.; George T. Rock-
rise, FAIA, San Francisco; and George
M. White, AIA, of Cleveland.

The newly elected Treasurer of the
Institute is Rex L. Becker, FAIA, of
St. Louis.

Inaddition, six new members of the
Board of Directors began their three
year term of office. They are: Floyd
O. Wolfenbarger, FAIA, representing
the Central States Region; Hilliard T.
Smith, Jr., AIA, of the Florida Re-
gion; Arthur Froehlich, FAIA, of the
California Region; Daniel Boone,
FAIA, of the Texas Region; Russell
O. Deeter, AIA, of the Pennsylvania
Region; and Frederick W. Salogga,
AIA, representing the Illinois Region.

Regional Judiciary Boards Eliminated
The Convention approved the Bylaw
change eliminating the Regional Judi-
ciary Boards. In place of the present
hearings by the regional judiciary
committees and the National Board,
there will now be but one-by the
National Judicial Board.

Terms of AIA Officers Change
The AIA Bylaws were amended to
provide that the Officers and Direc-
tors will take office on January 1 fol-
lowing their election.

Proposed Ethical Standards Introduced
The Task Force on Professional Stan-
dards introduced the proposed Ethical
Standards intended to replace the
present Standards of Professional
Practice. The Convention Delegates,
by motion, directed the Board of Di-
rectors to: continue to refine the
streamlined Ethical Standards; to pre-
sent them at the 1970 Grassroots
meetings; to promulgate them to the
membership; and to bring the final
version to the 1970 Boston Conven-
tion for vote.


Daniel Patrick Moynihan Speaks


"If we are to save our cities and re-
store to American life the sense of
shared experience, trust, and common
purpose that seem to be draining out
of it, the quality of public design has
got to be made a public issue because
it is a political fact," according to
Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Assistant
to the President for Urban Affairs.

Delivering the keynote address at the
joint convention of The American In-
stitute of Architects and The Royal
Architectural Institute of Canada in
Chicago, Dr. Moynihan said, "An era
of great public works is as much
needed in America today as any other
single element in our public life," and
added, "Magnificence does not mean
monumental."

He noted that "the special require-
ment of this age of enormity is to
create a public architecture of inti-
macy, one that brings people together
in an experience of confidence and
trust."

He said, "The American Institute of
Architects shares with Dr. Moynihan
an abiding concern for the social and
economic fabric of the city."

Placing architecture in the context of
contemporary America, Dr. Moynihan
pointed out that the country is no
longer young, that America, not the
world, has changed. He said that the
end of youth "ought to mark the
onset of a period of far more satisfac-
tion and much greater consequence
. . Properly used, this should be a
time of great expectation."

He said that "architecture and urban
planning are the two arts which gov-
ernment by definition must be in-
volved with, for better or worse," that
"the common good requires an un-
common standard of taste and ex-
penditure for the physical appoint-
ments of government and of the
public places of the city.


"The steady deterioration in the qual-
ity of public buildings and spaces,"
he said, has been accomplished by "a
decline in the symbols of public unity
and common purpose with which the
citizen can identify, of which he can
be proud, and by which he can know
what he shares with his fellow citi-
zens."

Dr. Moynihan stated, "Good or bad
architecture is not an option. It is as
fundamental a sign of the competence
of government as will be found." He
said that he believes this is beginning
to be seen, and that the concern has
begun to show results.

Calling for the creation of the "city
beautiful," an "era of great public
works," he said, "At a time when
there is so much that is brutal . .
the task of this less than all-powerful
nation is to show to the world and to
ourselves that, sensing our limitations,
we know also our strength, and that
we will husband and develop those
strengths."

Dr. Moynihan concluded, "The surest
sign of whether we have done this
will reside in the buildings and public
places which we shall construct in our
time, and for which we will be re-
membered or forgotten in history."

Dr. Moynihan expressed optimism in
the Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development's new "Operation
Breakthrough" program. On the sub-
ject of transportation, he said that
although the highways built in the
1920's and 1930's were not, and were
not supposed to be, designed with the
social impact in mind, today the gov-
ernment and highway designers are
aware of this and the impact of all
parts of the transportation system on
community development. Design
teams, such as the one operating in
Baltimore, he said, are a very powerful
conceptual tool, and added, "If any
invention has merit, this one does."


22 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969




















Students Seek
Involvement
Architectural students asked American
architects to donate 10 per cent of
their annual business income to solv-
ing the nation's critical urban prob-
lems.

