Title: Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00179
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: May 1969
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00073793
Volume ID: VID00179
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Full Text






























The Florida Architect
May
1969


wNomeI CY








May 1969 / Volume 19 / Number 5


Loch Haven Art Center



Advertisers' Index



Letter



Brumos Pompano, Inc.



Florida Architect Handbook



Newsnotes


State Fire Marshal's
Rules and Regulations


Bold massing in brick articulates
the Loch Haven Art Center in
Orlando. Architects were Schwei-
zer Associates and the dramatic
cover photo is by Robert Duncan
Braun.


7



8



20



21


21


The Florida Architect



THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS


BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Broward County Chapter
Donald I. Singer--Joseph T. Romano
Daytona Beach Chapter
David A. Leete-Carl Gerken
Florida Central Chapter
Jack McCandless--James R. Dry
I. Blount Wagner
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter
Edward J. Seibert Frank Folsom Smith
Florida North Chapter
Charles F. Harrington-James D. McGinley, Jr.
Florida North Central Chapter
Mays Leroy Gray Forrest R. Coxen
Florida Northwest Chapter
Thomas H. Daniels -Richard L. MacNeil
Florida South Chapter
Robert J. Boerema- George F. Reed
Walter S. Klements
Jacksonville Chapter
Albert L. Smith-Herschel E. Shepard
Charles E. Patillo, III
Mid-Florida Chapter
Wythe David Sims, II -Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach Chapter
Howarth L. Lewis Rudolph M. Arsenicos
John B. Marion
Director, Florida Region, American
Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA,
1600 N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami


Executive Director, Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects
Fotis N. Karousatos,
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables
OFFICERS
H. Leslie Walker, President
706 Franklin St., Suite 1218
Tampa, Florida 33602
Harry E. Burns, Jr., Vice President/President
Designate
1113 Prudential Bldg.
Jacksonville, Florida 32207
James J. Jennewein, Secretary
Exchange National Bank il.M: Suite 1020
Tampa, Florida : ., -
Myrl J. Hanes, Treasurer
P. O. Box 609
Gainesville, Florida 32601

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Charles E. Patillo, III
Russell J. Minardi
Wythe D. Sims, II
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty /Assistant Editor
Helen Bronson / Circulation
Howard Doehla / Advertising


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
Journal of the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, Inc., is
owned and published by the Association, a
Florida Corporation not for profit. It is
published monthly at the Executive Office of
the Association, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distrib-
uted without charge of 4,669 registered archi-
tects, builders, contractors, designers, engineers
and members of allied fields throughout the
state of Florida-and to leading financial in-
stitutions, national architectural firms and
journals.

Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architects' work, are wel-
comed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA
publications, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT for prior use . .Controlled circula-
tion postage paid at Miami, Florida. Single
copies, 75 cents, subscription, members $2.00
per year, industry and non-members $6.50 per
year. February Roster Issue, $10.00 . Mc-
Murray Printers.


2 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969


COVER:






In Orlando


Photo: G. Wade Swicord


Loch Haven Art Center ARCHITECT / Schweizer Associates
Loch Haven Art enter CONTRACTOR / Jack Jennings


The proposed ultimate develop-
ment of Loch Haven Art Center
is to occur on the site of the
present facility, located in Loch
Haven Park, overlooking lakes to
the east and north. It is antic-
ipated that the center shall be-
come the hub of cultural en-
deavor for the Central Florida
Area.

The program established for the
development of the center was
extremely complex. Considera-
tion for security, museum fa-
tique, lighting, receptions, edu-
cational and display functions
were incorporated in the design.
The design grew from the func-
tional requirements, although the
aesthetic and psychological im-
pact of the building were of ut-
most importance and constantly
considered.

