<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Front Cover
 New FAAIA officers
 Table of Contents
 The convention
 Resolutions
 Advertisers' index
 Newsnotes
 Architecture for Florida livin...
 Letters
 Back Cover


AIAFL



Florida architect
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00073793/00173
 Material Information
Title: Florida architect
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Institute of Architects -- Florida Association
Florida Association of Architects
Publisher: Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Creation Date: November 1968
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Architecture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 4, no. 3 (July 1954)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1996.
Issuing Body: Official journal of the Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects.
Issuing Body: Issued by: Florida Association of Architects of the American Institute of Architects, 1954- ; Florida Association of the American Institute of Architects, <1980->.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06827129
lccn - sn 80002445
issn - 0015-3907
System ID: UF00073793:00173
 Related Items
Preceded by: Bulletin (Florida Association of Architects)
Succeeded by: Florida/Caribbean architect

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    New FAAIA officers
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    The convention
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Resolutions
        Page 6
    Advertisers' index
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Newsnotes
        Page 16
    Architecture for Florida living
        Page 17
    Letters
        Page 18
    Back Cover
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text


















L TiAMI JYJL 11 W[ILIJULIII


UNIV. OF FLA. LIBRARIES
ARCH. & i iE ARTS LIBRARY.


The Florida Architect


November
1968


Eo2.
e-2.3-
IL2^







Leading the FAAIA This Year Will Be ..



President
H. LESLIE WALKER


And:


Vice President/President
Designate
HARRY E. BURNS, JR.

Secretary
JAMES JENNEWEIN

Treasurer
MYRL J. HANES


During the coming year, this adminis-
tration will make an in-depth study
and an evaluation of our state and
chapter organizations paralleling a
similar investigation by National-to
determine if it is possible and desir-
able to recommend changes in struc-
ture. As you know, your state organi-
zation is a collection of individual
autonomous chapters which have been
created by National and have manda-
tory responsibility only to National.
At times this structure works a real
hardship on the FAAIA because the
state organization has no authority
other than that which is relegated to
it by the several chapters. Perhaps
this is best perhaps not. We intend
to study this situation in depth and
make recommendations to our next
convention.

This administration may proceed to
explore the feasibility and possibilities
of relocating the University of Flor-
ida's Department of Architecture to a
major metropolitan center. This "Chal-
lenge To Change" was "kicked-off" in
the September issue of "The Florida
Architect" by its Editor and the re-
sponse has been significant enough to
warrant additional investigation.

In part, the editorial stated:

"Let us investigate the question of re-
locating the School of Architecture. A
major metropolitan center would, in
all probability, provide many addi-
tional sources of culture in the fields
of art, music, and science. These re-
sources are vital in the educative
process.

"A center of this type would also pro-
vide, for the students, exposure to a
large population of practicing archi-
tects. Such contact would be extremely


important. It cannot be denied that the
educational curriculum provides, in
addition to theory, such practical as-
pects of architecture as design prob-
lems of various kinds and types. But
it is of equal importance to have avail-
able many architectural offices of
varying sizes in close proximity to the
School of Architecture. This relation-
ship will provide for and permit stu-
dents to be employed in these offices
in different capacities. Call it on-the-
job training, if you will, but the im-
portant aspect of this relationship
would be to allow our architects of the
future to become involved in associ-
ation with the practicing members of
the profession during their educative
process."

I believe this proposal merits the at-
tention of the Association.

We shall continue our efforts to
achieve a closer coordination with the
Florida State Board of Architecture.
In the past few years a successful
working relationship has been main-
tained with this body. We have become
acquainted with their problems and
hope that we have rendered some as-
sistance. Some day, we trust, the Flor-
ida State Board of Architecture and
the Florida Association of the Ameri-
can Institute of Architects may be (if
not one and the same) at least jointly
housed and jointly administered.

Our continuing education program,
already a dynamic arm of our Associ-
ation, is now being focused on the
subject of urban planning. Another
seminar topic, to be given in cooper-
ation with the Florida Bar, will be
architectural law. Other seminars will
be designed around office practice,
emerging techniques and public rela-


tions. This Association intends to ful-
fill its obligation to the architect by
providing these valuable educational
programs.
We shall continue our efforts to
improve our relations with the pro-
fessional engineers and consulting
engineers. We, as practicing architects,
have always appreciated the contribu-
tions that have been made by the
engineering sciences and it is our desire
to provide closer collaboration with
these groups.
Perhaps one tangible way we may
accelerate this collaboration is for the
individual chapters to extend invita-
tions to consulting engineers through
the recently authorized "Allied Mem-
bership." This voluntary program,
adopted at the last A.I.A. Convention
in Portland, is open to engineers, land-
scape architects, interior decorators
and other allied professionals. I would
strongly recommend that the chapters
extend to these professions this cate-
gory of membership.

We will continue the following pro-
grams

S. increase membership

... chapter information meetings by
the FAAIA

In addition a task force will be ap-
pointed to work jointly with the State
Convention Committee on the matter
of reviewing our procedures for the
annual conventions.