Taylor Culver, president of the
17,000-member Association of Stu-
dent Chapters of The American In-
stitute of Architects issued the plea at
a meeting between students and AIA
officers at the AIA's 101st annual
convention.


Architects could reach the 10 per cent
goal through direct financial contribu-
tions, donated time, money secured
from foundations or the government,
Culver explained.

Incoming AIA President Rex W.
Allen, FAIA, of San Francisco re-
ponded with a "Yes" when asked by
Culver if he would try to increase
AIA programs of urban problem solv-
ing and public service.

If 15,000 architects donated only four
hours of work a week or two weeks a
year, the value would be more than
$15 million, explained Frank Hunt,
a San Francisco architect.

Culver also urged AIA to "police" its
membership, perhaps ousting members
who failed to contribute to public
service. George E. Kassabaum, FAIA
of St. Louis, said such action would
drive architects out of community
service. Instead architects who are
public spirited should educate and
persuade those who aren't, said Kas-
sabaum.

AIA members are already helping
around 100 community design centers
across the nation. They are also re-
cruiting minority members, helping
get accreditation for architectural
schools at mostly Negro universities,
and advising national, state and local
government on better design of high-
ways, housing, urban renewal and
conservation of air, land and water.

Twenty years ago, said Allen, AIA
was largely concerned with securing
work for architects.

"Now we're increasingly interested in
pubilc service and if we do this well,
we won't have to worry about work."

"However, AIA efforts have often
been minimal," declared Culver.

"We know we have failed. Look
around us. Not just in the ghettos,
But in all our cities, black, white, and
mixed. The structure we have built
isn't working," said Marcus H. Caines
of New York City.

Caines urged architects to join engi-
neers, planners, landscape architects
and other professions and raise a mul-
ti-million-dollar war chest to influence
U. S. government policy, aid the poor,
produce better design in the cities.

"This profession is at a crisis stage.
We could use $10 million to start to
change. And then we would stop de-


signing little buildings on little bits
of land," added Caines.

"Poverty is the real problem in our
cities and there is no architectural
solution for that," said a Princeton
student. Architects must use money,
politics and sociology before design
can help, he added.

Culver explained, "Our request for
$15 million will be used to help com-
munities determine the way in which
they want to live. This is what we
want you to be about," he said. "Ar-
chitects can build their buildings, but
it's the people who are going to live
in them that must say what they
should be. We ask you to stand for
something."

He called for an on-going program,
not a one-year commitment, and said
that it would be structured with equal
student AIA member participation.
"We don't think architecture is nec-
essarily the problem," he said. "We
are re-defining the role of the archi-
tect and want you to be a part of it."

Ray Smith, of the Architects' Work-
shop in Philadelphia, said that the
final product of the work proposed by
the students would not be aesthetics,
but that through the program a com-
munity would be able to develop a
political and economic strength it
did not have before, and it would be
given technical assistance it could not
otherwise afford.

When asked by Robert S. Sturgis,
AIA, Cambridge, Mass., what group-
ing would constitute a "community,"
Culver said that whether it was a
house, an area, a city, or the world,
the "community" would be repre-
sented by an organization and given
funds to sustain it.

Culver said, "We want you to under-
stand that the students are human
beings. We dislike what we've been
given as society, and we want to work
to change it. Specifically, we want to
do it with you-blacks, whites, young,
and old."

AIA President George E. Kassabaum,
FAIA, enjoined the members, "We
have been given a challenge here, not
an unreasonable demand.

(Editor's Note: The ASC Resolution
was brought before the Convention
Delegates who approved it in prin-
ciple. It is believed the intent is to
establish a Task Force Committee to
determine how best the student re-
quest can be accomplished.) N














FAAIA Legislative Box Score


3 Hits


0 Errors


The Association sponsored three legis-
lative bills affecting the Practice of
Architecture and, as the headline
states, all were successfully passed.
They are:
The Corporate Practice bill was
amended but the final wording of the
amendment does not affect the intent
of this permissive legislation.
The Corporate Practice law, to be
effective July 1, 1969, allows the
Florida State Board of Architecture
to establish rules governing the prac-
tice of architecture as a corporation.
We mention this purposely to urge
caution on the part of architects in
presuming their responsibilities and
prerogatives based on Rules not yet
written. We have been informed the
FSBA will make every attempt to es-
tablish these Rules within six months
or earlier.
The bill providing for qualifications
and procedural requirements for ap-
plicants for examination deletes effec-
tive July 1, 1969 the . "seven years
of diversified training" as an alternate
requirement for examination. It does
provide a grandfather clause for those
persons who are presently engaged in
the seven year diversified training re-
quirement to be allowed to sit for
examination if they notify the FSBA
within one year i.e. by June 30, 1970.
The third bill sponsored by FAAIA
allows the FSBA to establish standards
of professional practice or conduct.
The wording of the above bills as
they passed the Legislature appears at
the end of this report. Architects and
those persons planning to become reg-


istered should take time to carefully
read the new statute.