The character, or style, of the
building is one of elegant sim-
plicity, and yet by no means
sterile or severe. The use of
warm brick at the building base,
the entrance pool, the relief de-
sign and the intricate massing
and surfaces are designed to of-
fer an open invitation to the com-
munity to enter, inspect, and


enjoy the artistic work enclosed
within.

The entrance and lobby are for-
mal in arrangement in order to
establish the dignity and validity
of the artistic efforts which will
lead directly or indirectly to the
ultimate development of this fac-
ility. Generating from the lobby
are informal spaces, the type of
space in which one feels free and
unrestricted. Although its sec-
urity measures are extremely
strict the building needed to re-
flect man's intellectual freedom
his freedom to become aware of
his world, his freedom to think,
his freedom to create.

The interior spaces were not to
dominate the human element or
accomplishments within the build-
ing, but were designed by scale
and arrangement to compliment
the work displayed or the proj-
ects being worked upon. Still it
was most necessary to establish
a sense of permanence for this
building, and all it represents.
By boldly massing and utilizing
elements which made positive
statements, the strength of the
building was insured.
Continued *








































Loch Haven Art Center
The character of such a building
is quite difficult to define in a
few short words. Because of its
complex program it must possess
many traits and as often happens
in flexible individuals, these ex-
pressions of character can be
contradictory.
The building is formal, yet flows
freely, it imposes restrictions
while encouraging freedom, it
displays strength but will not
dominate or overpower.

It is straight-forward and honest,
and yet its simplicity belies the
complex functions from which it
grew. It is a contemporary build-
ing in so far as concept and
museum technology are concern-
ed, yet it delights in the use of
traditional materials.
The building, in order to project
itself into the community and
fill its needs, must do many
things, and gain its acceptance
not through one outstanding trait
but through many. U
4 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969











Photos: G. Wade Swicord


'Ii







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I II
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,47






Masonry Contractor

P.O. Box 6094
Orlando, Florida
275-9067
















Charles E.
Whitmore


Miscellaneous Metals


1030 Wilfred Drive
Orlando, Florida
843-1840












Jennings
&
Jennings
Construction
Co.


2809 N. Orange Avenue
Orlando, Florida
422-1653
















R. G. Coffman
Company, Inc.


These firms helped build Loch Haven Art Center


Jack Jennings

General Contractor

1030 Wilfred Drive
Orlando, Florida
843-1840


6 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969


Millwork







Letter
April Issue

Just a note of commendation on The
Florida Architect's presentation of
Uxmal and Chichen-Itza.

Sebastian Trujillo did a beautiful job
of text and photography.

Sincerely,
Russell T. Pancoast


Advertisers
BELCHER OIL CO.
16
BRUMOS POMPANO, INC.
22
CALLAHAN PLUMBING
& HEATING
10
CHARLES E. WHITMORE
6
CONTROLLED AIR CORP.
10
DUNAN BRICK CO.
23
FLORIDA GAS
TRANSMISSION CO.
15
FLORIDA INVESTOR OWNED
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
12-13
FLORIDA NATURAL GAS
ASSOCIATION
18-19
FREDERICK SCHILL & CO.
10
JACK JENNINGS
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
6
JENNINGS & JENNINGS
CONSTRUCTION CO.
6
LEHIGH PORTLAND
CEMENT CO.
11
MATTHIESSEN & HEGELER
ZINC CO.
7
PORTLAND C- 1II.NT
ASSOCIATION
17
R. G. COFFMAN CO., INC.
6
SLATER CONSTRUCTION CO.
10
TRINITY WHITE, GENERAL
PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
14