The Publication Committee will be
charged with the responsibility of re-
viewing all existing publications and
presenting recommendations regarding
continuance of each one. N


2 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968







Cover Feature


7


16


17



18


The Convention was people


New FAAIA Officers
President Walker outlines his program

The Convention
Daytona Beach Meeting was highly successful

Resolutions
These were the major resolutions passed by the convention

In Memoriam:
McMillan H. Johnson III

Advertisers' Index


Newsnotes


Architecture For Florida Living
An ideal Christmas gift


Letters


Comments on the September editorial "Challenge to Change"


THE FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT, Official
SJournal of the Florida Association of the
BOARD OF DIRECTORS Executive Director, Florida Association of the American Istitute of Archtects, Inc., is
Broward County Chapter American Institute of Architects owed and published by the Assoclatlo, a
Donald I. Singer--Joseph T. Romano Fotis N. Karousatos, Florida Corporation sot for profit. It is
Daytona Beach Chapter 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables published monthly at the Executihv Office of
David A. Leete-Carl Gerken the Assocition, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Florida Central Chapter OFFICERS Coral Gables, Florida 33134. Telephone: 444-
Jack McCandless- James R. Dry H. Leslie Walker, President 5761 (area code 305). Circulation: distrib-
I. Blount Wagner 706 Franklin St., Suite 1218 uted without charge of 4,669 registered archi-
Florida Gulf Coast Chapter Tampa, Florida 33602 tects, builders, contractors, designers, engineers
Florida North Chapter larry E. Bums, Jr., Vice President/President and members of allied fields throughout the
Charles F. Harrington-ames D. McGinley, Jr. Designate state of Flord-n to leading financial is-
Florida North Central1113 Prudential Bldg. stitutlons, national architectural firms and
Florida. Nrth Cntrl p Jacksonville, Florida 32207 journals.
Mnvw lIerv Crav-- Fnrrl R Cnren JcsnilFoia327]uss


Florida Northwest Chapter
Thomas H. Daniels -Richard L. MacNeil
Florida South Chapter
Robert J. Boerema- George F. Reed
Walter S. Klements
Jacksonville Chapter
Albert L. Smith Herschel E. Shepard
Charles E. Patillo, III
Mid-Florida Chapter
Wythe David Sims, II- Donald R. Hampton
Palm Beach Chapter
Howarth L. Lewis-Rudolph M. Arsenicos
John B. Marion
Director, Florida Region, American
Institute of Architects
H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA,
1600 N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami


James Jennewein, Secretary
Exchange National Bank Bldg. Suite 1020
Tampa, Florida 33602
Myrl J. Hangs, Treasurer
P. O. Box 609
Gainesville, Florida 32601


PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE
Charles E. Patillo, III
Russell J. Minardi
Wythe D. Sims, II
THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
Fotis N. Karousatos / Editor
John W. Totty/ Assistant Editor
Helen Bronson / Circulation


Editorial contributions, including plans and
photographs of architect' work, are wel-
comed but publication cannot be guaranteed.
Opinions expressed by contributors are not
necessarily those of the Editor or the Florida
Association of the AIA. Editorial material
may be freely reprinted by other official AIA
publications, provided full credit is given to
the author and to The FLORIDA ARCHI-
TECT for prior se .. Controlled circula-
tion postage paid at Miami, Florida. Single
copies, 75 cents, subscription, members $2.00
per year, industry and non-members $6.50 per
year. February Roster Issue, $.00 . Mc-
Murray Printers.


































Ehrenkrantz

SCSD inventor explained his latest:
URBS.
For several years, SCSD, School Con-
struction Systems Development, has
been a familiar term in the lexicon
of educators across the country. Now
a new system has come from the
same source: Educational Facilities
Laboratories and architect Ezra Eh-
renkrantz. URBS, University Resi-
dential Building System, is a compo-
nent building system designed and
bid for the construction of residence
halls by the University of California.

Basically the system consists of five
components: 1) structure and ceiling,
2) partitions 3) heating-ventilating-
cooling, 4) furnishing and 5) bath-
rooms. Each component was bid on
the basis of performance specifica-
tions with each bidder doing design
development on his proposed compo-
nent.


The successful structural design is
essentially a post and beam concrete
system utilizing both cast in place
and precast concrete. Precast inverted
double-T beams are supported by cast
in place transverse beams, precast
columns and shear walls. The floor
is poured over discardable metal forms
on the T stems. The void thus cre-
ated between floor and ceiling is
utilized for ventilation and utilities
distribution.
Partitions and furnishings were de-
signed to give the student maximum
flexibility for personal expression and
4 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968


room arrangement. University hous-
ing must compete with private apart-
ment developments which, in the
past, have provided far more pleasant
living environments.
Development of performance specifi-
cations was not based only on past N
experience in dormitory design. Ehren-
krantz outlined the detailed research
and study into habits, needs and de-
sires of college students which his
firm did as a basis for design. The
results, when published, should do
much to upgrade residence hall de-
sign at colleges and universities across
the country.
For the many who requested a com-
plete transcript of Mr. Ehrenkrantz'
remarks, THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT
will publish a complete transcript in
a forthcoming issue.