In addition to the three Association
sponsored bills FAAIA was also on
the scene in Tallahassee in the role
of "watchdog" against bad legislation.
The efforts of FAAIA and others were
successful in preventing certain pro-
posed legislation from being enacted,
such as:

a. placing limitations on indemnifi-
cation agreements for construction
contracts,

b. extension of grandfather clause for
landscape architects to become li-
censed without examination,

c. permissive legislation for stock
school plans,

d. mandatory legislation for stock
school plans,

e. requirement for State Superintend-
ent of Education to approve and
be responsible for structural and
mechanical design and strength of
materials in school construction,
f. removal of jurisdiction of apart-
ments from Hotel & Restaurant
Commission.
The legislative efforts of the FAAIA
in behalf of the profession, both mem-
bers and non-members, is one impor-
tant reason why all architects in Flor-
ida should support their professional
organization.
The three Association sponsored bills
are presented herewith:


1

Corporate Practice
Be it enacted by the Legislature of
the State of Florida:
Section 1. Chapter 467, Florida Stat-
utes, is amended by adding a new
section 467.19 to read:
467.19 Corporate and partnership
practice of architecture; certificate of
authorization; fees; revocation or sus-
pension; rules.-

(1) The practice of or offer to prac-
tice architecture by individual archi-
tects registered under this chapter
through a corporation or partnership
offering architectural services to the
public, or by a corporation or partner-


24 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June 1969





ship offering architectural services to
the public through individual regis-
tered architects, as agents, employees,
officers or partners, is permitted sub-
ject to the provisions of this chapter;
provided, that one (1) or more of the
principal officers of such corporation
or partners of such partnership and all
personnel of such corporation or part-
nership who act in its behalf as archi-
tects in this state are registered archi-
tects as provided by this chapter and
provided that control of such corpor-
ation and all partners of such partner-
ship shall be registered architects un-
der this chapter or registered profes-
sional engineers as provided in chapter
471, Florida Statutes, or registered
landscape architects as provided in
chapter 481, Florida Statutes, and
that one (1) or more of the officers
and one (1) or more of the directors
and one (1) or more of the owners of
such corporation, and one (1) or more
of the partners of such partnership
shall be a registered architect as pro-
vided in this chapter, and further pro-
vided that said corporation or partner-
ship has been issued a certificate of
authorization by the board as provided
herein. All documents involving the
practice of architecture which shall
have been prepared for the use of
such corporation or partnership shall
bear the signature and seal of a regis-
tered architect; provided that no ar-
chitect shall affix or permit to be
affixed his seal or his name to any
plan, specification, drawing or other
related document which was not pre-
pared by him or under his responsible
supervising control. Nothing in this
section should be construed to mean
that a certificate or registration to
practice architecture shall be held by
a corporation or partnership.

(2) A corporation or partnership de-
siring a certificate of authorization
shall file with the board an applica-
tion upon such a form to be pre-
scribed by the board and the designa-
tion required by the following sub-
section, accompanied by the fee pre-
scribed by the board, which fee shall
not exceed seventy-five dollars ($75).

(3) A corporation shall file with the
board, using a form provided by the
board, the names and addresses of all
officers and board members of the
corporation, including the principal
officer or officers duly registered to
practice architecture in this state, and
also of an individual or individuals
duly registered to practice architecture
in this state who shall be in responsi-
ble charge of the practice of architec-
ture, in this state, by said corporation.
Such partnership shall file with the


board, using a form provided by the
board, the names and addresses of all
partners of the partnership, including
the partner or partners duly registered
to practice architecture in this state,
and also of an individual or individ-
uals duly registered to practice archi-
tecture in this state who shall be in
responsible charge of the practice of
architecture, in this state, by said
partnership. This same form, giving
the same information, must accon-
pany the annual certification of au-
thorization renewal fee prescribed by
the board. In the event there shall be
a change in any of these persons dur-
ing the year, such changes shall be
designated on the same form and filed
with the board by the corporation or
partnership within thirty (30) days
after the effective date of such
change.