TITANALOY

The "architect's metal" for design, diversity, depend-
ability: the zinc-copper-titanium alloy, TITANALOY. Prac-
tically-priced, lower than copper. No streaks; no stain:
weathers to a subtle grey/black beauty a distinctive
patina compatible with any building style, material.
Highly corrosion resistant. TITANALOY forms easily,
solders and welds in the shop or on-site. Specify TITAN-
ALOY Unquestionable in taste and test. Available in
unlimited quantities for prompt delivery.
D. D. Harper
Doug. D. Harper & Associates
REPRESENTED BY 3945 Richmond Ave. P.O. Box 5202
Shreveport, Louisiana 71106
Phone: 318/868-5314
DISTRIBUTED IN FLORIDA BY
Jacksonville, Florida Metal Products, Inc., P.O. Box 6310
Jacksonville, Horne-Wilson, Inc., 745 W. Forsyth Street
Jacksonville, Reynolds Aluminum Supply Co., 590 Beautyrest Road
Jacksonville, J. M. Tull Metal & Supply Co., 5336 Highway Avenue
Miami, Horne-Wilson, Inc., 3401 N.W. 31st Street
Miami, Reynolds Aluminum Supply Co., 3690 N.W. 52nd Street
Miami, J. M. Tull Metal & Supply Co., Inc., 6201 N.W. 36th Avenue
Orlando, Reynolds Aluminum Supply Co., 2040 N. Rio Grand Avenue
St. Petersburg, Reynolds Aluminum Supply Co., 2700 23rd Street
Tampa, Eagle Roofing & Art Metal Works, 13th & 4th Avenue
Tampa, J. M. Tull Metal & Supply Co., 2736 E. Hanna Avenue

MATTHIESSEN & HEGELER
ZINC COMPANY
Main Office: La Salle, Illinois
Phone: 815/223-8600
New York Office: 233 Broadway Rm. 4015
Phone: 212/267-6542













Mercedes Benz-Porsche dealer-
ship, Brumos Pompano, Inc., was
designed to showcase, sell and
service luxury cars in luxury sur-
roundings. This premise while
recognized by Cadillac in the do-
mestic market had not been at-
tempted in the luxury foreign car
field until Brumos Pompano.
That this made good business
sense has been borne out by the
spectacular increase in sales vol-
ume since opening of the new
facility.

The Owner's requirements were
simple: An agency that was dif-
ferent from others, a personal
office complex for himself, a
low maintenance building and a
rigid construction budget. The
resulting multi-level building
brings together certain functions
by plan and multi-level relation-
ships and isolates others with the
same devices.

The elevated showroom and out-
door display area occupy a mid-
level between executive space
on the upper level and business
offices and service facilities on
the lower level.


The executive or top level over-
looks sales and service areas for
visual control, and psychological-
ly, authority elevated and observ-
ing has its effect. The Executive
Office complex provides the
owner with a satisfying environ-
ment to direct the affairs of the
agency and his many and varied
other enterprises. The furnish-
ings, the result of close collabora-
tion with the Interior Designer,
deliberately avoid the office at-
mosphere and is evocative of the
serene feeling of a gentleman's
club. Necessary business appur-
tenances and equipment are con-
cealed when not in use, further
contributing to this mood.

The mid-level of the showroom
sales area was necessary visually
to provide sight lines above the
top of cars parked at grade level
-both used car displays, and
customers' cars. The placement
of the sales manager's office gives
visual control of showroom and
outdoor displays. The salesmen's
octagon offices provide a num-
ber of sophisticated sales devices
including sound movies. The con-
tribution of carpeting to noise re-


duction is evident. Interior de-
sign and furnishings were
thoughtfully considered for their
effect on employees as well as
customers.
On the lower level, the work flow
in the Service Department was
carefully considered. Special at-
tention was paid to the relation-
ship between the Office, Parts
Department, and Service Depart-
ment, to furnish centralized con-
trol with a small work force. The
sequence of work through the
Service Department, Parts Issue,
and the parallel paper records de-
termined the layout.
Seemingly extravagant materials,
e.g., tile wainscots in shop areas,
brick and gravel wall and floor-
ing, it is felt will in the overall
view maintain their appearance
and not require periodic refinish-
ing as would another surface.
Signs were deliberately detached
from the building. Signs serve
their purpose equally well for
identification and do not vie with
the building and its purpose to
show the cars to their undis-
tracted advantage. E


In Pompano Beach

Brumos Pompano, Inc.