Texas Team

building a hotel with boxes.
From dream to reality, a 600 room
hotel in nine months. This was the
goal and accomplishment of the H.
B. Zachary Company in the design
and construction of the Hilton Pala-
cio del Rio in San Antonio, Texas.
The method of construction, a well
known story by now, was to precast
each individual room, completely fin-
ish and furnish it on the ground and
lift it into place. The operation was
so successful that it was completed
ahead of schedule.


Convention

Recap






It was a most successful nuts and bolts
convention. The seminars each cen-
tered on particular applications of ad-
vaneed technology to actual building
projects. The product exhibits, the
best in several years, were literally in
the center of activity. The business
sessions dwelled for some length on
the critical question of how architects
might practice as a corporation. And
the change to weekend meeting dates
brought increased attendance with over
600 persons registering.


























Though the remainder of the build-
ing was of conventional poured con-
crete construction, the entire job was
scheduled in such a manner that foun-
dations went in while drawings for the
upper floors were still on the draw-
ing boards. Problems and loss of ef-
ficiency in design by this manner
were only minor.
The interesting factor in this pre-
sentation was the teamwork which
went into the building design. The
contractor, architect and engineers
Sll worked together in a closer than
casual manner and in a manner dif-
ferent from most projects. At no point
were various steps in the process sepa-
rated or complete within themselves.
Critical scheduling set up new proc-
ess relationships and required a change
in the traditional approach to build-
ing design. For instance, the engineer
was required to estimate total build-
ing loads for footing designs before
the architectural design was com-
plete.
Another project shown was a low
cost housing development which util-
ized the same precast box module as
the hotel. However various restric-
tions imposed severely limited the de-
sign potential of this approach. But
what was achieved made interesting
massing and building relationships, ef-
ficient and economical construction,
all in record construction time.


Mouton

Unusual structures from usual appli-
cations of engineering design.
Engineer William I. Mouton of New
Orleans is a quiet man who speaks
long and lovingly of his personal ap-
plication of engineering principles to
everyday problems.
In his illustrations was shown work
of an innovative nature which met
and solved complex building prob-
lems with economical structural sys-


teams. Simple materials such as steel
and concrete were shown utilized
each to their best advantage in creat-
ing structures which were things of
beauty within themselves.
For a comparison to the systems pre-
sented in the two previous seminars,
Mouton spoke of his work in low cost
housing utilizing precast concrete
floor and wall slabs. The project he
chose to illustrate was built in Wash-
ington. The precast slabs were all
designed as the load bearing struc-
ture. Rather than punching holes in
the panels for doors and windows,
open slots were left between panels
to be filled with preassembled units.
This building block method of as-
sembling big pieces is extremely effi-
cient and quick when a design is
created to take full advantage of it.


Analysis

The architect is finding new ways to
practice his profession and to serve
society in the creation of environ-
ment. The work presented in each of
the three seminars was not only of a
different nature but each had a new
role for the architect.
In the URBS project, Ehrenkrantz
as architect created the basic frame-
work, wrote performance specifica-
tions and acted as consultant. Other
architects designed several of the
components and still others will be
commissioned as project architects to
put together these components into
buildings.
In the Texas project, the architect
was part of a total design team work-
ing under the client who conceived
the project and its basic shape and
form. Mouton showed how a cre-
ative architect and engineer working
in new relationships, can accomplish
so much more with common methods.
Such is the future of the profession.
It will be new, different and exciting.


Rounding out the convention was a
seminar presented by the State Board
of Architecture which gave an ac-
count of Board actions and answered
questions of how the Board works.
On Sunday morning was an interest-
ing presentation of the proposed new
six year curriculum at the University
of Florida, 2+2+2, by Arnold Butts,
new Chairman of the Department of
Architecture. Also introduced at this
session was Professor Robert Ander-
son, new Chairman of the Department
of Architecture at the University of
Miami.
Speaking at the annual banquet, Arch.
ibold Rogers, FAIA, brought a note of
philosophy to the convention when he
called for architects to use the tech.
nology we have developed toward the
creation of a new and human en-
vironment.
The 54th was a grand one. Plan now
for the Bahamas next year! E






These Resolutions Were Passed


By The Convention


RESOLUTION /
STATE BUILDING CODE
WHEREAS,
a state law is being proposed which
would impose a state building code on
the entire state, and
WHEREAS,
such proposed code would impose un-
due hardship on the design professions
in most of the larger political subdi-
visions where adequate and complete
building codes are now already or will
be in operation, now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED,
that the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects in
convention assembled this 27th day of
October, 1968 does urge that prior to
passage of such proposed legislation it
be amended to provide that such state
building code shall not be considered
mandatory upon those political sub-
divisions which have adopted or do
adopt their own building codes based
on recognized national standards.