(4) If all the requirements of this
section are met, the board shall issue
to such corporation or partnership a
certificate of authorization. Revoca-
tion or suspension of a certificate of
authorization held by such corporation
or partnership as provided in this
section shall be administered by the
board in the same manner as pro-
vided for revocation of an individual
architect's certificate of registration as
provided in section 467.14, Florida
Statutes.

(5) The board shall promulgate and
enforce such rules as are required to
regulate corporations or partnerships
as to the name of such corporation or
partnership which shall be authorized
to obtain a certificate of authoriza-
tion from the board and as to the
practice of architecture through such
corporation or partnership.

(6) Persons seeking to incorporate
under the provisions of this section
shall first obtain approval from the
Florida state board of architecture
prior to filing their articles of incor-
poration with the office of the secre-
tary of state.

(7) The fact that individual regis-
tered architects practice architecture
through a corporation or partnership
as provided in this section shall not
relieve such architects from personal
liability for their professional acts,
and each such corporation and such
stockholders who are architects or
partnership shall be jointly and sev-
erally liable for the professional acts
of agents, employees, officers, or part-
ners.

Section 2. This act shall take effect
on July 1, 1969.


2


Educational
Requirements
Be it enacted by the Legislature of
the State of Florida:

Section 1. Section 467.08, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:

467.08 Rules governing examinations.

(1) Provisions shall be made by the
Florida state board of architecture for
holding examinations at least twice in
each year, of applicants for registration
to practice architecture, if there shall
be any such application. All persons
now registered to practice architecture
shall continue to be so registered but
all architects must apply for and ob-
tain annual renewals of their registra-
tions as provided by law. Upon pay-
ment of a fee, new applicants may be
admitted by the board upon examin-
ation. The scope of the entrance-to-
practice examination shall be such as
to determine the qualifications of the
applicant to practice architecture and
shall cover such technical and profes-
sional subjects as relate to architecture
and the basic arts and sciences, a
knowledge of which is material to the
proper understanding, application and
practices of the principles of architec-
ture. Any applicant for examination
shall establish by satisfactory evidence
to the board with his application that
he is twenty-one years of age, that he
is a citizen of the United States, or
has pending a declaration of intention
so to become, that he is of good
moral character, that he is a graduate
of an accredited high school or has
Continued a





education equivalent thereto, and that
he is a graduate of a school or college
of architecture appearing upon the
list of approved schools and colleges
of architecture as adopted and pub-
lished by the board in its rules, with
graduation therefrom evidenced by a
diploma setting forth the applicant's
degree, or that he has had training
which shall be found by the board to
be fully equivalent to such degree,
and a minimum of one year of diversi-
fied training in offices of registered
practicing architects.

(2) Time spent engaging in architec-
tural activities either as a part of mili-
tary duties while in the armed forces
of the United States or as a teacher
in a curriculum of architecture at a
school or college of architecture ap-
pearing on the approved list adopted
by the board as provided herein shall
be evaluated by the board for credit
to apply towards the periods of diver-
sified training required herein; and
providing that any applicant, in prop-
er form, filed with and accepted by
the board for consideration at the
time this law becomes effective shall
be subject only to the present re-
quirements of this section 467.08 as
they existed immediately prior to the
adoption of this act. It is further
provided that any person engaged in a
program of seven (7) years of diver-
sified training in offices of registered
practicing architects at the time of
the adoption of this act who shall so
notify the board within one (1) year
after the adoption of this act that he
is engaged in such a program of seven
(7) years of diversified training in
the offices of registered practicing
architects shall be, if otherwise qual-
ified, permitted by the board to take
the examination upon completion of
said seven (7) years of diversified
training as was provided in section
467.08 prior to the adoption of this
act; provided, however, that no cer-
tificate of registration shall be issued
either with or without an examina-
tion to any corporation, partnership,
firm or association to practice archi-
tecture in this state, but all certifi-
cates of registration shall be to in-
dividual persons.

(3) All examinations shall be pre-
pared and conducted by or under the
direction and supervision of the board,
and due notice of the time and place
of the holding of such examinations
shall be published, as in the case pro-
vided for the publication of the rules
and regulations thereof.

Section 2. This act shall take effect
on July 1, 1969.