ARCHITECT / James E. Lynskey, AIA
CONTRACTOR / Slater Construction Company


8./ THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969
































Photos: Robert N. Morris W







2222 N. Atlantic Blvd.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
565-4951
















Slater
Construction
Company


4444 N.E. 8th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308
566-9011














Callahan
Plumbing
&
Heating


Millwork & Cabinetry


500 North Flagler Avenue
Pompano Beach, Florida
946-4440


















Frederick Schill
& Company


These firms helped build Brumos Pompano, Inc.


Carrier



BRUMOS POMPANO, INC., Pompano Beach
and many other distinguished "Gold Coast"
firms have chosen the best for prestige
buildings ... CARRIER AIR CONDITIONING

Engineered
and
Installed by:


Controlled Air Corp.
SALES & SERVICE
AIR CONDITIONING- HEATING- REFRIGERATION
533 N. E. 34th Street
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308
565-2586


10 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969







New Winter Park High School

... the Florida growth that Lehigh helps make happen


-ALF


This spacious new two-story
school complex typifies the vigor
and rapid expansion of Florida. Its
design reflects the growth, not
only of structures, but of young
minds and bodies that will mature
to become the state's greatest
resource.
Here, as in many new design
ideas around Florida, Lehigh was
able to help. The Company offers
architects and engineers building
products made in Florida by people
who live here and know local
conditions and requirements.
Plus technical assistance which
not only incorporates thinking
based on local conditions, but
experience gained from a wide
variety of projects throughout the
United States as well.
When you plan a new building,
check the Lehigh plant nearest
you for information on concrete
and concrete construction.
Owner:
Board of Public Instruction, Orange County, Fla.
Architect and Engineer:
Rogers, Lovelock & Fritz, Winter Park, Fla.
Contractor:
Frank J. Rooney, Inc., Orlando, Fla.
Ready-Mixed Concrete:
Lehigh Portland Cement Co., Orlando, Fla.
Concrete Masonry Units:
Lehigh Portland Cement Co., Orlando, Fla.
Precast Concrete Seats:
Durastress, Leesburg, Fla.
Precast Concrete Panels:
Precast Industries, Miami, Fla.


LE H IGH
G-iE1VENTS --


This new high school to be completed by September, 1969, will have facilities for 3,000
students. Reinforced concrete frames and floors, with concrete masonry back-up and
partition walls throughout, give maximum durability and fire safety to these buildings.


IL..V *


Precast concrete seats for this school gymnasium provide additional
fire safety. Other precast concrete units give pleasing architectural contrast
to exterior masonry. These precast units are also made with Lehigh Cements.


Lehigh ready mix concrete and Lehigh concrete masonry units,
both made with Lehigh Cements,
were used exclusively in this project.


LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY 0 P.O. Box 16937, Jacksonville, Fla. 32216
11


1 I

IB














MR. BRUCE H. MALECOT OF ST. PETERSBURG:
"When you figure how reasonable our daily
operating cost for electric air conditioning is, it's
easy to see why we use and enjoy it in our home.
The whole family not only feels better, but the house
stays quieter and cleaner. We feel it's a most
economical investment in good living for our family."


MR. HARRY E. SHAW OF TAMPA:"I just couldn't s
going to the trouble and expense of building a home
we wouldn't be completely pleased with ... that's
why we built a total electric Gold Medallion home."
MRS. SHAW ADDS HER VOTE: "It's so convenient.
With electric heating and air conditioning our home
stays so much cleaner. Less dirt means less work,
and more time for leisure. And you needn't worry
about gauges, or running out of fuel on a cold night.
Another advantage of our Gold Medallion home is
the lighting. Our system was planned by the experts
at the Electric Company, and it's wonderful."


bour more

votes for

Gold Medallion

livin


12 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969























MRS. ROBERT CHAVIS OF PENSACOLA: "Our Gold
Medallion home is always up to the job. My little girl
and the neighborhood children are in and out of
the house all day, sometimes forgetting to close the
door. But our electric heating and air conditioning
always maintains a comfortable temperature. And I'm
very pleased with the electric water heater, which
always provides plenty of hot water. We are proud
of our Gold Medallion home."