RESOLUTION /
CORPORATE PRACTICE
WHEREAS,
the architects of Florida are facing
great competitive forces at large in
this land; and
WHEREAS,
they are doing so without one of the
major tools available in that competi-
tion; and
WHEREAS,
as the architects of Florida do need
and do deserve the privilege of avail-
ing themselves of these tools, of tax
shelter, continuity of service, retire-
ment programs, profit sharing, per-
sonnel stability and the other possi-
bilities more readily provided through
corporate structure; and
WHEREAS,
believing that in the public interest
the professional aspects of architec-
tural practice and relationships need
to be continued by retaining personal
responsibility of the architect for his
professional acts, and by requiring
professional control of these corpor-
taions, the people of Florida will not
be adversely affected and in fact can
be helped to obtain better architec-
tural services-now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED,
that this convention assembled instruct
the Board of the Florida Association
of the American Institute of Architects
and request the Florida State Board of
Architecture to promulgate, initiate,
introduce and support legislation de-
signed to accomplish these goals and
further to enlist the support and
understanding of such legislation by
proper dissemination of this resolution
and its legislative proposal to all the
architects in Florida.


RESOLUTION /
COMPETITIVE BIDS
WHEREAS,
the attorney General's office on Sep-
tember 13, 1968 addressed a com-
munication to the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Clay County, Florida ex-
pressing an interpretation with respect
to Chapter 57-990 as amended by
Chapter 61-884, a local statute, which
provided in part a requirement for
competitive bids for materials, sup-
plies and "services" exceeding $1,-
000.00, and
WHEREAS,
the interpretation expressed was that
such "services" should be construed
to include "professional services," and
WHEREAS,
this interpretation does not agree with
previous opinions of the Attorney
General's office or with court deci-
sions that "professional services" are
special and apart from routine "serv-
ices" intended by the statute in ques-
tion, and
WHEREAS,
the interpretation was the cause for
the Clay County Board of County
Commissioners advertising for and re-
ceiving competitive bids for architec-
tural services in connection with a
county building, and
WHEREAS,
such action was contrary to previous
opinions and court decisions and was /
in conflict with the ethical disciplines
of the design professions, and
WHEREAS,
this recent opinion is in danger of
being applied by other public bodies
under similar wording of applicable
statutes, be it therefore
RESOLVED,
that the Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects in
convention assembled this 27th day of
October, 1968 does urge the Attorney
General to reconsider the reasoning of
the aforesaid opinion and to cause to
be published a revised opinion in line
with previous opinions with respect to
the exclusion of professional services
from all statutes dealing with the term
"services" where competitive bidding
is required.


MeMillan H. Johnson HI
WHEREAS,
the Supreme Architect has seen fit to call McMillan H.
Johnson from his earthly labors; and
WHEREAS
McMillan H. Johnson as an architect and educator was
dedicated to his profession and earned the deepest respect
and admiration of his students and fellow members of his
profession; now therefore be it
RESOLVED,
that the Florida Association of the American Institute of
Architects express and have its record reflect its sincere
feeling of sorrow at the passing of this beloved gentleman;
and be it further
RESOLVED,
that this convention, here assembled, express to the asso-
ciates and family of McMillan H. Johnson its heartfelt
sympathy.


IN MEMORIAL


6 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968


I












Suut. 4ac


ILt...,:I : a B -. 7 T!3 ia Utm, .


Advertisers' Index
ALUMAIRE AIR DIVISION OF
MOLECULAR RESEARCH, INC.
13
AMERICAN CYANAMID CO.
15
DUNAN BRICK YARDS
T9
FLORIDA GAS TRANSMISSION
8
FLORIDA INVESTOR-OWNED
ELECTRIC UTILITIES
10-11
LEHIGH PORTLAND CEMENT
COMPANY
9
MERCER PLASTICS CO., INC.
7
PORTLAND CEMENT ASSN.
12
SUPERIOR FIREPLACE CO.
16
TRINITY-WHITE, GENERAL
PORTLAND CEMENT CO.
14


WHAT SELLS IT

IS WHAT YOU

SSEE IN IT.


And what you see is
the first high-gloss,
residential wall base.
Mirror-Finish Wall
Basel Proved in the
marketplace to be a
best seller in the over-
the-counter field. With
ten great decorator
colors. With a surprisingly competitive price. And
packaged in a crowd-stopping, self-selling upright
display that's boosted the volume of retailers across.
the country
Sizes: 21/2" and 4" heights. Packaged in upright 52"
display cartons, with 13-4' sections,
paper-interleaved, or stand-
ard 100' cartons.









Exclusive Mireer-1inish
Floor Rock I
Exciting NEW Innovation in Wall
Base merchandising. Real traffic-
stopper for floor covering dealers,
lumberyards, hardware stores, and
home decorating chains A space-
saring 1' x 2'--hollds 1040 feet of
baos. Complete with eye-catching full
color range easl.

Mercer...pacesetter in vinyl wall basel With more color-
25 beautiful hues. More sizes-l /,", 2'/", 3", 4", 6",
and 7" heights. More finishes-matte, satin, textured sculp-
tura, mirror-finish. With or without toe-4' sections or 100'
rolls. Look to Mercer for the greatest, best and most prot.
able selection of vinyl wall basel

See your local distributor, or writes

Mercer
PLASTICS COMPANY, INC.
Main Office Warehouse: 1 Jabe St., Newark, N. J. 07105
Foctory & Warehouse Eustis, Florida 32726











1 There are a lot of reasons for specifying
gas. The most practical is the economic
advantage. Then there's maintenance -
almost none. And, most important with vital
projects like hospitals, you need that
assured dependability of gas equipment.