26 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / June


3


Standards of Practice
or Conduct


Be it enacted by the
the State of Florida:


Legislature of


Section 1. Section 467.01, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:
467.01 Florida state board of archi-
tecture; terms of members.
(1) The governor shall appoint a
Florida state board of architecture, to
be composed of five members who
are architects residing in the state,
who have been engaged in the prac-
tice of architecture at least five years,
whose duty it shall be to carry out
the purposes of this chapter.
(2) No person shall be eligible to
appointment as a member of the
Florida state board of architecture
unless he shall be at the time of his
appointment a citizen of the United
States, a Florida resident, and a re-
gistered architect in this state, nor
unless he shall have had at least ten
years previous experience in the in-
dependent practice of architecture un-
der his own name, of which five years
shall have been within the state, or
shall have had five years experience
in such practice and not less than five
1969


years experience as a member of the
faculty of the school or department of
architecture at the University of Flor-
ida or the University of Miami at
Coral Gables, Florida.

(3) The terms of three of said mem-
bers shall be in four year cycles from
the date of the appointment of the
first board; and terms of the other
two members shall be in four year
cycles from a day two years subse-
quent to such appointment of the
first board; each member shall hold
over after the expiration of his term
until his successor shall be duly ap-
pointed and qualified. Any vacancy
occurring in the membership of the
board shall be filled by the governor
of the state for the unexpired term
of such membership. The governor
may remove any of the members of
said for inefficiency or neglect of
duty.

Section 2. Section 467.03, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:

467.03 Board to adopt rules and reg-
ulations; seal; record; quorum. -

(1) The Florida state board of archi-
tecture shall have power to sue and
be sued in its official name as an
agency of the state and to make such
rules and regulations as may be nec-
essary to govern its proceedings and
shall establish standards of profession-
al practice or conduct encompassing
improper use of an architects seal,
incompetency, negligence, dishonest
practices and acts by an architect
which willfully mislead or defraud
any person.

(2) The board shall adopt a seal,
and the secretary shall have the
care and custody thereof, and shall
keep a record of the proceedings of
the board, which shall always be open
to public examination.

(3) Three members of the board
shall constitute a quorum.

Section 3. Section 467.10, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:

467.10. Who entitled to a certificate
of registration; display; to be recorded.
Any individual person who practices
or offers to practice architecture
through a partnership or corporation
which offers architectural services to
the public must hold a certificate of
registration to practice architecture
as provided in this chapter. Each
person holding certificate of registra-
tion to practice architecture in this
state, shall post such certificate of






registration in a prominent place in
his place of business and shall cause
such certificate of registration to be
recorded in the secretary of state's
office upon payment of a fee of one
dollar to the secretary of state. Failure
to post his certificate of registration
or to have the same recorded, shall
be deemed sufficient cause for revoca-
tion of said certificate of registration.

Section 4. Section 467.11, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:

467.11. Admission without examina-
tion.- Hereafter no person shall be
admitted to practice architecture in
this state without an examination ex-
cept in accordance with the proce-
dure: that a certificate of registration
may be issued upon filing of applica-
tion and payment of the same fees
as if qualified by examination to a
person who meets the requirements
of applicants for examination as set
forth in section 467.08 and has passed
a standard examination and holds a
current certificate issued by the na-
tional council of architectural regis-
tration boards and who furnishes sat-
isfactory evidence of continued honor-
able professional practice after the
passing of such examination together
with satisfactory evidence of his pres-
ent ability and integrity.

Section 5. Section 467.13, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:
/.
467.13. Filling and distribution of
roster; registration made condition
precedent to obtaining occupational
license. No roster of architects need
be published by the board hereafter,
but annually the secretary of the
board shall prepare a roster showing
the names and business addresses of
all registered architects and the names
and business addresses of all partner-
ships, corporations or other business
organizations which hold certificates
of authorization to offer architectural
services and the principal officers,
partners or members thereof and file
the same in the office of the secretary
of state and furnish a copy to each
registered architect. A copy shall also
be furnished without charge upon the
request of any public official of this
state, including any state, county or
municipal building inspector or com-
missioner. Any person applying to the
licensing official of any county, city,
town or village for an occupational
license to practice architecture shall
at the time of such application ex-
hibit to such licensing official satis-
factory evidence under the seal of
the Florida state board of architec-
ture and the hand of its secretary


that such applicant possesses a reg-
istration certificate and any required
annual renewal thereof and no such
occupational license shall be granted
until such evidence shall be presented,
any provision of any special act or
general act notwithstanding.