You can't argue with the people's
choice... not if you hope to profit in
any business related to housing. And
the people's choice is Gold Medallion.
If you want to know more about
the advantages to you of the
Gold Medallion Home Program-and
all the sales promotion support it gives
you-contact your electric utility.
No obligation. Except to your clients
and your profit sheet.


MR. BEN L. DICK OF MIAMI SHORES: "Just a note
to advise how much we enjoy the convenience
in our new Gold Medallion home. This was our first
custom-built home, and having been closely
associated with the building industry, you can be
certain we researched and chose each item very
carefully. Our choice of total electric was concurred
with by our architect and our builder. We especially
enjoy the controlled heating and cooling with our
reverse-cycle electric air conditioning system."


Florida's Electric Companies...
Taxpaying, Investor-Owned
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
TAMPA ELECTRIC COMPANY
FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION
GULF POWER COMPANY






There are many reasons why

you should use Marblecrete in your design.



I -l


Universityof Washington The Intramural Activities Building at the
Intramural Activities
Building, Seattle. University of Washington provides an
Architect: Robert almost classic example. The University
andAssoc.,Tacoma. needed a strong, economical, good-
Lathing and Plastering looking building exterior. They got what
Contractor: J. Jefferson
&Son,nc., Seattle. they wanted by choosing Marblecrete.
enter Contractior For a lot of good-sense reasons:
Company, Seattle. Flexibility: Any size or shape wall or wall
section is possible with Marblecrete.
Texture: A wide variety of textures is
available through the selection of an
almost limitless number of aggregates.
Color: Color choice is unlimited. Let
aggregate shades, matrix tints, and
imagination be your guide.
Economy: Marblecrete's simplicity of
construction offers budget-stretching
economy.
Beauty: Marblecrete offers a distinctive
beauty all its own. A beauty you create
through your choice of color and
texture. And a beauty that lasts, because
Marblecrete is maintenance-free.


Specify Marblecrete made withT A U J Portland Cement or Masonry Cement



General Portland Cement Company
Offices: Chattanooga, Dallas, Fort Wayne, Houston, Kansas City, Kan., Los Angeles, Miami, Tampa
14 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969





































Tod


ays


systems


Water heating methods
have come a long way.
Modern gas water heat-
ing now provides more
hot water at a lower cost.
Significant savings -
no matter how large or
small the installation.
And the recovery rate is
twice as fast as electric!
Do you have the latest
facts on today's gas


I I


water heating systems?
They're available from
your local gas utility.
Check the Yellow Pages.
For a free 11x14 print
of the 1894 water heater/
stove, send your name
and address to: Patent,
Advertising Department,
Florida Gas Co., Post
Office Box 44, Winter
Park, Florida 32789.


GAS
TRANSMISSION COMPANY
Winter Park, Florida







NEVER FOLLOW A BUM STEER...


... IT WILL COST YOU MONEY.
Like in Miami Beach particularly, and Florida generally...
people planning and constructing new buildings, renovating
or replacing hot water and heating systems, were warned against
fuel oil equipment.
Sooner or later, they were given to understand, they would be forced
to the expense of replacing oil equipment with gas equipment.
Why? Because, they were told, fuel oil was polluting the air...
and the pollution control man was sure to get them.
Then, a few weeks ago, the Metro Pollution Control Board
reported exhaustive tests showed Miami Beach and Dade County
air among the three purest in America! As it also had been
reported three years earlier. No change. No pollution.
Sorry 'bout that... for those people who followed the bum steer.
It's going to cost them money.*
*Oil, in addition to being clean, safe and dependable, is so much cheaper.