For your next project, consider the
advantages of specifying gas. Contact your
local Gas Utility for complete information.


New addition, Halifax Hospital, Daytona Beach.
Architect: Gomon and Associates.
Served by Daytona Beach Division of Florida Gas.


TRANSMISSION COMPANY
the natural way to modem living I


8 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968





























New Auburn Memorial Coliseum consists of a 320' x 412'
main building, connecting walkways and a smaller building
containing a swimming pool, practice basketball court and
boiler room.

\A combination of concrete techniques

for a multi-purpose coliseum


This new college sports complex serves many
purposes. It seats 13,000 spectators for basketball
games or 8,500 spectators for concerts, ceremonies
and meetings. And it provides 23 faculty rooms,
4 classrooms, a variety of special-purpose physical
education facilities, plus dressing room facilities to
Sif accommodate 500 male and 375 female students
at one time.
Cast-in-place concrete was used for the founda-
Stions, supporting columns and seating structures.
Extensive use of precast concrete wall panels provides
an exciting architectural effect.
., SHere, as in important projects all around the
,A nation, Lehigh Cements contribute substantially to
the structure. Lehigh Portland Cement Company,
Allentown, Pa. District Sales Office: Jacksonville,
Fla. 32216.
Owner: Auburn University, Auburn, Ala.
Architect-Engineer: Sherlock, Smith & Adams, Montgomery, Ala.
Contractor: Jones and Hardy, Contractors, Montevallo, Ala.
Ready Mix Concrete: Sharpe Sand & Gravel Company, Auburn, Ala.
Precast Concrete: Opelika Concrete Products Co., Opelika, Ala.
Prestressed Concrete: Southern Prestressed Concrete, Inc.,
Montgomery, Ala.

280 large precast, prestressed double T panels provide the ribbed effect
of the upper walls of the new auditorium. Each measures 30' high x 48'
wide. Smooth surface precast panels form the top section of the wall.
A major portion of cast-in-place concrete for the structural system was L E H IG H
pumped into the forms.
























The Gold Medallion. It stands for Tc
Electric Living. It reflects the constai
increasing public recognition (and
construction industry's, too) that
flameless total-electric concept is
today and for the all-electric fut,
Other things being equal, the
Medallion insignia is the extra r
that can induce a prospect to s\-t
the dotted line.
To qualify for the Gold Medall
award, a home or apartment unit m
have year 'round electric air conditic
ing for cooling and heating... plus ma























iliances including an electric range
I water heater . plus Full House-
ver wiring with adequate switches
I convenience outlets ... and ample
ht for Living for proper illumination
I decorative beauty.

'- multi-million dollar Gold
ilion advertising program is a
Nerful sales tool for you...for
;tige and profit.

or full details on Gold Medallion
tification, contact your electric
ty company.













Il







A concrete roof



for the


price of wood?



Sure, you always knew concrete would be
great for roofs.
But the expense.
Concrete can't burn. It stands up to high winds
and hurricanes. A concrete roof with concrete
masonry walls and concrete floors could cut
insurance costs as much as 50%.
But the expense.
Then there is the concrete roof system's
superiority as an insulator. Which could reduce air
conditioning costs. And concrete's easy maintenance.
Rust-free, rot-free, damp-resistant.
But the expense ?
Not any more. Right here in Florida, Engineer-Builder
Jack Sullivan has built more than 150 concrete
masonry homes with concrete roof trusses and roof
decks. His system, using cast-in-place concrete, is
competitive with any other roofing material-
including wood.
The same system would work just fine for
low-rise motels, apartments and other commercial
structures.
Want to know more ? We just happen to have a
14-minute film we would like you to see. That's what
the coupon is for.
See it on film

Yes, we would like to see your film on the Sullivan System
I of concrete roof construction.
Name
Company
Address
City State Zip
Portland Cement Association
1612 East Colonial Drive, Orlando, Florida 32803
I An organization of cement manufacturers to improve
and extend the uses of portland cement and concrete


12 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November


1968




ENGINEERED
AND BUILT
inside and
outside
IN FLORIDA
for Florida's climate

Removable Rigid ALUMINUM Fram
Sound-Conditioned and Base
ALUMINUM Panels
Heavy ALUMINUM
Full-Surface ALUMINUM Corner Posts
Condensate Pans
Honeywell Control Cent
Easily Accessible Centrally-
Located Compressor
Fully Weatherproofed
Wide Range of BTUH
Outputs Available Vertical, Horizontal and
Split Systems
Warranted
One Year on Complete Accessories Available f(
Unit-Compressor Five Years Custom Installations
and priced no higher Now available in water
than ordinary or air cooled models 1 to 5 tons
equipment Ask for specification sheets and performance curve charts.
Phone or write for estimates, without charge, for your specific requirements.