Section 6. Section 467.14, Florida
Statutes, is amended to read:

467.14. Revocation of registration
certificate; reinstatement; procedure,
process, attorneys, and counsel. -

(1) Any architect's certificate of reg-.
istration issued in accordance with
the provisions of this chapter shall re-
main in full force until revoked for
cause as provided in this chapter.
Any architect's registration certificate
and current renewal may be suspend-
ed for a period not exceeding twelve
months or may be revoked, by the
unanimous vote of the members of
the board sitting with a minimum of
four members in any hearing, *foFr-7
incompetency, or negligence in the
practice of architecturepfor a dishonest
practice for affixing or permitting to
be affixed his seal or his name to any
plan, specification, drawing, or other
related document which was not pre-
pared by him or under his responsible
supervising control;,for using his seal
or doing any other act as an archi-
tect at a time when his certificate of
registration is suspended or at a time
when current renewals have not been
obtained in conformity with section
467.12, Florida Statutes;oon convic-
tion of a felony or misdemeanor in-
volving moral turpitude, in which
case the record of conviction is con-
clusive evidencepfor willfully mislead-
ing or defrauding any person employ-
ing him as an architect;*for violation
of ,the standards of professional prac-
tice or conduct established by rule
and regulation of the board;*or for
the violation of this or any other law
of this state relating to the practice
of architecture or- any lawful rule or
regulation made by the board pur- /
suant to law.

(2) The accused certificate holder
shall have twenty days notice of the
charge against him and of the time
and place of the meeting of the
board for the hearing and determina-
tion of the charge. At such hearing
the accused shall have the right to
cross-examine witnesses against him,
to produce witnesses in his defense,
and to appear personally or by coun-
sel. In the event of suspension or
revocation, the secretary of the board
shall give notice to the secretary of
state, who shall duly cancel the re-


cordation of such registration in his
office.

(3) The Florida state board of archi-
tecture under the hand of its secretary
and seal of the board, may require
the production of books, papers, or
other documents and may issue sub-
poenas to compel the attendance of
witnesses to testify and to produce
such books, papers, or other docu-
ments in their possession before the
board or any member thereof which
are relevant to any hearing or to any
proceeding concerning any violation
of laws regulating architects or the
practices of architecture. Subpoenas
shall be served by the sheriff of the
county where the witness resides or
may be found.

(4) If any person refuses to obey any
subpoena or refuses to testify or to
produce any books, papers, or other
documents required to be produced,
the board may present its petition to
the circuit court of the county where-
in such person was served with sub-
poena setting forth the facts, where-
upon such court shall issue its rule
nisi to such person requiring him to
obey forthwith the subpoena or show
cause why he fails to obey the same.
Unless such person shows sufficient
cause for failing to obey, the court
shall forthwith direct such person
to obey the same. Upon his refusal
to comply he shall be adjudged in
contempt of court and punished
therefore, as the court may direct.

(5) In any judicial proceeding to
which the board may be a party, the
board shall be entitled to the services
of the attorney general of this state
and of the several state attorneys and
assistant state attorneys in any circuit
where such litigation may be. The
board shall also have power to secure
such other legal advice and services
as may be necessary or proper for the
conduct of its affairs.

(6) The person whose certificate of
registration was revoked may have a
new certificate of registration issued
to him by the secretary of said board
upon the certificate of said board,
issued by them upon satisfactory evi-
dence for proper reasons for his re-
instatement, and upon payment to
the secretary of a fee of ten dollars.
The person whose certificate of reg-
istration is suspended shall have his
certificate of registration reinstated
by the board at the end of the period
of his suspension.

Section 7. This act shall take effect
July 1, 1969. U




THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
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Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
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Publication at Miami, Fla.






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Convention Pre-Payment
Deposit Plan For
Architects

At the request of the FAAIA
President the Pre-Payment Depo-
sit Plan for the October Conven-
tion remains open for participa-
tion by all architects and by as-
sociate members of AIA Chap-
ters. The membership received
the necessary materials early in
April and the response was good:
Anyone desiring to participate
may do so with the only differ-
ence being a reduced number of
payments towards the hotel room
cost. If you do not have the form
and wish to begin participating
please contact the Association
office.
The Convention Program Com-
mittee will begin to release in-
formation on the Convention Pro-
gram within the next thirty days.
At this time hotel room reserva-
tion forms will be sent to every
registered architect and associate
members.



the 55th Annual
Convention
Florida Association
of the
American Institute
of Architects

October
24, 25, 26, 27
1969

Grand Bahamas Hotel & Country Club, West End, Grand Bahama Island




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