BELCHER OIL CO.

Oil-powered equipment and fuel oil for all uses
MIAMI e PORT EVERGLADES WEST PALM BEACH
PORT CANAVERAL TAMPA SARASOTA
FT. MYERS NAPLES
FLORIDIANS SERVING FLORIDA SINCE 1915


16 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969


~ICL_---IIII~-----~311~-- ^h


v-,,











































Pick a card. Any card.


New PCA computer programs cut your design time on plain
or reinforced concrete, give you more design options, provide
an accurate check on your work.
You don't have to know too much about computers or computereze
to use them.
Simply select the program that covers your problem and contact
your PCA man. He will advise you on the computerized cards
that cover the program, plus input sheets and any explanations
you may need.
Then just send the input sheet to your favorite computer.
If you have none, your PCA man will furnish you a list of computer
service companies.
The computer will provide you with the answers you want
in minutes. The answers that it takes you days-perhaps
weeks-to calculate by hand. Another reason why
concrete is good for you.
Call your PCA man today.


1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
PCA-IMPROVING AND EXTENDING THE USES OF CONCRETE


PORTLAND CEMENT
ASSOCIATION


Concrete is goo for yo













E-FOR


?', .;

ITHE
:. "





'. .
"! .




; .


i:.
*.r
''



i
'^-


HELPING M


BIGGEST YI


NATURAL


. . . . .. .... .. .. .. ....., .... ::::


cl . *.I L. ;...









nothing succeeds
like success:


more customers ..
more residential .


more commercial


. 0 .


Q..


7


..9 .... A



.. .o'!


more industrial
more gas consumed .
more expansion...
more air conditioning
more water heating .
more appliances sold
more everything!


* if you are one i
the few who haven
got the facts ....
hadn't you bettc
look into it?


CHECK YOUR LOCAL NATURAL GAS UTILITY








Coming



in



October


A new look will be taken on by the
October issue of "The Florida Archi-
tect", the monthly publication of The
Florida Association of the American
Institute of Architects. This issue will
now be referred to as THE FLOR-
IDA ARCHITECT HANDBOOK
AND DIRECTORY OF ARCHI-
TECTURAL BUILDING PROD-
UCTS & SERVICES.


20 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May


The Association has become increas-
ingly aware of a growing need within
the architectural profession of an
Annual Directory which would list
the following information:
a. Building products manufacturers
b. Manufacturers' local representa-
tives
c. Florida distributors
d. Firms offering special services to
the architect and the construction
industry
e. Contractors and sub-contractors.
This need has been evidenced by the
many phone calls received by the
FAAIA headquarters from architects
and others requesting the location
and telephone numbers of manufac-
turers' Florida representatives, regional
office, or distributors.
In most cases, the architect has lo-
cated the product in Sweet's Cata-
logue but, because of the urgency for
immediate information, does not wish
to contact the main office. With the
Directory in his office, the informa-
tion will be at his fingertips.
The second section of the October
issue will contain material relevant to
the architect's practice. Briefly, some
of the material will include:
a. 1969 Convention Program
b. List of Building Product Exhibi-
tors
c. National Council of Architectural
Registration Boards
d. Public Relations for the Architect
e. Insurance
f. State Agencies and their Jurisdic-
tion
g. Legislative-list of legislators and
how to communicate
h. Membership Roster
i. 1969 Architectural Awards
j. FAAIA Organization
k. Speakers Bureau
1. Profit Planning for the Architect
m.AIA Standards of Professional
Practice
n. Film List about Architecture &
Urban Design.
The October Handbook will be dis-
tributed through normal circulation
channels to over 4,000 readers of
which more than 2,800 are architects.
In addition, professional consulting
engineers, contractors and builders, ar-
chitectural students, Florida libraries
and state and local public officials
will receive a copy.
Since this is a reference book, the
October Handbook will be continu-
ously used by the architect for the
next twelve months.
1969


Directory of Architectural
Building Products and Services
This portion of the Handbook will be
printed on color paper stock. Listing
in the Directory will be alphabetical
by Company within the Product Clas-
sification. The cost will be $10 for
the first listing, such as the manufac-
turer's name and address, and $3 for
every additional listing for representa-
tives, distributors or branch locations.