ALUM AIRE
M AIR CONDITIONERS
4174 BURNS ROAD, PALM BEACH GARDENS, FLORIDA 305/842-42,
A DIVISION OF MOLECULAR RESEARCH, IN
See Our Exhibit at Southeastern Air Conditioning Exposition, Orlando, Dec. 6-






There are many reasons why

you should use Marblecrete inyour design.


University of Washington
Intramural Activities
Building. Seattle.
Architect: Robert
Billsbrough Price
and Assoc.. Tacoma.
Lathing and Plastering
Contractor: J. Jefferson
& Son, Inc., Seattle.
General Contractor:
Century Construction
Company, Seattle.


The Intramural Activities Building at the
University of Washington provides an
almost classic example. The University
needed a strong, economical, good-
looking building exterior. They got what
they wanted by choosing Marblecrete.
For a lot of good-sense reasons:
Flexibility: Any size or shape wall or wall
section is possible with Marblecrete.
Texture: A wide variety of textures is
available through the selection of an
almost limitless number of aggregates.
Color: Color choice is unlimited. Let
aggregate shades, matrix tints, and
imagination be your guide.
Economy: Marblecrete's simplicity of
construction offers budget-stretching
economy.
Beauty: Marblecrete offers a distinctive
beauty all its own. A beauty you create
through your choice of color and
texture. And a beauty that lasts, because
Marblecrete is maintenance-free.


Specify Marblecrete made with If i0 X Portland Cement or Masonry Cement




General Portland Cement Company
Offices: Chattanooga, Dallas, Fort Wayne, Houston, Kansas City, Kan., Los Angeles, Miami, Tampa
14 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968






The look-alikes that make

the big differences


These two new carpets from
Columbus are identical to the eye. The
same crisp, contemporary air, the same
eight matching stock-dyed heather tones
that set off an installation.
The difference is the weight.
Contract X is engineered for normal traffic
areas. Contract XI is built for extra-heavy
wear.
By using them according to traffic
loads, you give every foot of floor space
exactly the carpet it requires. Makes a


carpet budget stretch when you don't pay more carpet for the money. Both carpets
for weight you won't be using. meet FHA requirements for wear.
This special flexibility makes So cash in on this latest, greatest
Contract X and Contract XI particularly discovery by Columbus. To receive a
suitable where there are wide variations in sample kit with all the facts on Contract X
traffic. In schools, churches, offices, and Contract XI, just use the coupon below.
restaurants, hospitals, department stores,
showrooms. ( R l -
Both carpets are made with 100% .... .....
Type 61B Creslan acrylic fiber with C MAM
exceptional bulk. This meansextrastrength, Creslan is a product of American
extra ease of cleaning. And it means much Cyanamid Company, New York.


Columbus MillsIE

Columbus Mills, Inc., P.O. Box 15S0, Columbus, Georgia 31902
a Gentlemen:
* Please send me Technical Information Kit for Contract X and XI .
carpeting.
NAMF
ADDRESS m
CITY STATE ZIP____
******.***.u....u*..m** *************.*.......*.







Before you build or remodel your fireplace get complete information about HEATFORM


HEATFORM is the double-walled heavy steel unit, hearth
to flue, around which the masonry walls are easily built.
HEATFORM, consisting of firebox, throat, smoke dome and
properly hinged and operating damper, is a part of the
fireplace, replacing firebrick lining and throat damper. The
small extra cost of a HEATFORM is returned many times
over in fuel saved and added comfort. Built to furnace


principles, with air chambers surrounding the firebox and
throat, HEATFORM captures and circulates into the room,
and even adjoining rooms, a large volume of heat lost up
the chimney by the old fashioned fireplace. HEATFORM
eliminates fireplace construction errors and smoke trouble.
Available in five models and various sizes for single, and
multiple opening fireplaces for every style of fireplace.






Ba


.Wr e 1N - -vlvmm -- -MWl
Model "A" Model "S" Model "M" Model "D"
For single opening With front and Front and both For opening-through Model "MH"
fireplaces either side open for sides open for fireplaces serving Hooded model
view of the fire view of the fire two rooms with both sides open
WRITE TODAY FOR FREE 12 PAGE DETAILED CIRCULAR ON ALL MODELS OF HEATFORM
-PLUS OTHER SUPERIOR FIREPLACE PRODUCTS including Hi-Form dampers, ash doors,
clean out doors, storage doors, fire screens, grilles, fan grilles, grates, Feastmaster barbe-
cues and metal accessories for the fireplace and barbecue.
Note: A HEATFORM fireplace can be of vital Importance in providing necessary heat for
the home in emergencies when, due to storm or damage of municipal power equipment,
the central heating system of the home may become useless.


Arrows demonstrate contact
of ai to all heating surfaces.
Compare HEATFORM with
any other heat circulating
unit and be convinced that
HEATFORM delivers more
warm air circulation into the
home.


SUPERIOR FIREPLACE CO. tho pioneer designer and manufacturer of warm air-circulating f:rep!ace units and Hi-Form dampers.
Dept. FA-H, P. O. Box 2066, Fullerton, California 92633 (or) Dept. FA-H, 601 North Point Road, Baltimor, Maryland 21237


Newsnotes


NOTICE TO CANDIDATES
FOR LICENSURE
IN ARCHITECTURE
The National Council of Architectural
Registration Boards has announced
changes in the History & Theory of
Architecture Examination, Examina-
tion C, and in the Building Equip-
ment Examination, Examination I.
Copies of the notice of changes may
be obtained from the FAAIA office or
the Florida State Board of Architec-
ture.

LAKE WORTH ARCHITECT
ELECTED DIRECTOR
TO NATIONAL BOARD
Architect Hilliard T. Smith. Jr., AIA
of Lake Worth was elected to a three
year term of Regional Director to the
American Institute of Architects
Board of Directors. His election took
place at the Annual Banquet of the
4th Annual Convention of the Flor-
ida Association of the American In-
stitute of Archiitects.
Smith will represent the architects of
Florida to the national association.
His three year term will begin in June,
1969 when the present Regional Di-
rector, H. Samuel Kruse, FAIA of
Miami, will end his service to the
Board.
Smith is Past President of the Florida


Association of the American Institute
of Architects and is in private practice
in Lake Worth. This year, he was
appointed by the Secretary of State
to the Architectural Planning & Ad-
visory Council to the Capito Center
Planning Committee. He is very ac-
tive in several community programs in
the Lake. Worth area.


CHANGE IN OFFICERS
OF STATE BOARD
OF ARCHITECTURE
The Florida State Board of Architec-
ture at its meting held in Jacksonville,
Florida on 8 November 1968, elected
Mr. Donald R. Edge, of Palm Beach,
Florida, as President of the Board to
fill the unexpired term of Mr. Wahl
J. Snyder who resigned his position as
President.
Mr. Herbert Coons, Jr., of Jacksonville
was elected Vice President to fill the
unexpired term of Mr. Donald RI Edge
who had been elected President.


AIA CONTRACT DOCUMENT
ADOPTED BY U.S. OFFICE
OF EDUCATION
The Office of Construction Service of
the U.S. Office of Education will no
longer use a 20-page OE booklet to
specify required provisions of con-
tracts between educational institu-
tions and building contractors.
Utilized instead will be a new edition
of a standard document on construc-
tion contracts of The American Insti-
tute of Architects (AIA) that differs
from the basic version only in the
requirements which have been added
to cover minimum wages, equal em-
ployment opportunity, and other con-
ditions the contracting parties must
meet under Federal law.
George E. Kassabaum, FAIA, Presi-
dent of The American Institute of
Architects, today said that his group
and the Associated General Contrac-
tors (AGC) of America--both with
headquarters in Washington D.C.-
have been working with OE on de-
tails of the new procedure since last
February. He added that the special
Federal Edition of the document
A201, "General Conditions of the
Contract for Construction," will be
made available within the next few
weeks.


16 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968







ARCHITECTURE is an appropriate subject
for a gift

FOR associates, clients and friends -both

FLORIDA residents and those who wish they
were

LIVING in the Sunshine State.


On the attached order blank fill in the
name and address of each person to
whom you wish a copy to be sent. Each
copy will be accompanied by a gift
card signed with your name. Fill in
your name and address in the space on
the order blank provided for that pur-
pose so that we may sign the card with
your name and invoice you (where
necessary).
The cost is $4.00 per copy ($3.00 for
the publication and $1.00 to cover
postage and handling costs.) Check or
money order should be made payable
to FAAIA.


Address

City State Zip Code


Name

Address

City State Zip Code


Name

Address

City State Zip Code

This space should list the name of the person placing the order. This is the name
that will be used on the card unless otherwise indicated.

Name

Address


City


State Zip Code


Check/M. O. Enclosed Bill Me_
Mail this form to: Architecture For Florida Living, c/o Florida Association of the
American Institute of Architects, 1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables,
Fla. 33134.












Letters


This is in response to your editorial
in the September 1968 issue of THE
FLORIDA ARCHITECT, entitled
"Challenge to Change."

My first reaction was that this sounds
more like political gerrymandering
than professional planning; but then
I realized that the politicians are talk-
ing about reconciling and uniting, in
contrast to dividing.

I then questioned what right our Edi-
tor has to propose an action within
the profession that would be so divi-
sive and disrupting to the profession.
When our newly elected President
proposed that this be made a major
concern of his administration, it
brought to light the origination of the
idea. This is not to question his in-
tegrity or sincerity, but I would ques-
tion the propriety of his suggestion.

A subject as controversial as this
should certainly not be allowed to
become a matter of policy of the Asso-
ciation without full consideration by
the Board of Directors and completely
informing the membership. There are
established procedures for bringing
such important matters up for con-
sideration, and we should carefully
adhere to such procedures.

The article states that ". A major
metropolitan center would in all prob-
ability provide many additional sources
of culture in the fields of art, music
and science. .. ." It then goes on to
propose that the University of South
Florida, located in Tampa, be con-
sidered as a new site for the School of
Architecture.