For further information to be
included in the Directory contact:
Florida Association
of the AIA
Suite 210
1000 Ponce De Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone 305/444-5761

The
Florida Architect
Handbook
and
Directory
of
Architectural
Building
Products
and
Services







Newsnotes

New Section for Florida
Gulf Coast Chapter
The AIA Board of Directors has ap-
proved the formation of the "Southern
Section" of the Florida Gulf Coast
Chapter, AIA with jurisdiction in the
counties of Charlotte, Collier, Glades,
Hendry, and Lee.

Schedule of AIA Professional
Development Program
Sepetmebr 6 will be the next date for
the Professional Development Pro-
gram established by AIA for the mem-
bership. The subjects and locations
are as follows:

Atlanta-"Architectural Program-
ming"

New York-"Project Finance & Loan
Development"

Chicago-"Specification: Develop-
ment & Production" (note: this pro-
gram begins September 5 and con-
tinues into the next day)

Los Angeles-"The Architect & The
Law"
For further information contact AIA
directly or the FAAIA office.

Architectural Students at
University of Florida Honored

Eight students were named winners
of architectural awards at the recent
awards banquet of the College of Ar-
chitecture & Fine Arts.

Receiving the $500 Producers' Coun-
cil Awards for being the most prom-
ising students in architectural design
in the lower division were Paul Cas-
silly, Ownesboro, Ky., and Jeffrey L.
Barnes, North Palm Beach:

The $600 Reynolds, Smith and Hills
award to capable, promising and
needy students went to Sol. J. Fleisch-
man Jr., of Tampa, and Robert Mun-
son III, of Miami.

Gregory Uzdevenes, Pensacola, was
recognized for winning the Portland
Cement Association's $1,500 trip to
study this summer at the Fountaine-
bleau School of Fine Arts in Paris.

Three students received recognition
from the American Institute of Archi-
tects. Miss Lourdes de Counsuelo
Soler, Gainesville, was granted a
$1,500 scholarship for graduate study.
Derek Bland Donley of East Palatka
and Jonathan Richard Toppe of Day-
tona Beach each received certificates
of merit.


Notes about the State Fire Marshal's


Rules and Regulations
It is believed that every architectural
firm which prepares plans and speci-
fications for structures to be built in
Florida should have for ready refer-
ence a copy of the State Fire Mar-
shal's Rules and Regulations. Free
copies are available from Broward
Williams, State Treasurer and State
Fire Marshal, Larson Building, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32304.

These Rules and Regulations have
been promulgated under the provi-
sions of Chapter 633, Florida Stat-
utes, in order to effectuate the en-
forcement of the State Fire Marshal's
duties and responsibilities which in-
clude (but are not limited to) the
following:

(1) Prevention of fires;

(2) Storage, sale, use, keeping, man-
ufacture, handling, transportation or
other disposition of combustibles, ex-
plosives, flammables, gunpowder,
carbide, and crude petroleum or any
of its products and may prescribe the
material or receptacles and building
to be used for such purposes;

(3) Installation and maintenance of
fire alarm systems and fire-extinguish-
ing equipment;

(4) Servicing, recharging, marking,
and tagging of portable fire extin-
guishers and shall provide standards
of operation for those engaged in
such activities;

(5) Construction, maintenance, and
regulation of fire escape;

(6) The means and adequacy of
exits from all buildings in event of
fire;


(7) Suppression of arson and the
investigation of fires; and

(8) Transportation of radioactive
materials intrastate by private carrier,
and may prescribe the handling and
storage procedures during such trans-
portation and the marking of vehicles
engaged in such transportation.