I might ask factiously if Tampa has
a reputation as a center of culture.
The idea that architectural students
be exposed to culture in the fields of
art, music and science is a good one,
but certainly no one can say these
are not available at the University of
Florida. The proposers of this idea
should also be aware of the fact that
a good many years ago, the School of
Architecture acquired the status of a
College, giving it equal standing with
other Colleges in a great University.
Of greater importance is the inter-
disciplinary relationships with other
respected and important professions.
It is imperative that the young man
entering our profession become in-
volved with the top men being devel-
oped in the professional fields of law,
medicine, engineering, education, etc.
The University of Florida has been


Replies to the September Editorial
"Challenge to Change", have been
numerous. We will publish them all
as they are received.

in the past-and will continue to be
-the leading institution in most pro-
fessional fields in the state's higher
education system.

There are currently more than 25 dis-
tinct and unique disciplines being
taught at the University of Florida.
With only one or two exceptions,
this is more than at any other insti-
tution in the southeast. The oppor-
tunities this broad-based institution
offers to the profession, by having the
College of Architecture as an integral
part of its structure, are of inestimable
value.

Arnold Butt, chairman of the Depart-
ment of Architecture at the University
of Florida, has outlined to the pro-
fession critical and important steps
his staff is taking in developing and
improving the curriculum in the archi-
tectural field. There is a challenging
opportunity for Florida architects and
for the Association to assist and ac-
tively participate in the rapidly chang-
ing concepts of education as they
apply to our profession.

I certainly have no objection to the
profession continually evaluating the
effectiveness of our educational system
as it affects our profession-in fact, I
feel there is an obligation for it to do
so. Unfortunately, the Florida Asso-
ciation has not established a very
bright record of accomplishment in
the field of education. This is a mat-
ter of self-criticism and is true insofar
as our Colleges and our in-service
training and education are concerned.

There is too much to be done in this
area without tearing down what we
already have. For instance, has any-
one given thought to the disrupting
influence that would be caused in the
lives of the more than 50 faculty
members and their families in their
relocation? This would be a demoral-
izing influence that would not be
lived down nor forgotten for many
years to come.

The battle for locating our profes-
sional schools in the metropolitan
centers has been fought before. When
a medical school was first being con-
sidered for the State of Florida, there
were many arguments proposed for its
being located in a metropolitan cen-
ter; however, rather than the issue
being settled on a political basis, the
program was first established and cri-
teria for the site laid down, based on
the needs for the best educational
program.


A group of nationally recognized edu
cators and medical consultants wa
then asked to recommend a site. Thei
recommendation was for the nev
medical school to be located at th,
University of Florida. Planning i
presently underway for a Veterinar
College and a Dental College to b6
established in Florida; to my know
edge, no thought has been given tb
any other location for these profei
sional schools than at the Universit
of Florida.
As architects and planners, we, mor
than any other profession, should
have the ability and. foresight to plain
the type of education system that i
best for the long-range benefit of th
architectural profession. Every da)
we practicing architects see the foil
of a client coming to us with a prc
posed building site and asking us t,
plan a facility, when he has only th
vaguest idea of the program and rc
quirements of the building or of th
suitability of the site to fit this prc
gram.
Are we to be guilty of this same mi.
take in a matter so vital to our prc
session?

Sincerely yours,
Jack Moore.





It was with a great deal of interest
that I read the editorial "Challeng
to Change" appearing in the Sei
tember issue of The Florida Architect
I would be very much interested i
having any additional information
you might have or receive as a result
of the editorial.

I would be more than glad to help i
any way I can to obtain addition:
information if the idea is well receive
by Dr. Allen and his staff of advisor:

I think the points you have raise
certainly have merit and tie in we
with other changing concepts in loc;
tions of state institutions to be place
where best utilization can be ol
trained.


Looking forward
again, I am


to hearing from yo


Sincerely,
Ray C. Knopke,
Senator, 23rd District.


18 / THE FLORIDA ARCHITECT / November 1968




We Wen #&a .. .


Our Three Ingredients...

Concrete, Imagination, Know-How...

STOCK DECORATIVE MASONRY
AS WELL AS CUSTOM UNITS


W a&& dv o er...


CLAY-FACE-FIRE AND GLAZED
BRICK OF ALL TYPES

NATURAL STONES FROM
MANY QUARRIES


CERAMIC VENEER


METAL UNITS FOR FIREPLACES
AND BARBEQUES


If ae don't a e te utCta Ya o wantt-- we'U try to made O get at/
NOW LOCATED IN PALM BEACH COUNTY AT 1818 NORTH 7TH
AVENUE, LAKEWORTH (305) 582-5760, AS WELL AS IN MIAMI


BRICK


DUNAN BRICK YARDS, INC.
MIAMI, FLORIDA 887-1525


DUNANil




It. rnFLRuuA Al ll.IIl r
1000 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
Accepted As Controlled Circulatior
Publication at Miami, Fla.








University of Florlia Libraries
Gairesville, Fla. 10
32601
An architect is many men.
He is a man of the arts.
Because of his artistic skills and vital awareness,
he is a man most important to his community.
It is the duty of an architect
to focus his attention
on the pulse of that community
its urban planning, educational
opportunities, good government.
It is the responsibility of the architect to be involved,
to express himself,
to lead the way -
to see creative ideas
become part of major community decisions.