From time to time these Rules and
Regulations are, after a public hear-
ing, amended to conform to new cir-
cumstances that have developed. The
last such revisions were effective Oc-
tober 18, 1967. At that time, a rule
was adopted which reads as follows:
"Plans for new construction or major
alterations of all state owned build-
ings should be submitted to the State
Fire Marshal's Office for approval of
fire safety provisions before construc-
tion commences."

Already this provision has resulted in
closer rapport between the State Fire
Marshal's Office and a number of
architectural firms and in the process
has enhanced fire safety. It is recog-
nized that the architect is almost in-
variably faced with a dilemma over
how to stretch the dollars available
for a given job so as to meet esthetic
requirements and still cover all the
functional demands made upon him.
On the other hand, both legal and
moral obligations in the matter of
fire safety are likewise coming to be
recognized as a problem for the de-
signer of a building-particularly if
it be a building intended for public
use.

In any event the State Fire Marshal's
Office stands ready to make its highly
specialized technical knowledge avail-
able to any architectural firm desiring
it. N






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U.ieS A coMPuTeIR AS/rTED PETeRMWATr
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Architects Chosen for
AIA Headquarters
The Architects' Collaborative, a Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts architectural
firm, has been selected to design the
new national headquarters building in
Washington, D. C. for The American
Institute of Architects. Norman C.
Fletcher, FAIA will be the principal-
in-charge for the development of the
program for space requirements, eco-
nomic feasibility studies and schem-
atic concepts for planning and design.


New Design Awards
Program Announced
Distinguished community and junior
college facilities which respond to the
needs of the educational program and
goals of the college are the subject of
a new design awards program.
Sponsored by the American Associa-
tion of Junior Colleges' Office of Fa-
cilities Development, The American
Institute of Architects, the U.S. Of-
fice of Education's Office of Con-
struction Service, and the Educa-
tional Facilities Laboratories, Inc., the
program will cover four categories: 1)
comprehensive campus master plan;
2) new facilities; 3) facilities catalytic
of community improvement, and 4)
converted or remodeled facilities.
All entries must be submitted by re-
gistered architects and will be limited
to projects of two-year institutions of
higher education. Projects submitted
must have been occupied by Sept.
30, 1969, but not prior to Sept. 30,
1959.
Entries will be judged by a jury of
three architects and two educators,
and awards will be given in two ca-
tegories: Honor Award and Award of
Merit. Certificates will be presented
to the winning architect and institu-
tion's president at the A.A.J.C. con-
vention in Honolulu, March 1-6,
1970.
Entry applications are due Sept. 2,
1969, submissions of projects are due
Nov. 3, and the jury will meet Nov.
10-11. The registration fee is $20 per
project.
For further details, contact AIA Head-
quarters, Washington, D.C.


22 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / May 1969











































This is a full-color portrayal of our Rainbow Range Slumped
Brick. First presented more than fifteen years ago, we are
re-running it here to remind you that our Slumped Brick is
still being widely used from Key West to Cleveland. We make
it also in other color ranges red, tan, chalk-white, oyster
and gray. Your inquiries are welcomed .


DUNAN BRICK
1818 North 7th Avenue
Lake Worth, Florida
(305) 582-5760


BRICK

YARDS, INC.
P. O. Box 5
Miami, Florida
(305) 887-1525




THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulation
Publication at Miami, Fla.


'ty /.'1 F" !a Libraries
*Ij.'


wL'~/~ 4JL


the 55th Annual
Convention
Florida Association
of the
American Institute
of Architects
October
24, 25, 26, 27
1969


Grand Bahamas Hotel & Country Club, West End, Grand Bahama Island


~"`7




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